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Diabolical, Triumph of the Moon, Goetia, Underworld, Magic, Witchcraft & Ghosts

Diabolical, Triumph of the Moon, Goetia, Underworld, Magic, Witchcraft & Ghosts

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Published by Mogg Morgan
Diabolical
edited by Peter Grey & Alkistis Dimech,
Scarlet Imprint Publishing,
Hardback /338pp/ full colour illustrations/£35
no isbn


Ten Years of Triumph of the Moon
edited by Dave Evans & Dave Green,
isbn 9780955523755
Hidden Publishing
Paperback /227pp



The Qliphoth
by Paul A Green,
Libros Liberted Publishing
isbn 9780978186500
Paperback/ 321pp/£10.99


Underworld
by Katherine Sutherland
(illustrated by Alex Singleton)
isbn 9780955685828
Web of Wyrd Press
Paperback/53pp/


Also received and reviewed next time Magic, Witchcraft & Ghosts in the Greek and Roman World a sourcebook prepared by Professor Daniel Ogden, Oxford University Press (The author teaches history of Greek & Roman "necromancy" at Exeter). Billed as an alternative to Georg Luck's earlier collection "Arcana Mundi". The books looks to be mainly as titled, ie material from Greek & Latin Classics, with a smattering of real magick from Egypt. [Mogg]
Diabolical
edited by Peter Grey & Alkistis Dimech,
Scarlet Imprint Publishing,
Hardback /338pp/ full colour illustrations/£35
no isbn


Ten Years of Triumph of the Moon
edited by Dave Evans & Dave Green,
isbn 9780955523755
Hidden Publishing
Paperback /227pp



The Qliphoth
by Paul A Green,
Libros Liberted Publishing
isbn 9780978186500
Paperback/ 321pp/£10.99


Underworld
by Katherine Sutherland
(illustrated by Alex Singleton)
isbn 9780955685828
Web of Wyrd Press
Paperback/53pp/


Also received and reviewed next time Magic, Witchcraft & Ghosts in the Greek and Roman World a sourcebook prepared by Professor Daniel Ogden, Oxford University Press (The author teaches history of Greek & Roman "necromancy" at Exeter). Billed as an alternative to Georg Luck's earlier collection "Arcana Mundi". The books looks to be mainly as titled, ie material from Greek & Latin Classics, with a smattering of real magick from Egypt. [Mogg]

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Published by: Mogg Morgan on Jan 10, 2010
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05/14/2013

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New on my bookshelf I must have received about half a dozen excellent new titles for review: Diabolical edited

by Peter Grey & Alkistis Dimech, Scarlet Imprint Publishing, Hardback /338pp/ full colour illustrations/£35 no isbn Scarlet Imprint's Diabolical is collection of essays on Grimoires, ie ancient & not so ancient books on magick regarded by magicians as the recepticals of the core secrets of the Art. As co-editor Peter Gray comments in his foreword, grimoires are very popular at the moment. I'd also say that collections of essays are popular and have maybe taken the place of the "fanzine". Seems to me that the essays in Diabolical are as good as many trade and academic paperbacks and that there is an potential audience for a slightly cheaper edition. Interesting also that not one of the dozen contributors, apart from the co-editor, is female, which makes me think that the grimoire still very much a male preserve? I wasn't sure if I was going to be that interested in this volume, although I suspect many will be. My own magical work doesn't often impact with the largely medieval grimoire traditions although I am vaguely aware that it is some sort of continuation of the late classical Egyptian magical-religion. But there again one of the first essays is by Paul Hughes-Barlow and concerns the so-called Testament of Solomon - a compilation apparently made and incorporating many manuscripts from Roman Egypt. In other words this is a very early grimoire that still shows its debt to the Kemetic tradition. Paul's Hughes Barlow essays is interesting but maybe a bit short, I hope he will extend his research in a longer work. Aaron Leitch's has contributed an informative essay and study guide to The Book of Sacred Magick of Abramelin the Mage, a book made famous by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. I'd forgotten that Abramelin is said to be an ancient Egyptian adept, a details that would once have been dismissed without much thought. These days the academic consensus is that Egyptian authorship should be taken on face value at least until proved false. If you go with this idea, it becomes clear that the Grimoire are not about the medieval Christian "hell" but really the Egyptian "underworld". Like other grimoires, Abramelin "blurs" the distinction between "high" and "folk" magick. Its techniques require a flexible approach, even in the prelimary setting up and invocations of the daemona. When the work is done, the owner can dispense with the formal ritual, deploying appropriate talisman either secreting them on his or her body, often under one's hat or bonnet. I'm told that grimores have always been popular with folk practitioners, such as "cunning men & women etc, now I understand why. So that's two out of a dozen essays in this collection, so you get the drift, substantial stuff. I'm still contemplating Jake Stratton Kent's very personal take on "Nebiros" which also has a neo-Egyptian theme. . .

Ten Years of Triumph of the Moon edited by Dave Evans & Dave Green, isbn 9780955523755 Hidden Publishing Paperback /227pp Ten Years of Triumph of the Moon is a collection of essays, perhaps even a jubilee

or festshrift for Ronald Hutton and his seminal study of Wicca and Witchcraft. The contributors are an impressive band of occultural scholars from around the globe and present topics such as Geoffrey Samuel's essay From Tantrik Chakra to Wiccan Circle; Sabina Magliocco's Aradia in Sardinia: The Archeology of a Folk Hero and Henry Bogdan, author of the standard bibliography of Kenneth Grant, on The Occult Underground: Strategies for Power & Antinomianism. So its an interesting collection. I might also claim some credit for the title which was one I used for a review article in this very newsletter, generously quoted in co-editor's Dave Evans' foreword.

The Qliphoth by Paul A Green, Libros Liberted Publishing isbn 9780978186500 Paperback/ 321pp/£10.99 The Qliphoth by Paul A Green, is his first venture into occult fiction although his science fiction has been well received and his radio play about the rocket scientist/occultist Jack Parsons was great. Qliphoth is a Hebrew/Kabbalistic concept, literal meaning "shells", a kind of anti-universe. Whenever I think of them I see the world of Jean Cocteau's film Orphee in which the departed live in a faded replica of their former existence, disintergrating though a process of slow inertia. The narration opens at a new age centre somewhere in Devon. Young Lucas is viewing snippets of a TV documentary about his estranged father Nick, who is a 1960s acid casaulty currently incarcerated in a care home at his former wife Pauline's insistance. Lucas wants to see his father. Meanwhile at the care home, we learn of a chain of events that lead to Nick's current predicament, the finding of a collection of magical artefacts belonging to a defunct magical order with strong Crowlesque overtones called the Order of the Brazen Head (perhaps a reference to Francis Bacons wondrous contraption) personally I prefer the Dennis Wheatley school of writing, that uses real characters rather than "joke" names. As the story unfolds Nick is desperate to see his teenage son and give his side of the story before it is too late. I guess the author was aiming for something like the work of Gustav Meyrinck's Golem or even Herman Hesse's Steppenwolf. So Paul Green has set himself a very high bar and now and again reaches it. The bits I enjoyed the most were the less occult passages of Pauline's attempts to live a normal life despite the dark stain of a feckless former husband and missing son. Paul Green doesn't quite deliver for me but nevertheless if you like an occult story with a continuous dreamy occultual flow, this might work for you.

Underworld by Katherine Sutherland (illustrated by Alex Singleton) isbn 9780955685828 Web of Wyrd Press Paperback/53pp/ All aspects of occult publishing seem to be on the ascendent just now - and the many novelists and poets deserve your support. One rising star is the poet

Katherine Sutherland, whose new collection Underworld is a spirited re-imagining of the Inanna mythos accompanied by excellent illustrations from Alex Singleton, rather misleadingly credited as co-author of the book. A fine addition to any aesthete's book shelf. Also received and reviewed next time Magic, Witchcraft & Ghosts in the Greek and Roman World a sourcebook prepared by Professor Daniel Ogden, Oxford University Press (The author teaches history of Greek & Roman "necromancy" at Exeter). Billed as an alternative to Georg Luck's earlier collection "Arcana Mundi". The books looks to be mainly as titled, ie material from Greek & Latin Classics, with a smattering of real magick from Egypt. [Mogg]

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