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Student Portfolio Semester Unit Guide

Catherine M Sewall
Assessment Techniques - Asssessment for Student Learning
July 6, 2014

Abstract

Art education faces a problem when it comes to assessing students in their artwork. Most
often people think that art is so subjective, no one person can properly assess or provide
proper feedback without destroying a childs creativity and imagination. In this unit plan,
I provide a variety of assessments that have students relying on their own self reflections
along with peer, parent and teacher feedback utilizing a process-portfolio to collect
evidence of student growth and learning.

Student Portfolio Semester Unit Guide


Understanding by Design

VITAL INFORMATION
Author Cate Sewall (CateSewall@gmail.com)
Subject Visual Arts
Topic or Unit of Study Student Process Portfolio
Grade/Level Grade Six
Summary Students will maintain a working, process portfolio of their artwork over the
course of one semester. The portfolio will include all brainstorms, homework
assignments, unfinished along with finished works of art, and
student/peer/teacher/parent reflections. Students will maintain a table of contents,
their personal grades and records, and be prepared to hold a parent/teacher
conference or gallery walk of their most successful work.

STANDARDS
1.1 The Creative Process All students will demonstrate an understanding
of the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art.
1.3 Performance All students will synthesize those skills, media, methods,
and technologies appropriate to creating, performing, and/or presenting
works of art.
1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies All students will
demonstrate and apply an understanding of arts philosophies, judgment, and
analysis to works of art.

STAGE 1 - DESIRED RESULTS


Established Goals
Students will build and develop art skills, terminology, and reflect upon
their progress as an artist, creative problem solver and independent
learner.
Maintain and record their progress, growth and development as an
artist
Overarching Understandings
Art is personal and should reflect the interests, feelings or ideas of the
artist.
Interesting art comes from divergent and independent thinking.
The elements and principles of design (EPD) are the basic building
blocks of every artwork.
Self-reflection, planning and practice are important components in
every work of art.
Related Misconceptions
Most talented people are born with it or you cannot learn how to
create art.
This is not accurate. Just as you can learn to read, walk or solve math
problems, you can learn to create and express yourself through your art.
Essential Questions
What inspires, motivates or moves you to create?
How can artists solve problems and express themselves creatively?
How can you think independently?
How can you develop your ideas?
How can the Elements and Principles of Design (EPD) enhance your
artwork?

Were you reflective about the process of your artwork?

Knowledge (Students will know)


How to recognize and recall the EPD (shape form line value texture color
space emphasis balance unity contrast movement rhythm pattern)
Reflection is necessary to grow
Skills (Students will be able to)
Apply the EPD in their own works of art
Create several works of art and write about the process they used to create it
Provide and receive constructive criticism concerning artwork
Develop a list of ideas that motivate and inspire them
Analyze the creative process
Develop ideas through the brainstorming process
o Create a list of ideas using MOI (Memory Observation Imagination)
o Draw a thumbnail sketch of favorite ideas
o Choose favorite and make revisions
Display their personal artwork and provide constructive criticism to peers

STAGE 2: Assessment Evidence

Performance Task Description: Gallery Walk


Students will maintain a working portfolio throughout the year,
reflect on each piece, then display what they think are their three
most successful works of art. Students will then create a gallery
experience by displaying their artwork for feedback and discussion
with their peers.
Purpose - Both self-reflection and peer reflection are very important in the
process of creating a work of art. How can you improve if you dont look at
what youve done? The purpose of this exercise is to reflect on artwork and
find out what students have done well and what they can improve on.
Students will choose their most successful works of art and create a
gallery for peer and teacher critique.
Artists will speak with peer art critics about their work as they walk
through the Gallery providing constructive criticism about artwork.
o Two Stars and a Wish
o Silent Critique
o Compliment sandwiches
Goal Students will reflect upon and assess their learning through peer
critique.
Student Role - Artist
Audience Peers as art critics
Product/Performance
Students will walk through the gallery and speak with artists about
their artwork focusing on the creative process and the EPD. Students
can write feedback on post-its and leave it to help peers recall critique.
Standards
1.1 The Creative Process - All students will demonstrate an understanding of
the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art.
1.3 Performance - All students will synthesize those skills, media, methods,

and technologies appropriate to creating, performing, and/or presenting


works of art.
1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies - All students will
demonstrate and apply an understanding of arts philosophies, judgment, and
analysis to works of art.

Gallery Walk Guidelines

Be positive and kind


Use Two Stars and a Wish to focus your conversation
Focus on the elements and principles of design
Be specific in your feedback
Speak about what caught your attention
Talk to your peer about something you learned about them
Listen to your peer speak about their work
Thank them for sharing their artwork with you

Gallery Walk Reflection


Peer Feedback
Your name
Date
1. My peers noted the following strengths in my artwork:
2. Here are some suggestions my peers made to improve my artwork:
3. Based on the above feedback, here is a goal I want to reach:
4. Specific ways I can reach my goal:

STAGE 3: Semester Learning Plan


Suggested portfolio contents and sequencing
Diagnostic Assessment
o EPD Test

o Two Point Perspective drawing using the EPD


Creativity Crushers
o Free draw that focuses on creativity and originality by avoiding
clich symbols such as lollipop trees, M mountains, V birds,
corner suns, etc
Assessment Compliment sandwich
Elements and Principles of Design
o Learn the EPD
o Create an acronym using the EPD for memory
o Create a drawing of the acronym incorporating EPD
o Observe and find the EPD in famous works of art
Assessment Peer Review
Brainstorming through MOI Memory Observation Imagination
o How do we come up with creative and original ideas?
o Create a list of MOIs with accompanying thumbnail sketches
o Revision and creation of free draw utilizing EPD
Assessment Self Reflection
Snowmen at Night value/shape vs form/movement/texture/balance/color
o Create a snowman at night doing one of your favorite hobbies
o Shade sphere using hatching and cross-hotching
o Observe highlights and shadows of a sphere
o Observe and apply atmospheric perspective techniques
Assessment Artist Statement
Pop-up Watercolor Dragon Painting
o How do we draw anything using basic shapes to start
o Background is important
Assessment Artist Statement, Two stars and a wish
2 Point Perspective
o Learning proper techniques to create 3D drawings
o Utilize all techniques learned throughout the semester to design
a city/treehouse/house
Assessment Artist Statement
Model Magic Sculpture
o 3D sculpture of a dragon EPD work in sculpture as well
Assessment Peer Review, Teacher Discussion
Gallery Walk Portfolio Assessment

PORTFOLIO COVER SHEET


Artists Name
Homeroom Teacher

Date
Complet
ed

Artwork Title

Reflection

Student Teacher
Grade
Grade

Providing an organization tool such as a portfolio cover sheet allows for students
to take ownership of their record keeping and help them manage their time, what projects
or assignments they may be missing, or still need to complete. It helps students learn to
become more independent and self-reliant, an important 21st century skill. Ownership is
important. If students perceive that the folders are not really theirs, but yours, they may
act as unpaid aides rather than learners setting their own goals, assessing their own
progress, and sharing that information with you and others (Davies, n.d.)

Davies , A. (n.d.). Facilitating Children's Self-Assessment.


Name
HR Teacher

Artist Statement
Project Title ___________________________________________________________
My strengths on this project were (be specific)
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
One thing I would change is
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
because
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
List the elements and principles of design you successfully used in your
artwork.
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Where did you get your idea(s) from? What inspired you?
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Reflection

Artists often write an artist statement to help convey the process used to create
their artwork, help set the tone or mood in their work, or in some way help their audience
connect with their piece. Students often have a hard time knowing where to start or what
to write about. Being reflective and focusing on the strengths of their artwork or what
they could change for next time helps them to assess the work in a specific area in terms
of its quality, and then set a short-term goal for the next piece of work in the same area
(Davies) .
When students metacognitively reflect on each piece within the larger process
portfolio, students are held accountable for their own learning and can further develop
their skills and understanding of the topics and techniques being learned. They begin to
understand themselves better as learners and their own thinking process. (RolheiserBennett, 2000). Accountability for individual student learning involves looking at the
evidence with learners, making sense of it in terms of student strengths, areas needing
improvement, and helping students learn ways to self-monitor their way to success.
(Davies, 2003).

Davies, A, & Le Mahieu, P. (2003). Assessment for learning: reconsidering portfolios


and research evidence. In M. Segers, F. Dochy, & E. Cascallar (Eds.),!Innovation
and Change in Professional Education: Optimising New Modes of Assessment: In
Search of Qualities and Standards (p. 141-169).!Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic
Publishers.
Rolheiser-Bennett, N. C., Bower, B., & Stevahn, L. (2000). The portfolio organizer:

Succeeding with portfolios in your classroom. Alexandria, Va: Association for


Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Characteristics of Creativity

Think about ideas in original ways


Ask new questions to build upon an idea
Brainstorming multiple ideas and solutions to problems
Communicates ideas in new and innovative ways

Very Creative
Ideas and
Contexts

Creative

Ordinary

Limited

Artwork created
presents a wide
variety of four or
more original
ideas from a
variety of
contexts.

Artwork
created
presents a
variety of
three original
ideas from a
variety of
contexts.

Artwork
created
presents tow
ideas that
demonstrate
original
thought from
one or two
different
contexts.

Artwork
created
presents ideas
that do not
show a variety
of contexts or
are unoriginal
in design.

Sources

Artwork created
draws on a wide
variety of five or
more sources such
as memory,
observation,
photos, books,
and/or internet
resources.

Artwork
created draws
on two varied
sources.

Artwork is
limited to one
source.

Something
New

Artwork introduces
a new and useful
application of
ideas or
techniques. This

Artwork
created draws
on a wide
variety of four
or more
sources such
as memory,
observation,
photos, books,
and/or
internet
resources.
Artwork
introduces a
new
application of
content that

Artwork was
created as the
intended
purpose.

Created
artwork does
not serve as
intended
purpose.

artwork may build


upon previous
ideas and
techniques but is
well developed in
a new and
interesting way.

may build on
previous ideas
by creating a
new solution
to a project.

Reflection
Creativity is a 21st century skill that can be taught, learned and assessed by
providing a rubric for students to use with their in-class and homework assignments prior
to starting the assignment. If teachers involve the students in the learning process by
making them aware of your teaching goals and aligning those goal with how the students
will be assessed , the guess-work is taken out of the equation and students can make
informed decisions about how they can begin to think and create artwork creatively.
Providing specific charachteristics
Creative thinking and reasoning have been identified and highlighted as an
essential twenty-first-century skill by many business, education, community and
government leaders. As our children grow and develop, introducing them to the idea that
the arts involve creative problem solving will teach them how to manage frustration,
uncertainty and ambiguity with innovative ideas and solutions. Through the arts, our
children can learn how to express their unique identities, while simultaneously
developing habits of mind that will help them succeed anywhere, from the playground to
the workplace. (Robertson, 2013)

Lewis , A. D. (2013). Assessment Techniques: Student Learning Guiding Instruction.

NJ: LAD Custom Publishing, Inc.


Robertson , K. O. (2013, March). The Arts and Creative Problem Solving . Education .
PBS Parents | PBS. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/musicarts/the-arts-and-creative-problem-solving/
MY ART PORTFOLIO
Name
Date
HR Teacher

My portfolio is organized by

My portfolio shows that I

My best piece of artwork is

My favorite piece of artwork is

The piece that shows my best effort is

I want you to notice

I think I have grown in

Next year I plan to work on

Artists signature ________________________________________

Reflection
Providing students with the opportunity to choose their favorite works in their
portfolio and speak to their strengths and favorite pieces provides a window into
students heads and hearts (Rolheiser, 2000). Taking the time to write thoughtfully about
their artwork prior to sharing their ideas with peers, parents or teachers provides them
with the think time necessary to make connections to their own learning.
Success is a powerful motivator and student reflection on their long-term
processfolio can help them see evidence that these goals are attainable. (RolheiserBennett, 2000). Celebrating student success followed by thoughtful improvement plans
and goals will help learners find success in the art classroom. Unrecorded goals are not
particularly helpful. In the hectic pace of a classroom and with all that transpires in one
day, oral comments may be forgotten or misinterpreted. When learners can refer back to
the recorded goals they can more easily assess their progress and achievements.
(Rolheiser, 2000)

Rolheiser-Bennett, N. C., Bower, B., & Stevahn, L. (2000). The portfolio organizer:

Succeeding with portfolios in your classroom. Alexandria, Va: Association for


Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Parent/Guardian Artwork Review


Please take a few minutes to look over your students artwork and
record some of your observations.

Student Name
Name of Reviewer
Date

1. Please record two successes or sources of pride as you review


your childs artwork.

2. Please record one wish for your childs growth in the art
classroom.

Reflection

The most effective way for students to talk and reflect about their artwork is
often social/collaborative. Social activity is an essential part of reflective practice; by
reflecting together occasionally, students can begin to understand their own learning in
relationship to other peoples learning styles and experiences. (Morris, n.d.)
Including parents in the reflection process of art room, focusing on positive
comments and constructive conversations can help students and parents communicate
about the progress of the student and the process they went through. Not only does this
help students share their experiences with their parents, but it helps parents better
understand what is happening in the art room. A large obstacle for art teachers is breaking
old stereotypes that art cannot be learned but people are born with the ability to be
creative or create a good work of art. Having their children educate them on their own
learning process can help break that chain while also having a child reinforce that they
have learned and how they have grown in their art education.

Morris , G. (n.d.). Center for Writing University of Michigan. Retrieved from


http://www.lsa.umich.edu/UMICH/sweetland/Home/Instructors/Teaching
%20Resources/Metacognition.pdf
Name
Homeroom
Portfolio Assessment - Holistic
Exceeds Expectations
3

Meets expectations
2

Student portfolio is
organized with a table
of contents reflecting
student projects, selfgrading and
homework
assignments
throughout the
semester. Each piece
shows planning and
self- reflection.
Artwork displays
growth, originality and
creativity - reflecting
the interests and life
of the artist. Use of
elements and
principles of design to
create artwork is
prevalent. There is
evidence of student
effort and
perseverance.

Student portfolio is
organized with a table
of contents reflecting
student projects, selfgrading and
homework
assignments. Most
pieces show evidence
of planning and selfreflection. Artwork
demonstrates
evidence of growth,
originality and
creativity reflecting
the interests and life
of the artist. Use of
the elements and
principles of design to
create artwork are
present. There is
evidence of student
effort.

Student reflection:

Does not meet


expectations
1
Student portfolio has
no evidence of
organization and has a
limited table of
contents, few
completed homework
assignments. Student
work shows little or no
planning or selfreflection. Artwork
shows no growth, no
creativity and ideas
are not original.
Artwork does not
reflect interests or life
of artist. Little or no
elements and
principles of design
are evident in artwork.
There is little effort
and incomplete work.

Teacher comments:

Reflection

Providinganoverarchingholisticrubricforstudentstolookattheirportfolioasa
wholehelpsdefineclearcriteriaforwhichstudentswillbeassessed.(Lewis,2013)
Studentswillreceivetherubricinthebeginningoftheportfolioprocessinorderforthem
tobecomemoreinvolvedintheprocess.Foroptimumlearningtooccurstudentsneedto
beinvolvedintheclassroomassessmentprocess.Whenstudentsareinvolvedinthe
assessmentprocesstheyaremotivatedtolearn.Thisappearstobeconnectedtochoice
andtheresultingownership.Whenstudentsareinvolvedintheassessmentprocessthey
learnhowtothinkabouttheirlearningandhowtoselfassesskeyaspectsofmeta
cognition.Learnersconstructtheirownunderstandingstherefore,learninghowtolearn
becominganindependent,selfdirected,lifelonglearnerinvolveslearninghowto
assessandlearningtouseassessmentinformationandinsightstoadjustlearning
behaviorsandimproveperformance.(DaviesMahieu,2003)

Davies,A,&LeMahieu,P.(2003).Assessmentforlearning:reconsideringportfolios
andresearchevidence.InM.Segers,F.Dochy,&E.Cascallar(Eds.),!Innovationand
ChangeinProfessionalEducation:OptimisingNewModesofAssessment:InSearchof
QualitiesandStandards(p.141169).!Dordrecht:KluwerAcademicPublishers.
References:

Davies , A. (n.d.). Facilitating Children's Self-Assessment.


Davies, A, & Le Mahieu, P. (2003). Assessment for learning: reconsidering portfolios
and research evidence. In M. Segers, F. Dochy, & E. Cascallar (Eds.),!Innovation
and Change in Professional Education: Optimising New Modes of Assessment: In
Search of Qualities and Standards (p. 141-169).!Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic
Publishers.
Lewis , A. D. (2013). Assessment Techniques: Student Learning Guiding Instruction.
NJ: LAD Custom Publishing, Inc.
Miller , A. (2013, March). Yes, You Can Teach and Assess Creativity! | Edutopia.
Retrieved from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/you-can-teach-assess-creativityandrew-miller
Morris , G. (n.d.). Center for Writing University of Michigan. Retrieved from
http://www.lsa.umich.edu/UMICH/sweetland/Home/Instructors/Teaching
%20Resources/Metacognition.pdf
Robertson , K. O. (2013, March). The Arts and Creative Problem Solving . Education .

PBS Parents | PBS. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/musicarts/the-arts-and-creative-problem-solving/


Rolheiser-Bennett, N. C., Bower, B., & Stevahn, L. (2000). The portfolio organizer:
Succeeding with portfolios in your classroom. Alexandria, Va: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Whitman , G. (2014, June 17). Assessment, Choice, and the Learning Brain | Edutopia.
Retrieved from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/assessment-choice-and-learningbrain-glenn-whitman