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Daylan Bakes

Math
12/11/14

Final Draft

Core Decisions of Lesson Design
Pedagogical Focus
The pedagogical focus for this lesson is “selecting and using representations to make
mathematics meaningful and draw connections between mathematical concepts.”
Through the use of manipulatives my students will work through the abstract concept of
part-whole relationships, specifically by decomposing numbers less than ten into all
possible pairs. I hope that by anchoring the abstract in the physical (with manipulatives)
my students will better grasp the concept.
What
In this lesson I will work with first grade students on their understanding of part-whole
relationships. Chapin and Johnson, in their book Math Matters, define part-whole
understanding as meaning “quantities are interpreted as being composed of other
numbers.” My students will gain a deeper understanding of part-whole relationships,
allowing them to simultaneously deepen their understanding of additive computation. We
will focus on number decomposition into two parts, with two separate activities, both
centered around the mathematical concept of decomposition. The following Common
Core State Standards work in partnership with this lesson:
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.OA.A.3
Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by
using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g.,
5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.OA.C.6
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10.
Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14);
decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the
relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows
12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by
creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
How
Tasks:
While the central concept of this particular lesson is part-whole relationships, this will be
broken into two activities, one of which will address a combination of one-to-one
correspondence and connection between the abstract (numbers that make up a whole) and
the physical (cubes used as manipulatives). Once this relational understanding has been
established, the second activity will focus on the recording of number sentences that work
to create the whole (blocks presented with). I hope that the first activity serves as a
connection between the abstract idea of part-whole relationship and additionally

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Daylan Bakes
Final Draft
Math
12/11/14
conservation and the concrete nature of decomposing a whole. After the abstract has been
brought into the realm of concrete, it is my hope that my students will be able to once
again step into the abstract, representing what has been done concretely, in a physical
space, numerically.
Discourse:
The main discourse of this lesson will be student led. I will work to introduce both
activities, but the individual will undertake both activities, with discussion between peers
allowed. I hope to elicit a connection between the two activities from my students.
Tools:
We will use cubes, worksheets, pencils, and discussion to facilitate both activities. We
will also create a poster of all possible combinations found.
Norms:
The norms of group led instruction are: raise your hand unless signaled to respond as one
(I usually say, “all together”), sitting on your bum, and respectful listening. The students
know that they are free to ask questions throughout instruction; however, I try to
emphasize the need for questions that connect, either to what a peer has just said, or to
the material being taught (this avoids questions about what time lunch is, or what I’m
doing this weekend and hopefully teaches communication skills).
Why
My lead classroom teacher identified decomposition of whole numbers into pairs as a
needed point of review/practice for my first graders. For this reason I have chosen to
focus on this content area for the following lesson.
It has also become clear that a basic understanding of decomposition houses a large
number of other basic conceptual understandings, i.e. one-to-one correspondence,
beginning additive properties, grouping, using “friendly” or base (ten).
According to Chapin and Johnson, “students instructed using a part-whole approach do
significantly better with number concepts, problem solving, and place value than those
students whose instruction focuses just on counting by ones” (2006). If this is something
my students still need work with, it seems crucial that it be reviewed.
According to the CCSS, I have chosen to take a significant step backwards, teaching a
lesson that is seemingly focused on the Kindergarten standard stating: “Decompose
numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or
drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5
= 4 + 1).” I have chosen to do so because I believe my students are not entirely ready for
the first grade standard which states, “add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency

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Daylan Bakes
Final Draft
Math
12/11/14
for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten
(e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g.,
knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or
known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 =
13).” While they have some comfort with number sentences and are, for the most part,
able to add and subtract, many still struggle with decomposition of numbers into all
possible paired parts – which indicates a deficit in number sense. I hope that by taking
this step back, my students will be able to transition with greater ease into the realm of
computation.

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