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Daylan Bakes

Math
12/11/14

Final Draft

Lesson Plan
Goals / Objectives
My students will gain a deeper understanding of part-whole relationships through two activities
based in number decomposition into pairs. Both activities work to anchor the abstract concept of
number decomposition into the concrete; in so, my students will also make this leap from the
concrete into the abstract. They will also notice the general pattern of one more pair than the
whole number being decomposed (i.e. 9 pairs possible in the decomposition of 8), leading to a
greater understanding of basic number sense.
Standards (and Assessment Anchors, if applicable)
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.OA.A.3
Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using
objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and
5 = 4 + 1).
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.OA.C.6
Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use
strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a
number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between
addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating
equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 +
1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
Materials and preparation
We will use, cubes, worksheets, pencils, and discussion to facilitate both activities. We will also
create a poster using a large sheet of white sticky graph paper, markers, and I table I will have
previously drawn, of all possible combinations found.
Classroom arrangement and management issues
The room in which the lesson will be taught is a conference room located on the bottom floor of
the school. It is rarely used and with a sign on the door, will provide a quiet and uninterrupted
space to conduct a lesson. The greatest management issue I foresee arises from the small group
lesson itself – my students are used to whole group direction and then independent or individual
work. Removing them from that environment and placing them in a new one (the small group
lesson) might confuse or make them unsure of what norms of behavior are expected. There will
also be two wheeled chairs used as seats for the student – which might pose a problem.
Plan
a. Establish behavior norms

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Daylan Bakes
Math
12/11/14

Final Draft

i. Even though we’re in a new space, our classroom rules still apply:
1. Raise your hand
2. Respectful listening
3. Sitting on your bum
ii. Discussion reminders – does your question have anything to do with what
someone else has said or the topic we’re discussing?
b. Cube “playtime” – let kids play with, get used to the cubes
c. Activity One (10 Minutes) – Introductory Activity
i. Introduction –
1. “We’re going to do a short activity to get us used to breaking
whole numbers into two parts. We’re going to be working with
cubes. This should take us about 10 minutes.”
ii. Activity –
1. Give each student 8 cubes. Have them count cubes. Ask each
student how many cubes they have. Ask students to put a few in
one hand and the rest in their other hand. Then ask them to put
both hands behind their backs. Ask each student how many cubes
they have in one hand – ask the group as a whole, “Does anyone
know how many x has in their other hand?” If no one knows, ask
x, “how many do you have in your other hand? Then ask the group
how many x had originally. Ask x if they are right.
2. Record each response on a chart.
iii. Discussion a. “I’m going to give you two minutes to look at our chart and
think about anything you’ve noticed about the
combinations we came up with.”
b. The following discussion will be a combination of
gathering information and exploring a mathematical
concept/relationship.
i. Ask if they think we made all the possible
combinations?
1. At this point we should not have made all
possible combinations of 8 – there are only
six students, it would be impossible to come
up with all possible combinations of 8.
ii. Does anyone have any other combinations?
iii. How many different ways to form eight did we
come up with?
d. Activity Two (10 minutes)
i. Activity 1. Divide students into pairs. Give each pair of students an
interlocked tower of blocks (different number of blocks in each
tower – around 10 blocks in each tower). Ask students to divide
tower once – model recording (on chart) and have them record on

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Daylan Bakes
Math
12/11/14

Final Draft

their own sheet. Have them divide tower as many times as
possible, recording each new pair.
ii. Discussion –
1. Did anyone think it was hard to find all these different
combinations? Why or why not? What was hard?
e. Final Reflection (10 minutes)
i. Have each pair record all combinations found on chart.
ii. Ask students as a group if they notice any patterns. “Now that all the pairs
we’ve found are up in front of us, what do you notice?”
1. How many combinations have we found for each number?
f. Final Mini-activity (5 minutes)
i. Show students twelve cubes, and two cups. Ask each student to come up
with a possible pair – “how many cubes should I put in the first cup? how
many in the second cup?” “What is the number sentence for what x just
said?”
ii. Write down each number sentence.
Anticipating students’ responses and your possible responses
1. What students are likely to be confused by or find difficult
Because my students already struggle with the abstract concept of decomposition, I’m
anticipating some initial struggle, specifically with the connection of concrete object to the
symbolic representation of those objects with numbers.
2. What students are likely to find especially engaging
I find that my students become especially engaged when given the opportunity to work with
manipulatives and in pairs.
3. What aspects of the lesson might present particular managerial challenges
If my students do not find my instructions clear enough, I think both activities have the potential
to pose managerial challenges. Also, the movement from whole to small group lesson may cause
confusion; students may not know what kinds of behavior norms are expected.
Assessment of the goals/objectives listed above
See attached assessment checklist and student worksheets.
Accommodations
1. Accommodations for students who may find the material too challenging
a. If a student finds the initial activity too challenging, they may work with a
partner, hopefully bridging the zone of proximal development.
b.

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Daylan Bakes
Math
12/11/14

Final Draft

2. Accommodations for students who may need greater challenge and/or finish early?
a. If students finish early, I would provide them with a different number of cubes
and ask them to find all possible combinations.
b. If they complete the above, I would provide them with just a number and see if
they have completely made the transition beyond manipulatives. Are they able to
find all possible combinations of a number without the use of manipulatives?

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