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Names Sydney Rogan, Alan Ezcurra, and Nat Block.

Per 4
10/30/14
UV Bead Lab
Problem/Background: UV radiation is wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation.
There are many harmful results of UV radiation, but not very many people consider
the beneficial results. Harmful results include sunburn, skin cancer, premature
ageing, and wrinkling. Although, it may not seem like there are any, there is a
beneficial result to UV radiation. That result is an increase in vitamin D that people
receive from the sun. From sun exposure, peoples bodies produce more vitamin D,
which helps for healthy bones. The government recommends that the people use
SPF 15 sunscreen or higher for protection against the sun. Sunscreen is not the only
way to protect against UV radiation, though. Although, it is an extremely helpful way,
there are other ways that people protect themselves from the sun. People wear tight
clothing, wear hats, wear sunglasses, and limit exposure when UV rays are most
intense in the day. All of these ways are great to protect against UV radiation. This
experiment if the depth of water affects UV radiation is something that our group has
researched, as well. We found from multiple sources that depth of water can
decrease the amount of UV rays and fish can even be sunburned. However, fish can
be sunburned in only very rare occurrences. This information help us make an
inference as to how our experiment will go.
Question: Does changing the depth of water in a container affect the amount of UV
rays?
Hypothesis: Changing the depth of water in a container will decrease the amount of
UV rays.
Materials: Container, water, beads, tape, washers, petri dish, and the sun.
Procedures:
1. Fill two containers with beads.
2. Put both containers in two separate buckets.
3. Put a washer on both containers of beads to keep it from floating.
4. Put tape around the buckets so its only coming from direct sunlight.
5. Slowly fill one with water 14 cm down.
6. Slowly fill the other one with water 8 cm down.
7. Observe the changes in color in the beads to see if the depth of water affects
the amount of UV rays.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Procedure for second experiment:
1. Fill two containers with beads.
2. Put both containers in two separate buckets.
3. Put a washer on both containers of beads to keep it from floating.
4. Put tape around the buckets so its only coming from direct sunlight.
5. Fill one with water 14cm down.
6. Fill the other with water 8cm down.

Rogan, Sydney

Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 3:00:44 PM Pacific Daylight Time

70:56:81:af:d7:ab

7. Bring in another set of beads in a petri dish.


8. Dont have any water in the third set.
9. Put tape around the petri dish, so it is only direct sunlight.
10. Observe changes from the ones with water and the one without water to see
if the depth of water affects the amount of UV rays.
Controlled Variables: We controlled the variables of the depth of water and that the
there was only direct sunlight.
What were testing: We are testing how the depth of water affects the amount UV
rays.
Tests we Conducted: We conducted two tests. One between 14 cm of depth of
water and 8 cm of depth of water. And the other one was the same experiment
except we also added a container of beads without water.
Control Group: During the second procedure, we had one set of beads in a petri
dish without any water on it to see the difference. We put tape around it to protect it
from anything but direct sunlight. We didnt change this set of beads and we left it in
the petri dish.
Protecting Beads:We protected the beads from receiving light from other directions
by putting tape around and the under the buckets and petri dish.
Data: before experiment day set up data tables for recording your data
Time (s) Depth of water (cm) UV level
15s
0cm
5
15s
8cm
5
15s
14cm
3
25s
0cm
6
25s
8cm
6
25s
14cm
4
Graph:

Rogan, Sydney

Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 3:00:44 PM Pacific Daylight Time

70:56:81:af:d7:ab

Depth of Water Affecting UV Rays


6

UV level

0, 5

8, 5

4
3

14, 3

2
1
0
0

10

12

14

16

Depth of Water (cm)

Analyze and Conclude


As a class we experimented on the amount of UV rays by conducting
several different tests. In this lab, our group tested if the depth of water made a
difference to the amount of UV rays that reached the bottom. Our hypothesis was
that changing the amount of water in a container will decrease the amount of UV
rays. Our data supports our hypothesis that an increase in depth of water will
decrease the amount of UV rays because 14cm of water took longer for the UV rays
to hit the beads in the petri dish. This is shown because at 15s the one without water
and the one with only 8cm of water were at the UV level of 5 when the one with
14cm of water was only at 3. This shows our hypothesis was correct, and the depth
of water causes a decrease in time for the UV rays to reach the bottom of the water.
Different articles on the Internet have said to have reached the same conclusion that
our group did. The experiments we found on the Internet had all come to the
conclusion that the depth of water will decrease the amount of UV rays. We found
that the deeper the water is the less UV rays reach the bottom as said from many
other experiments that were conducted. In our lab, a limitation to our experiment and
data was that we couldnt have very deep buckets to analyze how far UV rays can
reach in water. The buckets we used didnt have enough room to have a lot of depth
of water, but enough to conduct the experiment and receive accurate data. Some
other experiments used the ocean and deep water to get their data. One of these
websites even researched on how UV rays reach animal life underwater. They
discussed how in rare circumstances, fish can get sunburned and hurt their scales
and lose color. This shows that while our experiment answered our question, it only
answered it to an extent because of how deep we could make our water. Throughout
our research, we have discovered many ways to protect against UV exposure. Our
lab shows that water will help against UV exposure, but of course there are many
other ways, too. It is recommended to wear tight clothing, hats, sunglasses, and
sunscreen. Also, to limit exposure when UV rays are most intense in the day from 10
AM to 4 PM. In conclusion, the depth of water did affect the amount of UV light that

Rogan, Sydney

Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 3:00:44 PM Pacific Daylight Time

70:56:81:af:d7:ab

reached the bottom of the container. And our group came to the conclusion that the
deeper the water is the less UV rays reach the bottom of the container.

Bibliography:
Works Cited
"Information | University of Guelph." Information | University of Guelph. Web. 29 Oct.
2014.
"Protecting Yourself in the Sun." Protecting Yourself in the Sun. Web. 28 Oct. 2014.
"Skin Cancer Foundation." Prevention Guidelines. Web. 26 Oct. 2014.
"Ultraviolet Radiation: How It Affects Life on Earth : Feature Articles." Ultraviolet
Radiation: How It Affects Life on Earth : Feature Articles. Web. 28 Oct. 2014.
"Ultraviolet Radiation." Ultraviolet Radiation. Web. 29 Oct. 2014.
"UV Radiation | SunWise | US EPA." EPA. Environmental Protection Agency. Web. 26
Oct. 2014.

Rogan, Sydney

Thursday, October 30, 2014 at 3:00:44 PM Pacific Daylight Time

70:56:81:af:d7:ab