And more……

What does Email Etiquette
Mean?
ETIQUETTE = Acceptable Behaviour

Formal vs. Informal
Emails
Emailing a friend or classmate is different than emailing:

A parent’s friend
Your manager at work
A teacher or coach
Someone you don’t know very well, especially an adult

Question For the Class
What are some things that
you should avoid doing
when sending a FORMAL
EMAIL?

Tip #1:
Don’t
Overuse
Capital
Avoid overusing
capital letters,
because:
Letters

USING ALL CAPITAL LETTERS MAKES IT
LOOK LIKE YOU’RE SHOUTING

So does over punctuating!!!!!!!?!?!??!

(Try to avoid this as well)

Tip #2: Use capital
letters
and punctuation
Not using capitalization
or punctuation makes
e-mail hard to read and understand
properly
hey man im going to the game will you come
today will i see you

Tip #3: Avoid Abbreviations,
Write Out all Words Fully and
Spell out words properly, as abbreviations
Properly
look sloppy and can be difficult to understand
do u wanna join da game 2day bro?
btw we r playing at 2, c u there
lol some 1 lost there shoe last time
ttyl

Tip #4:
Edit for Spelling and
Imagn u emaild someone looking for a job.
Grammar

Wood they take you seriasly if this waz ur email
to them?

Tip #5: Format Your
Emails
Some emails are hard to read because they lack
proper spacing and formatting. All the
information is jumbled together. For example,
there are no spaces between paragraphs, and
information that the sender hopes will get
noticed does not stick out properly. This is
something that should be kept in mind.

Format your Emails
However, a properly formatted email allows the
(Continued)
information to be read more easily.
Important information can also be bolded.
If you think someone might miss something important,
feel free to underline it.
Or feel free to use point form, because:

- It makes it easier for the reader to follow
- It makes it easier for you to organize your
thoughts

More on Formatting
Formal Emails should have a proper greeting and
closing.
The greeting should contain a Dear Mr. or Dear Ms.
The closing should include a Yours truly, Sincerely,
or Thanks

Example
To: Dfinch@kidsfortoday.org
From: jwu@kebnet.ca
Subject: Volunteer Experience
Dear Mr. Finch,
Thank you so much for giving me the opportunity to volunteer at Kids For Today.
I truly enjoyed working with your staff and clients, and appreciated the
welcoming atmosphere.
If it’s okay with you, I’d like to keep in touch regarding future volunteer
opportunities.
Sincerely,
Jane Wu

Tip #6
Have
aanFormal
Email
Don’t use
informal email address when
sending a formal email
Address
i.e. greendayrocks@hebnet.ca
sillybilly103@tv.net
Use your name in the email address:
i.e.
lesleyspears@gnat.org
johnhanson@york.net

Tip
#7
In group
emails, people often hit REPLY ALL when
they mean to just hit REPLY.
Be Careful Who you
Example:
Email
To: broda@gnet.org; cody_ridelle@hnet.ca;
crichie@jdag.org;
Subject: Weekend Retreat 2012

Hey Bob, isn’t Cody such a jerk? I totally hated
his last email. Let’s not invite him this weekend.

Including Others on Your
Emails
You can CC (Carbon Copy) someone on an
email that you feel they should be seeing,
even if the email is not written to them
directly
You can BCC (Blind Carbon Copy) someone on
an email that you feel they should be seeing,
but you don’t want others to see their name
on the list of recipients.

Example of CC and BCC
To: jasonrodda@qmail.net
From: samhenderson@coolnet.com
CC: markcohen@gnet.ca
BCC: emmadougal@tellnet.ca
Subject: Basketball Team
Hey Jason,
I got Mark’s email regarding basketball signup for this year. I’ll
register online when I get hope from work today.
Take Care,
Sam

CC and BCC (Continued)
When Jason gets the email, he cannot see that
Emma was BCC’d on it:
To: jasonrodda@qmail.net
From: samhenderson@coolnet.com
CC: markcohen@gnet.ca
Subject: Basketball Team
Hey Jason,
I got Mark’s email regarding basketball signup for this year. I’ll register
online when I get hope from work today.
Take Care,
Sam

Tip #8: Be Careful of
Hackers
and Scams!
Unwanted email
 Phishing

Emails that appear to be from legitimate websites and
businesses, requesting personal or financial information
The real senders are hackers trying to steal your passwords,
information, or money!

 Spam

The email equivalent of “junk mail”
Some are legitimate advertisements, while some are phishing
scams.

 Viruses

Harmful software installed on your computer without your
knowledge or consent
Often used to cause harm to your computer or steal passwords.

Is this a real email from your
bank?

Or is it a phishing scam?
Wording to make
you feel that you
have to comply or
you cannot access
your money.

No specific time
to comply
Leaves no way to contact
someone to verify
authenticity.

Should I Open This
Attachment?

Or is it a potential virus?
When you hover
over links you see
that they don’t go
to where you
expect them.

Never open an
attachment from
someone you do not
know.

NEVER give someone your
user ID and password via
e-mail

Email Safety Tips
Never give out your username and password to

anyone
Never open attachments from senders you are
unsure about
Never reply to emails from senders you are unsure
about
Move all spam emails to your email program’s SPAM
or JUNK box, or delete them
Be careful of emails that appear to be from your bank
No one legitimate will EVER ask you to email them a
password, username, account number, etc.