You are on page 1of 7

Part I: Information about the Lesson and Unit

Topic: cycling of matter (carbon) and energy transfers
Abstract
I’d like to lead the students through a more in­depth look at how carbon cycles 
through an ecosystem, as a detailed example of matter cycling and changing forms in an 
ecosystem. I want to try out some of the CarbonTIME material (the carbon tracing 
worksheet), adapting it as an application sequence, for students to begin to work through 
how carbon transfers.

Part II: Clarifying Your Goals for the Topic
A. Big Ideas
Ecosystems are sustained by the continuous the recycling of matter and nutrients 
within the system. The cycling of matter within ecosystems occur through interactions 
among different organisms and between organisms and the physical environment. All 
living systems need matter. Matter (stores energy in bonds and) fuels the energy­
releasing chemical reactions that provide energy for life functions and provides the 
material for growth and repair of tissue. Animals acquire matter from food, that is, from 
plants or other animals. The chemical elements that make up the molecules of organisms 
pass through food webs and the environment and are combined and recombined in 
different ways. As matter cycles through living systems and between living systems and 
the physical environment, matter is conserved in each change.
The carbon cycle provides an example of matter cycling and energy flow in 
ecosystems. Photosynthesis, digestion of plant matter, respiration, and decomposition are 
important components of the carbon cycle, in which carbon is exchanged between the 
biosphere, atmosphere, oceans, and geosphere through chemical, physical, geological, 
and biological processes. This includes long term and short­term storage of carbon and 
other matter. Its forms and amounts within these spheres affect economics (long term 
storage as fuel), climate change (considering rising CO2 levels, the ocean as a sink), and 
the health of ecosystems (organisms’ needs from the environment, limiting resources, 
acid rain relating again to CO2 levels).

B. Student Practices
1. Naming key practices
Using models, constructing explanations. 

C. Performance Expectations for Student Learning
Performance Expectation

Associated
NGSS Practice 

NGSS Performance Expectation(s)
1. HS­LS2­5. (Developing)/Using a model to illustrate the role of 
photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the 
biosphere.

Using a model, 
constructing 
explanations

Specific Lesson Objective(s)
1.  Describe carbon cycling within ecosystems as movement of carbon atoms among 
different locations/pools associated movement of materials and carbon­transforming 
processes.
2. ­explain how abiotic factors cycle in an ecosystem (carbon, 

oxygen).  (B3.3b)

3. Explain where/how organisms in the ecosystem get carbon, and where/how it is 
transferred to another part of the ecosystem.

Constructing 
explanations
Using models, 
constructing 
explanations

2 above is HSCE Objectives/mentor ‘learning targets’ relating to sequence.
Will also address ­ identify how energy is stored in an ecosystem. (B3.2A)

Part III: Example Activity Sequence
A. Storyline for the Activity Sequence in Context
Stage

Role in Storyline

Lessons before 
your sequence

Intro to ecology, populations (growth and dynamics), organism interactions (lynx and hare), 
possibly succession (depending on the class). 

Lesson 1

Tree question­ where does the mass come from? 

Lesson 2

The carbon/movement (carbon­tracing) wkst packet

Lesson 3

Grandma johnson’s carbon quiz question 

Lessons after 
your sequence

Invasive species, speciation study. 

Will also be giving reading quiz over section and completing mentors’ note on cycling in ecosystems.

B. Activity Sequence Details
Focus Objective
Objective
Describe carbon cycling within ecosystems as movement of carbon atoms among pools 

NGSS Practice
Constructing 

(movement of materials and carbon­transforming processes).

explanations

Explain how carbon (and oxygen) cycle(s) in the ecosystem. (B3.3b)
1. Application Cycle
Examples and Scaffolding (Pattern in Student Practices)
List of examples
1.

burning a match

2.

CO2, CO, 

3.

C6H12O6, (list of sugars, list of lipids, list of proteins) –examples of what living things are made of
Scaffolding that applies to all examples

Conservation of matter. Carbon doesn’t disappear or come out of nowhere, it’s always present in some form. 
Form may be gaseous!
Stages in Your Application Sequenc
Stage
Establishing the 
problem
Modeling
Coaching
Fading
Maintenance

Teaching Activities
Organisms and carbon, how and where does it come from (and go to)­ cycling.
Acorn to oak tree.
Carbon­tracing packet wkst (carbonTIME unit, nat geo/Andy)
Give grandma’s carbon question, and question applicable to other cycles, reminding students to draw on 
modeling and coaching.
Formative assessments as quick checks during following days, relating other lesson material to this 
concept.

C. Lesson Plans
Lesson  Materials
Presentation materials (Overhead transparencies or PowerPoint presentations, etc):  
(attach files)
Copied materials (Handouts, worksheets, tests, lab directions, etc.):  (attacedh files)
Pages in textbook:  Book:_Biology Textbook__________   Pages:__Sec 2.3 
(cycles)_____
Laboratory materials:  For the teacher or the class as a whole: (attach files)
For each laboratory station: (attach files)
Other materials: (attach files)
Lesson 1 Activities
Materials : Powerpoint with pictures (of seed and tree)/question. Slips of paper 
handout with question on it.

Lesson 1 Introduction (15, (may insert most of macro for notes, or other Lesson) 
20,minutes)
(May need to take/correct reading quiz at the beginning­ 15min).
(May need to split L1 with either mentor cycle notes or with L2, depending on macro)
We’ve been talking about cycling matter. What are the three cycles we mention in our 
notes? (water, C & O, nitrogen). Today and tomorrow, we’re going to be focusing on the 
carbon and oxygen cycle, specifically, tracing Carbon through the ecosystem. I have a 
question for you to start. (Show picture slides of maple ‘helicopter’ seed, and full grown 
maple tree. Ask: When a this seed grows into a tree, where does the mass (matter) come 
from?
Clarify mass/matter (weight is a measure of mass­ weight changes on the moon, mass 
does not, mass is how much “stuff” how much matter.) Give students a chance to write 
down their own answers (like a pre­quiz). Collect and ask for volunteer answers. (Take 
poll of how many agreed, what was different if you thought something else?)
Lesson 1 Main Teaching Activities (35minutes) 
Diagram out and model how tree/seed gets its mass. Organic/living things made 
up of mostly carbon, so that mass is mostly carbon. What does a plant need to grow? Can 
it grow in a sealed container? (sunlight, water, air­) What does it need from the air? What
do plants take in? Where do they take it in. Photosynthesis happens with what pigment 
(where is this green cholorphyll? So where do you think that photosynthesis takes place? 
=> how/ where does the carbon come from?)
Introduce idea of making sugars, balancing in/out (conservation of matter!)
Using sugars. All living things need a source of food, if autotrophs make their 
own food, are they going to just make it for something else? No, they need to use it! 
That’s WHY they make it/why they do photosynthesis. 
So do just animals use their food? No, plants do to. So when plants do 
photosynthesis, they take in CO2 and make what (review). What do we use from the air 
when we breath in? Why? What do we use it for? To use our food. Cellular respiration. 
Go through this with them as well.
Draw out ins/outs of each process, highlight where carbon is coming from/going 
to. Draw example, go over labels we could use (Will use, in Lesson 2).
Lesson 1 Conclusion (8minutes)
Have students wrap things up, collect papers if it seems reasonable that students finished 
during the macro, let them know that we’ll be working on the matter (carbon) tracing 
aspect tomorrow. Ask how it went, ask for questions/struggles. Remind of other due 
dates.

Lesson 2 Materials
CarbonTIME carbon tracing worksheet, and powerpoint.

Lesson 2 Introduction (20 minutes)
Review tree question­ where does a tree get it’s mass? What element is 
responsible? How did it get there? How will it leave? What processes did we call these? 
What are the input/outputs of each? Can animals do both of these?
Remind students of carbon tracing, conservation of matter, why we’re doing this. 
Walk them through examples/format the worksheet/packet’s asking for, and a few bumps
expected (biosynthesis meaning, etc). How to draw the arrows, what each label means. 
Give example using tree
Lesson 2 Main Teaching Activities (40minutes)
 Pass out worksheets.
Pass out copies of the Lesson 3.2 Tracing Carbon Worksheet. Have students complete
Part I in groups (~4 students). Show Slide 2 of Lesson 3.3 Tracing Carbon 
Presentation while they work. Afterwards, use Slide 3 for students to check their 
answers.
 Practice tracing carbon through an ecosystem.
Use Slide 4 of the Presentation to discuss their answers to Part I of the Worksheet. 
Then, with the class as a whole, practice tracing carbon in the scenarios in Slide 5, 6 
and 7. Ask: What is the path a carbon atom would take to move from the atmosphere 
to a flower? What is the path a carbon atom would take to move from the atmosphere
to the muscle of a rabbit? What is the longest path a carbon atom would take to move
from the atmosphere to a decomposer?
 Draw arrows and processes.  
Display Slide 8 of the Presentation while students fill out Part II numbers 2­4 (arrows 
and processes) on the Worksheet. Then, use Slide 9 to compare to another class’s 
data.
 Answer the Carbon/Movement Question.
Use Slide 10 of the presentation to remind students of the Carbon/Movement 
Question and Slide 11 to show students the answer to the Carbon/Movement 
Question. Have students compare this to the answer to Part II number 4 on their 
worksheet.

Lesson 2 Conclusion (10minutes)
Have students wrap things up, put materials away/collected, in their seats. Review what 
happened! What did we have trouble with, what did we get the hang of, how did this 
help, what questions do we have? Remind of other due dates.
Lesson 3 Materials
Grandma Johnson’s carbon question (on sheet explaining, with picture of grandma and 
coyote). 
Lesson 3 Introduction (40 minutes)
Revisit student ideas about the Carbon/Movement Question.
Go through the packet with them, if didn’t have chance the day before (I suspect we 
won’t).
Highlight the processes we talked about (photosynthesis, respiration) and especially how 
decomposition ties in (did this with groups while they worked, but again now with 
whole class). What’s in the soil that those dead things and feces go to? What do these 
things become to organisms in the soil? If these organisms are using their food, what 
happens? Etc. 
Lesson 3 Main Teaching Activities (20minutes)
Have students take grandma johnson’s carbon quiz question on their own, with
explanation and drawing tracing carbon. Tell them the story and remind that coyote
doesn’t eat Gram.
Go through tracing this (key points with CR/carbon from air to plant) after. Answer any
stray but interested and related questions.
Lesson 3 Conclusion (10minutes)
Wrap up the sequence! Ask students what they’ve learned, has this helped their
understanding, other questions, connections. Review with them some of the highlights.
Remind of due dates for sequence work and other things. Give heads up for next day’s
plan.

Part IV Assessment of Focus Students
A. Focus Objective
Describe carbon cycling within ecosystems as movement of carbon atoms among pools associated 
movement of materials and carbon­transforming processes.
Describe the flow of energy from the sun through the ecosystem to heat. 

B. Developing Assessment Tasks
Possible focus tasks/questions: 
Explain how carbon atoms move between ecosystem pools. 
Explain how energy is transformed into chemical energy when it enters an ecosystem.
Explain how chemical energy moves between ecosystem pools.*
Explain how chemical energy is transformed when plants or animals use it.*
Explain how chemical energy eventually leaves an ecosystem.
Why do plants and animals do cellular respiration?