Running head: MIAA 350 Reflection – 8th-pt.

2

Reflection on Mathematics Lesson – Eighth Grade – pt. 2
Christina L Hambleton
Teacher’s College of San Joaquin
November 28th, 2014

Abstract

The following written reflection analyzes a mathematics lesson given my class of eighth grade
students. The lesson objective was to solve equations with variables on both sides. Students had
previously mastered solving linear equations with variables on one side. My strategies for this
lesson was to first provide review equations of previous work and then segway into solving
linear equations with variables on both sides. Worksheets, group activities, and quizzes were
used for this lesson instruction.

Reflection on Mathematics Lesson – Eighth Grade
Our class had previously learned and mastered the ability to solve linear equations with
variables on one side. When the next lesson called for solving equations with variables on both
sides, I thought it would be quick to instruct and allowed two days in my planner for the
mastering of the objective. It is now three weeks later, and I am still looking at the majority of
my students failing the quizzes.
My first strategy was to review the previous lesson of solving equations with variables on
one side. I wrote problems on the board. Students were selected randomly (after provided ample
time to solve) to solve the answer on the board. All students understood the problems and
correctly answered the problems.
I then explained how now we were going to add a 2nd variable to the equation, but use the
same processes to solve. I wrote examples on the board. I checked for comprehension.
Everything seemed fine. I then passed out a worksheet for students to complete either by
themselves on with a partner (their choice). After 15 minutes, I randomly selected students to
solve the problems on the board. It was a complete disaster. The 2nd variable through a gigantic
wrench into their ability to solve the problems. They had huge difficulty understanding how and
where to move it.
Over the next few weeks, I demonstrated numerous written examples on the board, of
which they write in their math notebooks. I provided multiple worksheets and quizzes to check
for comprehension. We did individual work. We did group work. We did board work. Yet, the
last quiz produced only eight students who passed.

Upon reviewing the student work, here is what I can infer:
1. Students who write down their steps in a neat and systematic manner are able to solve the

problems correctly.
2. Students who do not write down each step clearly are not able to solve the problems

correctly
3. Students are making mistakes when they divide/multiply/add/subtract positive and

negative integers.

4. Students are making mistakes when they need to divide/multiply/add/subtract decimals

and fractions

.

My next lesson will begin with (another) refresher lesson on decimals, fractions, and
positive/negative integers. After which, we will have group solving of the previously delivered
quiz. Students will be called on randomly to solve each step as I write them down on the board.
We do this process frequently and students respond positively. It also ensures engagement
throughout the lesson. In addition, the next quiz I give them will have lines for which they are to
write each step. I’m hoping that this added organizer will assist those who are being sloppy or
are confused in the process.