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Donation of Geese to Food Pantries

Lizzi Schieldt

November 24, 2014
ENG 1800
Professor Olson

Donation of Geese to Food Pantries 1

November 16, 2014
Professor Mark Olson
English Professor
Hamline University
1536 Hewitt Ave
St. Paul, MN 55104
Dear Professor Olson,
Enclosed is “The Feasibility Report: Donation of Geese to Food Pantries.” This report contains
evidence on how this idea will work and how this is feasible. As a student at Hamline
University, I have the resources to conduct this feasibility report to show how this will be done.
Also, how it will help the less fortunate.
The problem is that there are many people who have to use food pantries and these places have
old, canned and starchy food. Not healthy, high protein food. This report shows how we can
fixed this problem by letting hunters have another tag, “donation tag,” so they can hunt an extra
goose to donate to these food shelters. Geese are a good source of protein and are
overpopulated. We can take advantage of the overpopulated geese and use it to help give the less
fortunate healthier food options.
It is my hope that this report will provide the information needed to evaluate the effectiveness of
the feasibility report. Please let me know if you have any questions about this report or if you
need any further information. I may be reached at eschieldt01@hamline.edu.

Sincerely,

Lizzi Schieldt
Lizzi Schieldt
Hamline University Student
eschieldt01@hamline.edu

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Table of Contents
Abstract……………………………………………………………………………………………3
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………..4
Importance………………………………………………………………………………...4
How it works in Wisconsin…………………………………………………………….....4
The Research Relationship………………………………………………………………..4
Discussion…………………………………………………………………………………………4
Health Benefits of Goose Meat……………………………………………………………5
Comparison to other Meats………………………………………………………………..6
Population of Geese in Minnesota………………………………………………………...8
DNR‟s Contributions……………………………………………………………………...8
Hunter‟s Contributions………………………………………………………………...….9
Where to Hunt………………………………………………………………………...…..9
Process of Geese………………………………………………………………………......9
Qualifications of Food Pantries………………………………………………………….10
Conclusions and Recommendations……………………………………………………………..10
Works Cited……………………………………………………………………………………...11

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Abstract
This report examines that Minnesota DNR should start recognizing that there is an
overpopulation of geese and there should be action taken to this opportunity. Also, that society‟s
food pantries could benefit with getting healthy quality meat to hand out to the less fortunate.
This report also examines:
 The health benefits of geese.
 The population of geese in Minnesota.
 The DNR‟s contributions for this feasibility study.
 The hunter‟s contributions for this feasibility study.
 Where the geese would be hunted.
 The process of processing geese.
 The qualifications of the food pantries.
The purpose of this report is to show how we can fix two problems in the community. This
report makes apparent that there are more families dependent on the food pantries and the food
that stocks the shelves are mostly starchy and carb related foods. This report shows how healthy
goose meat really is and how we can take advantage of the fast reproducing geese to help the less
fortunate.

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INTRODUCTION
Goose meat is said to be a great source of protein and there is an imperative opportunity to use
this resource in favor of the less fortunate. This introduction talks about the importance, how it
works in Wisconsin, and the research relationship.
Importance
The purpose of this report is to discuss the feasibility of how food pantries need more protein
base foods and we can help by donating the overpopulated Canada geese to these places. This is
important because having fresh protein in your diet, not starchy or canned food, is healthy for
you and we need to help the people who cannot afford to buy protein. The Canada goose are
overpopulated, if one goes to a beach or the park, they‟ll immediately notice all the geese and
especially all the feces. The geese population would be controlled by the DNR. “Goose Hunting
Locations” says, “Some farmers are eager to rid their fields of geese and will be happy to let you
do the ridding.” This shows that the farmers are annoyed of the overpopulated geese and want
something done about it. This opportunity will make the farmers, food pantries and hunters
happy. Most importantly, we need to help the less fortunate and pursue this opportunity.
How it Works in Wisconsin
In Wisconsin, the DNR issues the number of donation tags to each municipality. The hunters
can ask to have a donation tag. Once they use that tag, they can take the goose to a certain
butchering place around them that will be cost free for the donation tagged birds. They are then
given to the closest food shelter or pantry. Nancy Smith from the food banks, in “About that
Christmas Goose”, says, “It’s a wonderful resource for protein, we are absolutely thrilled. Not
many people donate protein.” If the tag is not used, it is returned so the DNR can keep count of
what was used and not used. Nancy also mentions how in demand they are, "This is the first
time in 32 years that we've seen middle-class families using food pantries. Goose meat flies off
the shelves as soon as it's available." Bannerman, in “About that Christmas Goose”, mentions
that, “Before releasing goose meat, the USDA tests it for toxins. The meat is often distributed
widely so that no one family or location would be reliant on this meat."

The Research Relationship
In this feasibility report, the research is directed to show how this will work, how it will take
place and the positive effect on food pantries. At the end, it will be clear that this is feasible and a
great opportunity to be able to use our resources around us to help those in need. This study
relates to previous research because there is an overpopulation in geese and we need a way to
control this as well as helping society‟s underprivileged.
DISCUSSION
The discussion will discuss the health benefits of goose meat, the comparison to other meats,
population of geese in Minnesota, DNR‟s contributions, Hunter‟s contributions, where to hunt,
the process of geese, and the qualifications of food shelters. These headings will make sense of
this feasibility and show how this will be a significant idea for Minnesota.

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Health Benefits of Goose Meat
Gosse meat is a dark meat that contributes to a healthy life style. “Calories in Goose, Meat
Only,” has a list of good points for the meat which include: low sodium, sugar free, high in
phosphorus, and high in selenium. Phosphorus is important for our bodies because, “Phosphorus
is a mineral found in the body. About 85 percent of the phosphorus in the body is in bones.
Phosphorus is the body‟s next most abundant mineral after calcium” (Phosphorus). It also
stimulates muscle growth. This tells us that it is important to have in our diet. Selenium is also
important in our health because it is important for the metabolism. “Vitamins and Supplements
Lifestyle Guide” says, “Among healthy people in the U.S., selenium deficiencies are uncommon.
But some health conditions -- such as HIV, Crohn's disease, and others -- are associated with low
selenium levels.” With knowing what phosphorus and selenium are used for in our bodies, it
reassures us that goose meat is beneficial to have in our diets. “Calories in Goose, Meat Only”
also gives a list of nutrition facts:
Serving Size 1 unit (yield from 1 lb ready-to-cook goose) (143 g)
Per Serving % Daily Value*
Calories 340
Calories from Fat 163
Total Fat 18.1g 28%
Saturated Fat 6.5g 33%
Polyunsaturated Fat 2.2g
Monounsaturated Fat 6.2g
Cholesterol 137mg 46%
Sodium 109mg 5%
Potassium 554.84mg 16%
Carbohydrates 0g 0%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 0g
Protein 41.4g
Vitamin A 1% · Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 2% · Iron 23%
*Based on a 2000 calorie diet
This shows precisely the benefits of eating this nutritious bird. Based on a normal calorie diet,
this type of meat, from a goose, is rich in iron and protein which we all need in our daily diets. It
also has some calcium which helps build strong bones and is especially essential for small
children who are growing.

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Table 1. The Goose Fat Information Service

Fat Data - Comparison of Nutritional Values
Typical values per 100g

Butter
Beef dripping
Lard
Suet (shredded)
Compound Cooking Fat

Fat content
81.50%
100%
100%
100%
100%

Saturates
54g
54.8g
40.8g
48g
38.1g

Monounsaturates
19.8g
36.7g
43.8g
32.1g
45.6g

Polyunsaturates
2.6g
2.5g
9.6g
2.1g
11.1g

Goose fat

100%

32.7g

55g

Duck fat

100%

26.9g

57g

10.8g
11g

Another source giving a positive feedback on goose meat is, “The Goose Fat Information
Service.” They state that, “Animal fats are often considered to be „bad fats‟, goose fat is one of
the better ones and contains far fewer saturated fats than butter or lard. Goose Fat contains 32.7g
Saturated Fat per 100g compared with 54g for Butter and 40.8g for Lard.” This explains and
shows that this fat is healthy because it is natural and not human made.
Comparison to Other Meats
Turkey information:
Table 2. Nutrition
Meat Type

Calories

Total Fat

Protein

Breast with skin

194

8 grams

29 grams

Breast w/o skin

161

4 grams

30 grams

Wing w/skin

238

13 grams

27 grams

Leg w/skin

213

11 grams

28 grams

Dark meat w/skin

232

13 grams

27 grams

Dark meat w/o skin

192

8 grams

28 grams

Skin only

482

44 grams

19 grams

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Goose meat, we know, is 340 calories which is a bit more than the different kinds of turkey
meats. On the other hand, protein in geese is 41.4 grams compared to turkey witch does not
reach that high in grams of protein. The most for turkey is 30 grams and that is for breast
without skin. Goose meat is higher in grams of protein showing goose meat is healthier.
Duck information:
Table 3. Duck, Domesticated, Meat and Skin, Raw

Amounts Per Selected Serving

Calorie Information
%DV

Calories
From Carbohydrate

1159 (4853 kJ)
0.1 (0.4 kJ)

From Fat

1019 (4266 kJ)

From Protein

141 (590 kJ)

From Alcohol

0.0 (0.0 kJ)

58%

Looking at the calories from fat, goose is 163 compared to duck which is 1019 calories from fat.
Goose meat is obviously the better option in looking at the calories from fat.
Table 4. Duck, Domesticated, Meat and Skin, Raw
Protein & Amino Acids
Amounts Per Selected Serving

%DV

Protein

33.0g

66%

Tryptophan

413 mg

Threonine

1352 mg

Isoleucine

1541 mg

Leucine

2583 mg

Lysine

2617 mg

Methionine

835 mg

Cystine

517 mg

Phenylalanine

1318 mg

Tyrosine

1134 mg

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Valine

1644 mg

Arginine

2210 mg

Histidine

812 mg

Alanine

2230 mg

Aspartic acid

3163 mg

Glutamic acid

4905 mg

Glycine

2663 mg

Proline

1969 mg

Serine

1400 mg

Looking at the protein, goose is 41.4 grams and duck is 33.0 grams. Including the calories from
fat, we can also see that goose meat is healthier by the grams of protein.
Population of Geese in Minnesota
Geese are easily reproduced and gather in areas where there is open space, water, small cut grass
and marshy areas to hide. The DNR gives us the reason why there are so many:
“Canada geese are extremely prolific. Able to reproduce at 2 or 3 years of age and living
to over 10 years, a pair of adult geese raises an average of about 4 young per year. At
normal reproduction and mortality, a pond or lake with 3 pairs of adult geese can
multiply to nearly 50 birds within 5 years and to over 300 in just 10 years.”
Geese always come back to the same feeding ground each year bringing more friends and family
with them. As of right now, there are about 25,000 geese just in the Twin Cities this summer.
Looking outside the Twin Cities, the population of geese is even greater. When hunters get the
donation tag, the population will not die off, the geese will keep reproducing heavily and we will
be able to control the population more efficiently.
DNR’s Contributions
The DNR, department of natural resources, would have the most control over this project. By
limiting the population of the geese and the number of tags to give out each year. They also set
the dates for geese season and how much the fees will cost. For 2014, the adult age 18 or over
and under age 65 for the annual fee is $22.00. For the senior age 65 and over for the annual fee
is $13.50. On top of the annual fee, there is a license cost for geese that everyone pays. The
Canada goose during a special season and the light goose during a special season are both $4.00.
These prices are found in the DNR Handbook.
Also, in the handbook it states who will have to purchase these licenses and fees. “A special
$4.00 permit is required to hunt Canada geese during the special August and September seasons.
Everyone must have the permit to participate in the hunts, except residents under age 18 or age

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65 and older, and people hunting on their own property. The August goose hunt is open in a
limited portion of west-central Minnesota,” also found in the Handbook. Getting the extra
donation tag will have no cost to the hunters.
Hunters Contributions
The hunters are important for this to work efficiently. They can be granted an extra tag for a
goose only if they donate that goose to a food pantry. If they take the extra tag, they have no
choice but to donate that goose with that tag and if they do not get a goose for that tag, the tag
will have to be returned. The hunters love to do what they do and many would love to get the
chance to have another tag to get more time to hunt. In doing what they love, they also get to be
a good citizen and be able to donate to people who are unable to go hunt their own food for their
families. This will make them more satisfied with hunting and give them another reason to
pursue this sport. This would also help control the population of the geese.
Where to Hunt
Looking around all of Minnesota, there is an abundance of geese everywhere. Even in the cities
there are geese around the lakes and beaches. Even though they may be fun for the kids to feed,
this needs to be controlled and monitored. Goose hunting takes skill and experience. One needs
a knowledge of where to find the geese in the hunting seasons and know how to hunt them.
Many suggest to start hunting where you hunt duck or pheasants. The article, “Goose Hunting
Locations” says, “Canada geese nest throughout much of southern and western Minnesota and
when migrating can be found almost anywhere there is water and nearby cropland. This idea
will start in Southern Minnesota because they have lots of respectable places to hunt and it‟s a
good place to get it all set up. Then it will make its way to all of Minnesota with Western
Minnesota being next and then Eastern, followed by the North.
The Process of Geese
Many hunters will butcher what they have hunted. This process is not complicated, but takes
experience. From “Processing Ducks and Geese,” they first talk about plucking versus Skinning.
Within this, they discuss how an older and more mature bird would be skinned to harvest the
meat. However, if you want the carcass to be moist, you want to keep the skin and pluck the
goose. The next section is “wet versus dry plucking,” here it says that dry plucking is more
difficult. Instead, one should soak the bird in “150 degrees Fahrenheit for 3-5 minutes.” Also,
“you need to raise and lower the bird in the water to ensure the bird is completely soaked.”
When the hunter decides to process the goose on his own, he will have to have it approved
before taking the bird to a food pantry. The bird would have to be processed before donating.
Some places will not take the goose unless it is deboned also, though that depends on the food
pantry. By contacting some processing places around Minnesota, some will process the donating
geese for free and they can contribute in that way to help the less fortunate.

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Qualifications of Food Pantries
When they are cleared by the processing places, many places are happy to get fresh meat to hand
out to the families that come in. Many Churches ask their well off attendees to donate so they
can get healthier, high in protein foods to their families in need of meals. Other food pantries,
especially around holidays, are grateful to give out a big, expensive part of the holiday meal.
Geese are a great resource; any pantry will be grateful to make families happy by getting quality,
healthy meat that they cannot afford.
CONCLUSION
In conclusion, this idea is feasible. Looking at the population of the geese and how fast it grows,
there are beyond plenty of geese to support this idea. The number of people going to the food
pantries are increasing. We know that the pantries need more food to hand out and it would
benefit the pantries and families who depend on them to have protein that will improve their
health. Seeing how healthy the goose meat is compared to turkey and duck meat shows that we
would be donating a healthy meat that is in abundance. This meat will have good protein which
will last, unlike carbs that make you hungry faster after eating. Seeing that this idea is working in
Wisconsin, gives a positive attitude towards Minnesota starting this process and having it be
successful. This feasibility will be sustainable because the DNR will be able to control the
population of the geese by handing out a certain number of tags. Also, by starting this just in
southern Minnesota will give time to test the feasibility in a small portion of the state and also
gives time to correct the mistakes of the feasibility before implementing it throughout the state.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Recommendations for the next steps:




Get the information out to hunters in Southern Minnesota to start.
Have the DNR calculate the number of donation tags they can hand out.
Get some processing places on board with the free processing of these geese to be given
to food pantries.
Contact food pantries and even churches around southern Minnesota to tell them the
health benefits of geese meat and that this will be happening shortly.
Get the health benefit information out to the community so they are comfortable taking
the donated geese from the food pantries and from their fellow community members.

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WORKS CITED
"About That Christmas Goose . . ." Washington Post. The Washington Post, Web. 13 Nov. 2014.
"Calories in Goose, Meat Only." Calorie Count. Web. 14 Oct. 2014.
"Duck, Domesticated, Meat and Skin, Raw." Self Nutrition Data. Condé Nast, Web. 14 Nov.
2014.
"Geese." Living with Wildlife. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Web. 16 Nov. 2014.
"Goose Hunting Locations.” Minnesota DNR. Web. 14 Oct. 2014.
"Nutrition And Health." The Goose Fat Information Service -. Web. 21 Oct. 2014.
"Nutrition." Turkey Facts. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Web. 14 Nov. 2014.
"Phosphorus and Chronic Kidney Disease." Phosphorus Foods and Chronic Kidney Disease.
DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc, Web. 27 Oct. 2014.
"Processing Ducks & Geese." Metzer Farms Processing Waterfowl. Web. 26 Oct. 2014.
2014 Minnesota Waterfowl Hunting. MNDNR, 2014. Web. 26 Oct. 2014.
"Selenium: Benefits, Uses, Side Effects, Dosage, and More." WebMD. WebMD, 13 Dec. 2012.
Web. 27 Oct. 2014.