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Philosophy of Education

Lourdes Andrade
California State University, Dominguez Hills
LBS 400
December 8, 2014

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There are many issues that have shaped my philosophy of education. As a parent, a
student, and an educator, I have developed my own philosophy of education based on many of
my own experiences. Education is an important part of society, because basics skills such as
reading, writing, mathematics, science, and geography are important to be able to compete with
the rest of the world. In addition, an education empowers its society and its people for greatness.
As Dickinson (2011) explained, we need education to expand our horizons, to understand beauty,
and to extend thought. He stated that without education, there cannot be any empathy, or
comprehension of our community or our society. In order to "truly appreciate and enjoy life"
people must be educated" (Dickinson, 2011, p.1). The greater their education, the more power
people will have of making superior decisions.
While an education can increase knowledge, the student's environment is vital in a
student's education. Wolfe (1998) clarified that when the brain encounters something that is seen
as threatening, it sends a signal to prepare the body to accept it or block it. Each child needs
motivation to develop academically, emotionally and socially. Teachers not only play an
important role in the academic development of their student, they are also a significant part of a
student's emotional and social growth. Students spend seven or more hours in school. Sometimes
they spend more time in school than at home. Darling-Hammond and Bransford (2008) found
that student's development depended on many things and amongst

those was the classroom's

environment. I believe that school must be a safe haven, where students know that they are an
important part of the school and classroom, where they are involved in the decisions making
progress, where they are encouraged to participate, to be creative and imaginative, and where
they are taught that it is okay to make mistakes so that learning can be more natural and
enduring.

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Schools are filled with diversity, with different cultures, ideologies, and even different
resources. Sadly, not everyone has the same learning opportunities. Although some may want to
believe that all schools are created equal, I grew up in the city of Compton, and had the
opportunity to experience firsthand many of the social injustices that still exist today. Even
though I had some great teachers, I know that I did not receive a quality education. As time goes
on, I find that each day I learn something new; something that I should have learned in
elementary, middle, or even high school. Oakes and Lipton (2003) established that while many
teachers have heard of the "achievement gap," many have never heard of the "opportunity gap."
Oakes and Lipton (2003) confirmed that diversity is unavoidable because it is a great part of the
American Society. In a quote Lorde once said, "It is not our differences that divide us. It is our
inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences"(Lorde, 1986, pg. 1). By sharing,
by making connections, comparisons, and showing that we have more similarities than
difference, students will be able to understand each other better, to trust each other, and to
confide in each other. All students must be given an opportunity to excel, a way for them to be
proud of whom they are, and given the chance to know that everyone is capable of learning.
Understanding these differences are important not only to the well being of the classroom but to
the prosperity of society.
Curriculum is constantly changing; changing with the goal of meeting all students' needs.
The purpose of a curriculum is to set a framework. Through my education, I have learned that all
students have different ways of learning. I believe that today's students need activities, they need
interaction, and they need technology based curriculum. Wolfe (1998) pointed out that work
must be challenging, but not too challenging or too easy so that it does not interfere with
proficient learning. Students need curriculum that engages them, and at the same time expands

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their critical thinking. The new Common Core Standards want students to not just memorize the
answer, the students must be able to explain why, when, where, what, how, and who. It is no
longer about just learning the rules. During my schooling, I have learned ways to teach
curriculum where students can be active participants. In addition, I have learned how to teach
verbs through songs, and how to teach social science and nouns through puzzles and games. If a
day becomes overly stressing then Physical Education can be used to teach vocabulary, health,
and team work. There are many ways to teach curriculum, in which students can actively
participate, relate to content, and can fully comprehend it and learn it, not just for the moment,
but for a lifetime.
Teaching is an extensive career. Similarly to that of a parent, a teacher holds many titles.
Oliver (2008) noted that teachers have a demanding career, a career that obligates them to
transfer all of their energy into education. An effective teacher must be able to multi-task, to be
organized, to teach, while making sure everyone is safe, to be a care-taker and at the same time
to be a care-giver. Working with children is not only telling them what to do, but also learning to
listen. It is difficult for a student to just sit and listen. Students want to know why things work
the way they do. Wolfe (1998) stated that students are always paying attention and it may not be
to what the teacher is saying, but they are paying attention to something. Students want to
experience, feel, touch, and understand the why, how, and what of life. It is a teacher's
responsibility to fulfill all of those senses. To constantly seek for different ways to teach when
things do not go quite as well as planned, to reflect on their teaching styles, to participate in
professional development and to be open to students input. Each child is unique and also learns
in different ways. A teacher must offer their support, and show his/her students that he/she cares.
An efficient teacher must be willing to accommodate and target their student's needs, to give

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them a sense of belonging and a desire to learn. Through visual aids, participation, and
activation of prior knowledge, students can become successful learners and achievers. Teaching
is not a smooth journey, but it is a journey that affects teachers and their students. It is a journey
that both student and teacher take together, but can only be successful when there is mutual
respect and learning becomes enjoyable.

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References
Bransford, J., Darling-Hammond, L., & Le Page, P. (2008). Introduction, In. L. DarlingHammond, L., & Bransford (Eds.), Preparing teachers for a changing world: What
teachers should learn and be able to do. SanFrancisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Dickinson,A., (2011), Viewpoint: Why get an education? Here's why. San Luis Obispo, CA: The
Tribune.
Lorde Day, A. (1986)."AUDRE LORDE DAY - Film presentation about the life of Audre Lorde
'The Berlin years'" New York. NY: Norton.
Oakes, J., & Lipton, M. (2003). Teaching to change the world (3rd ed.). New York, NY:
McGraw-Hill.
Oliver, B., (2008). "The forgotten r" Just for the ASKing! vol V (issue IX) . Alexandria, VA: Just
ASK Publications.
Wolfe, P., (1998)." Educational leadership:How the brain learns:Revisiting effective teaching.
vol 56 (issue 3). Newletteronline.

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