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Jamileth Barrera
Professor Duran
English 100
6 November 2014
Annotated Bibliography
Fugita, Stephen S. & Fernandez, Marilyn. Altered Lives, Enduring Community. Japanese
Americans Remember Their World War II Incarceration. Seattle. University of
Washington Press. 2004. Print.
As the was was going on the federal government had decided to collect extensive data
about the incarcerees. The main purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the
World War II to the Japanese-Americans and to see how the reestablished in their new
American Society. Given that they were forced to leave their homes the study was done
to see if there were any socioeconomic consequences due to the living conditions they
were placed, the loss and disruption of their education and careers, and the big
humiliation they were exposed to. A psychological study was done as well to determine if
the incarcerees were psychologically damaged by the World War II experience. Even
though the journey after the World War II some incarcerees were still better educated and
had higher incomes than the white majority.
Hohri, William Minoru. Koshiyama, Mits. Kuromiya,Yosh. Hoshizaki,Takashi. and Seishi,Frank
Emi. Resistance: Challenging Americas Wartime Internment Of
Japanese-Americans.U.S.A. Morris Publishing. 2001. Print.

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The U.S. government, through presidential Executive Order Number 9066, decided to
detain all Japanese-Americans due to the bombing of Pearl Harbor This Order gave the
Secretary of War and military commanders designated power to exclude all
Japanese-Americans and relocate them into camps. This Order did not exclude anyone
the threat went to all men, women, children, and even institutionalized orphans and
disabled children. With them all being detained the government used all young male as
weapons in the armed force. The young man protested the unconstitutionality of their
internment but it was not enough to keep them with their families.
Japanese-American Internment. U.S. History. U.S. History Online. n.d. Web. 19 Oct. 2014.
< http://www.ushistory.org/us/51e.asp>
Despite the lack of evidence on February 1942 President Roosevelt signed an executive
order. Which ordered to have all the Japanese-American ancestry to be relocated to
Concentration Camps inside the United States. Many Japanese-American communities
were forced to leave everything behind due to the instructions that were followed by the
executive order. Many of them had to sell their homes, their stores, and most of their
assets. Due to the rush many sold their properties less of what their true value was. Then
came Fred Korematsu who challenged the government's executive orders in court. But
then The Supreme Court found the government's actions as a wartime necessity. It was
not until 1988 that the U.S. government tried to apologize to all the people they had
punished.

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Sundquist, Eric J. The Japanese--American Internment.American Scholar 57.4 (2012). Web. 6


Nov. 2014
The United States felt guilty to what they have done to all the internees so the decided to
pass a bill. The bill consisted of a one-time grant of $20,000 to each surviving internee.
This was as a compensation for the losses they had when they were forced to give up
their homes and jobs at the time they were brutally taken away to the concentration
camps. Those who were able to resettle had jobs, sometimes at their appropriate
professional trades but usually at routine jobs. All would only get paid between twelve to
nineteen dollars a month. To who werent as lucky as others and couldnt resettle again
would be imprisoned for four years and reduced to an austere existence lightened only by
their spiritual fortitude.
Weglyn, Michi. Children of the Camps Internment Most of the 110,000 persons removed for
reasons of national security were school-age children, infants and young adults not yet
of voting age. PBS. PBS Online, n.d. Web. 6 Nov, 2014.
<www.pbs.org>
120,000 Japanese ancestry were evacuated and incarcerated, most of whom were U.S.
citizens or legal permanent resident. These Japanese-Americans who half of them were
children were imprisoned for four years due to the Executive Order 9066 issued by
President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Many of the families who were incarcerated were
separated and placed in different camps. Some who died due to inadequate medical care
and emotional stress. Not only did they die due to medical problems but some were

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brutally murdered by military guards for allegedly resisting orders. At the time the
government had applied that they kept them incarcerated due to military necessity to
protect the U.S. from any sabotage. Later on it was documented that the government had
proof that the Japanese-Americans were no harm to society.
Japanese-American Internment. U.S. History. U.S. History Online. n.d. Web. 19 Oct. 2014.
< http://www.ushistory.org/us/51e.asp>
Despite the lack of evidence on February 1942 President Roosevelt signed an executive
order. Which ordered to have all the Japanese-American ancestry to be relocated to
Concentration Camps inside the United States. Many Japanese-American communities
were forced to leave everything behind due to the instructions that were followed by the
executive order. Many of them had to sell their homes, their stores, and most of their
assets. Due to the rush many sold their properties less of what their true value was. Then
came Fred Korematsu who challenged the government's executive orders in court. But
then The Supreme Court found the government's actions as a wartime necessity. It was
not until 1988 that the U.S. government tried to apologize to all the people they had
punished.