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Term III Math lesson!

Kristin Wang

Lesson Plan Math!

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Pedagogical Focus: Assessing student understanding through listening to and making
sense of student solution strategies and explanations !

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What!
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In this lesson, the students will be finding the perimeter of rectangles using rulers
using measurements in inches. In fourth grade, students are working to further their
skills in addition and multiplication. In this lesson, my goal is to help students to understand the definition of perimeter and the methods of finding rectangle perimeters. Students will understand that the perimeter is the lengths of all the sides of a rectangle. In
3rd grade, students already were familiar with the measure of perimeter, angles, and
area unit. The students practiced finding the perimeter of many objects in the classroom. It is important for students to understand the relationship between size, shape,
and symmetry because it leads to their study of geometry and shapes later on. It is also
important to help students identify a 2 dimensional surface of the rectangular objects
that they will look at. Students should know that perimeter is a 2 dimensional measurement. When they measure perimeter on a 3 dimensional object, they are measuring the
perimeter of one surface of the object. !

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How!
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I will start the lesson by accessing the students’ prior knowledge to think about
area and perimeter in third grade. For the hook of the lesson, I will tell them either a story or video clip that connects to the purpose of finding perimeter in the real world. Afterwards, I want to guide the students into looking at an object as a group to find the
perimeter of a rectangle. For example, it could be the surface of a rectangular desk,
poster, or sheet of white paper. The lesson will be mostly focused on students’ answers
and questions from the teacher. I will be there to help them, but I plan to have the students think about and help each other understand through working together. The students will thus work together to estimate the perimeters of rectangular objects and then
to check their estimates through using rulers and finding the measurements in inches.
The completion of the worksheet and accuracy of the answers will be the assessment
for this lesson, to check for student understanding of how to find the perimeter of objects. Students will share their work at the end they present their solutions to the group. !

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Why!
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It is important to teach students how to find the perimeter of rectangular objects
by the end of 4th grade. In the Common Core Standards for fourth grade mathematics,
students should be able to apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real
world and mathematical problems. My goal, however, is not to give the students a formula to remember as they solve a perimeter or area problem. It is necessary for students to apply their understanding of multiplication and addition strategies and to work
together while solving these problems. Using addition and multiplication as the student

Term III Math lesson!

Kristin Wang

works out the perimeter problem will help them see the larger context of adding and
multiplication as they relate to word problems or real life situations. !

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Goal/ Objectives!
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By the end of the lesson, students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of
what the perimeter of a rectangle is and how to find the perimeters of a rectangle.!

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Students will be able to find out how to use find the perimeter of rectangles in inches.!
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Standards!
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CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.MD.A.3

Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. For example, find the width of a rectangular room given the area of the flooring and the length, by viewing the
area formula as a multiplication equation with an unknown factor.

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Materials and preparation!
Rulers!
Blank Paper!
Posterboard!
Student workbook (Investigations)!
Papers/Pencil!

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Classroom arrangement and management issues!
- small group of 4 or 5 students!
- Teacher will tell the students of expectations beforehand!
- Students should listen to the teacher when talking!
- One person talks at a time!
- Students should remain focused on their tasks!
- Misbehaviors will be reported to the teacher and privileges taken away!

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Plan (Lesson total time: 55 minutes)!
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Hook (10 minutes)!
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Teacher accesses prior knowledge by asking the students, “Can you tell me something
that you know about perimeters? What kind of shapes have perimeters? Can we find
the perimeter of this desk? Book? Classroom? No, but we can find the perimeter of one
part of the desk.”!

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Teacher asks students to produce a definition of perimeter or parts of the perimeter !
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Perimeter: Length of the border around a shape (For example, the border of a picture
frame, the bulletin board, the fence around a house). Teacher will have an example of

Term III Math lesson!

Kristin Wang

the border of the picture frame and run finger around the border or edge of the picture
frame for students to observe. !

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Teacher provides counter examples: this desk (or room) has other types of measures. It
has a height. Is height different from perimeter. Also talk about area. !

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Teacher: I will choose one student to stand up and walk around the perimeter of our
room. What do you notice? Students will “think, pair, share” who in the real world would
need to measure perimeter and for what purpose. Teacher writes it on the posterboard.!

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Before beginning the guided lesson, teacher talks about how we can measure length,
and asks students to look at both sides of the ruler. Teacher draws a line on the poster
paper and models how to use a ruler to measure the line in inches. !

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Guided Instruction (15 minutes)!
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Teacher states purpose of lesson: Today, we are going to find the perimeters of rectangular shapes in inches. !

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We have been measuring the length of many objects, such as your desks. What would
you measure if I asked you to measure the perimeter of my table or this poster?!

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Teacher does a discussion on identifying perimeters. Teacher shows students objects
and ask the students if the objects have perimeters (some will have more than one).
The focus is that objects are usually 3 dimensional, made up of 2-dimensional surfaces/
faces. Perimeter is the measure around ONE of those 2-D faces (Focus on this idea,
but do not state it explicitly)!

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Teacher shows students a sheet of letter sized paper. Teacher asks the students to help
find the perimeter of the sheet of paper in inches. !

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Questions: What would you estimate it to be? How would your answer change if you
measured the same perimeter in inches? What would you estimate the answer to be?
Would it be bigger or smaller than our answer in inches?!
Teacher holds up a phone and asks the students to estimate the length of one of the
sides. What would it be? !
Teacher allows students a few minutes to think about their new estimate. Focus on
whether the measurement will be larger or smaller.!

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Teacher: We will estimate the perimeters of objects first, and then check our estimations. !

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As student answers, the teacher will write the length of the sides of the paper on the
posterboard. Then, the teacher reinforces the students’ prior memory of the definition of
perimeter and explains that it is necessary to find the total length all around the object.

Term III Math lesson!

Kristin Wang

One of the methods is to add up all the sides of the paper to arrive at the answer. Encourage students to come up with alternative ways to solve the problem. !

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Teacher: What is name of this shape? (rectangular)!
How many sides does it have? Estimate/measure each side and add. !

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Independent work (12-15 minutes)!
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Students will complete the worksheet on perimeters below by estimating the perimeter
of the perimeters first and then checking on their estimations. !

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Share time/Talk about solutions (20 minutes)!
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Share time will be similar to a number talk, where the teacher will ask the students to
share their estimates and their answers with the rest of the group. Each student will
have the opportunity to talk about his or her answer. !
Teacher does a compare and connect discussion, picking out two different strategies
for getting the perimeter of one of the objects you gave them and comparing them. For
example one student might keep measuring all the way around, another might add the
sides. Another might realize that, with rectangles, 2 sides will always be the same length
and do 2l+2w.!

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Assessment of the goals/objectives listed above!
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From looking at the students’ work on the worksheet and workbook page, I should be
able to determine if they understand the meaning of perimeter and how to find the
perimeter of a rectangular shape. Additionally, I will use the students’ responses as they
share their answers with the group to further see if they were able to apply the learning
into their own work. If the student gets a wrong answer, depending on the question that
the student answers incorrectly, I will be able to identify where the student’s confusion is
when they calculated the perimeter of the rectangular shape. !

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Exit Ticket: Students will take a post it note to write their own definition of perimeter.!
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Anticipating students’ responses and your possible responses!
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Student says, “I think it will be about 3 feet because I know that two of the sides are
each about 1 foot so that is 2 feet. And the other 2 sides look like they might make
about 1 foot together. There are 12 inches in each foot and 3 x 12 = 36. So it is about 36
inches”!
Teacher: Knowing the conversion between feet and inches is very useful. 1 foot is 12
inches. Can you tell me why you decided to use feet to measure this object?!

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Student says, “I know the space between y thumb and my pinky when I stretch out my
fingers is 5 inches. And when I put that around the paper i get to about 40.”!

Term III Math lesson!

Kristin Wang

Teacher: Using nonstandard measurement to figure out the length and perimeter of objects is very useful in real life situations. I really like how you made the connection between inches and the length of your thumb and pinky. !

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Student says, “I don’t need to estimate, because I know that the paper is 8 1/2 inches
by 11 inches. So I added up all the sides in my head and got 39.”!
Teacher: I like how you found out and estimated the measurement to get 39. Can you
please show me how you found this information by writing down your ideas?!

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Accommodation!
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The poster should be big enough so that everyone can see it!
The teacher’s writing should be legible and easily read by all the students!
Teacher must prepare materials for the students to measure beforehand!
For students who might need additional help, teacher will be there to provide one on
one attention!
Aspects of the lesson might change based on the pacing of the lesson and the students’
responses!
For students who need more challenge, the teacher could have a deeper discussion
with them if there is extra time, students can complete the worksheet!
Students might have an easier time identifying perimeter on 2 dimensional objects int he
classroom, but measuring a 3 dimensional object will be more difficult.!

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Work Cited!

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Measuring Perimeter. (2008). In Investigations Size, Shape, and Symmetry (Vol. 4).
Glenview: Pearson Education.

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Term III Math lesson!

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Kristin Wang