P. 1
Zbigniew Brzezinski - Between Two Ages

Zbigniew Brzezinski - Between Two Ages

4.75

|Views: 15,121|Likes:
Published by Mr Singh
www.cuttingthroughthematrix.com
www.cuttingthroughthematrix.com

More info:

Published by: Mr Singh on Apr 12, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/29/2015

pdf

text

original

With the growth in the West of man's ability to master his environment, secular rationalism,
accompanied by a greater awareness of social complexity as well as by a breakdown in the existing structure of
religious allegiance, emerged to challenge institutionalized religion. That religious allegiance simultaneously
rested on the narrowness and on the universalism of man's horizons: the narrowness derived from massive
ignorance, illiteracy, and a vision confined to the immediate environment by limited communications; the
universalism was provided by the acceptance of the idea that man's destiny is essentially in God's hands and that
the limited present is but a steppingstone to an unlimited future. Emerging secularism challenged both
dimensions, and in so doing required for the external projection of man's identity an intermediary focus of
loyalty—something in between the immediate and the infinite. The nation­state and nationalism were the re­
sponses.
The doctrine of sovereignty created the institutional basis for challenging the secular authority of established
religion, and this challenge in turn paved the way for the emergence of the abstract conception of the nation­
state. Sovereignty vested in the people, instead of sovereignty vested in the king, was the consummation of the
process which in the two centuries preceding the French and American revolutions radically altered the structure
of authority in the West *

and prepared the ground for a new dominant concept of reality. The nation­state
became simultaneously the embodiment of personal commitments and the point of departure for analyzing
reality. This development marked a new phase in man's political consciousness.
Nationalism did not seek to direct the individual toward the infinite, but to activate the impersonal
masses for the sake of immediately proximate goals. Paradoxically, these concrete goals were derived from the
still intangible and transcendental, though new, object of worship: the nation. The nation became the source of
ecstatic, lyrical affection, and it was this highly emotional relationship, symbolized by the new anthems ("La
Marseillaise"), flags, and heroes, that served to energize the populace. The concrete goals took the form of
massive preoccupation with frontiers, irredenta, "brethren" to be regained from foreign captivity, and, more
generally, the power and the glory of the state as the formal expression of the nation. The state thus became the
institutional form for the new dominant belief, with a monopolistic claim on the active dedication to it of man,
now designated, first and above all, as the citizen.
The designation "man the citizen" symbolically marks another milestone in the evolution of man as a
social being. Equality before God was now matched by equality before the law; spiritual egalitarianism was now
reinforced by legal egalitarianism. It is of note that legal equality was asserted both by the American Revolution,
which supplemented its stress on equality before the law with a strong attachment to religious values—indeed, it
derived the former from the latter—and by the French Revolution, which constructed its pantheon of human
equality by explicitly rejecting the religious tradition. In both cases the legal equality of the citizen was
postulated as a universal principle—and thus it marked another giant step in the progressive redefinition of man's
nature and place in our world.

With nationalism, the distinction between the inner contemplative man, concerned with his relationship
to God, and the external man, concerned with shaping his environment, became blurred. Nationalism as an
ideology was more activist; man's relations to man were objectivized externally by legal norms and were not
dependent, as was man's relation to God, on personal conscience; yet at the same time the definition of man as a
"national" was based largely on abstract, historically determined, and highly emotional criteria. This outlook
involved considerable vagueness and even irrationality when used as a conceptual framework within which
relations between nations and developments within nations might be understood. Nationalism only partially
increased men's self­awareness; it mobilized them actively but failed to challenge their critical faculties; it was
more a mass vehicle for human passion and fantasizing than a conceptual framework that made it possible to

*

"In both its religious and its secular versions, in Filmer as well as in Hobbes, the import of the new doctrine of sovereignty was the
subject's absolute duty of obedience to his king. Both doctrines helped political modernization by legitimizing the concentration of authority
and the breakdown of the medieval pluralistic political order. They were the seventeenth­century counterparts of the theories of party
supremacy and national sovereignty which are today employed to break down the authority of traditional local, tribal, and religious bodies. In
the seventeenth century, mass participation in politics still lay in the future; hence rationalization of authority meant concentration of power
in the absolute monarch. In the twentieth century, the broadening of participation and the rationalization of authority occur simultaneously,
and hence authority must be concentrated in either a political party or in a popular charismatic leader, both of which are capable of arousing
the masses as well as challenging traditional sources of authority. But in the seventeenth century the absolute monarch was the functional
equivalent of the twentieth century's monolithic party" (Huntington, p. 102).

­ 34 ­

dissect and then deliberately reassemble our reality.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->