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Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem

CHAPTER 1- HOTEL DESIGN


The design of a Hotel is one of the major considerations in planning of efficient Hotel. While
designing the Hotel following factors should be kept in mind:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Attractive appearance
Efficient plan
Location
Suitable material
Workmanship
Sound financing
Competent Management

Developing an efficient design is a complex sequential process requiring intense interaction of many
professionals to successfully planned, designed and operate all facilities. The result of participation will surface
following decisions: i)
Manage all services
ii)
Prepare a programme defining requirements for all services and operations
iii)
Apply principles of design and layout to service facilities
iv)
Select most appropriate equipment for all services provided by the Hotel
These design programmes will fall into two basic categories i.e.
1.
2.

Guiding programme
Confirming programme

Guiding Programme:
Guiding programme will be written prior to undertaking design process. The programme inputs will be
gathered all appropriate sources.

Confirming Programme:
This programme will be written after the facility design process is well under way which contains both
basic criteria and describe design philosophy, constrain and capability to develop. This programme is
used to provide with all available information to the designer. A working copy of the programme is to
be continuously updated during design process.

The following design consideration is to be kept in mind:


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Attractive appearance
Efficient plan
Location
Suitable material
Workmanship
Sound financing
Competent Management

1.

Attractive appearance:
All over appearance of a Hotel is one of the very important considerations for a Hotel. It should be
attractive and should reflect the architecture of that area and should also have character of the services
being provided in that Hotel.
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Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem


2.

Efficient Plan:
The plan of the Hotel should be such that it should be functional and also appeal to the eye. All the
services should be so designed that it meets various principles of layout and design.

3.

Location:
The design of the Hotel will be guided by the geographical location of the Hotel e.g. if a Hotel is
situated near the airport or railway station, the reception of the Hotel will be designed in such a way
that it could handle large number of guests at one time because there is a possibility of guest checking
in large groups and around the clock. Similarly, Hotel situated at hill stations, beaches and the Hotels
located in heart of the cities and metros will be designed differently.

4.

Suitable Material:
The Hotel should be designed in such a way that it should be able to use the material locally available,
which will be cost effective and efficient.

5.

Workmanship:

6.

While designing a Hotel one should consider the fact that what kind of workmanship is available and
designer should take advantage of local expertise. This will not only make the hotel efficient but also
will be economical.
Sound Financing:
One of the very important factors is finance in designing the Hotel. The availability of ready funds and
management of finance is a crucial factor and it should be considered very carefully in Hotel Design.
Competent Management:

7.

The design of a Hotel will depend upon the quality of management available to operate the
establishment. If we have the quality management and manpower only then Hotel should be designed
for sophisticated equipment and high tech gadgets.
These are some of the consideration, which affect the design of hotel.

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Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem

CHAPTER 2 FACILITIES PLANNING


THE SYSTEMATIC LAYOUT PLANNING PATTERN
Systematic Layout Planning is an organized way to conduct layout planning, it consists of a framework
of phases, a pattern of procedures, and a set of conventions for identifying, rating, and visualizing the elements
and areas involved in a planning a layout.
We explained the frame work of four phases in Chapter 1. In this chapter, the systematic layout planning
pattern of procedures is described. The conventions will be introduced at the appropriate places in later
chapters.
The strictly layout planning phases of any facilities rearrangement involve creating a general overall
layout and subsequently a detailed layout plan for each portion of the general overall layout. In both Phase II
and Phase III. In both Phase II and Phase III, the pattern to be followed is essentially the same.
Every layout rests on the three fundamentals:
1. Relationships - the relative degree of closeness desired or required among things.
Space - the amount, kind, and shape or configuration of the things being laid out.
Adjustments - the arrangement of things into a Realistic is best fir.
These three are always the heart of any layout planning project, regardless of products, processes, or size of
project. It is therefore logical and to be expected that the pattern of layout planning procedures is based directly
on these fundamentals.
The SLP Pattern
In the previous chapter, we indicated the importance of Product (P) and Quantity (Q) to any layout. An
analysis of them individually and in their mix is a necessary preliminary to any real layout planning. Process
routing and equipment, supporting services, and timing information are also basic input data. And in addition,
identifying the various activities (or areas) included in the layout is a preliminary planning step.
Box 1 of the pattern - and in process - dominated industries often the most significant aspect of layout
planning - is flow of materials. By planning the layout around the sequence and intensity of material moves, we
attain a progressive flow through the areas involved.
In addition to the operating or producing areas, many supporting - service areas must be integrated and
planned. As a result, developing or charting the activity relationships - that is, the relationships among the
service or support activities or functions is frequently or equal or greater importance then relationships based on
flow of materials alone.
These two investigations are then combined into Flow and / or Activity Relationship Diagram. Here
the various activities, departments, or areas are geographically related each other without regard to the actual
space each requires.
Next, the space requirements: These are developed from analysis of the process machinery and equipment
necessary and from the service facilities involved. Area requirements must, however, be balanced against the
space available. Then the area allowed for each activity is hung on the activity relationship diagram to form a
space relationship diagram.
The space relationship diagram is essentially a layout. But, in all likelihood, it is not an effective layout
until it is adjusted and manipulated to integrate with its space any modifying considerations. These include such
basic considerations as the handling method, operating practices, storage scheduling, and the like. As each
potentially good consideration or idea concerning these features is thought up, it must be tested against practical
limitations like cost, safety, and employee preference.
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As the integrating and adjusting of the various modifying considerations and their limitations are
worked out, one idea after another is probed and examined. The ideas that have practical value are retained and
those that do not seem worthy, we end up with two, three, four, or five alternative layout proposals. Each of
them will work; each has value. The problem lies in deciding which of these plans should be selected. These
alternative plans may be termed Plan X, Plan Y and Plan Z.
At this point, a cost analysis of some kind should be made for purposes of comparison and justification.
in addition, some evaluation of intangible factors should also be made. This is called an evaluation of
alternative layouts or an Evaluation of costs and Intangibles. As a result of this evaluation, one of the
alternatives is chosen - although frequently a modification or combination of two or more layouts may actually
result from the evaluation process itself.
The alternative layout that is chosen becomes the Selected Layout, the General Overall Layout. With
the selection of this general overall layout, phase II is completed.
Tie-in P,Q,R,S and T
We have seen how the pattern of Systematic Layout Planning is constructed. Now lets us relate it to
the basic input data, P,Q,R,S AND T. P,Q,R,S AND T underline most of the calculations needed for layout
planning. The preparations of the data for the various boxes in the SLP pattern starts with these five basic
elements. The product designs and sales forecasts must be woven together and integrated with a P-Q analysissometimes called volume-variety or study of product mix. The logical splits and combines of various products
or product groups or layout groupings are derived from the P-Q analysis. Specifically, this analysis of product
mix, along with analyses of Routing(R), Services(S) and Times (T), leads us to an identification or delineation
of the individual activities (areas, machine groups, work places) involved, and thus often to the 4 actual type of
layout.
P,Q and R are then woven together to develop the flow of materials P,Q and S are woven together to
develop a service activity relationship. From the flow of materials or the activity relationship chart, or a
combination of the two, the relationships are then diagrammed. It is Routing(R), together with Time(T), which
essentially determines the machinery and equipment required. Similarly, the services (S) called for are
translated into the various service facilities required. The process machinery and equipment and the service
facilities are then translated into space requirements. These space requirements are then worked into the SLP
pattern as described above.

WHY LAYOUT PLANNING?


Many managers ask Why plan layouts at all? In some cases it would seem to be about as easy to
move the furnishings into an area and then have the fun of arranging them and rearranging them until you are
satisfied. For the housewife who likes the freshness of rearranging her house occasionally, this makes sense.
But for industry, merely rearranging will, in practically every case, result in lost time, idle equipment, and
disruption of personnel. In addition, it may well lead to serious blunders in the use of a companys available
land, in costly rearrangements, in actually tearing down buildings, walls or major structures which are still
usable but which subsequently turn out to be roadblocks to efficiency and low-cost operation.
A little time spent in planning the arrangement before it is installed can prevent such losses.
Moreover, it allows the integration of subsequent moves and rearrangements into a logical program. Planning
makes facilities arrangements an orderly, logical sequence. Layout planning pays off: Obviously, it is much
easier to move templates or replicas of facilities and equipment around on a piece of paper than it is to move the
actual buildings, machinery, or equipment around. As professor School used to say, You can make as many
mistakes as you want in layout planning, and they will all pay for themselves if they avoid mistakes in the
physical installation.
Actually, from an installation standpoint, it is about as inexpensive to put in a god layout as to put in a
poor one-frequently much less expensive. However, once a poor layout is installed, the cost of rearranging,
disrupting production, and fighting your way through a new financial appropriation prohibit remaking it into a
good layout.

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The Key to Unlocking Layout Problems
There are two basic elements on which every layout problem rests:
1. Product (or material to service) - what is to be made or produced.
2. Quantity (or volume) - how much of each item is to be made.
Directly or indirectly, these two elements underline all other features or conditions in layout work. Therefore,
facts, estimates, or information about these two elements are essential.

PRODUCT (MATERIAL)

QUANTITY (VOLUME)

ROUTING (PROCESS)

SUPPORTING SERVICES

TIME (TIMING)

By Product (or material or service) we mean the goods produced by the company or area in question,
the starting materials (raw materials or purchased parts), the formed or treated parts, the finished goods, and / or
service items supplied or processed.
Products may be termed, varieties, models, styles, part numbers,
formulations, product groups, or material classes. By Quantity (or volume) we mean the amount of goods or
services produced, supplied, or used.
Quantity may be termed number of pieces, tons, cubic volume, or value of the amount produced or
sold.
In terms or unlocking layout problems these two elements represent the handle of any key we must
grasp. For it seems obvious that if we are planning the layout of a Hotel or department, the layout must
accomplish something. That something is certain products in certain quantities.
After obtaining the product and quantity information, we must next learn about the routing (or process).
The routing refers to how the product or material will be made.
By routing we mean the process, its equipment, its operations and their sequence. Routing may be defined by
operation and equipment lists, process sheets, flowsheets, and the like. The machinery and equipment used will
depend on the operations selected to change the form or characteristics of the material. Similarly, the movement
of work through the area to be laid out is dependent upon the sequence of the operations. Therefore, the
operations involved in the process and their sequence become the body (or stem) of our key. Backing up the
direct forming or assembly operations the producing activities or areas are a number of supporting services. In a
sence these are the things that give strength to the producing operations, for without adequate support, the
producing equipment and workers could not function adequately.
By supporting services we man the utilities, auxiliaries, and related activities or functions that must be provided
in the area to be laid out, so that it will function effectively.

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Supporting services include maintenance, machine repair, tool room, toilets and locker rooms, cafeteria, first aid
and shop, offices (or out area). It is common to include storage areas as a part of the supporting services as
well.
Taken all together, the supporting services often occupy more floor area than the producing departments
themselves. Therefore, adequate attention must be given to them.
One other basic element of the key to unlocking layout problems is time (or timing). By time (or timing) we
mean when, how long, how often, and how soon.
Time or timing involves when products will be produced or when the layout being planned will operate (one
shift only, during festival season). Operating times for the producing operations determine how many of a given
piece of machinery are required, which in turn determines the space required, man power staffing, and operation
balancing. Urgency (of delivery of action) is also a part of timing, as the frequency of lot or batch run and the
response of supporting services.
Perhaps the most important of all, time affects us the layout planners. Every layout project takes a certain
amount of time to accomplish, and usually there is deadline to meet.

P. PRODUCT
MATERIAL
WHAT IS THE
PRODUCT

S. SUPPORTING SERVICES
WITH WHAT
SUPPORT

R. ROUTING - PROCESS
HOW IT WILL BE FORMED
Q. QUANTITY VOLUME
HOW MANY OF
EACH ITEM TO
THE PRODUCT

WILL PRODUCTS
BE BASED

T. TIME - TIMING
WHEN WILL
W H Y ?

The above figure shows the elements as a key. But note that these letters at the business end of the
key; W H Y. These are an essential reminder to the layout man to question the basic data - to check with
reliable sources or his top management find out the basic figures on which lay out planning will depend.
Therefore a few challenging W H Ysmay be necessary to be sure the starting data is sound.
Phases of layout planning
The four steps that the layout planner takes may be translated into what is known as the Four Phases of
Layout Planning. These include the following:
Phase I - Location
Determine the location of the area to be laid out.
This is not necessarily a new site problem. More often it is one of determining whether the new layout (or
re-layout) will be in the same place it is now, in a present storage area which can be made free for the purpose,
in a newly acquired building, or some other potentially available space.

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Phase-II - General Overall Layout
Establish the general arrangement of the area to be laid out.
Here the basic flow patterns and the areas allocated are brought together in such a way that the general
size, relationships, and configuration of each major area is roughly established. Phase-II is sometimes termed
block layout or area allocation of merely rough layout.
Phase-III - Detailed Layout Plans
Locate each specific piece of machinery and equipment.
In detail planning, the actual placement of each specific physical feature of the area to be laid out is
established. And this includes utilities and services as well. The detailed layout plan is customarily a sheet or
board with replicas of the individual machines or equipment placed or drawn thereon.
Phase-IV - Installation
Plan the installation, seek the approval of the plan, make the necessary physical moves.
Once the detailed layouts are completed (Phase III), considerable detailing of installation drawings and
planning of moves must be worked out. Funds for the installation must be appropriated and the actual moves to
install the machinery, equipment, and the services as planned must be made.
These four phases come in sequence, but, for best results, they should overlap each other. Every layout
project passes through these four phases even though the layout planning analyst may not be specifically
charged with the responsibility for Phase I and / or Phase IV. That is, he must make sure that Phase I has been
agreed to or that a specific decision has been, or will be made as to where the layout he is planning is to be
located. Obviously, he cannot be very specific about his detailed layout planning if he does not have
information about number of floors, ceiling heights, column spacing, and building features. All the generally
dependent upon a location- or a reasonably acceptable assumption as to the location -having been established.
In many cases, the Phase I work actually involves a plant location study or a new site analysis. In such
cases, the person actually responsible for making the layout plan may or may not be involved directly in Phase I.
Likewise, in Phase IV some other group may do the physical installation. However, in any case the layout
planning engineer should be aware of this four phase sequence and should be prepared to integrate his work
with Phase I and V.
FLOW OF MATERIALS
The third letter of our Key to unlocking layout planning problems is R (Routing). Routing means how
an item is made - its process. The process is established essentially by selecting the operations and sequences
that will best produce P and Q wanted in the optimum operating T - although many other consideration be
involved in the determination.
The routing yields the basic data for analyzing the flow of materials. But before utilizing the routing
handed him, the planner should recall the meaning little word why, the business end of our key. The routing
should be examined and proved reasonably right; it should be restudied when the planner feels it can be
improved.
The standard word - simplification check originally developed by Allan H.Mogensen - and discussed in
all industrial engineering text is handbooks - is especially applicable. Mogensens check challenges each step in
the process routing with these words.
1. Eliminate - Is the operation necessary, or can it be eliminated ?
2. Combine - Can it be combined with some other operation or action ?
3. Change sequence, place, or person - Can these be changed or rearranged ?
4. Improve details - Can the method of performing the operation or action or
its equipment be improved ?
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Once satisfied with the process routing, the planner can begin flow-of - materials analysis. This is the
Box 1 of the SLP pattern.
Flow of Materials - Heart of Many Layouts
The analysis of materials flow involves of determining the most effective sequences of moving
materials through the necessary steps of the process involved and the intensity or magnitude of these moves. An
effective flow means that materials move progressively through the process,. always advancing toward
completing and without excessive detours or back-tracking (counterflow).
Flow-of-Materials analysis is the heart of layout planning wherever movement of the materials is a
major portion of the process. This is especially true when materials are large, heavy, or many in quantity or
when transport of handling costs are high compared with costs of operation, storage, or inspection. In extreme
cases of this kind, the desired flow is developed and then diagrammed directly. The space requirements are
hung on the flow diagram. Little investigation of supporting services and made, and no activity relationship
chart is constructed. The services and other than flow relationships are simply picked up as part of the
Modifying Considerations.
Analyzing materials flow, therefore, is one of the primary steps every layout planner should understand
and know how to do.

Determining Method of Flow Analysis


There are several different methods of analyzing flow of materials. Part of the problem of course is
knowing which method to use for a given project. The P-Q chart can be used as a guide, for the method of flow
analysis varies with the volume and variety of the items being produced.
1. For one or a few standardized products or items, use operation process
chart or some similar flow chart.
2. For several products or items, use multi-product process chart, if assembly
and disassembly are not involved.
3. For many products of items (a) Combine them into logical groups and
analyze as 1 or 2 above; or (b) Select or sample products or items and
apply 1 or 2 above.
4. For very many diversified products or items, use the from-to-chart.
Each of these flow-analysis techniques are discussed further in this chapter. The chief point here is that
different methods of flow analysis should be used for different product volume and variety conditions and that
the curve can show which type of analysis should be made.

The operation process chart


If the planner can picture the materials flow- if he can see it - he can plan its layout. That is why the
visual aspects of analysis are continually emphasized in this book. In fact, this necessity to see the picture is
perhaps the underlying reason that SLP has developed into its present form.
To help the planner see, a system of sign language is used - equivalent to those used by the
mathematician, the chemical engineer, or the procedure analyst. The sign language of process charting is well
known to trained industrial engineers. It was originally developed by Frank and Lillian Gilbreth. Subsequently,
two different committees sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers modified it to the form
given.
Essentially, just five things can happen to any material as it moved through its process.
1. It can be formed, treated or be assembled or disassembled with other
items or materials.
2. It can be moved or transported.
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3. It can be counted, tested, checked or inspected.
4. It can wait for some other action or for the rest of its batch.
5. It can be stored.

Space Allocation Guidelines for Hotel Facilities

Guest Rooms: The total square footage of the guest room block is typically 65-75 percent of the total
floor area of the entire hotel.

The net guest room area (includes living space, bathroom, and closet) for typical room:
Budget
Standard
First Class
Luxury

Square feet
200-275 (1&2 star including Motel)
275-325 (3&4 star)
325-375 (5 star)
375-450 (5 Deluxe)

To determine the total square footage of the guest room block (including corridors, elevators,
stairways, linen closet, vending areas and storage) generally add 50 per cent to the net guest room are
(assumes & single-loaded corridor).
-

II

For strium hotels, add 60 percent of the net guest room area (assumes a single loaded corridor).
The total square footage for some extremely efficient hotels may be as low as 35 percent of the net
guest room area (assumes a double-loaded corridor)
Very inexpensive hotels very too dramatically for a general rule; consider them on a case by case
basis.
The minimum finished width of a room is generally 12 feet.
The minimum finished width of corridors on guest room floors is
usually 6 feet, which may be
reduced to 5 feet if the guest room doors are recessed.
Public Facilities: The amount of space allocated to the various public facilities shown below will
fluctuate dramatically. However, except for budget hotels or those with no restaurant or meeting
facilities, it typically approximates 10 to 20 per cent of the total floor area of the entire hotel.

Lobby: typically 2 to 6 percent of the hotels total floor area.


Square feet Per Guest Room
Main Lobby (general circulation)
Seating Area
Front desk and related
Baggage storage
Public washrooms (lobby)

7.0 - 10.0
0.7 - 1.0
3.0 - 4.0
0.5 - 1.0
0.5 - 1.0

Retail Shops: A gift/sundry shop is generally included with 1.0 to 1.5 square foot per guest room; the
size of other retail outlets can range from 100 to 1,200 sq. ft. or more depending on whether they are
desk operations for car rentals or airline tickets, or regular shops. The scope of what is
recommended in dependent on market requirements.
-

Dining rooms and lounges: typically 4 to 6 percent of the total floor area of the hotel, the size of
outlets will be dependent on the market and assumed utilization.
Square feet Per Seat

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Coffee Shop
Specialty Restaurant
Formal Dining
Cocktail Lounges
-

15-18
18-20
20-22
15-18

Function space: can range from none to extensive depending on market requirements; when meeting
space is included, it typically ranges between 1.0 and 2.0 meeting seats per guest room.
Square feet required
Ballroom
10-12 per person (seat)
Meeting rooms
10-12 per person (seat)
Boardrooms/hospitality suites
12-16 per person (seat)
Pre-function area
25-40 per percent of Ballroom area
Public washrooms:
Men
Women
Coatroom

III

4 per meeting seat


6 per meeting seat
4-5 per meeting seat

Recreational facilities: can range from none to extensive depending on market requirements.
Square ft. required
Swimming pool & deck
10-20 per guest room
Lockers/Shower/Toilet Area
2 per guest room
Health Club
2 per guest room
Putting Green
1500
Circulation: from 15 to 20 percent of the total public area (excluding the ballroom) should be added to
allow for circulation; the circulation related to the ballroom was included above in the pre-function area
allocation.
Support Facilities and Services: the amount of space allocated to various support facilities and services
will vary considerably based on the public facilities included, the concept of operation (full-service versus
no frills), and the facilities provided for employees. The space required typically ranges between 10 and
15 percent of the total floor area of the hotel.

Food Preparation
Coffee shop kitchen
Main Dining Room Kitchen
Banquet Kitchen
Room Service
Food & Beverage Storage Area

Sq.Ft. Required
10-25% of coffee shop
30-45% of dining room area
20-30%of ballroom meeting space
1 per guest room
30-45% total kitchen space

Receiving:
Office
Platform

Sq. ft. required


0.3-0.5 per guest room
100-250 per bay

Hotel Employee Facilities:


Lockers/Restrooms
Cafeteria
Lounge (if any)

Sq. ft. required


6-10 per guest room
4 per employee
1 per guest room

Housekeeping
Laundry
Linen Storage (not on guest floor)
Guest laundry
Uniform Issuing

Sq. ft. per Guestroom


7
3
08.1.5
1

Other Storage, Maintenance and Miscellaneous


Hotel general storage
Ballroom/meeting room storage

Sq. ft. required


3-7 per guest room
1.0-1.5 per seat or

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Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem


10-20% of ballroom area
Miscellaneous storage (garbage, Empty bottles)
Telephone Switchboard/Equipment
Computer Room
Mechanical, electrical and air handling
Rooms and systems
Maintenance Shop
Security
Circulation

IV

1.0-1.8
1.3-2.0
1.0-1.5

per guest room


per guest room

13.18 per guest room


5 per guest room
3.6
per guest room
10% total area for support
facilities and services

Hotel Administration: the amount of space allocated to administrative offices typically ranges between
1 and 2 percent of the total floor area of the hotel. It includes the executive offices as well as the sales,
accounting, personnel and any other administrative support offices. A total of 10 square feet per guest
room is generally allocated to this category.

Preliminary Construction Cost Estimate


Based on Space Allocation
I Recommended Facilities: 250 guest rooms, 250-seat dining room, 50-seat coffee shop, 75-seat cocktail
lounge, 300-seat banquet area, two meeting/breakout rooms, each to seat 100 and be divisible by two.

Space allocation in Square Feet:


Guest Rooms
250 rooms
Corridors, elevators, stairways,
linen closets, vending areas and
storage

Retail Gift/Sundry Shop


Dining Rooms and Lounges
Main dining room
Coffee shop
Cocktail lounge

Sq. ft.
81250

Rationale
325 sq. ft. per room net
50% of net area

40625
--------121875
--------300

1.2 sq. ft. per room

5000
800
1200

20 sq. ft. per seat


16 sq. ft. per seat
16 sq. ft. per seat

-----7000
-----Function Space
Ballroom (banquet area)
Meeting rooms (2)
Pre-function area
Publish washrooms
Coatroom

Recreational Facilities
Outdoor swimming pool
Circulation

3000

10 sq. ft. per seat


12 sq. ft. per seat
1000
30% ballroom
500
1 sq. ft. per seat
(total of 500 seats)
250
5 per seat
------7150
------Sq. ft.
Rationale
5000
20 sq. ft. per room
2965
15 percent public
2400

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Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem


facilities without
ballroom(19750)
--------25715
---------

Total Public Facilities


Support Facilities and Services:
Food Preparation
Kitchen (serves both dining room
and coffee shop)
Banquet Kitchen

1740
1350

Room Service
Food & Beverage storage

1390

250

30% dining room &


coffee shop area
25% percent ballroom & meeting space
1 sq. ft. per room
45% total kitchen space

------4730
------Receiving
Office
Platform

125

0.5 sq. ft. per room


One bay

200
----325
-----

Hotel employee Facilities


Lockers/restrooms
Cafeteria

1500
560

6 sq. ft. per room


Assume 140 employees
4 sq. ft. per employee

-----2060
-----Housekeeping:
Laundry
Linen storage
Guest laundry
Uniform issuing

1750
750
250
250

6 sq. ft. per room


3 sq. ft. per room
1 sq. ft. per room
1 sq. ft. per room

------3000
------Other Storage, Maintenance, Miscellaneous
Hotel general storage
Ballroom/meeting room storage
Miscellaneous storage(garbage)
Telephone switchboard & equipment
Computer room
Mechanical electrical & air
Handling rooms & systems
Maintenance shop
Security
Circulation for support facilities

1000

4 sq. ft. per room


20% of ballroom
1 sq. ft. per room
2 sq. ft. per room
1 sq. ft. per room

3750

15 sq. ft. per room


5 sq. ft. per room
0.4 sq. ft. per room
10% of total support
Facilities area(15,125)

600
250
500
250

1250
100
1520
--------6620
---------

Total support facilities & services

16735

Hotel Administration:

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Executive & administrative offices

2500

10 sq. ft. per room


166825

III

Summary of Space Allocation:


Sq. ft.
Guest Rooms
Public Facilities
Support Facilities & Services
Hotel Administration

121875
16735
2500

73.1%
15.4%
10%
1.5%

166825

100%

25715

Total
IV

Percentage
Distribution

Estimated Project Construction Costs:


=
=

Total Square Feet X Cost of Construction/Sq.ft.


as per market rate
Rs. X

Construction Cost Per Room*

Rs.X / No. of Rooms

Parking as per rooms of building approval authority.


Approximate cost distribution in percentage (in comparison to the total cost of the hotel)
1.
Civil work
35
2.
Plumbing
5
3.
Electrical work
10
4.
Air condition & Ventillation
12
5.
Elevators
3
6.
Hotel equipments
12
7.
Interior
18
8.
Operational supplies
3
9.
Consultancy charges
2
10.
Total
100

FACILITY DESIGN & ARCHITECTURAL CONSIDERATION

Hotel design is an interactive process bringing together the skills and expertise of owners, managers,
Architects, builders and a host of others to conceive and construct a building that meets a variety of Travel and
business objectives. The people involved in designing and constructing the hotels are:a)
b)
c)

Owner
Consultant
Architect and others

Owner

Sees
a hotel

as a real estate and investment


opportunity.

Consultant

Expects
a hotel

to meet the strategic goal and


revenue earner.

Architect

involves

For development and design.

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Others
A proper communication and coordination between all the above is a must though the onus to
accomplish the project is on Architect but the owner must spell out clearly the need of creating a particular
design to suit his philosophy of service and must explain why the need is:
Design must be such that:
i)
ii)
iii)
iv)

suits the investment available.


easy to maintain.
must have sufficient circulation area.
it provides proper flow of work.

A project may be initiated in two ways:


a)

A site exists in a particular location and the study is conducted to explore the feasibility for
development as a hotel.
It is considered that a particular town or area offers opportunity and it is studied in order to confirm this
or otherwise.

b)

Whatever the starting point happens to be, the methodology remains the same which is to
study the market feasibility. The feasibility should include the P.P.P.P. i.e.
-

Physical facilities
Place
Price
Promotion

The Feasibility Report must cover:


1.

L.A.E. (Local area evaluation)


Analysis of the economic vitality of the city or region. Describe the suitability of the project site for a
hotel.

2.

L.M.A. (Local Market analysis)


Assess the present demand and future growth of several market segments. Identity the existing
properties and their probable growth.

3.

P.F. (Proposed Facilities)


Propose a balance of guest room and revenue generating public facilities (Restaurant and lounges,
function area, recreating facilities). Assess competitive position of the property).

4.

F.A. (Financial analysis)


Estimate income and expenses for a hotel over a five year period to show its potential cost flow after
fixed charges.

Development process
The development process starts with
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i)
ii)
iii)
iv)
v)

Establish project objective.


Assemble development team.
Commission feasibility study.
Establish project budget and schedule.
Investigate potential financing and negotiate joint ventures.

(Action by Owner/Developer)
vi)
Conduct market study and prepare financial analysis.
vii)
Recommend Architect, establish design and operating criteria.
(Action by consultant)
viii)
Analyse site.
ix)
Prepare initial conceptual design.
x)
Review programme and Budget.
(Action by Architect)
The space allocation program.
Among the many tasks of the development team is to establish a space allocation program. The
allocation of space among the principal functions in a hotel varies from property to property. The most obvious
difference among properties is the ratio of guest room space to public space and support area space. This varies
from 90% in budget hotels and many motels to 50% - 65% in large commercial hotels.
Architectural Consideration will include the Site Design and the Design Phase.
Site Design The Architect is responsible for site planning, analysis of site, its constraints and opportunities.
Before firming up design, the Architect must consider:i)
ii)
iii)
iv)
v)
vi)
vii)

Visibility and Accessibility: Consider road access and surrounding street patterns.
Surface Conditions: Analyse terrain, vegetation, existing buildings and roads and environmental
constraints.
Sub Surface Condition: Confirm location and underground utilities, height of the water table, bearing
capacity of the soil, existence of environmental hazards.
Regulatory restriction: Height restrictions, parking requirements, Highway restrictions etc.
Site Character: Describe qualities of the site such as surrounding uses and views.
Orientation: for Sunlight.
Adaptability: Potential for future development

DESIGN PHASE:
Commences with the preparation of schematic design (set of alternate plans) and establish
design directions considering the space allocation programme. Provide design team with approvals.
Establish design schedule, Freeze structural drawings and specification of finishes etc.
While working for design, it is important to consider:1.

Site Benefit: Potential sites needs to be considered in relation to the main tourist and service
attraction. View influences the plan from, compensatory attraction (garden view, recreational
focuses) should be provided for disadvantages rooms. The orientation of sun, shade and
prevailing winds will affect building design.

2.

Traffic Analysis: An analysis of traffic flows is necessary to identify:a)


Counter flows of traffic.
b)
Restrictions on new entries to the highway and
c)
Condition relating to signage on highway

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3.

Density and Height: The density and massing of building is dictated by location, land costs
and local regulation.

4.

Circulations: The movement and guests, non-resident visitors, staff and supplies in a hotel
tend to flow distinct, circulatory patterns. Where practical, guest, supply and staff circulation
be kept separate.

5.

Guest Room Plans: Guest room may be arranged in rows or one on both sides, of the corridor
forming a slab plan or stacked around the circulation core of a tower structure, which are
explained as under:a)

b)

c)

Slab Plan: Can be double loaded slab or a single loaded slab. In double loaded slab
the rooms are laid out on both sides of the corridor whereas in single loaded slab, the
rooms are only on one side of the corridor. Double loaded corridors are most
efficient so far as space utilization is concerned and work out to be more cost
effective and economical.
Atrium designs: These are internal corridors overlooking the central space which
may be open or sub-divided by mezzanine extensions to increase utilization.
Elevators extending through the atrium are invariably transparent. The guest rooms
are arranged in a single loaded corridor.
Tower Structure: The rooms are spread over around a central core which enable the
guest rooms to be cantilevered, propped or suspended around the sides. The
proportion of space taken up in circulation, including corridors on each floor, is high
and tower structures are generally used for high rise buildings where the advantages
of view justify the higher costs.

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CHAPTER 3 -

********
CHECK LAST CHAPTER OF THIS DOCUMENT
*******On Page No:- 61*******

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CHAPTER 4 - KITCHEN
EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENT FOR COMMERCIAL KITCHENS
There are various heavy and light equipments required for the commercial kitchens. Determining the specific
equipment required for the proposed kitchen is one aspect of design on which considerable time can be spent.
During this part of the planning process the food service facility consultant has to estimate accurately the
capacity of each of the various types of kitchen equipment to be used. If these capacity estimates are too low,
the result will be delays and bottleneck in the food production process. Estimates that are too high will result in
expensive and inefficient piece of equipment. The consultant should be careful to take into account any
projected increase in business volume, that would require increased equipment capacity, and plan accordingly.
At this juncture, he has to make decision about the manufacturer, the model number, attachments, special
accessories.

A systematic method of determining equipment capacity required is to analyse each food item appearing on
the menu. Whether a la carte (or) daily change menu as in the case of buffets a sample of the typical menus may
be sufficient. First, we have to estimate the number of portions to be prepared for a particular period. This
estimate is made for every menu item requiring equipment. Next the standard portion size of the each food item
has to be fixed. For e.g. (soup-240 ml., coffee-180 ml., etc.) multiplying the estimated number of portions by
the portion size will give the total volume if food to be prepared.

Once the volume of food to be prepared is arrived, the capacity of the equipment should be determined with
future changes anticipated. Trends can be studied, and then any anticipated changes in foods, sales volumes or
meals offered can be projected to see if drastic changes in equipment are necessary. For e.g.: perhaps no freezer
space will be required currently, but if the need for freezer space is highly probable is 5 or 10 years, space can
be left to add it then conveniently and economically.

The method of preparations and production for each item is then evaluated. Possible alternatives may
include a) items individually prepared to order. b) Items prepared in small batches in anticipation of orders, c)
item prepared in large batches, d) item that are partially batch prepared and finished when orders are received.
The batch size is next determined for those items that are to be prepared batches. The selection of the
batch size is one way that the food service facility consultant can control the capacity of the equipment. Smaller
and more frequently prepared batches are desirable because they require less equipment capacity and the foods
are fresher when served. Some items that can be held swell after cooking can be made in larger batches.

For those items to be prepared and cooked to order, the maximum no. Of portion to be made at one time is
evaluated on the basis of the no. of customers, their menu preference, their arrival pattern.

After determining portions, equipments catalogs may be consulted to match the capacity needed for
production with the available sizes of standard equipment. The designer is also careful when sizing some
equipment that may have a usable capacity that is somewhat less than the standard capacity.
Equipment Check list

The equipment required for the kitchen varies from one type of operation to another depending on the menu
offerings, the nature of food materials, method of preparation, service, personal desire of the owners, manager,
or chefs. The following list of equipment is grouped by typical functional areas.

Refrigerated, storage
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Cold Rooms:
- Shelves
-

Dairy
S.S.Trolleys
Vegetables

FreezeRoom:
- Fish
- Meat

Cold Kitchen
-

Meat Saw
Gravity feed slicer
Meat Block
Reach in Refrigerator
Reach in Freezer
Scales
Work Table with service and drain board
SS Utility Trolley
Mincer Chopper
Sausage Stuffer
Buffalo Chopper

Vegetable and Salad Preparation


-

French-fry cutter
Peeler
SS preparation table
Salad rack
Vegetable cutter
Slicer/Chopper

Pantry
-

Griddle
Microwave oven
SS worktable sink drain board
Toaster
Salamander
Reach in Refrigerator
Bread Cabinet
Juice extractor
Coffee/Tea Pantry man
Ice Cream cabinet

Cooking All kitchens


-

Bain Marie counter with overhead heaters.


Chinese range
Condiment cabinet
S.S.work table
S.S. work table with sink unit

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-

S.S.work table with OH shelf


Deck oven
Food warmer
Brat pan
Griddle
Grill
Gas cooking ranges (a la carte, Indian kitchen, Banquet, Halwaii)
Refrigerated Table
Reach in Freezer
Reach in Refrigerator
Salamander
Steam jacket kettle
Pot rack
SS utility trolley
Vertical cutter/Mixer
Dosa Plate
Chapatti Puffer
Wet Grinder

Bakery and Confectionery


-

S.S.Work Table
Bread Moulder
Bread Slicer
Cooling rack
Convection oven
Deck own
Dough divider
Dough rounder
Dough sheeter
Dough kneader
Weighing scale
Planetary Mixer
Proofing cabinet
Proofing rack
Ice cream machine

Snacks bar
-

S.S.Counter
Coffee maker
Food warmer
Freezer
Fudge warmer
Griddle
Grill
Gas range
Work table
Working table with sink and drain board
Slush Machine
Juice dispenser
Pastry cabinet
S/W grill
Soda fountain
SS utility trolley
Bain Marie counter
Chaat Counter
Dosa Plate

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Pot work
-

Pot rack
Shelves
Sink
Pre rinse faucet
Water agitator
Drying rack

Wet Grinding
-

Convention wet grinder


Tilting model wet grinder
Worktable.

A complete discussion of selecting and sizing of all the different types of kitchen equipments is beyond the
scope of this study material. A brief discussion of frequently specified major items of equipments would serve
to illustrate this part of the planning process.
A: DEEP FAT FRYERS:
Deep fat fryers are available in a variety of types, capacities and degree of automatic operation desired. The
productive capacity of a fryer is related to the litres of fat in the fryers, the heat input, and the cooking time
required for various foods. Typical designs of fryers are based on a fat-to-food ratio 6:1. This indicates that
each kg. of food to be fried requires 6 lits. of oil (or) fat in the deep fat fryer. Conventional fryers are tailor
made to the requirement of the client to various capacity, 1/2 lit, 1 lit. 3, 5, 7 and so on.
Pressure fryers make another category of deep fryers they are sealed to permit steam pressure to build up
between the lid and the fat surface. The steam is generated from the foods fried or by water injectors. The
pressure fryer reduces the loss of moisture from foods. Heat transfer in a pressure fryer is greater than a
conventional fryer and consequently the cooking time is shorter. The food is brown outside, moist and juicy on
the inside.

B. BRATT PAN (Tilting frying pan):


The brat pan is one of the most versatile pieces of cooking equipment. Its design is such that it can be used
to boil, simmer, grill, saut, fry and curries. For some items like Indian gravies, sambar, foogath can be done in
the tilting frying pan with some savings in time that would normally be spent transferring foods and cleaning
other utensils. Brat pan may be free standing; walls mounted, counter mounted and are available in gas and
electricity model. There are models which are ignited by electricity and working on gas. The brat pan is tilted
by a worm and gear assembly operated by hand wheel. They are tailor made to difference capacities of 50 litrs.
to 300 litrs.
C. GRIDDLE:
Griddle are flat top piece of equipment heated from beneath, as compared to grills which have heating
sources both above and beneath. Griddles are used for high production food service and fast food operations.
Grills are more of a specialty piece of equipment. Both gas fired and electric models are suitable for most
purposes. Griddle are available in variety of sizes from small i.e. 10 x 20 to as large as 72 x 24. Griddles
are free standing, counter-mounted, mobile or built in as the situation demands. The height of the splashguard,
location and the width of the grease trough should be considered when specifying griddles. Combination
griddle-grill is also available. This provides greater flexibility for the preparation of different menu items.
D.FOOD CUTTERS:
Food cutters are versatile piece of equipment that can handle meats, vegetable and fruits. The food cutters
can cut, dice, shred, and almost liquefy foods, depending upon the amount of time the food is left in the cutter.
The foods to be size reduced are placed in a bowl, which rotates and exposes them to high speed rotating blades.

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Both bench and floor models are available. Some cutter models are equipped with an attachment hub for
accepting various attachments.
E. STEAM JACKETED KETTLES:
Steam jacketed kettles are constructed of two stainless steel bowls sealed one within the other, with almost 2
of space between them for the introduction of steam. The amount of steam surface between the bowls is
referred to as jacketing, and models from half-jacketed to full jacketed are available. The operation of steamjacketed kettles utilizes steam, which is condensed back to water in the jacket to provide the heat for the inner
kettle. A condensate line is provided to remove the water that accumulates. The amount of heat input is
dependant upon the pressure and amount of steam allowed to enter the jacketed area. There is a pressure gauge
to indicate the pressure. In case of excess pressure is let into the jacket, there is a pressure /air release valve to
reduce the pressure. These kettles are used to cook rice, dhal, boil milk, and cook vegetables. They are
available in 50, 100, 200 and 300 lit. cap.
F.GAS COOKING RANGE:
Gas cooking ranges have open top burners with high-pressure burners, T-22, T-35. They are tailor made for
the clients is requirement. They are manufactured in different combinations such as 2 in 1, 3 in 1, 4 in 1 and 6
in 1. The length and breath of the range depends on the quantity food to be prepared. In case of a la carte
preparation, a combination of high and low pressure burners is used, the area being 14x 14. The height of the
cooking ranges 33 - 34. But for ideal bulk cooking the length various between 20 to 24 per range, and. the
height is reduced to 18 to 20. Heavy gauge stainless steel and heavy-duty supports are used for these cooking
ranges since it involves bulk preparation.
A Chinese gas cooking range is aptly designed for authentic Chinese delicacies, with a cast iron dome, to
prevent the direct heat on to the chef while cooking with a wok. A 12 to 14 height splash back with a
swiveling faucet with controls in front panel for immediate water, and a drain channel at the rear to enable to
chef to empty the wastewater is also provided in this equipment. They are ideal with flat open top gas range in
the middle for stockpot and dome cover gas ranges on either side for a la carte preparations.
G. DOSA PLATE:
The dosa plate are similar to the griddle which have hot plates specially designed to prepare dosas. The plate
is thick machine polished, mild steel with even heat distribution for optimum use.
The M.S.plate rests on stainless steel frame, and it has S.S.top, front and a specially placed oil spillage
trough. The splash back on all three sides of the dosa plate to avoid splash of oil or batter. For uniform heat
distribution a V shaped burner is placed. This unit is available in electric/gas. It is custom-built size to
prepare a minimum 2-3 dosas to 8-10 dosas at a time.

H. IDLI STEAMER:
Idly steamers are S.S. cabinets with tight fitting doors with gaskets. Steam is injected into the cabinet to pre
heat to the required temperature. Idly plates are made of S.S./Alum. with different combinations. The steam is
injected from the sides, top and bottom. These cabinets are tailor made to accommodate 2-4-6 idly plates at a
time. It is advisable to have 2 plate compartments because steam is lost during the process of loading the idly
plates.

DEVELOPING SPECIFICATION FOR VARIOUS KITCHEN EQUIPMENTS.

STANDARD:
After determining the type and capacity of the equipments required for a particular kitchen, the next phase
involves selecting the specific characteristics that are desired. Factors such as

Materials
Constructions techniques
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Special features
Maintenance consideration
are evaluated.

STAINLESS STEEL:
Stainless steel is an alloy containing minimum amount of chromium and nickel and maximum amount of
other alloying elements such as manganese, silicon and carbon. Its use in kitchen equipments is based on the
following characteristics:

High corrosion resistance


High strength
Hardness
Durability
Abrasion resistance
Ease of maintenance

TYPES:
Kitchen equipments manufacturers and fabricators select from the stainless steel referred to have Type 304
and 302 (food grade). These stainless steel sheets produced in India, according to the standards of Steel
Authority of India that controls the amount of alloying materials.
The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is attributed to the addition of Chromium to the alloy. Nickel
lowers the thermal conductivity of the alloy and increases its co-efficient of expansion, allowing it to be formed
into various shapes more easily. The amount of carbon is restricted so that the alloy can be welded without
forming chromium carbide, which lowers corrosion resistance.
Stainless steel is produced in sheets, plates, bars, wires, pipes and tubing.
===============================================
ELEMENT
TYPE 302 %
TYPE 304 %
===============================================
CHROMIUM
17-19
18-20
NICKEL
8-10
8-12
MANGANESE
2 max.
2 max.
SILICON
1
1
CARBON
0.15
0.08
===============================================

FINISH:
A number of degrees of finishing are available for Stainless steel. There are 8 designated types of
finish for stainless steel. They are achieved by standard guiding, polishing and buffing. The finish used for
surfaces that are in direct contact with food or exposed is standard polish No.4. Non-food contact surfaces and
non-exposed supporting frames and sheets can have a duller finish, which is less expensive than polished finish.

THICKNESS:
The Swiss Wire Gauge (SWG) usually designates metal thicknesses. Although other gauges are
manufacture, typical gauge numbers of metals used for kitchen equipments ranges from 6 to 24 (6 is the thickest
and 24 is the thinnest). The actual dimensions for these typical gauges are given below:

======================================================
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GAUGE NUMBER
THICKNESS (inches)
======================================================
6
0.1943
7
0.1793
8
0.1644
9
0.1495
10
0.1345
11
0.1196
12
0.1046
13
0.0897
14
0.0747
15
0.0673
16
0.0598
17
0.0538
18
0.0478
19
0.0418
20
0.0359
21
0.0329
22
0.0299
0.0269
24
0.0239
======================================================

23

GALVANISED STEEL:
Coating the steel with a layer of Zinc produces galvanized steel. The preferred method of producing
galvanized steel is by electroplating, which gives the best bond between the steel and zinc. The quality of
galvanized steel is dependent upon the thickness of the zinc coating.
Galvanized steel can be satisfactorily used for kitchen equipments, where there is no food contact or where
abrasion is not evident. Sinks, tables, counters, shelves, racks are manufactured with galvanized steel
framework.
CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS:
Equipment manufacturers to produce the finished product utilize several fastening methods. The fastening of
materials in the food zone has to be capable of meeting sanitary requirements while in non-food zones.
There are 3 fastening methods

Welding
Soldering
Mechanical fasteners.

WELDING:
Welding is the preferred methods of joining sheets of metal that cannot be formed into the desired shapes.
Heliarc welding is used on stainless steel if there is sufficient thickness of metal. The heliarc welding utilises an
inert gas as the flux, resulting very smooth or strong weld. The weld can be ground and polished to the extent
that the joint is equivalent to No.4 finish.
Heliarc welding is preferred for all kitchen equipments with food contact zones. Electric arc welding is as
smooth or even as the heliarc welds. They may be used in non-food contact equipments. Acetylene welding
may be necessary for thin metal sheets, since the other two will burn through the metal easily.
SOLDERING:
Soldering is different from welding in that the metal to be joined are bonded rather than fused together.
Soldered joints do not have the strength of welded joints, and should be used appropriately in those applications
that are not subjected to stress. Tin and lead are the basic solders used, the presence of these metals prevents
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their use on joints in food contact areas. If at all soldering has to be done in a food contact area, a silver
soldering may be done with 95% of tin, 5% silver, but it is expensive.

MECHANICAL FASTENERS:
The use of bolts, screws, rivets and studs are undesirable in the food zones of kitchen equipments for sanitary
reasons. They may be used only in non-food zones if other joining techniques are not practical. Low profile
fasteners are preferred in order to facilitate cleaning of the area where the fasteners protrude.

EDGE TREATMENT:
Exposed edges on kitchen equipments are formed to provide safe and sanitary conditions. Nosings are either
open with sufficient room for cleaning are completely closed. If open edges are to be used at least 3/4 space
between the edge and the body is required. On equipments where spillage is anticipated such as soiled dish
landing table, the edges are turned up a sufficient height to contain the material.
LEGS AND FEET:
Unless the equipment is to be placed on a raised platform, seated to the floor, or wall hung, legs and feet may
be specified for support. Tubler or square legs are usually used to raise the equipment so that the lowest
horizontal part is 6 above the floor. The legs and feet should be rigid enough to support the weight of the
equipment with minimum cross bracings.
CASTERS AND ROLLERS:
Mobile equipments are becoming popular in kitchen equipment, because it provides greater flexibility to
accommodate different work place arrangements for handling changes in menu items. Casters and rollers are
selected to assure that one worker can easily move the equipment. It also helps in cleaning the equipment better
than the fixed ones. A wheel tread that is smooth and wide enough to prevent damage to the floor material is
desirable.
DOORS AND PANELS:

Doors that are used to enclose opening and provide access to interior areas are usually of two types,
Single panel
Double panel

Double panel doors may include insulators heat transmission is to be minimized. They are used on
refrigerators, freezers and oven. Hinges are kept minimum because it is difficult to maintain them.
Gauges commonly recommended for kitchen equipment
Equipment

Bain Marie
Drain board
Sink
Work table
Counter
Steam kettle
Shelves
Sides and bottoms
Legs
Cross bracings
Doors - outer pan
Doors - inner pan

Recommended gauge top


14
12-14
12-14
16-18
12-14
12-14
20
18-20
10-12
16
18
20

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There are several types of specifications that may be written includes,
> Performance specifications
> Descriptive specifications
> Reference specification
> Proprietary specifications.
PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS.
It describes the work to be done by the results desired. For e.g. food facility planners know that many
manufacturers are capable of producing fryers / grinders / bain-marie with different characteristics. The may
choose to write a performance specification that will establish the type, size, capacity and output per hour that
will meet their requirement.
For e.g. the length, breath and height of the equipment
The framework to be used
DESCRIPTIVE SPECIFICATION
The most detailed type of specifications is the descriptive specification. It describes the component of the
equipment and how these components are to be assembled. The specific identification the physical properties of
the materials, size of each component, spacing.
For e.g.:
Legs and cross rails shall be continuously welded and ground smooth.
Bottom of legs at floor level shall be fitted with stainless steel bullet type foot, with 1/2 adjustment.
Gussets that are used to attach the legs to the equipment are designed to be 1 minimum dia at the top,
welded to the frame or sink bottom.
Gas equipments - all burners, copper pigtails, valve control etc.
Ends of fixtures, splash back, shelves etc. shall be finished flush to the walls and adjoining fixtures.
Framework to be either box type framing or open channel type.
Drawers to be 18 gauge stainless steel channel type housing and drawer cradle; both housing and cradle
being reinforced and welded at corners. Housing and cradle secured to the underside of the table top.
Fabricate sink compartment with 1/4 coved vertical and horizontal corners.
Framework of galvanized iron shall be welded construction, having welds smooth, and where galvanizing
has been burned off, touched up with high-grade aluminum bronze.
Edges for equipments either marine edge or crimped edge.
Under shelves made of 18/20 SWG stainless steel sheets, double beaded on all sides and reinforced with
under frame with cross supports of 35x35x5 mm M.S. angles.
REFERENCE SPECIFICATIONS;
Reference specification employees standards of recognised agency and authorities to specify quality. Many
companies state in their literature and catalogue that there product or equipment conforms to specific recognised
standards.

For e.g.:
Gas burners - United Works, Mumbai, I.S.I Mark.
Heaters - Escorts/Racold
Thermostat - EGO
Compressors - Kirloskar

PROPRIETORY SPECIFICATIONS:
Proprietary specifications call for material, equipment or products by trade name, model number and
manufacturers. This type of specification is the easiest to write because the commercially available products
and equipments set the standard of quality acceptable to the specification writer.
For e.g. :
Kitchen equipments - LL equipments, Continental etc.
Vertical chopper - Hobart,
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Dish Washing machine - Electrolux

Steps to develop standard specifications.


1.

Ascertain the overall size of the equipment; overall size means, the length, breadth, and the height of
equipment from the ground level in mm. (1 foot = 300 mm).

2.
3.

Framework to be used.
Briefly describe the top and 3 sides of the equipment with gauge of metal. Then the interior of the
equipment, (shelves, racks etc.) with gauge, distance between the racks and shelves.

4.

Then express in brief about the 4th side i.e. the door, (swing door or sliding door) metal gauge used, type of
insulation to be used.

5.

Specify the electrical attachment required for the equipment - compressor on top (or) bottom, location of
the panel - left / right/side. Specify the make of the electrical attachment to be used.

6.

If sinks have to be made/in built with the table the overall size of the sink, the side on which it is required:
LHS/RHS/Middle.

7.

Bain marie containers, whether dry heat/moist heat, which side the bain marie containers are required and
the size of the containers L/B/D.

8.

Chute : whether chute is required, size of the chute, location of the chute, length of the chute, and finish.

9.

Gas burners: type of burners, T-35, T-22, Chinese, specify the type of burners and the make to be used.

10. Wet Grinder: specify the make, capacity, if possible the model number.
Now we

shall develop a standard specification for

STAINLESS STEEL WORK TABLE WITH THE UNDERSHELF.


< OS - 2100 x 750 x 850 mm
< MS framework
< Table top 16 gauge S.S.304
< Under shelf with 20 gauge S.S.304, 6 inch. above ground level.
< Tubler stainless steel bullet legs.
< Edges to be marine edge.
< No.4 finish.
STAINLESS STEEL WORK TABLE WITH SINK:
< OS - 2100 x 750 x 850 mm
< MS framework
< Table top 16 gauge S.S.304
< Under shelf with 20 gauge S.S.304, 6 inch. above ground
level only on non-sink side.
< Tubler stainless steel bullet legs.
< Edges to be crimped edge.
< The unit shall be provided with one sink on LHS size
450 x 450 x 450 mm.
< Splash back shall be provided 150 mm height.
< No.4 finish.
DOSA PLATE:

The unit shall be of open frame construction with 12 Stainless steel panels on all sides with loovers.
The framework of the dosa plate is 12 SWG S.S. Rods.
One under shelf shall be provided - 20 swg. 200 mm from GL.
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Uprights shall be provided with bullet feet.


The griddle plate (GI) of 16 mm thickness, machine polished
Splash back shall be welded to the frame, 6 inch. height.
S.S.trough to be provided with the removable grease-collecting tray.
V burners 2 Nos. to be provided with individual pilots, United (Mumbai) make.
Gas inlets on both sides of the unit.
O.S. - 1500 x 750 x 850 + 150 mm.
No.4 finish.

TWO BURNER S.S.GAS RANGE (BULK COOKING)

The unit shall be open frame structure provided with cross bracings.
Top S.S.sheet shall be 16 SWG.
S.S.panels upto 12 from the top shall be 18 SWG.
The vessel rests shall be of cast iron size 450 x 450 mm.
S.S. spillage or drip tray to be provided.
2 Nos. high-pressure burners - T.22 United (Mumbai) make along with pilots.
Provision of gas inlets shall be on both sides.
Exhaust loovers on all 3 sides of the panel.
Needle control valve to be provided.
Marine edges to be provided.
O.S. 1500 x 700 x 600 mm.
No.4 finish.

IDLI STEAMER:

All stainless steel 18 gauge unit shall be steam injected on all sides.
The capacity of the unit 108 idlies per batch.
The unit shall have 2-chamber model with each unit having chamber to prepare 54 idlies per batch.
Stainless steel idly trays shall be provided to make 9 idlies each tray.
Door shall be insulated and provided with rubber gaskets.
Hinged mechanism for doors closing.
Water outlet for the unit to be provided.

STEAM JACKETTED VESSEL:

All stainless steel 16 SWG steam-cooking unit shall be double jacketed.


The width of the mouth shall be 18 dia. with lid.
The vessel shall be mounted on 16 SWG stainless steel pipes provided with base plates of 4 x 4 10 SWG
SS to facilitate grouting.
The unit shall be provided with tilting handles and necessary standard bearings for smooth operation.
The vessel shall be provided with drain valve and pressure release valve.
The capacity of the vessel 75 lits.
Heliarc welding to be used in all places.
Overall size 750 x 750 x 900 mm.

CHAPPATHI PLATE WITH PUFFER:

The unit shall be open frame structure with under shelf (20 SWG)
Under shelf 6 above ground level.
Stainless panel of 12 width shall be provided on all sides with loovers.
A splash back 150 mm shall be provided.
The chapatti plate shall be a one-piece machine polished 5/8 thick plate.
The puffer shall be a cast iron with vents.
V burner to be used. 2 for chapatti plate and 1 for puffer
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Individual pilots and control valves to be provided.


Spillage/drip tray to be provided in S.S.
Adjustable nylon bullet feet.
O.S. 1300 x 750 x 850 + 150 mm
Chapatti plate - 950 x 700 mm
Puffer plate - 300 x 700 mm.

ALL STAINLESS STEEL 6in1 BAIN MARIE SERVICE COUNTER:

The top of the bain marie shall be 16 SWG S.S.


3 side blinders shall be of 20 SWG
The under shelf 18 SWG shall be 6 above GL
The unit shall be provided with 1/2 G.N.pans (gastro norm pans) 200 mm deep and with 2 Nos. round
containers of 225 mm x 200 mm depth made of 16 SWG with lids.
The unit shall be provided with rotator switch on/off, thermostat and pilot lamp indicator of standard make.
One partition inside the counter on the non-bain marie container side at 12 height from the bottom.
O.S. 1500 x 700 x 850 mm.

A complete discussion of selecting and sizing of all the different types of kitchen equipments is beyond the
scope of this study material. A brief discussion of frequently specified major items of equipment would serve to
illustrate this part of the planning process.

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CHAPTER 5 KITCHEN LAYOUT AND DESIGN


LAYOUT OF COMMERCIAL KITCHENS
After developing the work places, determining the specific equipment to use, and finialising the space
requirements, the food facility consultant is ready to accomplish the layout phase of the planning process.
Some of the equipment layouts for certain functions may already have been completed during the design of the
work places. Now the designer will formalize them, first as rough scetches and ultimately in the form of blue
prints.
The layout process may be described as two separate stages that occur at the same time. One stage deals
with arrangements of individual pieces of equipment, work tables, and sinks with a unit which comprise a
functional area or a functional department i.e. one particular area may be developed for the function of Indian
and Tandoor preparations, (or) salad and sandwish preparation, as a single unit.
The second stage of layout process involves arranging the functional areas into a total facility. For e.g. the
receiving, storing, prepreparation, production, pot washing areas, and non production areas such a rest rooms,
offices are brought together to form the basic floor plan for the facility.
There may be some doubt as to whether these 2 stages of layout are done at the same time. Even though the
designer may be working on one stage or another at any given time, layout design must be considered in term of
both stages. In essence, the layout of the total facility must be considered when laying out the component areas
and vice versa.
Concepts of Layout:
There are 4 concepts of layout for a kitchen plan, they are
1.
2.
3.
4.

Materials or products
Machines and equipments
Workers
Movement.

1.Materials or products
The products should be designed for ease of production.
Raw materials used should require minimum no. of processing steps.
The layout should protect the material from detrimental factors such as moisture, dust, vibration and
temperature changes.
To provide flexible layout to handle change with product
Material storage area should facilitate taking inventory.
Provide facilities for storing waste and scrap materials.
2.Machines and Equipments.
The equipment provided in the layout should be united to the required processes.
Maximum use of the equipments should be planned.
Layout should provide for each operations of the equipment.
Layout should facilitate movement of mobile equipments.
Sufficient access space for equipment maintenance should be provided.
Proper ventilation and exhausting of equipment to be provided.
3. Workers:
Layout should safeguard the workers by eliminating hazards.
Adequate light should be provided.
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Proper exhaust system for fresh air should be provided.


Layout should be free of distracting activities.
Design of work place should correspond to the height of the workers.
Layout should provide adequate work space.

4.Movement:
Layout should provide for easy movement of material and workers.
Provide for smooth flow into and out of work place
Layout should prevent back tracking
Delays in movement of material should be minimised.

Layout configuration
The arrangement of equipment and work places for functional areas is usually is the form of a straight line or
in combination and modifications of straight line configurations. The basic patterns that may be used include;
Single straight line arrangement: This is the simplest of designs, but it is limited in the number of
pieces of equipment or work places that can be arranged. The straight line arrangement may be placed
along a wall or take the form of an island.
L Shaped arrangement: This is a modification of the straight line arrangement to accommodate more
equipments and work places, it is sometimes used where linear space is limited. The L shaped
configuration is suitable for seperating two major groups of equipment. One group of equipment
would be placed on one leg of the L, the other group forming the second leg.
U shaped arrangement: U shaped configuration is ideal for small areas where only one or two
employees are working. One disadvantage of this configuration is that straight line flow through the
area is not possible.
Paralell, back to back arrangement: This configuration is an arrangement of two parallel lines where
the backs of the equipment and/or work places on each line are adjacent to each other. This
arrangement centralizes the utility lines required for the equipment. Some time a short wall is
constructed between the two rows of equipment, in which case provision for cleaning and maintenance
should be provided.
Parallel face to face arrangement: This arrangement utilises two straight lines of equipment and work
places where the front face each other and are separated by an aisle space. This is very common
configuration that can be used in many areas of facility. This configuration requires two separate
utility lines for equipment as compared to the single utility line used in the parallel back to back
arrangement.
The final arrangement for most facilities is usually composed of a combination of configuration of
equipment and work places. Only the smallest of operations would use a single configuration of the
layout facilities.
After arriving at the total area requirement for the main kitchen, the following is the estimated
percentage of production/space for functional areas:-

Functioning area

Receiving
Food storage
Pre-preparation
Cooking
Baking
Potwash - KSD
Traffic aisles

Space allotted %
5
20
20
12
10
5
16

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Garbage wet/dry
Employee facilities
Miscellaneous

5
5
2

If you understand the basic principles of kitchen layout will help take much of the mystery out of the design
process. The most basic layout principle is the work triangle. The work triangle is the line drawn from each of
the three primary work stations in the kitchen - the food storage, cooktop, and sink. By drawing these lines, you
can see the distance youll walk to move to and from each area.

The sum of the ideal triangle is supposed to be between 15 and 22 feet, putting each of the three appliances
within two or three steps of one another.
The three primary kitchen work stations which create the work triangle are:
1. Food storage - Your refrigerator and pantry are the major items here. Cabinetry like lazy susan or swing-out
pantry units add function and convenience. Options like wine racks, spice racks, and roll-out trays help to
organize your groceries.
2. The preparation/cooking station - Your range, oven, microwave, and smaller appliances are found in this
area. Counter space is important in this section. Conserve space by moving appliances off the counter with
appliance garage cabinets and space-saving ideas like towel rods and pot lid racks.
3. The clean-up station - Everyones least favorite activity is one of the kitchens most important - clean-up.
This area is home to the sink, waste disposal, and dishwasher. Cabinetry for this station is designed to organize
with the trash bin cabinet and roll-out tray baskets for storage convenience.
Your kitchen is probably more than just a place to cook and eat. You may choose to include a breakfast bar,
desk, bookshelves, computer station, a TV or whatever in your kitchen.
Triangle reloaded
The work triangle, however is experiencing a remodel of its own. The work triangle was designed for an age
when there was only one cook, and only three appliances (fridge, stove, sink).
Here are a few top tips:

No leg of the triangle is supposed to be less than 4 feet or more than 9 feet.
There should be no human (well, or non human, of course) traffic flow cutting through the triangle.
Place the microwave near the refrigerator for convenience
Walk space should be 42 wide to account for traffic flow and clearance of large appliance doors or
large relatives
Counter space on either side of the range or cooktop should be a minimum of 15 inches
An 18-inch counter should be adjacent to the fridge on the same side as the handle
The food prep area (minimum counter space 36 inches) is ideally located between the fridge and the
sink; If the food prep area is between the sink and the range or cooktop, it will involve more travel.
A lower surface is best for food prep (measure 7 to 8 inches below your elbow height)
In two-cook kitchens, the fridge and range/cooktop are usually shared.
Two triangles can share a leg, but shouldnt overlap
An island with a second sink creates at least one more triangle, and adapts to many uses: wet bar
location, flower cutting and arranging, homework station etc.

Now lets see the layouts:

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The single line (or Pullman) kitchen


This is a smart and simple solution for narrow rooms, ideally with one wall over
10 feet long, without windows or doors. However, this layout causes the longest
journey distances since you often have to walk from one end of the room to the
other. Therefore, its a good idea to place the sink in the middle of the line, with
adequate space separating it from the range.

Ideal for apartments and smaller homes


Works well with the open designs found in many contemporary homes
Small moveable table can provide eating space
Can be enhanced with the addition of an island

The galley kitchen

This shape offers the most efficient use of space, making it the choice of many
professional chefs. The two rows allow room for lots of preparation space, and moving
between activity areas can be as easy as turning around. However, this shape is not ideal
if the corridor is open at both ends, since it can cause traffic congestion.
Make sure there is enough room for opposite drawers to be open at the same time (at
least 48). Another important consideration is to keep the cleaning and cooking areas on
the same side in order to minimize the risk of accidents while moving hot pans between
the sink and range.

Great for smaller kitchens


Appliances are close to one another
Easy for one cook to maneuver
Can easily convert to a U-Shape by closing off one end

The L-shape kitchen

This is a very popular kitchen layout - ideal for a family kitchen, or for entertaining guests,
since it can easily accommodate table and chairs in the same room. Using two adjacent
walls, the kitchen also benefits from the lack of through-traffic. The sink, range and fridge
should be separated by a preparation area.

Very flexible layout design


Major appliances can be placed in a variety of areas
Work areas are close to each other
Can easily convert to a U-Shape with a cabinet leg addition

The U-shape kitchen


The use of three full walls in a room offers the perfect working kitchen. The fridge,
range and sink can be spaced out for maximum efficiency and convenience. This is
great news for those who take your cooking seriously, as it provides the best workflows
with the shortest distances around the kitchen. This shape also allows for large amounts
of countertop and storage space.

Perfect for families who use their kitchens a great deal

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Provides plenty of counter space


Efficient work triangle
Can convert one cabinet leg into a breakfast bar

The island kitchen

A very popular kitchen type, the island layout is perfect if you plan to entertain but
requires more floor space. An independent island unit can face a dining or living area,
allowing the cook to socialise while preparing. A sink here provides the optimal
arrangement in terms of the kitchens working triangle. Otherwise, a cooktop with a
canopy over the island can form a stunning focal point to the kitchen.

The G-Shaped Kitchen

Built very much like the U-Shaped with the addition of an elongated partial wall, the
G-Shaped kitchen offers a great deal of space.Ideal for larger families needing extra
storage space Plenty of counter and cabinet space Multiple cooks can function well in
this layout Can convert one cabinet leg into a breakfast bar or entertaining area

PLANNING OF VARIOUS SUPPORTING SERVICES


Pot and Pan Washing:
The pot and pan washing function is also preferably done in a separate area instead of combining it with
other areas as some small operations may be inclined to do. The basic pot and pan washing function can be
handled with a 3 compartment sink and drain boards, sufficient space for storing the soil utensils have to be
provided.
In some operations, a large storage area for soiled utensils may be required because they are not washed as
soon as they are received. This occurs when the same personnel who wash dish, also wash the pots and pans.
Pot washing machine are considered for large food facility if they can be economically justified.
A pot wash area is suppresed by 6 than the regular floor level of the kitchen, to avoid the water flowing into
the main kitchen area. Heavy jet washers with water at a temperature of 88 degrees is used to wash pots
because they easily remove the dirt and fat and make cleaning easy. Since the pot wash area becomes very
messy with waste food and fat, anti-skid tiles are recommended for the floor and white glazed tiles on the three
side walls upto 8 feet height. A minimum area of 10 x 10 is required.
Wet Grinding Area:
In India wet grinding area is considered to be one of the supporting services to the main kitchen. There will
be a minimum of two wet grinders in any small hotels, so that there is a stand by in case of breakdown. Wet
grinders are tailor made and are of different capacities. The ideal functional area required for a wet grinding is
10 x 4. The area has to have anti-skid tiles for the floor and glaze tiles on the wall to maintain hygienic
conditions.

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Chefs Cabin:
The chefs cabin has to be ideally located, so that, he has a clear view of the entire kitchen. In some
organizations and some hotels the Chef cabin is being utilized to store the imported stock of ingredients like,
spices, wine etc. Ideally 10 x 10 is required for the chefs cabins.
Chefs Larder:
This is a substore which is located within the kitchen, in the control of the chef. The quantities of material
drawn for the day from the main food store is stored in the chefs larder, since there is no space to store this in
the individual kitchen, the drawn material is stored in a place with the kitchen, which is called as chefs larder.
Chefs larder is convenient for the cooks, because they can draw material at any given time of the day even after
the main food store is closed for the day in the evening. Large quantities of food material should not be stored
in a chef larder because it blocks the capital of the hotel.

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CHAPTER 8 ENERGY CONSERVATION


Energy conservation measures for Hotel Industry
DOS AND DONTS

FOOD & BEVERAGE DEPARTMENT


This department consumes approximately 25% of the total energy cost so the opportunities to reduce energy
consumption in this area are excellent. Some helpful guidelines are given below.

A. FOOD PREPARATION - KITCHEN


01. Determine the preheating time for ovens, grills, boilers, fryers & other cooking equipments. Generally
speaking 10 to 20 minutes should be sufficient.
02. When preheating ovens, set thermostat at the desired temperature. Ensure thermostat controls are operating
the properly.
03. Determine cooking capacity of ovens; use smaller or more energy efficient oven when possible.
04. Use additional fry units, boilers, oven etc. only for peak business hours.
05. Load & unload ovens quickly. If an oven door is kept open for a second, it losses about 1% of its heat.
06. Cover pots & panswitch lids while cooking.
07. Turn off cooking & heating units that are not needed.
08. Oven should not be opened during operation. Food will cook faster and lose less moisture if oven is kept
closed.
09. Frozen food should be thawed in refrigerators. It will thaw easily & reduce power demand on the
refrigerator.
10. When using gas range for full heat condition, the tip of the flame should just touch the bottom of the pan or
kettle. Yellow flame is the indication of inefficient, incomplete combustion and wastage of gas. Clean burners,
pilot light regularly. If flames are still yellow, have gas-air mixture adjusted.
11. A blue flame with a distinct inner cone is best. Flame should never flout but should just wipe the surface.
Adjust flame until it is entirely blue.
12. Thoroughly clean pot & pans to ensure there is no carbon build up at the bottom.
13. Placing foil under range burners & griddles will improve the operational efficiency.
14. Fryers need to be cleaned & oil filtered at least once a day.
15. Cooking rang burners should always be smaller than the kettle or pot place on it.
16. Have broken door hinges and cracks of oven doors attended to immediately.
17. Turn off Rotary Toaster when not in use. Use pop up toasters on lean timings.
18. Shut off steam Heater on dishwasher when dishwasher in not in use.
19. Use hot water only when necessary.
20 In pot washing area fill sink for washing utensils instead of running water.
21. Cleaning should be done during day hours if possible. Do not use dishwasher till full load of soiled dishes is
available.
22. Turn off lights in the walk in refrigerators and freezers when not required. Lights not only waste energy
but add load to the box.
23. Close tightly all walk-in doors after operating them.
24. Allow hot foods to air cool before placing in refrigerators.
25. Do not store items in front of the refrigerant coils or fans in a manner that restricts air circulation.
26. Fully stored refrigerators and walk-ins use energy more efficiently than partially stored ones.
27. Be sure foods requiring refrigeration are promptly placed in storage after delivery.
28. Turn off supply and exhaust fans in kitchens stores etc. when areas are not in use.
29. Report and leakage of gas immediately.
30. Keep records of all break down of equipments to find out accident prone/uneconomical equipment.
31. Turn on equipment only as needed. Make sure they are turn off at night.
32. Carefully follow instructions in the users guide for all equipments.
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33. Keep equipment and door seals clean and free of debris to prevent energy waste.
34. Reduce peak loading. Your electrical bill is determined by two factors:(a) demand charge (if applicable)
(b) total consumption in kWh
1 You may achieve this by:(a) Intensive cooking such as baking and roasting during non-peak demand hours.
(b) Use minimum number of electric appliances at a time. Stager their operation.
(c) Try to use electrical appliances between 6 AM to 10 AM or after mid night if possible.
35. Equipment should be turned on at specific time to a specific temperature and turned off at times when not
needed. A 10-15 minutes preheat period is requires only 7 to 15 minutes for pre-heating.
36. Clean heating elements at least weakly. This may even be done daily if you do high volume frying.
37. Cooking foods in least volume possible for most economic use of energy.
38 If keeping electric burner on for shorter period is inevitable, when they are not in actual use keep the
temperature low until you are ready to cook. This will even prolong the life of burner besides conserving
energy.
39. Avoid to turn on gas burners until you are ready to cook.
40. If possible, fill cooking vessels according to capacity. Large cooking vessel if used for cooking lesser
quantity of food will consume more energy.
41. Use flat bottom pots and pans for maximum heat transfer.
42. Group kettles and pots on close top ranges.
43. Turn down heat as soon as food begins to boil and maintain liquids at simmer.
44. Clear boil overs and spill overs promptly to avoid build up of carbon deposits which will effect the
efficiency of equipment adversely.
45. Always try to use roasting and baking oven to full capacity for maximum utilization of heat. If possible wait
till oven is loaded upto its optimum capacity prior to switching on.
46. Regular & prompt cleaning of rotary toaster saves energy.
47. Avoid frequent opening of refrigerator doors. Door opening if planned, saves energy.
48. Do not allow frosting on refrigerator coils to save energy.
49. Close & preferably lock ice cuber bins after removing ice for use.
50. Using hot water for cooking consumes less energy as compared to cold water.
51. Switching off heater when cooking is over, not only saves energy it is safer as well.
52. Do not use dishwasher until you have sufficient load
B. BANQUETS
01. While air conditioning is on, try to avoid using candles on the table. They add a tremendous heat load.
02. When renting a space for function try to fit the space to the size of function. Do not rent a 300 person ball
room to 50 people even if the room can be divided. Remembers you are spending almost same on air
conditioner of the space.
03. When setting up for a function, make certain that heating, cooling and lighting are off until hour to 1 hour
before function starts. Turn off systems as soon as the function is over. In fact, air conditioning can be turned off
even hours before function finishes. Air conditioning effect will stay for hour.
04. If you have a choice, try to avoid function that requires the addition of many spotlight or other heat
producing equipment.
05. Assign an individual responsible for turning lights on and off.
06. Keep the light off whenever any function area is vacant or unoccupied.
07. While Air-conditioning is on ensure that all doors and windows are properly closed.
08. During winter season try to use outside air for cooling.
09. Review lighting levels and prepare new standard lamping plans for meetings rooms to reduce unnecessary
wastage of energy.
C. RESTAURANTS
01. Reschedule cleaning of are during day light hours.
02. Avoid using electrical light while setting the table whenever possible.
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03. Turn off air-conditioning hour prior to closing the restaurant.
04. Keep wall and ceiling properly cleaned for better light reflection.
05. Turn off lights when not needed.
06. Review lighting level to provide minimum acceptable lighting level in all food service area.
2 FRONT OFFICE AND LOBBY MANAGERS
01. Front office can play an important role in energy conservation. When occupancy in unfortunately not high,
front office should rent room by virtue of their location. In summer, rooms on the east or north sides of the
building will be cooler. Also, corner rooms with two outside exposures will be warmer. Rooms close to heat
source should also be avoided if possible. This would certainly help reduce air conditioning load and result in
saving of energy.
02. Front office should make sure that the rooms which are not to be rented out during lean period are not air
conditioned or ventilated unnecessarily. If any one of these is to be rented. out, air conditioning or ventilation
can be started hour before the guest moves in.
03. Lower all lighting levels during late night and day light hours. Turn off all lights in offices when these are
closed.
04. If possible, instruct shopkeepers to reduce the amount of shop and display lighting. Although, in most cases,
shopkeepers do pay for their electric consumption, the lighting load still affects hotels cooling systems.
05. Lobby, managers should ensure that Lobby Main Entrance doors are not unduly kept opened. A door
opening will result in ingress of heat from outside and adversely effect air conditioning.
06. Lobby Managers, in course of their duty, do take rounds of the property. They on their rounds, should ensure
that no unnecessary lights or water tape are left ON by careless staff.
07. During day light hours reduce electric lighting load in Lobby etc. to minimum to make full use of natural
light.
08. During low occupancy period try to block complete floor. If this is not practicable, attempt should be made
to block as far as possible total wings of individual floor.
09. As soon as guest checks out, Front office should inform Housekeeping so that all lights of the vacant room is
switched off at the earliest.
10. Report broken windowpanes to stop ingress of air.
11. Inspect public toilets periodically and report leading W.C. and faucets top stop water unnecessary
illumination.
HOUSE KEEPING DEAPRTMENT
The major space in a hotel is devoted to guest rooms and corridors. Number and variety of ways to conserve
energy in these areas are startling. Although the energy conserved in one room or corridor does not seem
significant, but when multiplied by 100 or so rooms, it does become significant. Some of the opportunities for
Housekeeping Department where they can significantly contribute to energy saving listed below:01. Turn off guest room lights when rooms are not physically occupied.
02. Use minimum lighting when making up and cleaning rooms. Use natural light whenever possible.
03. Turn off corridor lights, or reduce it to 50% when natural light is available.
04. Turn off lights in linen rooms, storage room and maids closets when not in use.
05. Check your areas for light level. Reduce number of lights if possible. Use lower wattage bulbs wherever
possible.
06. Have lamp shades cleaned at once. Bulb gives more light with clean lampshades.
07. Keep walls and ceiling walls cleaned for better light reflection.
08. Switch off music & TV Sets when rooms are not physically occupied.
09. Turn off HVAC system when rooms are not physically occupied.
10. Report water leaks immediately
11. Keep windows closed and curtain on. The ingress of hot air in summer and cold air during winter contribute
to very large waste or energy. For example 6 wide window opened just one inch would allow hot air
necessitating 1.76 kwh to cool. This in terms of monetary value, will cost approx. Rs. 1150/- per hour.
12. Keep room hot water temperature at lowest acceptable limit.
13. Minimize use of lights during night cleaning by switching on only those lights which are actually required to
clean a particular area.
14. Bellhops may be advised to leave only such lights on which are actually needed by the guest while leaving
the room.

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3 LAUNDARY DEPARTMENT
One of the large consumers of water and heat, the hotel laundry is an outlet that can significantly reduce energy
consumption with no effect on guest comfort or satisfaction. Some of the important points to achieve desired
results are listed below:01. Have lights turned off when not in use.
02. Periodically clean lamps and lights fixtures.
03. Clean and wash walls, floors and ceiling
04. Operate washing machines at full load, partial loads may require same amount water as full loads.
05. Check and record your water consumption. Compare water consumption daily to find wastages, if any.
06. Do not leave water taps running.
07. Consider using cold water detergents. It will greatly reduce energy consumption.
o

08. Reduce hot water temperature to 120 F.


09. Repair or replace all hot water piping insulation.
10. All steam line values should be checked for leaks. That is, you should be able to shut off steam to any
machine not in use keeping steam supply main open.
11. If possible use final rinse water for 1st wash.
12. Reduce time between loads to prevent tumblers from cooling down.
13. Air line should be checked for leaks.
14. Periodically clean exhaust duct and blower of lint and dust.
15. Keep steam pressure at lowest possible level.
16. Shut off steam valve whenever machine is not being utilised.
17. Keep radiator coils and fins free from dirt all the times.
18. Ensure all steam traps in perfect working order.
19. Keep an eye on the preventive maintenance schedule of all laundry equipments by Engineering Department
to ensure timely compliance.
20. Ensure that Drying tumblers and washing machines are kept clean and free from scale at all times.
21. Switch off laundry exhaust fans when laundry is closed.
22. Ensure that extractors are working properly. Incomplete extraction increased load on dryer and consumes
more energy for drying.
23. Reschedule machine operation to reduce peak demand charges.
24. Inform boiler room when steam is not required so that boilers can be shut down to save fuel.
ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT
An analysis of Hotels show that approximately 60% of then energy consumed in a property is in the equipment
and machinery rooms, boiler rooms, air conditioning rooms, water treatment and pump areas and sewage plants.
Engineering Department is responsible for running and maintenance this equipment. They are also concerned
with entire building and complex.
Keeping the above in view, it is imperative that the Engineering Department operates these equipments at peak
efficiency. Engineering Department can help conserve energy in the following Ways:
01. By acting as an advisor to various departments to help them achieve their respective Energy Management
goals.
02. By ensuring efficient and economic operation of all equipments.
03. They must maintain history card of each machine so that in-efficient and uneconomical machines can be
identified and eliminated to save the wasteful uses of energy. This will also help in deciding the preventive
maintenance schedule of each machine.
4 Some guidelines to achieve energy management goals at little or no cost are listed below:HVAC SYSTEMS PLANT ROOM
01. Turn off HVAC machinery in all unoccupied spaces.
02. Eliminate or reduce duct air leakage.
03. While operating chillers ensure following:- As far as possible keep leaving chilled water temperature on the higher side.
- Reduce entering condenser water temperature
- Maintain proper refrigerant charge.
- Eliminate refrigerant and charge.
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- Maintain proper flow rate of condenser water
- Operate chillers in proper sequence.
- Operate condenser and cooler pumps in proper sequence.
04. Lower hot water temperature for heating when outside temperature rises.
05. When chiller is not operating, make certain that chilled and condenser water pumps are shut down.
06. Use proper water treatment to prevent fouling or sealing of condensers, cooling towers and piping.
07. Repair all hot, chilled and condenser water lines, valves and pumps. A considerable quantity of water is lost
through leaky pump glands which can be saved easily.
08. Repair or replace damaged hot or chilled water line insulation.
09. Check cooling water tower bleed off periodically.
10. Check efficiency of chiller against manufacturers specifications by checking water temperature and
pressure drop in and out of chillers and condensers and motor amperage on compressor.
11. Condenser tubes should be kept clean.
12. Stop all refrigerant leaks.
13. Check daily purge operation on chiller for signs of air leaks
14. Remove algae growth from cooling towers.
15. Check all belt drives. Replace worn out or frayed belts.
16. Clean AHU coils and fans periodically, check chilled water sample to know the internal condition of coil.
Do periodic cleaning of coil.
17. AHU filter must be cleaned periodically.
18. Check all thermostat for correct functioning.
BOILERS
01. Check Boilers Room for negative air pressure which can reduce combustion efficiency.
02. Avoid multiple boiler operation. One boiler operating at 80% is more efficient than two at 40%.
03. Operate boilers at as low steam pressure as possible.
04. Avoid excessive boiler blow down.
05. Clean burner nozzle periodically.
06. Pre-heat the fuel to correct temperature before injection.
07. Maintain a good water treatment programme.
08. Repair and replace if necessary boiler and flue insulation that is damaged.
09. Repair and replace all worn or damaged steam and condensate piping insulation.
10. Insulate all condensate and steam pipe line flanges.
11. Check and repair all steam traps.
12. Eliminate all steam leaks.
13. Check fuel lines for leaks.
14. Check combustion control in order to maintain maximum efficiency.
15. Check all safety valves for any leaks.
5 HEATING
01. Check and back wash water filtration plant for higher efficiency and reduction in water system scaling.
02. Check water analysis periodically.
03. Repair at once all leaks, dripping faucets and shower heads.
04. Check toiler flush valves for any water leaks.
o

05. Lower hot water temperature to 120 F.


06. Check and adjust swimming pool make up water (not to exceed 10%).
07. Shut down pool filtration plant when pool is not in use.
08. Reduce lawn and shrubbery watering to absolute minimum.
09. Check water regulating valves on water coolers, refrigerant units and ice machines.
10. Consider sprint loaded, self closing water valves in Kitchens.

BUILDING AND GROUNDS


01. Seal all exterior windows, doors cracks and openings to reduce outdoor air leaks.
02. Reduce gap under the doors of air conditioned spaces to minimum.
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03. Check grounds for leaking pipes underground.
04. Check and repair all door closers.
05. Make certain all electric connections are tight.
06. Keep all contacts clean.
07. Check Lighting levels in all Engineering spaces to see if they can be reduced.
08. Replace all incandescent fixtures with fluorescent and energy efficient lamps like PL-9 or SL-25 etc.
09. Keep all light shades clean. Use shades that allow more light to pass or reflect.
10. Do not switch on lights unless necessary.
11. Arrange schedules for turning or reducing lights in guest corridors, lobby area, function spaces, restaurants,
bars, shops, kitchens etc.
12. Make a house inspection of all departments to see that energy conservation is being observed.

CHAPTER 10 PLANNING FOR PHYSICALLY


CHALLENGED
The Kempinski Hotel Mall of the Emirates has been designed while keeping in mind the needs of our
handicapped guests. Following features are available:
Public Areas:

Ramps giving access to most public spaces such as the lobby, the restaurants and public restrooms
Seated check-in and check-out available in the reception area or the guest room.
Escape chairs available in all fire exists of the guest room floors

Guest Rooms:

Handicapped-accessible rooms feature connecting doors to another handicapped-accessible room


The guest rooms are located close to the elevators and fire exits
Entry door is 94 cm wide
Floor to ceiling mirror available in the room
The safety box are installed at shoulder-height of a sitting person (100 cm)
Lower cloth rails in certain areas e.g. left cupboard, small rail
The top of the mattress is 70 cm high and 46 cm when special mattress base is installed (upon request)
The bedrooms feature a bench in front of the beds with a height of 50 cm
Along the length of the bed (210 cm) between bed and cupboard width of 155 cm maneuvering space
next to bed
Plug Socket in 30 cm height
Light switch in 73 cm hight
A/C control 75 cm height
Service in the bathroom in 90 cm height

Bathroom in the Guest room:


1) General

Door to the bathroom is 120 cm wide with a threshold of 1 cm


Door to WC and shower is 88 cm wide with a threshold of 2 cm

2) Sink

Clearance below the sink is 69 cm in height between the floor finish and the apron to allow access to
wheel chairs users

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The sink is 85 cm high


Faucets are lever-operated
Mirror in 90 cm hight

3) Shower

Size of: width of 160 cm x 190 cm


Shower equipped with a marble bench (height 44 cm) depth: 35 cm
The shower spray unit features a hose of 145 cm length, that can be used both as a fixed shower head
and a hand-held unit

4) Bath tub

In-tub seats provided upon request


Grab bars are provided
The shower spray unit features a hose of 115 cm length, that can be used both as a fixed shower head
and a hand-held unit

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CHAPTER 11 PROJECT MANAGEMENT


NETWORK ANALYSIS

(PERT and CPM)

Introduction
PERT and CPM are two well known network techniques or models especially useful for planning, scheduling
and executing large time-bound projects which involve careful co-ordination of a variety of complex and
inter-related activities and resources. PERT is the abbreviated form for Program Evaluation and Review
Techniques and CPM for Critical Path Method. Both the techniques were developed in U.S.A. during the late
1950s. PERT was developed by US Navy Engineers to plan and control the huge Polaris Submarine Program.
CPM was developed by E.I. Dupont Nemours & Co., U.S.A. and the Univac Division of Remington Rand
Corporation in 1956 in connection with the periodic overhauling and maintenance of chemical plants. It
resulted in reducing the shut-down period from 130 hours to 90 hours and saving hours and saving the company
$1 million.

Both the techniques have been applied successfully to improve efficiency of execution of large projects within
pre-determined time and cost limits. Any new venture may be regarded as a project, such as constructing a new
plant, bridge, dam, shopping centre or residential complex, design of a new aircraft, manufacture of ships, R& D
projects, introduction of a new product, installing pipeline, floating a new issue of shares, major repairs and
overhaul of plant and machinery units, organizing a large conference/convention, handling an earthquake relief
work and so on.

PERT and CPM converge on several aspects, and are almost treated as twins; there are, however, some points
of difference between them which will be discussed later. The techniques recognize the systems or inter-related
nature of activities on large work projects and translate the job proposed into a model by drawing a network of
the activities involved. They are used in planning and controlling (monitoring) the projects. Planning in this
context implies developing the overall layout of the project with estimates of time, the resources required and
the detailed time scheduling and sequence of various jobs to be performed. The control, on the hand takes place
during the work on the project. Gradually as resources get used and completion times are obtained, project
management techniques can be used to reallocate, if necessary, the rescues, according to the revised criticality
rankings of the jobs remaining to be done. In general the application of PERT and CPM is intended to answer
the following:
1.
2.
3.

The expected project completion date


The scheduled start and completion time for the different activities comprising the project
The key activities of the project which must be completed at the scheduled time (or else would result in
delaying the entire project completion time) and require close managerial attention, the time period by
which non-key activities may be delayed without causing a delay in the completion of the whole
project.

In fact, PERT and CPM are suitable for any situation where
a.
b.
c.

The project consists of well-defined collection of activities or tasks


The activities can be started and terminated independently of each other, even
employed on the various activities are not independent.
The activities are ordered so that they can be performed in a technological sequence.
relations exist which preclude the start of certain activities until others are completed.
overhead water tank in a high-rise building cannot be installed until the top floor of
has been constructed.

if the resources
Thus precedence
For example, the
the infrastructure

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Advantages of using networking techniques (like PERT/CPM) as management tools of project control

Compels management to plan a project before it begins.


Requires an analytical approach to planning
Separates the planning and scheduling functions.
Permits the planner to concentrate on the relationship of items of work without considering their
occurrence in time.
Allows the planner to develop a more detailed plan, since he is concerned with how the work will be
performed, not when.
Results in a more realistic schedule.
Clearly shows dependency between work tasks.
Facilities control of a project.
Simplifies maintenance of the plan and schedule.
Informs of managements current status regarding the project.
Focuses managements attention on critical items of work.
Gives management the ability to assess consequences of anticipated changes to the plan.
Makes it easy to relate other functions of project control to the basic planning and scheduling function.
Meets contractual requirements of government, private industry and customers.

The application of PERT and CPM for project management involves the following steps:

1.

Establishment of objectives: The first step in the development of a PERT network is the
establishment of objectives. There will be a major objective to be accomplished, linked by supporting
objectives. When these are identified, they must be linked together so as to enable to planner to see the
project in its true perspective.

2.

Identification of all key activities and events or phases for completion of the project. In this
connection, the term activity is defined as an operation or job to be carried out which consumes time
and resources. In the AOA network diagram, activities are denoted by arrows (). An event is
defined as a beginning or completion of an activity. It is denoted by a circle (O). while identifying the
key activities, sequencing activities and estimating activity times, both technical and managerial
persons should work together.

3.

Determination of sequence of activities and events in a project and arranging them in a network that
brings out their interrelationship to satisfy the technological sequencing requirements. The network
diagram so constructed is a beginning point for the project. For the sake of convenience, each event is
given a serial number. In a project, some activities have to be undertaken sequentially while others
may be carried out concurrently. All these form part of the project network. The network so formed,
shows a number of paths of activities and events from beginning to completion.

4.

Determination and assignment of time for starting and completion of each activity in the network,
which will help to arrive at the total time required for completion of the project. In CPM only one time
rating per activity is used. In PERT, three estimates of time span for completion of each activity are
evaluated. They are optimistic time (shortest time denoted by t o), pessimistic time (longest time
denoted by tp) and normal time (most likely time denoted by t m). After these three time estimates have
been made, they are combined into a single workable time value known as expected time (denoted by
te). This is done algebraically by using a weighted average.
te
=
tp + 4tm + tp
6
where te is the expected time, to optimistic time, tp pessimistic time and tm normal time.

The three time estimates are used in PERT because the originators of PERT thought that the estimated
time for an activity is better described by a probability distribution than by a single estimate.

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5.

Determination of the total period of time required for completion of project. This calls for
identification of the sequence of those activities, the completion of which is critical for the timely
completion of entire project. The line connecting the critical activities from start to finish of the project
is the critical path. The completion time of activities along the critical path cannot be delayed.
Any delay in completion of activities that lie on the critical path, will delay the entire project.
The critical path is the path with the longest duration (compared to all the other possible paths) running
through the network in a continuous manner from the beginning to the end. It is of the longest duration
since it allows for the fact that certain activities cannot be started unless certain other related activities
that precede them are completed. It also is the period of time required for completion of the project.
Other useful figures that may be calculated for control are event slacks, activity floats, variability
duration and the probability of completing the project or part of it by or within a particular time.

6.

Implementing the network model created as a tool of control once the project commences. This
stage calls for periodic updating of the network amongst other tings to monitor the progress of the
project. This is done by comparing the actual activity completion times with their estimated times.
Necessary changes are made in schedules in case of intolerable deviations to ensure completion of the
project as close to the target time as possible.

7.

Resource Allocation and Scheduling: Based on the network calculations and assessment of resources
required for each of the activities, the plan is translated into a time schedule. If it is possible to
expedite the activities by incurring additional cost, the economics of doing so are also examined before
finalising the schedule.

Each person who participates in the application of PERT to the control of the project should have some basic
familiarity with the general nature of the work and with the ultimate objective desired.

Types of network diagrams


In general there are two ways in which network diagrams may be constructed. CPM and PERT (which is what
is taught here), both use the Activity on Arrow (AOA) manner of representing networks. STUDENTS WILL
FOLLOW THIS AND ONLY THIS MANNER (AOA) OF DRAWING NETWORKS. SIMPLY
SPEAKING THESE DIAGRAMS REPRESENT THE ACTIVITY ON THE ARROW (AND THE
EVENT ON NODE) IN PRESENTING THE PROJECT LOGIC.

For information purpose only, there exists another manner called the Activity On Node (AON) diagram to
present the project logic. In this, the activities are represented on the node (and not the arrow) and the
precedence relationships are represented by the arrows. This technique of project networking was developed by
John W Fondahl in USA and by Bernard Roy in France, at about the same time when PERT and CPM came into
existence. All of these techniques were developed independent of each other. Fondahl called his technique of
AON diagram by the name precedence diagram. The AON diagram is claimed to have some merits as
compared to AOA diagram as it does not require dummy activities, and because it is considered to be simple
and easier to explain as well as to understand and facilitates revision and updating. Irrespective of these
advantages, the AOA diagrams continue to be more popular than the AON diagram and the AOA diagrams add
dynamism to the network. Both types have their relative advantages and disadvantages and have carved their
respective niches in terms of application and usage.

Assumptions of PERT/CPM

1.

A project can be sub-divided into a set of predictable and independent activities.

2.

The precedence relations of project activities can be completely represented be a non-cyclical network
graph in which each activity connects directly into its immediate successors.
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3.

Activity items may be estimated either as single-point estimates or as three-point PERT estimates and
are independent of each other.

4.

In CPM, the duration of an activity is linearly (and inversely) related to the cost of resources applied to
the activity. (This means less the time more the cost as it happens when crashing activity time).

5.

In PERT model, activity duration is assumed to follow the beta distribution, the standard deviation of
the distribution is assumed to be 1/6th of its range, the mean is approximated by 1/6 th (to+4tm+tp) and the
variance in length of project is assumed to be equal to the sum of the variances of activities on the
critical path.

6.

Cost time-trade off for deriving the cost curve slopes are subjective again and call for great deal of
expertise of the technology as well as genuine efforts to estimate.

Constructing the Network


A project network is a directed graph that consists of finite collection of elements called events (or nodes)
together with a subset of the ordered pairs (i, j,) of nodes called activities (or jobs or tasks or operations). In
other words, a network is the graphical representation of logically and sequentially connected arrows and nodes
representing activities and events of a project. (Also called arrow diagrams) diagrams show the
operations/activities to be performed to complete a job, the sequence and inter-relationship of various activities
involved.

In networks, an activity is a clearly identifiable and manageable operation or an element of work entailed in the
project and it is represented by an arrow. An event (or node), is the and/or finish of an activity or group of
activities. Others terms used are junction, milestone or stage. In general milestone is reserved for particularly
significant events that require special monitoring. An activity arrow (i, j,) extends between two nodes, the tail
node (or event), i, represents the start of an activity and the head node (event) j, represents the completion of an
activity as shown below:

Activity
(i)
Starting event

(j,)
completion event

Activities may also be termed jobs, tasks or operations. Activities which must be completed before a certain
other activity starts are called the predecessor activity starts are called successors activities.

Predecessor activity: Activities that must be completed immediately prior to the start of another activity called
predecessor activities.

Successor activities: Activities that cannot be started until one or more of the other activities are completed, but
immediately succeed them are called successor activities.

Concurrent activity: Activities which can be accomplished at the same time are known as concurrent activities.

Path: An unbroken chain of activity arrows connecting the initial event to the final event via other events is
called a path.

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Rules of Network Construction

Following are some of the rules that have to be followed while constructing a network:
1.

Each defined activity is represented by one and only one arrow in the network. Therefore, no single
activity can be represented more than once in the network. These arrows should be kept straight and
not curved. Sometimes bending activity arrows so that the main portion of the arrows both straight and
parallel to the main horizontal axis of the diagram will improve the appearance of the network. This is
illustrated below:
1

2
1

Angles between arrows should be as large as possible. Arrows should not cross each other. Where crossing
cannot be avoided, the method shown below should be adopted.

3
1

2.

Before an activity can be undertaken all activities preceding it must be completed. Thus, a network
should be developed on the basis of logical or technical dependencies between various activities of the
project. The discipline of networking requires that the project be considered in a thorough and analytic
manner and the predecessor-successor relationships between the various activities clearly laid.

3.

The arrows depicting various activities are indicative of the local precedence only. The length and
bearing of the arrows are of no significance, although arrows in network diagrams should be drawn to
show time flow left to right i.e. in the forward direction.
The arrow direction indicates the general progression in time. Each activity must start and end in a
node (or event). The tail of an activity represents the point in time at which the activity start occurs
and the node marking this start is called the tail event for this event. The head of an activity represents
the point in time at which the activity completion occurs and the node marking this termination is
called the head event for that activity.

4.

5.

When a number of activities terminate at one event, it indicates that no activity emanating from that
event may start unless all activities terminating there have been completed.

3
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4
5

Fig.(I)

Fig.(ii)

6.

Events are identified by numbers. Each event identified by a number higher than that allotted to the
event immediate preceding one. I.e., events should be numbered such that for every arrow (i,j) (i, < j).
In assigning numbers to the events, care should be taken that there is no duplication of event numbers
in a network. The event numbered 1 denotes start of the project and is called initial node (or event)
while the event carrying the highest number denotes the final event in the network. A network should
have only one initial and one terminal node. (Students are advised to keep the project start event and
the project completion event in a straight line for a more aesthetic looking network diagram).

7.

The activities are identified by the numbers of their starting and the ending events. They are expressed
as i,j, where i represents the starting event, or the tail node number, and j represents the ending event or
the head node number. Naturally head nodes always have a higher number than tail nodes. No two
activities may be described by the same set of ordered pairs. All activities emerging (or taking off)
from event 1 should not be preceded by any other activity or activities. In fig.I activities B, C, D and E
can be expressed as 3-6, 4-6, 5-6 and 6-7 respectively. Event 3 represents the beginning of the activity
B while event 6 represents the completion of activities B, C and D, and the beginning of the activity E.

8.

An event which represents the joint completion of more than one activity is known as a merge event,
while an event which portrays the initiation of more than one activity is called the burst event. In
Fig.(I) above event 6 and event 2 in Fig (ii) is a burst event.

9.

Parallel activities between two events, without intervening events, are prohibited. Thus two or more
activities cannot be identified by the same beginning and ending events. By implication, any two
events should not be connected with more than one arrow. When two or more activities in a project
have the same head and tail events, dummy activities are needed in constructing the network. The
figure on the left is the wrong way to represent the two activities while the figure on the right shows the
correct representation of the two activities using a dummy.
WRONG

RIGHT

A dummy used in this manner is called an identity dummy. Dummies do not consume time or
resources. As a result of using dummy activities, other activities can be identified by unique endevents. Dummy activities are usually shown by arrows with dashed lines.

Dummy activities are also very useful in establishing proper logical relationships in the networks
which cannot, otherwise, be adequately represented. Known as logic dummies they are used when two
chains of activities have a common event, although they are in themselves wholly or partly independent

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of each other. Thus, when two or more activities have some, but not all, of their inputs in common, the
use of a logic dummy resolves the problem of representation.

Dummy

If a dummy is the only activity emanating from a node, it can be eliminated. If a dummy activity converging to
its final node, it can be eliminated. Dummy activities which portray predecessor relations that are already
implied by other activities may be removed as redundant.

A third reason to use dummies is to improve the layout of a network when they may not be strictly necessary to
represent the logic involved. This often happens at the start or finish of a network where a number of activities
either start from a certain point, or coverage to a particular point. In this way, the need for curved activities is
avoided.

10.

Looping is not permitted.


3

loop

Note: 2-3-5-4 forms loop which is not allowed in drawing networks.

11.

Dangling is not permitted.


3

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4

In this network activity 4-5 dangles which is not permitted when drawing network diagrams.
Numbering the events (Fulkersons Rule)

After the network is drawn in a logical sequence, every event is assigned a number which is placed inside the
node circle. The number sequence should be such so as to reflect the flow of the network. The rule devised D R
Fulkerson is used for the purpose of numbering and involves the following steps.

1.
2.
3.
4.

The initial event has all outgoing arrows with no incoming arrow is numbered 1.
Delete all the arrows coming out of node 1. This will convert some more nodes (at least one) into
initial events. Number these events 2,3
Delete all the arrows going out from these numbered events to create more initial events. Assign the
next numbers to these events.
Continue until the final or terminal node, which has all arrows coming in with no arrow going out, is
numbered.

Critical Path and Float Times

Consider the following notations for the purpose of calculating the various times of activities.
Estij
=
Earliest start time for activity (i,j) is the one at which the activity can start without affecting
the total project time.
LEstij =
Latest start time for activity (i,j) is the latest possible time by which it must start without
affecting the total project time.
Eftij
=
Earliest finish time for activity (i,j) is the earliest possible time by which it must finish without
affecting the total project time.
Lftij
=
Latest finish time for activity (i,j) is the latest possible time by which it must get completed
without delaying the project completion.
tij

Duration of the activity.

It may be noted that Eft

Es+t

and

Lst

= Lft- t.

With reference to events


Earlist event time (E) for any event is the earliest possible time by which all the activities emanating
(stemming) from that event can be started for the project completion time to remain unaltered. Effectively, E
for any event is the maximum of the Eft of all activities terminating at that event.

Latest event time (L) for any event is the latest possible time by which all the activities terminating at that
event can be ought to be completed without the project completion time being altered. Effectively, L for any
event is the minimum of the Lst of all activities at that event.

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Critical Path: The critical path in a network diagram is the longest continuous chain of activities (i.e.a path
along which it takes the longest duration) through the network starting from first to the last event and is shown
by thick line or double lines. All activities lying on this critical part are called critical activities, as any delay in
their execution will lead to a delay in the completion of the entire project.

How to find the critical path using forward pass and backward pass technique

Set the earliest time of the first event (node) to 0.


Add the activity time(s) commencing from this first event to this to get the earliest time (T E) of the
subsequent event/s. Now start with the earliest time of the subsequent event (which you have just
calculated) and add the activity times of those activities emanating from it. Keep doing this in the
forward direction following the arrowheads until you reach the last node. In case two or more
arrowheads converge on the same subsequent node select the greater of the choice of times as the
(TE) for that subsequent activity.
You have now completed the forward pass.
Now set the latest time of the last event equal to the earliest time you achieved in the forward pass (also
called the contractual obligation time).
Subtract the activity time(s) from this to get the latest time (TL) of the preceding event(s). Next, use
the latest time of this (these) preceding event(s) and subtract the activity times of those activities
diverging from it. Keep doing this in the backward direction following the arrow tails until you reach
the first event. In case of two or more arrow tails diverging (if seen from right to left; then
converging) from the same node select the lesser of the choice of time as the T L for that preceding
event. When working back to the first event one of the choice must give 0.
You have now completed the backward pass (whose objective was to calculate the Latest allowable
occurrence time of each activity).
Now trace from the first to the last event a thick line or double line or a line of another colour ink
touching all those events where the earliest time and lastest time are identical
This is the critical path whose duration is the latest time of the last event.

Normal project cost: This is calculated by adding up all the (direct) costs of each activity and possibly the
indirect costs for that much time.

Float or Slack: Slack is with reference to an event and float is with respect to an activity. In other words, slack
is used with PERT and flat with CPM, but they may be interchangeably used in general practice. Float or slack
means extra time over and above its duration, which a non-critical activity can consume without delaying the
project.

Total Float: The total float for an activity is given by the total time, which is available for performance of the
activity, minus the duration of the activity. It represents the amount of time by which it can be delayed without
delaying the project completion date. In other words it refers to the amount of free time associated with an
activity minus the earliest start time for the activity. Thus,
Total flat

Lst Est

Where Lst

Latest Start Time and Est =

Earliest Start time

Alternatively, Total flat = Lft Eft or Lft Est duration of activity

Free Float: This is that part of the float which does not affect the succeeding activities. This is the float which
is obtained when all the activities are started at the earliest. This is given by the equation.
Free float = Earliest start time for following activity the earliest completion time for this activity.
Alternatively,
Free float = Total flat Head slack
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Where slack or float of an event is the difference between the earliest and latest event times.

Independent Float: If all the preceding activities are completed at their latest, in some cases, no float may be
available for the subsequent activities which may, therefore, become critical. On the other hand, in some cases,
even after completion of the activities at their latest, there may still be some float left.
The part of the float, which remains unaffected by utilization of float by the preceding activities and does not
affect the succeeding activities is called Independent float. Independent float is given by the equation:
Independent float Est for the
=

Lft for the

following
activity

Duration of present

preceding

activity

activity

Alternatively, Independent float = Free float Tail slack


Interfering float: sometimes, float of an activity if utilized wholly or in a part, may influence the starting time
of the succeeding activities. The portion of the total which affects the start of subsequent activities is known as
Interfering Flat. This is given by the equation:
Interfering Float = Lft of activity in question Est of the following event.
Alternatively,
Interfering float = Latest event time of the head event earliest event time of that same event

In the case of independent float and interfering flat if negative figures are obtained the float is taken as zero.
Students are requested to put down the negative fitures (if any result) as the answers.
By employing network techniques like PERT and CPM one can plan, schedule and control a given
project very effectively. Discuss.
Planning and control are two of the most important functions of management. Planning involves the
formulation of objectives and goals that are subsequently translated into specific plans and projects. The
function of control is to institute a mechanism that can trigger a warning signal of actual performance in
deviating from the plan. The PERT and CPM models are extremely useful for the purpose of planning,
analysing, scheduling and controlling the progress because:

Each activity involved in the project is mapped on the network in a logical sequence with timings of
each activity marked.
Critical activities are identified which have no slack.
The non-critical activities are identified and free as well as total float is calculated.
Est, Eft, Lst and Lft are marked on the diagram.
Critical path is identified and in case of hindrance additional resources can be employed to keep to the
time schedule.
Crashing of the activities is made feasible to conform to the changing considerations.
PERT/CPM give us a lot of flexibility as regards resource, time and cost.

The Three Time Estimates of PERT: If the activity durations in a project are uncertain then activity
scheduling calculations are done by using the expected values of the durations. Sometimes, such expected
duration estimations may not give an accurate answer. Thus, rather than estimating directly the expected
completion time of an activity, three values are considered. From these times a single value is estimated for
future consideration. This is called three-time estimates in PERT. The three time estimates are as under:

1.

Optimistic time (to): This is the shortest possible time to perform the activity, assuming that
everything goes perfectly well with no complications.

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2.

Pessimistic time (tp): This is the maximum time that is required to perform the activity, under
extremely bad conditions. It is thus the longest time conceivable and it includes time for unusual
delays. However, such conditions do not include acts of nature like earthquakes, floods, etc.
3.
Most likely time (tm): This is the most often occurring duration of the activity. It would be the best
estimate of what normally would occur. Statistically, it is the model value of duration of the activity.
The differences in these three times give a measure of the relative uncertainty involved in the activity. These
activity duration are bound to follow a probability distribution called Beta () distribution.
The three time estimates are reduced into a single expected time (t e) with the weighted average formula
=
te+4 tm + tp

te

Further, to determine duration variance in PET, we find an interval of variate values of six standard deviations
to contain the large majority of the distribution. Hence in PERT, the standard deviation is expressed as the onesixth of the range assumed by the variate.
Standard deviation ()=

tp to or variance (2)

[tp to /6 ] 2

Variance of the project length is found by adding all the variances (2) of the activities lying on the critical path.
Standard deviation () of the project length is given by
________________________
variances of activities on critical path

___________
=

Before calculating the above we would have to find and consequently 2 for each activity of the network.
The standard deviation may be used to calculate the normal deviate Z and the corresponding probability of
occurrence of that event by the following formula.

tS tE

where tS is the conjectured time of completing the project or event.

Advantages and Limitations of PERT & CPM

Advantages of PERT
a.
b.
c.

This technique gives the management the ability to plan the best possible use of resources to achieve a
given goal within the overall time and cost limitations.
It helps management to handle the uncertainties involved in programmes where no standard time data
of the Taylor-Gantt variety are available.
It presses for the right action, at the right point, and at that right time in the organisation.

Limitations of PERT
a.
b.
c.

The basic difficulty comes in the way of time estimates for the completion of activities because
activities are of non-repetitive type.
This technique does not consider resources required at various stages of the project.
Use of this technique for active control of a project requires frequent updating and revising the PERT
calculations and this proves quite a costly affair.

Advantages of CPM
a.
b.
c.

It helps in ascertaining the time schedule.


With its aid, control by the management is made easy.
It makes better and detailed planning possible.
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d.
e.

It provides a standard method for communicating project plans, schedules, time and cost performance.
It identifies the most critical elements and thus more attention can be paid to these activities.

Limitations of CPM

a.
b.
c.

CPM fails to incorporate statistical analysis in determining the time estimates.


It operates on the assumption that there is a precise known time that each activity in the project will
take but this may not be true in actual life.
It is difficult to use CPM as a controlling device for the simple reason that one must repeat the entire
evaluation of the project each time when changes are introduced into the network. It may be
remembered that CPM was initially developed as a static planning model and not as a dynamic
controlling device.

Distinction between CPM and PERT


The main points of distinction between CPM and PERT are as below:

1.

2.

3.

CPM is activity oriented, i.e. CPM network is built on the basis of activities. Also results of various
calculations are considered in terms of activities of the project. On the other hand, PERT is event
oriented.
CPM is a deterministic model i.e., it does not take into account the uncertainties involved in the
estimation of time for execution of a job to an activity. It uses a single time estimate. It completely
ignores the probabilistic elements of the problem. PERT, however, is a probabilistic model. It uses
three estimates of the activity time: optimistic, pessimistic and most likely; with a view to take
into account time uncertainty. Thus the expected duration of each activity is probabilistic and
expected duration indicates that there is fifty percent probability of getting the job done within that
time.
CPM places dual emphasis on time and cost and evaluates the trade-off between project cost and
project time. By deploying additional resources, it allows the project manager to manipulate project
duration within certain limits so that project duration can be shortened at an optimal cost. One the
other hand, PERT is primarily concerned with time. It helps the manager to schedule and coordinate
various activities so that the project can be completed on scheduled time.

It is difficult to say with certainty which approach is commonly used. The nature of the project generally
dictates the use of an approach. CPM is commonly used for those projects which are repetitive in nature,
(e.g., construction projects) and where one has prior experience of handling similar projects. PERT is
generally used for those projects where time required to complete various activities is not known apriori.
Thus, for planning and scheduling research and development projects, PERT is widely used. For such project it
is very necessary that the project is completed in time, PERT can determine the probabilities of completing
various stages of such projects. It can identify the activities which have high potential of causing delays in
completing the project scheduled date so that the manager can take preventive measures to reduce possible
delays to maintain the project schedule.
However, the differences have almost faded and both these tools have merged together to provide a single tool
of management control.

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CPM
PERT
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

The origin is military (naval).


It is an event-oriented approach.
There is allowance for uncertainty.
It has three time estimates.
It is probabilistic model with uncertainty in
activity duration.
6. It does not demarcate between critical and noncritical activities.
7. It is especially suitable when high precision is
required in time estimates. E.g. defence projects.
8. Time is averaged.
9. The concept of crashing is not applied.
10. It lays emphasis on reduction of the execution
time of the project without too much cost
implications. It is time-based.
11. Used to schedule first time projects due to its
probabilistic nature that is suitable when activity
times are not known with certainty.

1.
2.
3.
4.

The origin is industrial.


It is an activity-oriented system.
No such allowance.
There is only one single estimate of time and the
emphasis is on cost.
5. It is a deterministic model with well-known
activity (single) time based upon past experience.
6. It marks critical activities.
7. It is suitable when reasonable precision is
required e.g. Civil construction projects, industrial
expansion schemes, etc.
8. No average of time is involved.
9. The concept of crashing is applied.
10. It lays emphasis on the greatest reduction in
completion time with the least increase in project
cost. It is cost-based.
11. Used to schedule projects that are repetitive in
nature due to its deterministic nature.

PROBLEM:
For the network shown below normal time, crash time, normal cost and crash
cost are given in the table. Contract the network by crashing it to optimum and calculate the
optimum project cost and saving.
Indirect cost is Rs.100/- per day
Activity

Normal

1-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
3-4
4-5

Time in days
3
6
7
8
4
5

Crashing
Cost in Rs.
300
480
2100
400
320
500
4100

Time in days
2
4
5
6
3
4

Cost in Rs.
400
520
2500
600
360
520

Solution:
Step-I

Project duration
Normal cost

Draw the network and identify critical path.

18 days
Rs.4100/-

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Step-II

To contract the network identify the activities on critical path which have cost slope less than
the indirect cost.

Cost slope

Activity
1-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
5-4
4-5

Crash cost normal cost


Normal time crash time
Cost slope
100
20
200
100
40
20

Step-III: Crashing activity having minimum cost slope i.e. 2-3 and 4-5
Critical path:
15 days

Step IV: Path remains the same.


Crash activity having reset minimum cost slope i.e. 3.4
Critical path 14 days

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This is the optimum network.
Total direct cost for activities on this network is:
300+520+2100+400+360+520=Rs.4200/Indirect cost : 14 days x 100 = Rs.1400/Director + Indirect cost = 4200+1400=Rs.5600/Cost without crashing
Direct cost:
Rs.4100/Indirect cost:
18days x100=Rs.1800/Total cost:
Rs.4100+1800=Rs.5900/Saving: Rs.5900-5600=Rs.300/Project Time & Cost in Networking

Introduction

Lot of money is involved for completing various activities in a project. Hence, the project manager always
remains conscious of time as well as costs involved. CPM assumes direct relationship between time and cost
and uses time-cost trade-off concept, which is its unique feature. This concept relates to the fact that on a crash
basis, it will cost a little more but even this increase in cost may prove economical in various ways. As such the
project manager will keep in mind the time-cost consideration before taking decisions regarding the project and
its different activities.

Crashing

Crashing is employed when we want to shorten the project completion time by spending extra resources i.e.
ultimately more money. In real life, it is always possible to employ more resources. Consider, for example, the
activity of laying bricks which requires a gang of a mason assisted by a few labourers. By increasing the
number of labourers the activity duration can be shortened or crashed. But there is a limit to this. Too many
labourers per mason would not reduce the duration any more since they are liable to jam up. Concerned
specialists would have to estimate the crashing limit for each activity as also the extra money for crashing each
activity. Once these estimates are made available an analysis can be made to determine the time-cost trade-off
curve i.e. what cost it takes to crash the project to a given duration. In other words, crash time is the minimum
activity duration to which an activity can be compressed by increasing the resources and hence by increasing the
direct costs.

Time-cost optimisation algorithm

The process of shortening a project is called crashing and is usually achieved by adding extra resources to an
activity. Project crashing involves the following steps:
Step one: Find the normal critical path and identify the critical activities. List all possible paths starting with the
critical path and followed by sub-critical paths. Write the duration of each path.

Step two: Calculate the cost slope for the different activities by using the formula.

Cost slope

Crash cost-normal cost


Normal time-crash time

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The crash slope indicates the extra cost required to expedite an activity per unit time.

Step three: Rank the activities in the ascending order of the crash slope and mark a tally for the number of days
each activity can be crashed.

Step four: Crash the activities on the critical path beginning with those that are the least expensive to crash until
they are crashed to maximum possible extent. If an activity selected for crashing lies on any other listed path it
will reduce the duration of those paths as well. Find the additional direct cost resulting from cashing the activity
as well indirect cost now expended and add the two to the normal direct cost to achieve the total cost. The
following table will be of great use to systematize the crashing process.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Activities crashed
No. of days crashed
Revised Project duration
Normal Direct (Activity) costs
Direct costs of crashing (cumulative
Indirect costs involved (if any)
=4+5+6 Total cost

The indirect costs (if any) are calculated as follows:


Indirect costs per unit time X time duration of revised project duration.
For safety sake, students should crash one day at a time and cancel one stick off the tally. It must be noted that
indirect costs are related to time and decrease with a reduction in project duration while the direct costs of
crashing activities are inversely proportionate to time i.e. they rise with a decrease in project duration. The net
effect of these two costs determine total cost.

Step five: As the duration of the critical path gets reduced, other paths too get critical. Now further reduction in
project duration is only possible if the critical paths are crashed simultaneously. The problem (of crashing)
ends when one of the co-critical paths to be crashed runs out of crashing time.
Students are requested to carefully note whether they have been asked minimum project duration and associated
cost or optimum project duration and associated cost after crashing. Optimum project duration is when the
costs associated with the project are minimum. Minimum project duration is the shortest project completion
time irrespective of the cost involved.

Note: crashing may also be more conveniently carried out, when the network is plotted on a time graph, which
we call a scheduled network or a squared network.

SOLVED EXERCISES (2.5)

1.

C & D starts concurrently, after completion of A&B which are independently. E follows C & F follows D.
Job ends after completion of E & F.

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2.

3.

3.

A & B starts the job concurrently. C follows A & D follows B. E starts after completion of C & D. F
follows E and it is the last activity.

Operation

Post Operation

precedes

--

C, D, E

--

--

--

Activity 1-2, 2-3, 2-4, 2-5, 3-4, 4-5


3

4.

Activity

4
2

Immediate predecessor

Days

B, C

B,C,D

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3

1
2

5
5.

Activity

Immediate predecessor

Days

D, F

E, G

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CHAPTER 3
STAR CLASSIFICATION OF HOTEL
CRITERIA FOR STAR CLASSIFICATION OF HOTEL

The hotels are classified by various systems such as:

Geographical location
The tariff
The facilities provided
Star classification

Out of the above four systems, star classification is most scientific and accepted all over the world. It has
certain advantages and disadvantages. In spite of disadvantages, it is most accepted official system.

Three different committees do the star classifications. The constitution of these committees is as follows:

FOR ONE AND TWO STAR:


1. Secretary (Tourism) of the State
Chairman
2. Regional Director (Tourism
3. Director of Tourism of State
4. Representative of Travel Agent Association of India (TAAI)
5. Representative of Federation of Hotel & Restaurant Association of India (FHRAI)
6. Principal of Institute of Hotel Management of that area.

FOR THREE AND ABOVE STAR:


1. Director General (Tourism)/Addl. Director General (Tourism), Government of India 2. Regional Director (Tourism
3. Director of Tourism of State
4. Representative of Travel Agent Association of India (TAAI)
5. Representative of Federation of Hotel & Restaurant Association of India (FHRAI)
6. Principal of Institute of Hotel Management of that area.

FOR HERITAGE HOTELS:


1. Director General (Tourism)/Addl. Director General (Tourism), Government of India 2. Regional Director (Tourism
3. Director of Tourism of State
4. Representative of Travel Agent Association of India (TAAI)
5. Representative of Heritage Hotel Association of India(HHAI)
6. Principal of Institute of Hotel Management of that area.

Chairman

Chairman

(in some states, even three star is classified by the committee which is for one and two star).

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CHECKLIST FOR
FACILITIES &
1
SERVICES
General
Primarily transient, full N
time operations, 7 days a
week in season

Establishment to have all N


necessary trading license
Establishment to have N
public liability insurance
24 hrs. lifts for building N
higher than ground plus
two floors

120

120

140

140

200

25%

25% 50%

100% 100%

A clean change of bed N


and bath linen daily &
between check-in

Minimum bed width for N


single (90cm) and double
Mattress minimum 10 cm D
thick
Minimum bedding 2 N
sheets, pillow & case,
blanket,
mattress
protector/bedcover

Sufficient lighting, 1 per N


bed
A 5 AMP earthed power N
socket
A bedside table and N

Bedrooms,
bathrooms,
public areas and kitchens
fully serviced daily
All floor surface clean
and in good repair
Guest Rooms
Minimum 10 lettable
rooms. All rooms without
side windows / ventilation
Minimum
size
of
bedroom
excluding
bathroom in sq.ft
Air-conditioning

5/5D

Comments

Maximum 10% rooms for commercial


use in hotel block or as per local law. At
least one room equipped for the
physically challenged
These documents are already detailed in
General Terms and Conditions
Public liability insurance has specified at
a minimum of Rs.5.00 crores
Mandatory for new hotels. Local laws
may require a relaxation of this
condition. Easy access for physically
challenged persons

Floors may be of any type

Single occupancy rooms may be 20 sq.


ft. less.
Airconditioning/heating depends on
climate conditions & architecture. Room
temperature should be between 20 & 28
Degree C. for 4, 5 and 5 Deluxe
(the % is of the total number of rooms)
Hotels may have a guest-triggered
system. For 1 & 2 on alternate days.
Definitely required between each checkin

Coir, foam or spring. Form covered if


cotton.
Blankets available in air-conditioned
rooms and as per seasonal requirement in
non-A/c rooms. Mattress protector is
desirable in 1 and 2 and necessary
for all others

1 per two twins and two per a double bed

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drawer
TV cable if available
A writing surface with
sufficient lighting
Chairs
Wardrobe with minimum
4 clothes hangers per
bedding
Shelves or drawer space
A wastepaper basket
Opaque
curtains
or
screening at all windows
Drinking water + 1 glass
tumbler per quest
A mirror, at least half
length (3 feet)
A
stationery
folder
containing stationery and
envelope
A do not disturb notice
Night
spread/bedcover
with rightly turndown
service
In room safe
Mini bar/fridge
Iron and Ironing board
on request

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N
N

N
N
N

N
N
N

N
N
N

N
N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

Contents must conform to local laws

N
N
N

2% of room block with a minimum of 1

Suites
Bathrooms
Percentage of rooms with
dedicated
(private)
bathrooms with room
Minimum
Size
of
Bathroom in square feet
Communal Bathrooms on
same floor as rooms for
1 & 2. Access not
through Public areas,
Kitchens etc.
1 bath towel and 1 hand
towel to be provided per
guest
One W.C. brush per toilet
seat
Guest toiletries to be
provided. Minimum 1
new soap / guest
A clothes-hook in each
bath/ shower room
A sanitary bin

3, 4, 5 and 5Deluxe must have


remotes

Preferable one per bedding


In1 and 2 these may be without
doors

Water treated with UV + filtration is


necessary

25%

75% ALL ALL

ALL

Dedicated bathrooms need not be


attached but must have private access

30

30

36

36

45

NA

NA

NA

25% of bathrooms in 1 & 2 to be


Western style WC
All bathrooms, shower stalls lockable.
Toilet area to have sanitary bin with lid.

If no attached / dedicated bath, to provide


in room.

Where bathrooms is not


toiletries provided in room.

attached,

In communal bathrooms, these must have

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a cover
Each Western WC toilet N
to have a seat and lid,
toilet paper
Floors and walls to have N
non-porous surfaces
Hot and cold running D
water available 24 hours
Bath tubs / shower closet
Water saving taps /
shower
N
Energy saving lighting
D
Bottled toiletry products
Hairdryers

N
In 4 plus hotels, some rooms should
offer this option to the guest.
N

N
D

N
D

N
N
N

N
N
N

Where not provided in bathroom, must


be available on request.

Public Areas
A lounge or seating in the N
lobby area

Temperatures to be between 20-28


degrees celcius.
In 1 and 2hotels, this may be unisex.
(4 & above should have facility for
physically challenged persons)

Reception facility or
means to call attention
Accommodation, F & B
and other tariffs available
Heating and cooling to be
provided in enclosed
public rooms
Public rest rooms for
Ladies and Gents with
soap and clean towels, a
washbasin with running
hot and cold water, a
mirror, a sanitary bin
with lid in Unisex &
ladies toilet
Public restrooms to have
low height urinal (24"
Max)
Ramps with anti-slip
floors and handrails at
the entrance. Minimum
door width should be 32"
to
allow
wheelchair
access and other facilities
for
the
physically
challenged
Facilities for aurally /
visually handicapped

Food & Beverage


Early morning beverage N

Size would depend on check in pattern.


There should be at least one telephone no
higher than 24" from floor level in
5/5- D
Manned minimum 16 hours a day. Call
service 24 hours
To be displayed in room.

Fire and emergency alarms should have


visual & audible signals. Wheelchair
access with suitable table in at least one
restaurant.

This may be room service or a self-

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA |

64

Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem


service
Dining Room serving N
Breakfast & Dinner

Multi cuisine restaurant D


on premises
Speciality restaurant
24 hours coffee shop
Full service of all 3 meals
in Dining room
A cooked breakfast be
available
Room service of full
meals
Room service of alcoholic
beverages
Crockery & Glassware N
unchipped
Cultery to be at least N
stainless steel
Silverware
Bar
Kitchens
Refrigerator with deep
freeze
Segregated storage of
meat, fish and vegetables
Tiled walls,
non-slip
floors
Head
covering
for
production staff
Daily germicidal cleaning
of floors
Clean utensils
Six monthly medical
checks for production
staff
All
food
grade
equipment, containers
Ventilation system
First aid training for all
kitchen staff
Drinking water

making facility.
Meal times to be displayed. Service to
start by 7 am and finish no earlier than
10 pm. Minimum one hour per meal
service. Break fast may be Continental.
1 hotel without dining room must offer
service in rooms.

D
D
N

N
N
N

N
N
N

In 1 & 2 this is necessary if no


Dining room. 3 must offer light (preplated) meals.
If permitted by local law

Plastic ware accepted in pool area

Plastic ware accepted in pool area

N
N

If permitted by local laws

Capacity based on size of F & B service.

Meats & fish in freezers.


must be separate

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

Garbage to be segregated N
wet and dry
Receiving and stores to be N
clean and distinct from

Vegetables

Water treated with UV + filteration is


acceptable
To encourage recycling wet garbage area
to be air-conditioned for 3 5 D

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA |

65

Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem


garbage area.
Staff Quality
Staff Uniforms for front N
of the house
Front office staff English
speaking
Percentage of staff with 10%
minimum
one
year
certificate course from
Government recognized
catering / hotel institutes.
Staff Welfare / Facilities
Staff rest rooms
Staff locker rooms
Toilet facilities
Dining area

D
D
N
D

Uniforms to be clean and in good repair

15% 20%

25%

30%

May be relaxed outside the 8 metros /


sub metros
This may be relaxed for hotels in rural,
pilgrimage and hill areas.

D
D
N
D

N
N
N
N

N
N
N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

Guest Services
Valet (Pressing) services
to be available
Laundry
and
Drycleaning service to be
provided
Paid transportation on
call
Shoe cleaning service
Ice from drinking water
on demand
CHECKLIST FOR
FACILITIES &
SERVICES
Acceptance of common
credit cards
Assistance with luggage
on request
A public telephone on
premises. Unit charges
made known
Wake up call service on
request
Messages for guests to be
recorded and delivered
Name,
Address
and
telephone numbers of
doctors with front desk
Stamps
and
mailing
facilities
Newspapers available

N
N
N
D

5/5D

Service can be next day. In resort


destinations, hill, rural & pilgrimage
areas dry cleaning services may be
relaxed.
Guest should be able to travel from hotel
May be charged
Ice machines accessable to guests are
acceptable. May be placed in corridors
for 4, 5 & 5-D
Comments

A prominently displayed message board


will suffice for 1 & 2
Doctors on call in 3, 4, 5, 5
deluxe

This may be in the lounge for 1, 2

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA |

66

Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem


Access to Travel desk N
facilities
Left luggage facilities

Provision for emergency


supplies toiletries / First
aid kit
Health / Fitness facilities
Beauty
saloon
and
Barbers Shop
Florist
Shop / kiosk
Money changing facilities
Bookshop
Safety & Security
Staff trained in fire
fighting drill
Security
arrangements
for all hotel entrances
Each bedroom door fitted
with lock and key, view
port / peephole & internal
securing device
Safekeeping
facilities
available
Smoke detectors
Fire
and
emergency
procedure
notices
displayed
in
rooms
behind door
CHECKLIST FOR
FACILITIES &
SERVICES

N
N

D
N

D
N

N
N

N
N

Indian system of treatments to be offered

News land, toiletries, novelties, games in


resorts

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

D
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

CPR / choking and regular first aid

4* plus should have direct dial and STD /


ISD facilities. 1*, 2* and 3* may go
through exchange

Fire exit signs on guest N


floors with emergency
power
D
Staff trained in first aid
First aid kit with over the N
counter medicines with
front desk
Communication Facilities
A telephone for incoming
& outgoing calls in the
room
PC available for guest use
with internet access

and 3 hotels
This need not be on premise for 1 to 3
hotels
This must be in a lockable room / 24
hour staffed area.
This may be a chargeable item

5/5D

Quarterly drill or as per law.

A safety chain/ wishbone latch is


acceptable in place of view port /
peephole

These can be battery operated

Comments

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA |

67

Notes:- Facility Planning 6th Sem


E-mail service

Fax
and
photocopy
service
In
Room
Internet
connection / dataport

This can be a paid service. Upto 3*, PC


can be in excutive offices. Internet
subject to local access being available
Subject to local internet access being
available.

Subject to local internet access being


available.

This should be a dedicated area. In hill,


beach destinationst and pilgrimage
centres this may be relaxed.
This can be relaxed for hill destinations.

Business Centre
N

Swimming Pool
Parking Facilities

Conference facilities

Should be adequate in relation to the no.


of rooms & banquet / convention hall
capacities.
Exclusively earmarked
accessible parking, nearest to the
entrance for physically challenged
persons.

Note: D = Desirable, N=
Necessary. There is no
relaxation
in
the
necessary criteria except,
as specified in the
comment column.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA |

68

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Government of India

Department of Tourism
( H & R Div ision)
G uid el ines for A pprov al & C l assific ation of A partment H otel s
a n in t e g r a l p a r t o
t h e m c a n m a k e o r
b e c o m in g p o p u la r
m e n t s , f o r f a m ily
t o g e t h e r . W it h t
t h e t o u r is t s , t h e
t a r y s c h e m e f o r
e f o llo w in g c a t e g o
x e , 5S t a r , 4S t a r

f a t o u r is t ' s v is it t o a p la c e a n d t h e s e r v ic e s
m a r a v is it c o m p le t e ly . A p a r t m e n t H o t e ls a r e
w it h b u s in e s s t r a v e le r s w h o c o m e t o I n d ia f o r
h o lid a y s , e t c . W h ic h a r e s o m e t im e s s t r e t c h in g
h e a im o f p r o v id in g s t a n d a r d iz e d , w o r ld c la s s
G o v e r n m e n t o f I n d ia , D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r is m
c la s s if ic a t io n o f f u lly o p e r a t io n a l A p a r t m e n t
r ie s :
, a n d 3S t a r ,

AR

H o t e ls a r e
o f f e r e d b y
in c r e a s in g ly
s o m e a s s ig n
f o r m o n t h s
s e r v ic e s t o
h a s a v o lu n
H o t e ls in t h
5S t a r D e lu

KU

T h e H o t e l & R e s t a u r a n t A p p r o v a l & C la s s if ic a t io n C o m m it t e e (H R A C C )
in s p e c t s a n d a s s e s s e s t h e h o t e ls b a s e d o n f a c ilit ie s a n d s e r v ic e s o f f e r e d .
P r o j e c t a p p r o v a l s a r e a l s o g i v e n i n a l l t h e a b o v e -m e n t i o n e d c a t e g o r i e s a t t h e
p r o j e c t im p le m e n t a t io n s t a g e .
p a r
a n d
s id e
t e d

t m
f a
s ,
in

e n t H
c ilit ie s
g e t t in
I n d ia a

o t e
t h
g
n d

ls / a p p r o v e d p r o j e c t s a r e e lig ib le f o r v a r io u s
a t a r e a n n o u n c e d b y t h e G o v e r n m e n t f r o m t im e
w o r ld w id e p u b lic it y t h r o u g h t h e I n d ia t o u r is m
a b r o a d .

ie d A
s io n s
e b e
s lo c a

C la s s if
c o n c e s
t o t im
O f f ic e

AR

* * * * * A n A p a r t m e n t H o t e l is m e a n t f o r u s e o f t e m p o r a r y s t a y t h a t s h o u ld
n o t e x c e e d b e y o n d 9 0 d a y s in a n y c ir c u m s t a n c e s
I n n o c ir c u m s t a n c e s a p a r t m e n t s in t h e A p a r t m e n t
in d iv id u a lly f o r r e s id e n t ia l o r a n y o t h e r p u r p o s e .
D e t a ils o f t h e
d o c u m e n t .

c r it e r ia

s e t

a n d

t h e

d o c u m e n t s

H o t e l

r e q u ir e d

a r e

w ill
g iv e n

b e

s o ld

in

t h is

F o r c la s s if ic a t io n / r e c la s s if ic a t io n a n d p r o j e c t a p p r o v a ls o f A p a r t m e n t
H o t e ls , t h e a p p lic a t io n s a lo n g w it h t h e r e q u is it e f e e s m a y b e s e n t t o :M e m b e r S e c r e t a r y (H R A C C )/ H o t e l a n d R e s t a u r a n t s D iv is io n ,

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r i s m , G o v e r n m e n t o f I n d i a , C -1 H u t m e n t s , D a l h o u s i e
R o a d , N e w D e lh i 1 1 0 0 1 1 .
G E N E R A L TE R M S , C O N DI TI O N S & A P P L I C A TI O N A T P R O J E C T L E V E L
&
C L A S S I F I C A TI O N / R E C L A S S I F I C A TI O N
F O R M A T F O R P R O J E C T
A P P R O V A L O F A P A R TM E N T H O TE L S

2 . P r o j e
o f I n
t h e h
A p a r

D e
e b
f it
m e

p a r t
a s e d
s f r
n t s r

c t a p p
d ia , D
o t e l b
t m e n t

m e n t o f T o
o n d o c u m e n
o m
t h e g o
e q u ir e d f o r
r o v a ls
e p a r t m
e c o m e
H o t e l

a r
e n
s o
m u

u r
t a
v t
p r

is m a
t io n ,
. a s
o j e c t

p p
w h
a n
a p

r o v e s
ic h e n
n o u n c
p r o v a

e v a lid f o r 5y e
t o f T o u r is m c
p e r a t io n a l e v e n
s t a p p ly f o r c la

A p a r t m e n t h
a b le s t h e h o t
e d f r o m
t im
ls a r e lis t e d b

T h e
s t a g
b e n e
d o c u

a r
e a
if
s s

s . P r o j e c t a p p r
s e 3m o n t h s f r
a ll it s r o o m s a
if ic a t io n w it h in

KU

1 .

AR

A pprov al at P roj ec t L ev el
o t e ls a t p r o j e c t
e ls t o g e t c e r t a in
e t o t im e . T h e
e lo w .

o v a
o m
r e
t h

ls o f t h
t h e d a
n o t r e a
e s e 3m

e G
t e
d y .
o n t

o v t .
t h a t
T h e
h s .
t o

3. T h e D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r i s m , G o v t . o f I n d i a r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t
m o d if y t h e g u id e lin e s / t e r m s a n d c o n d it io n s f r o m t im e t o t im e

AR

4. A p p l i c a t i o n f o r m . T h i s c o v e r s
i. P r o p o s e d n a m e o f t h e A p a r t
ii. N a m e o f t h e p r o m o t e r s w
a n t e c e d e n t s
iii. C o m p le t e p o s t a l a d d r e s s o f
iv . S t a t u s o f t h e o w n e r s / p r o m
1 . I f P u b lic / p r iv a t e lim
M e m o r a n d u m a n d A r t
2 . I f P a r t n e r s h ip , a c o
c e r t if ic a t e o f r e g is t r
3. I f p r o p r i e t a r y c o n c
p r o p r ie t o r / c e r t if ic a t
v . L o c a t io n o f A p a r t m e n t H o t e
v i. D e t a ils o f t h e s it e

m e n t H o t e l
it h a n o t e o n

t h e ir

b u s in e s s

t h e p r o m o t e r s / t e l./ f a x / e m
o t e r s
it e d c o m p a n y w it h c o p ie s
ic le s o f A s s o c ia t io n
p y o f p a r t n e r s h ip d e e d
a t io n
e r n , n a m e a n d a d d r e s s
e o f r e g is t r a t io n
l s it e w it h p o s t a l a d d r e s s

a il
o f
a n d
o f

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

AR

8 . D
a
e p r
w in g
1 . S it e p la n
2 . F r o n t a n d s id e e le v a t io n s
3. F l o o r p l a n s f o r a l l f l o o r s
4. D e t a i l o f g u e s t r o o m a n d b a t h r o o m w i t h d i m e
in s q .f t .
5. D e t a i l s o f F i r e F i g h t i n g M e a s u r e s / H y d r a n t s
6 . D e t a ils o f m e a s u r e s f o r e n e r g y c o n s e r v a t io
w a t e r h a r v e s t in g .
-c o n d i t i o n i n g d e t a i l s f o r g u e s t r o o m s , p u b l i c a r e a
a l a p p r o v a ls b y
1 . M u n ic ip a l a u t h o r it ie s
2 . C o n c e r n e d P o lic e A u t h o r it ie s
3. A n y o t h e r l o c a l a u t h o r i t y a s m a y b e r e q u i r e d .

AR

v iii. B lu
s h o

r e a (in s q . m e t e r s )
it le o w n e d / le a s e d w it h c o p ie s o f s a le / le a s e
e e d
o p y o f L a n d U s e P e r m it f r o m lo c a l a u t h o r it ie s
is t a n c e s f r o m
R a ilw a y s t a t io n , a ir p o r t , m a in
h o p p in g c e n t e r s (in K m s )
o f t h e p r o j e c t
C o p y o f f e a s ib ilit y r e p o r t .
t a r c a t e g o r y p la n n e d
u m b e r o f a p a r t m e n t s a n d a r e a f o r e a c h t y p e o f
o o m ( in s q .f t .)
u m b e r o f a t t a c h e d b a t h s a n d a r e a s ( in s q .f t .)
e t a ils o f p u b lic a r e a s L o b b y / lo u n g e , r e s t a u r a n t s ,
a r s , s h o p p in g , b a n q u e t / c o n f e r e n c e h a lls , h e a lt h
lu b , s w im m in g p o o l, p a r k in g f a c ilit ie s e t c .
F a c ilit ie s f o r t h e p h y s ic a lly c h a lle n g e d p e r s o n s .
E c o -f r i e n d l y p r a c t i c e s a n d a n y o t h e r a d d i t i o n a l
f a c ilit ie s .
( p le a s e in d ic a t e a r e a in s q .f t f o r e a c h f a c ilit y
e n t i o n e d a b o v e a t 5, 6 & 7 )
a t e b y w h ic h p r o j e c t is e x p e c t e d t o b e c o m p le t e d
n d o p e r a t io n a l.
in t s / s k e t c h p la n s s ig n e d b y o w n e r s a n d a r c h it e c t

KU

1 . A
2 . T
d
3. C
4. D
s
v ii. D e t a ils
1 .
2 . S
3. N
r
4. N
5. D
b
c
6 .
7 .

ix . A ir
x . L o c

n s io n s
e t c .
n a n d
s

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

4. A p p r o v a l / N O C f r o m A i r p o r t A u t h o r i t y
f o r p r o j e c t s lo c a t e d n e a r A ir p o r t s

p o n
e m
f o
b le

s ib ilit y
a y b e .
r a n y
t o b e

AR

m e n t io n e d a p p r o v a ls / N O C s a r e t h e r e s
m o t e r s / c o n c e r n e d c o m p a n y a s t h e c a s
r t m e n t s a p p r o v a l i s n o
s u b s t it u t e
a p p r o v a l a n d t h e a p p r o v a l g iv e n is lia
in c a s e o f a n y v io la t io n s w it h o u t n o t ic e .
d c a p it a l s t r u c t u r e
o t a l p r o j e c t c o s t
a . E q u it y c o m p o n e n t w it h d e t a ils o
c a p it a l
b . D e b t w it h c u r r e n t a n d p r o p o s e d
f u n d in g
e t t e r o f a c c e p t a n c e o f r e g u la t o r y c o n d it io n s .
le a s e in d ic a t e w h e t h e r t h e p r o m o t e r in t e n d s
e w r o o m s o r a ll r o o m s o n a t im e -s h a r e b a s is .
p p lic a t io n F e e

x ii. L
x iii. P
f
x iv . A

a b o v e
h e p r o
D e p a
u t o r y
d r a w n
r o p o s e
1 . T

I n d ia

p a id

u p

s o u r c e s o f
t o g iv e

KU

T h e
o f t
T h e
s t a t
w it h
x i. P

o f

5. I n t h e e v e n t o f a n y c h a n g e s i n t h e p r o j e c t p l a n s , t h e a p p r o v a l m u s t b e
s o u g h t a f r e s h .

6 . A u t h o r is e d o f f ic e r s o f t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r is m s h o u ld b e a llo w e d
f r e e a c c e s s t o in s p e c t t h e p r e m is e s f r o m t im e t o t im e w it h o u t p r io r
n o t ic e .

AR

7 . T h e A p a r t m e n t H o t e l m u s t im m e d ia t e ly in f o r m t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f t h e
d a t e f r o m w h ic h it b e c o m e s o p e r a t io n a l a n d a p p ly f o r c la s s if ic a t io n
w it h in 3m o n t h s o f t h is d a t e .
8 . T h e f e e s p a y a b le f o r t h e p r o j e c t a p p r o v a l a n d s u b s e q u e n t e x t e n s io n ,
if r e q u ir e d a r e a s f o llo w s . T h e d e m a n d d r a f t m a y b e p a y a b le t o " P a y &
A c c o u n t s O f f ic e r , D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r is m , N e w D e lh i " .
S t a
5- S
4- S
3- S

r C
t a
t a
t a
r

a t e g o r y o f A p a r t m e n t H o t e ls

A m o
1 5, 0
1 2 ,0
8 ,0 0

u n t in R s .
0 0
0 0
0

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

9 . T h e p r o m o t e r s
q u a r t e r f a ilin g
w it h d r a w n .
s m
N o
D o
E n

u s t b e v a lid
t a r y m u s t
c u m e n t s in lo
g lis h / o f f ic ia

a t t h e t im
d u ly c e r t
c a l la n g u a
l la n g u a g e

e o f a p
if y c o
g e s s h o
a n d b e

p lic a
p ie s
u ld b
d u ly

t io n a n d
f u r n is h
e a c c o m
c e r t if ie

a G a z e t t e d
e d t o t h e
p a n ie d b y a
d .

AR

1 0 . A ll d o c u m e n t
o f f ic e r o r
D e p a r t m e n t .
t r a n s la t io n in

m u s t f o r w a r d r e g u la r p r o g r e s s r e p o r t s f o r e a c h
w h ic h t h e p r o j e c t a p p r o v a l w o u ld b e c o n s id e r e d

1 1 . P r o j e c t s , w h e r e it is p r o p o s e d t o le t o u t p a r t o r w h o le o f t h e
A p a r t m e n t H o t e l o n t im e s h a r e b a s is w ill n o t b e e lig ib le f o r a p p r o v a l.

KU

1 2 . F o r a n y c h a n g e in t h e c a t e g o r y t h e p r o m o t e r s m u s t a p p ly a f r e s h w it h
a f r e s h a p p lic a t io n f o r m a n d r e q u is it e f e e s f o r t h e c a t e g o r y a p p lie d
f o r .
1 3. A n y c h a n g e s i n t h e p r o j e c t p l a n s o r m a n a g e m e n t s h o u l d b e i n f o r m e d
t o t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r i s m w i t h i n 30 d a y s o t h e r w i s e t h e a p p r o v a l
w ill s t a n d w it h d r a w n / t e r m in a t e d .

1 4. A p p l i c a n t s a r e r e q u e s t e d t o g o t h r o u g h c a r e f u l l y t h e c h e c k l i s t o f
p r o v is io n o f f a c ilit ie s a n d s e r v ic e s a s c o n t a in e d in t h e G u id e lin e s
b e f o r e a p p ly in g .

AR

1 5. I n c o m p l e t e a p p l i c a t i o n s w i l l n o t b e a c c e p t e d .
1 6 . T h e G o v t . o f I n d ia D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r is m r e s e r v e s t h e r ig h t
m o d if y t h e g u id e lin e s / t e r m s a n d c o n d it io n s f r o m t im e t o t im e .

t o

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
A partment H otel - C l assific ation/ R ec l assific ation G uid el ines

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

1 .

C la s s if ic a t
w it h in 3m
O p e r a t in g
H o w e v e r ,
r e c la s s if ic
c la s s if ic a t

io n f o r n
o n t h s o f
A p a r t m e
t h o s e
a t io n o n e
io n .

e w
c o
n t
s
y

ly o p
m p le
H o t
e e k in
e a r p

e r a t
t io n
e ls m
g
r io r

io n a l A p
o f a p p r
a y o p t
r e -c l a s s
t o t h e

a r t m e n t H
o v e d A p a r t
f o r c la s s if
if ic a t io n
e x p ir y o f t

o t e
m e
ic a
s h
h e

ls m
n t H
t io n
o u ld
c u r

u s t b e s
o t e l p r o
a t a n y
a p p ly
r e n t p e r

o u g h t
j e c t s .
s t a g e .
f o r
io d o f

AR

2 . I f t h e A p a r t m e n t H o t e l f a ils t o r e a p p ly 1 y e a r b e f o r e t h e e x p ir y o f
t h e c la s s if ic a t io n o r d e r , t h e a p p lic a t io n w ill b e t r e a t e d a s a f r e s h
c la s s if ic a t io n c a s e .

f o r
s s if
d t
e
lic a

5(F
ic a t
h a t
m e n
t io n

iv e ) y e a r
io n f r o m
t h e a p p
t io n e d a
s w ill n o t

KU

4. C l a s s i f i c a t i o n w i l l b e v a l i d
o r d e r s o r in c a s e o f r e c la
la s t c la s s if ic a t io n p r o v id e
w it h in t h e s t ip u la t e d t im
d o c u m e n t s . I n c o m p le t e a p p

3. O n c e a n A p a r t m e n t H o t e l a p p l i e s f o r c l a s s i f i c a t i o n / r e -c l a s s i f i c a t i o n ,
it s h o u ld b e r e a d y a t a ll t im e s f o r in s p e c t io n b y t h e H R A C C . N o
r e q u e s t s f o r d e f e r m e n t o f in s p e c t io n w ill b e e n t e r t a in e d .
s f
t h
lic a
b o v
b e

r o m
e d
t io
e ,
a c

t h
a t e
n h
a lo
c e p

e d
o f
a s
n g
t e d

a t e
e x
b e e
w it
.

o f
p ir
n
h

is s
y o
r e c
a ll

u e o f
f t h e
e iv e d
v a lid

H o t e ls a p p ly in g f o r c la s s if ic
u m e n t a t io n .
a t io n F o r m d e t a ilin g
N a m e o f t h e A p a r t m e n t H o t e l
N a m e a n d a d d r e s s o f t h e p r o m
o n t h e ir b u s in e s s a n t e c e d e n t s
iii. C o m p le t e p o s t a l a d d r e s s o f t h e
n o / f a x / e m a il
iv . S t a t u s o f t h e o w n e r s / p r o m o t e
1 . I f P u b lic / p r iv a t e lim it e
M e m o r a n d u m a n d A r t ic le
2 . I f P a r t n e r s h ip , a c o p y
c e r t if ic a t e o f r e g is t r a t io

AR

6 . A p a r t m e n t
f o llo w in g d o c
a . A p p lic
i.
ii.

5. A p a r t m e n t H o t e l s w h i c h p r o p o s e t o l e t o u t p a r t o f o r a l l i t s r o o m s o n
t i m e -s h a r e b a s i s a r e n o t e l i g i b l e t o b e c l a s s i f i e d .
a t io n

m u s t

p r o v id e

t h e

o t e r s / o w n e r s w it h a n o t e
A p a r t m e n t H o t e l w it h t e l.
r s
d c o m p a n y w it h c o p ie s o f
s o f A s s o c ia t io n
o f p a r t n e r s h ip d e e d a n d
n

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

AR

KU

AR

3. I f p r o p r i e t a r y c o n c e r n , n a m e a n d a d d r e s s o f
p r o p r ie t o r / c e r t if ic a t e o f r e g is t r a t io n .
v . D a t e o n w h ic h t h e A p a r t m e n t H o t e l b e c a m e o p e r a t io n a l.
v i. D e t a ils o f A p a r t m e n t H o t e l s it e w it h d is t a n c e f r o m
A ir p o r t / R a ilw a y S t a t io n / C it y C e n t r e / D o w n t o w n s h o p p in g
a r e a (in k m s )
v ii. D e t a ils o f t h e A p a r t m e n t H o t e l
1 .
A r e a (in s q . m e t r e s ) w it h t it le o w n e d / le a s e d w it h
c o p ie s o f s a le / le a s e d e e d
2 .
C o p y o f L a n d U s e P e r m it f r o m lo c a l a u t h o r it ie s
3.
S t a r c a t e g o r y b e in g a p p lie d f o r
4.
N u m b e r o f r o o m s a n d a r e a f o r e a c h t y p e o f r o o m
in s q .f t . ( s in g le / d o u b le / s u it e s )
5.
N u m b e r o f a t t a c h e d b a t h s
6 .
D e t a ils
o f
p u b lic
a r e a s
L o b b y / lo u n g e ,
r e s t a u r a n t s ,
b a r s ,
s h o p p in g
a r e a ,
b a n q u e t /
c o n f e r e n c e h a lls , h e a lt h
c lu b , s w im m in g p o o l,
p a r k in g f a c ilit ie s , f a c ilit ie s f o r t h e p h y s ic a lly
c h a l l e n g e d p e r s o n s , E c o -f r i e n d l y p r a c t i c e s a n d a n y
o t h e r a d d it io n a l f a c ilit ie s . T h e a r e a f o r e a c h
f a c ilit y s h o u ld b e in d ic a t e d in s q .f t
7 .
N o . o f b a t h r o o m s w it h d im e n s io n s in s q .f t .
8 .
D e t a ils o f F ir e F ig h t in g M e a s u r e s / H y d r a n t s e t c .
9 .
D e t a ils o f m e a s u r e s f o r e n e r g y c o n s e r v a t io n a n d
w a t e r
h a r v e s t in g
a n d
o t h e r
E c o - f r ie n d ly
p r a c t ic e s , m e a s u r e s a n d in it ia t iv e s .
1 0 . A i r -c o n d i t i o n i n g d e t a i l s f o r g u e s t r o o m s , p u b l i c
a r e a s

v iii. C e r t if ic
a )
C
t
a
b )
C
D
A
c )
C
O

a t e s / N o
e r t if ic a t
o s h o w t
n A p a r t m
e r t if ic a t
e p a r t m e
p a r t m e n
le a r a n c e
f f ic e r /

O b j e c t io n C e r t
e / lic e n c e f r o m
h a t y o u r e s t a b
e n t H o t e l
e /
lic e n c e
n t
a u t h o r iz in
t H o t e l
C e r t if ic a t e
S a n it a r y I n s p

if ic a t e ' s (a t t e s t e d c o p ie s )
M u n ic ip a lit y / C o r p o r a t io n
lis h m e n t is r e g is t e r e d a s
g

f r o m

c o n c e r n e d
t h e
r u n n in g

f r o m
e c t o r

P o lic e
o f
a n

M u n ic ip a l H e a lt h
g iv in g c le a r a n c e t o

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

j )
k )
l)
m )

o v
ib
a y
r y
n

e -m e n t i o n e d
ilit y o f t h e
b e . T h e D
a p p r o v a l a n
o t ic e in c a s e

a b
o n s
m
u t o
o u t

AR

T h e
r e s p
c a s e
s t a t
w it h

7 . A ll a p p
c o m p le t
p r e s c r ib
is lia b le

n )

AR

h )
i)

e )
f )
g )

KU

d )

y o u r e s t a b lis h m e n t f r o m s a n it a r y / h y g ie n ic p o in t o f
v ie w
N o O b j e c t io n C e r t if ic a t e w it h r e s p e c t t o f ir e
f ig h t in g a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m
t h e F ir e S e r v ic e
D e p a r t m e n t (L o c a l F ir e B r ig a d e A u t h o r it ie s )
P u b lic lia b ilit y in s u r a n c e
B a r L i c e n c e ( n e c e s s a r y f o r 4* , 5* & 5* -D o n l y )
M o n e y C h a n g e r s L i c e n c e ( n e c e s s a r y f o r 4* , 5* & 5* D o n ly )
S a n c t io n e d b u ild in g p la n s / o c c u p a n c y c e r t if ic a t e
I f c la s s if ie d
e a r lie r , a c o p y o f t h e
e a r lie r
" C e r t if ic a t e
o f
C la s s if ic a t io n
is s u e d
b y
D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r is m
F o r H e r it a g e p r o p e r t y , c e r t if ic a t e f r o m t h e lo c a l
a u t h o r it y s t a t in g a g e o f t h e p r o p e r t y a n d s h o w in g
n e w a n d o ld b u ilt u p a r e a s s e p a r a t e ly .
A n y o t h e r lo c a l a u t h o r it y a s m a y b e r e q u ir e d .
A p p r o v a l / N O C f r o m A A I f o r p r o j e c t s lo c a t e d
n e a r A ir p o r t s
P le a s e in d ic a t e w h e t h e r a f e w r o o m s o r a ll r o o m s
a r e t o b e l e t o u t o n a t i m e -s h a r e b a s i s .
A p p lic a t io n f e e s

lic a t io n s
e in a ll
e d c le a r a n
t o b e r e j e

a p p r o
O w n e r
e p a r t m
d t h e
o f a n y

f o r
r e s p
c e s ,
c t e d
.

v a ls /
s / p r
e n t s
a p p r
v io la

N o O
o m o t e
a p p r
o v a l g
t io n s

b j e c
r s / c
o v a l
iv e n
o r m

t io n C
o n c e r n
is n o
is lia b
is r e p r e

e r t if ic a t
e d C o m p
s u b s t it u
le t o b e
s e n t a t io

e s a r
a n y a
t e f o
w it h
n o f f

e
s

d r
a c

t h e
t h e
a n y
a w n
t s .

c l a s s i f i c a t i o n o r r e -c l a s s i f i c a t i o n m u s t b e
e c t v iz . a p p lic a t io n f o r m , a p p lic a t io n f e e ,
N O C s , c e r t if ic a t e s e t c . I n c o m p le t e a p p lic a t io n

8 . T h e a p p lic a t io n f e e p a y a b le f o r c la s s if ic a t io n / r e c la s s if ic a t io n a r e a s
f o llo w s . T h e d e m a n d d r a f t m a y b e p a y a b le t o " P a y & A c c o u n t s O f f ic e r ,
D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r is m , N e w D e lh i " .

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

S t a r C a t e g o r y o f A p a r t m e n t H o t e ls
3-S
4-S
5- S
5-S t a r

C la s s if ic a t io n / R e c la s
s if ic a t io n f e e s in R s .
1 0 ,0 0 0
1 5, 0 0 0
2 0 ,0 0 0
2 5, 0 0 0

t a r
t a r
t a r
D e lu x e

C h a ir e d
r e s e n t a t iv e
ia t o u r is m o
r e p r e s e n t a
r e t a r y w ill

b y

s f r
f f ic
t iv e
c o n s

C h
o m
e / D
(w h
t it

a ir m
F H R
ir e c
o s h
u t e t

a n

(H R A
A I / H A I /
t o r (T ) o f
o u ld b e a
h e o t h e r m

C C ) o r
I A T O / T
t h e c o n c e
G a z e t t e
e m b e r s o

(a )
R e p
I n d
h is
S e c

AR

9 . T h e C la s s if ic a t io n C o m m it t e e f o r A p a r t m e n t H o t e ls w ill c o n s is t a s
f o llo w s :
h is
A A I /
r n e d
d o f f
f t h e

r e p r e
I H M
S t a t e
ic e r )
C o m m

s e n t a t iv e .
/ R D / lo c a l
G o v t . o r
/ M e m b e r
it t e e .

KU

(b )T h e C h a ir m a n a n d a n y 3m e m b e r s w ill c o n s t it u t e a q u o r u m
( c .) T h e m in u t e s w ill b e a p p r o v e d b y t h e C h a ir m a n ( H R A C C ) .

a s e o f a n y d is s a t is f a c t
e n t H o t e ls m a y a p p e a
o r r e v ie w a n d r e c o n s id
m m u n ic a t io n r e g a r d in g
s w ill b e e n t e r t a in e d b e

io n w it h t
l t o S e c r
e r a t io n w
c la s s if ic
y o n d t h is

h e
e t
it h
a t
p e

d e c is
a r y (T
i n 30
io n / r e
r io d .

io n
),
d a
c la

o f H R A C C t h
G o v e r n m e n t o
y s o f r e c e iv in
s s if ic a t io n . N
g

e
f
o

AR

( d .) I n c
A p a r t m
I n d ia f
t h e c o
r e q u e s t

1 0 . A p a r t m e n t H o t e ls w ill b e c la s s if ie d f o llo w in g a t w o s t a g e p r o c e d u r e
a . T h e p r e
t h e e n c
i. N
f
p

s e n c e o f f a c ilit ie s a n d s e r v ic e s w ill b e e v a lu a t e d a g a in s t
lo s e d c h e c k lis t .
e w p r o j e c t s w ill b e r e q u ir e d t o a d o p t e n v ir o n m e n t
r ie n d ly p r a c t ic e s a n d f a c ilit ie s f o r p h y s ic a lly c h a lle n g e d
e r s o n s .

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

1 1 . T h e A p a r t m e
a ll t im e s . T h
H o t e l a t a n y
t h a t it s m e m
s e r v ic e s .
1 2 . A n
c o
c o
t o

n t H
e C la
t im e
b e r s

d e f ic ie n c ie
m p lie d w it h w
n s u lt a t io n w it
d o s o w ill r e s

s /
it
h
u lt

A p a r t m e n t
t o a p h a
s a n d f a c ilit
f a c ilit ie s a

o t e l is e x
s s if ic a t io
w it h o u t p
b e a c c o m
r e
h in
t h e
in

H o t e ls b e in g c la
s e d
p la n f o r a
ie s f o r p h y s ic a lly
n d s e r v ic e s w ill b

p e c t e d
n C o m m
r e v io u s
m o d a t e

c t if ic a t io n p
t h e s t ip u la t
h o t e l r e p r e
r e j e c t io n o f

t o
it t
n o t
d o

m a
e e
ic e
v e r

o in t e d
e d t im
s e n t a t
t h e a p

in t a in r e
m a y in s p
. T h e C o m
n ig h t t o

o u t
e , w
iv e s
p lic a

s s
d d
c h
e

if ie d w ill n e e d
i n g E c o -f r i e n d
a lle n g e d p e r s o n
e v a lu a t e d a g a in

q u ir
e c t
m it
in s p

e d s t a n d a r d s
t h e A p a r t m e
t e e m a y r e q u e
e c t t h e le v e l

t o
ly
s ,
s t
a t
n t
s t
o f

AR

E x is t in g
c o n f ir m
p r a c t ic e
b . T h e q u a lit y o f
t h e m a r k s h e e

b y t h e H R A C C m u s t b e
h ic h h a s b e e n a llo t t e d in
d u r in g in s p e c t io n . F a ilu r e
t io n .

ii.

A p a r t m e n t H o t e
e y a r e t a k in g s u f
t e r , g a r b a g e s e g r
n t r o l B o a r d (P C B ) n

l m u s
f ic ie n
e g a t io
o r m s

t b e a b le t
t s t e p s t o
n , a n d d is p
a n d f o llo w in

o c o n
c o n s
o s a l/
g o t h

v in c e t h e c o
e r v e e n e r g y
r e c y c lin g a s
e r E c o -f r i e n d

m m it t e e t h a t
a n d h a r v e s t
p e r P o llu t io n
ly m e a s u r e s .

1 4. T h
t h
w a
C o

KU

1 3. T h e c o m m i t t e e m a y a s s i g n a s t a r c a t e g o r y l o w e r b u t n o t h i g h e r t h a n
t h a t a p p lie d f o r .

AR

1 5. F o r a n y c h a n g e i n t h e s t a r c a t e g o r y t h e p r o m o t e r s m u s t a p p l y a f r e s h
w it h a f r e s h a p p lic a t io n f o r m a n d r e q u is it e f e e s f o r t h e c a t e g o r y
a p p lie d f o r .
1 6 . A n y
s h o u
T o u r
w it h

c h a
ld b
is m
d r a w

n g e s
e in f
w it h
n / t e

in

t h e p la n s o r m a n a g e m e n t o f t h e A p a r t m e n t H o t e l
o r m e d t o t h e H R A C C , G o v t . o f I n d ia , D e p a r t m e n t o f
i n 30 d a y s o t h e r w i s e t h e c l a s s i f i c a t i o n w i l l s t a n d
r m in a t e d .

1 7 . A p p lic a n t s a r e r e q u e s t e d t o g o t h r o u g h t h e c h e c k lis t o f f a c ilit ie s a n d


s e r v ic e s c o n t a in e d in t h is d o c u m e n t b e f o r e a p p ly in g .

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

1 8 . I n c o m p le t e
a p p lic a t io n s w ill n o t b e
c o n s id e r e d . A ll c a s e s o f
c la s s if ic a t io n w o u ld b e f in a lis e d w it h in t h r e e m o n t h s o f t h e a p p lic a t io n
b e in g m a d e .
1 9 . T h e G o v t . o f I n d ia D e p a r t m e n t o f T o u r is m r e s e r v e s t h e r ig h t
m o d if y t h e g u id e lin e s / t e r m s a n d c o n d it io n s f r o m t im e t o t im e

t o

AR

KU

AR

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

F o r m a t o f U n d e r t a k in g f o r P r o j e c t A p p r o v a l/ C la s s if ic a t io n / R e c la s s if ic a t io n o f
A p a r t m e n t H o t e ls

e S
v t .
p a r
N e w D

e c r e t a r y (T )
o f I n d ia ,
t m e n t o f T o u r is m
e lh i.
U N D E R T A K I N G
t o o d a ll
a p p r o v a
d h e r e b
d a r e c

t h e
l/ c la
y a g
o r r e

t e r m s a n
s s if ic a t io
r e e t o a b
c t a n d a

c o n d
n / r e c la
id e b y
u t h e n t

it io
s s if
t h e
ic t

a n d u n d e r s
t o p r o j e c t
H o t e ls a n
t s p r o v id e

n s
ic
m
o

m e n t io
a t io n in
. T h e in
t h e b e

n e d a b o v e
3/ 4/ 5/ 5f o r m a t io n
s t o f m y

S ig n a t u r e a n d n a m e in b lo c k le t t e r s
S e a l o f t h e a p p lic a n t

AR

P la c e :
D a t e :

r e a d
s p e c t
t m e n t
c u m e n
g e .

KU

v e
r e
p a r
d o
le d

h a
it h
A
n d
n o w

AR

T o
T h
G o
D e

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

CHECKLIST FOR FACILITIES & SERVICES

Parking

COMMENTS
Mandatory for new hotels.
Local laws may require a
relaxation of this condition.
One parking space per unit
should be provided.

N
N

251350
500650
950

1250

N
N
N
D

N
N
N
N

AR

Air conditioning

KU

N
Guesrooms
Minimum 10 lettable rooms .
All rooms with outside window /
ventilation.
Minimum floor area Studio
250
including
sleeping,
living,
bathing, cooking & dining-sqft.
Minimum floor area 1bedroom 500
including sleeping, living bathing,
cooking & dining sqft.
Minimum floor area 2 bedrooms 760
including
sleeping,
living,
bathing, cooking & dining sqft.
Minimum floor area 3 bedrooms 1000
including
sleeping,
living,
bathing, cooking & dining sqft.
N
Dining area

5*&
5*-D
N

AR

3* &
4*
24 hour lifts for higher buildings
N
then ground plus two floors

Iron with iron board


A 15 amp earthen power shocked
Television
Internet Connection

Living Dining bedroom and


kitchen areas are separate
with doors.
Living Dining, bedroom and
kitchen areas are separate
with doors.
Living Dining, bedroom and
kitchen areas are separate
with doors.
Separate dining table and
chairs
to
accommodate
maximum bedding
Air

conditioning/heating
depends
on climatic
conditions
&
architecture. Room temp.
should
be
between
20&28 Degrees C.For
4*,5* and 5* Deluxe
between 20 and 24
degrees
C.For
3star
minimum 50% of the
apartments should be air
conditioned.

GENERAL

For

star

and internet

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

facility be made available in


the Business Center.

N
1

1 1/2

2 1/2

3 1/2

36

40

Kitchens for 1 bedroom and


larger

AR

Washing Machines /dryers

Public Areas
A lounge or seating in the lobby
area
Reception
facility
manned

Half bath toilet and wash


basin.

AR

N
1

N
N

KU

N
N

Telephone in the room


Ward robe with minimum 12
clothes hangers per bedding
Shelves or drawer space
Bathrooms
Number of dedicated(private)
bathrooms Studio
Number
of
dedicated
(private)bathrooms1Bedrooms
Number
of
dedicated
(private)bathrooms2Bedrooms
Number
of
dedicated
(private)bathrooms3Bedrooms
Minimum Size of Bathroom in
square feet
Western WC toilet to have a seat
and lid toilet paper.
Floors and walls to have non
porous surfaces
Indoor
Games
Activity
Room
Outdoor
Games
Like Tennis , Badminton
Water saving taps /shower
Kitchens/Kitchenettes
Kitchenettes for Studios

Screened area-signal burner


stove top, no open flame,
Microwave oven or OTG,
Fridge (165 Ltr.) utensils,
crockery and cutlery, Tea /
Coffee maker, sink exhaust
fan.
Dedicated kitchen-2 burner
stove, Microwave oven,
Tea/coffee maker, Full size
fridge, sink exhaust fan,
utensils, cutlery, crockery.
Arrangements are made
available for laundry/ dry
cleaning services.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

N
N
N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N

N
N
N
N

N
N
N
N

N
N

N
N

Fire and emergency procedure


notices displayed in rooms behind
door
Fire exit sign on guest floors with
emergency power public liability
insurance
Public liability insurance

AR

Safekeeping facilities available


Smoke detectors

Swimming pool

Necessary for 4star and


above, desirable for 3-star

AR

N
N
N
D

Temperatures to be between
20-28 degrees calculus.

Guest Services
Utility shop
Acceptance of Common Credit
Cards
A public telephone on premises,
Unit charges made known.
Wake up call service on request.
Messages for and telephone
number of Doctor with front desk.
Assistance with
luggage on
request
Stamps and mailing facilities
Left luggage facilities
Fax and photocopy service
Business Center

KU

24hours
Heating and cooling to be
provided in enclosed public
rooms
Dining room serving break-fast
Garbage room (wet and dry)
Room for left luggage facilities
Health Fitness facilities

This should be a dedicated


area. In resort destinations,
tourist
and
pilgrimage
centers this may be relaxed.
These can
operated

be

battery

This can be related for hill


destinations. Necessary for
5&5-D-star
deluxe
and
desirable for 3-star, 4-star.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Government of India
Ministry of Tourism
(H&R Division)
C-1 Hutments
Dalhousie Road New
Delhi-110 011 Tel:
011-23012810
No. 8-TH-l (3)/2013
Dated 04-09-2013

Secretary (Tourism), All State Govts. /Union Territory Adminstrations


Secretary General, Federation of Hotel & Restaurant Associations of India (FHRAI)
President, Hotel Association of India (HAI)
President, Indian Heritage Hotels Association (IHHA)
President, Travel Agents Association of India (TAAI)
President, Indian Association of Tour Operators (IATO)
Principal, IHMs
All Indiatourism Offices in India

KU

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

AR

To,

Subject: Amendment in the existing Guidelines for Classification / Reclassification of Hotels


Madam / Sir,

Enclosed please find a copy of the revised Guideline for Classification / ReClassification of Hotels in regard to Bar License and Sewage Treatment Plant.
These revised guidelines are required to be adhered by all existing classified hotels and
those seeking Classification/Re-classification by the Ministry of Tourism under all
categories. The revised guidelines will come into force with immediate effect.

3.

You are requested to kindly circulate and publicise the amended guidelines.

4.

These guidelines are also available on the official website of the Ministry of Tourism
www.tourism.gov.in

AR

2.

Yours faithfully,

(S.V.Singh)
Assistant Director General (H&R)
Member Secretary HRACC

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA MINISTRY OF TOURISM (HRACC Division)


Hotels are an important component of the tourism product. They contribute in the overall tourism
experience through the standards of facilities and services offered by them. With the aim of
providing contemporary standards of facilities and services available in the hotels, the Ministry of
Tourism has formulated a voluntary scheme for classification of operational hotels which will be
applicable to the following categories:
I. Star Category Hotels: 5 Star Deluxe, 5 Star, 4 Star, 3 Star, 2 Star & 1 Star
II. Heritage Category Hotels: Heritage Grand, Heritage Classic & Heritage Basic

AR

2.
The Hotel & Restaurant Approval & Classification Committee (HRACC) inspects and
assesses the hotels based on the facilities and services offered.

Hotel Projects are approved at implementation stage

Operational Hotels are classified under various categories

KU

3.
Details of the criteria for Project A p p r o v a l / Classification along with the documents
required for this purpose are given in this document.

Applications for project approvals under the category of Heritage, 4 star and 5 star as well
as applications for Classification of operational hotels in the category of 4 star, 5 Star and 5 star
Deluxe as well as Heritage (Basic, Classic & Grand) categories along with the requisite fee (paid
vide Demand Draft) may be sent to:

AR

Member Secretary (HRACC)/


Hotel and Restaurants Division
Ministry of Tourism
C-1 Hutments,
Dalhousie Road
New Delhi 110011
Telefax: 011 - 23012810 I 23792504

4.
For project approval /classification in 3, 2 and 1 Star categories, application along with
the requisite fee (paid vide Demand Draft) maybe forwarded to the Regional Director,
Indiatourism Office in whose region the hotel / project is located. The offices of the Regional
Directors are as under:
i.

Regional Director, Indiatourism (Western & Central Region), 123 Maharshi Karve Road,
Mumbai - 400 020

ii.

Regional Director, Indiatourism (Northern Region), 88 Janpath, New Delhi - 110 001

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

iii. Regional Director, Indiatourism (Southern Region), 154 Anna Salai, Chennai-600002
iv. Regional Director, Indiatourism (Eastern Region), Embassy, 4 Shakespeare Sarani,
Kolkata - 700 071
v.

Regional Director, Indiatourism (North Eastern Region), Assam Paryatan Bhawan, 3rd
Floor, N e a r Nepali Mandir, A.K. Azad Road, Paltan Bazar, Guwahati - 781 008

5.
The detailed Guidelines for Project Approval are at Annexure i and that for
Classification / Re- Classification at Annexurell

AR

6.
The Ministry of Tourism reserves the right to modify the Guidelines / Terms and
Conditions from time to time.

AR

KU

******

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

ANNEXUREI

GENERAL TERMS, CONDITIONS & APPLICATION FORMAT FOR APPROVAL OF HOTELS


AT THE PROJECT LEVEL
APPROVAL OF HOTEL AT THE PROJECT STAGE

AR

1.
The Ministry of Tourism will approve hotels at project stage based on documentation.
Project approval is given to 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Star and Heritage (Basic) categories. Hotel projects
approved under 5 Star and Heritage category after becoming operational may seek classification
under 5 Star Deluxe / Heritage Classic / Heritage Grand category if they fulfill the prescribed
norms.

Application Form should have the following details:

KU

3.

2.
Project approvals will be valid for 5 years. The Project Approval would cease 3 months
before the date of expiry of project approval or from the date the hotel becomes operational, even
if all its rooms are not ready. The hotel must apply for Classification within 3 months of
commencing operations. The application for Project Approval will be submitted complete in all
respect as per details given below. Incomplete applications will not be accepted.

Proposed name of the Hotel:

ii.

Name of the promoters with a note on the business antecedents in not more than 60
words

iii.

Complete postal address of the promoter with Telephone, Fax and Email address

iv.

Status of the owner/promoter:

i.

AR

a) If Public/private limited company with copies of Memorandum and Articles of


Association
b) If Partnership, a copy of Partnership Deed and Certificate of Registration

c) If proprietary concern, name and address of proprietor/ certificate of Registration


v.
vi.

Location of hotel site with postal address


Details of the site:
a) Area (in sq. meters)
b) Title - owned / leased with copies of sale / lease deed

c) Copy of Land Use Permit to construct Hotel from local authorities

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

d) Distance (in Kms) from (a) Railway station (b) airport (c) main shopping center
vii.

Details of the project:


a) Copy of Feasibility Report
b) Star category planned
c) Number of rooms (with attached bathrooms) and size for each type of room (in sq.ft)
d) Size of bathrooms (in sq.ft.)
e) Details of public areas with size in sq. ft. - Lobby / lounge; restaurants; bar; shopping;
banquet/conference halls; business centre; health club; swimming pool; parking
facilities (no. of vehicles)

AR

f) Facilities for the differently abled guests (room with attached bathroom earmarked
forthis purpose, designated parking, ramps for free accessibility in public areas and to
at least one restaurant, designated toilet (unisex) at the lobby level etc.). All hotels at
project stage will require conforming to the requirements by 01.09.2010.

KU

g) Eco-friendly Practices (a) Sewage Treatment Plant (b) rain water harvesting (c) waste
management (d) pollution control method for air, water and light (e) introduction of non
CFC equipment for refrigeration and air conditioning. All hotels at project stage will
require conforming to the requirements by 01.09.2010.
h) Energy/ water conservation (use of CFL lamps, solar energy, water saving devices /
taps)
i) Details of Fire Fighting Measures / Hydrants etc.

j) Date by which project is expected to be completed and become operational

k) Any other additional facilities

AR

I) Security related features


m) The architecture of the hotel building in hilly and ecologically fragile areas should
incorporate creative architecture keeping in mind sustainability and energy efficiency
and as far as possible in conformity with local art and architecture with use of local
materials.
4. Blue prints / Building Plans signed by the owner, the architect and approved by the
competent authority showing:
i.

Site plan

ii.

Front and side elevation

iii.

Floor plans for all floors

iv.

Detail of guest rooms and bath rooms with dimensions in sq.ft.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

v.

Details of Fire Fighting Measures/ Hydrants etc.

vi.

Air-conditioning details for guest rooms, public areas

5.

Local approvals by:

i.

Municipal Authority

ii.
iii.

Concerned Police Authority


Any other local authority as maybe applicable / required (viz. Pollution Control Board /
Ministry of Environment & Forests etc.)

iv.

Approval / NOC from Airport Authority of India for projects located near the Airport

Proposed capital structure:

7.

AR

6.
Note: The above mentioned approvals / NOCs are the responsibility of the promoter /
concerned company as the case may be. The Ministrys approval is no substitute for any
statutory approval and the approval given is liable to be withdrawn in case of any violation
without notice.

KU

a) Total project cost


b) Equity component with details of paid up capital

c) Debt - with current and proposed sources of funding


8.
Submission of Undertakingfor observance of regulatory conditions / terms & conditions
to be furnished by the applicant (Format enclosed at Annexurellh.
9. The application should indicate whether a few rooms or all rooms are to be let out on a Time
Share basis. Hotels which propose to let out part of or all its rooms on time- share basis will not be
eligible for Classification under this scheme.

AR

10.
Application fee in the form of a Demand Draft payable to Pay & Accounts Officer,
Department of Tourism, New Delhi (further details are given at point No. 14)
11.
In the event of any change in the project plan, the applicant should apply afresh for
approval under the desired category
12.
Authorized officers of the Ministry of Tourism should be allowed free access to inspect the
premises from time to time without prior notice
13.
The hotel must immediately inform the Ministry of the date from which the hotel becomes
operational and apply for Classification within 3 months from the date of operation
14.
The fee payable for the project approval and subsequent extension, if required is as under.
The Demand Draft may be payable to Pay & Accounts Officer, Department of Tourism, New
Delhi.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Star Category

Amount in Rs.

5- star

15,000

4-star

12,000

3-star

8,000

2-star

6,000

1-star

5,000

Heritage category

12,000

AR

15.
The promoter must forward quarterly progress reports failing which the project
approval is liable to be withdrawn
16.
All documents must be valid at the time of application. All copies of documents submitted
must be duly attested by a Gazetted officer / Notary. Documents in local language should be
accompanied by a translated version in English which should also be duly certified.

KU

17.
Projects, where it is proposed to let out part or whole of the hotel on Time Share basis, will
not be covered under these guidelines. (Such facilities, however, will be covered under a separate
Guideline of Timeshare Resort which are available at www.tourism.gov.in)
18.
Any change in the project plan or management for 5 Star Deluxe, 5 Star, 4 Star and
Heritage categories should be informed to the Ministry of Tourism and for 3 Star, 2 Star & 1 Star
categories to the respective Regional Indiatourism Office within 30 days, failing which the approval
will stand withdrawn / terminated

19.
The project approval is only applicable for new hotels coming up and not for additional
rooms coming up in existing hotels

AR

20.
The minimum size of rooms and bathrooms for all categories have been specified in the
Guidelines. Hotels of 1, 2, 3 and 4 Star categories availing subsidy / tax benefits / other benefits
from the Central / State Government would be subject to a Lock- in period of 8 years so that these
hotels continue to serve as budget category hotels. Hotels would be permitted to apply for upgradation to a higher star category after the completion of the lock in period
21.
Applicants are requested to go through the CHECKLIST OF FACILITIES & SERVICES
contained in this document before applying for project approval of new hotel projects /
classification of operational hotels.
22.
Application for Hotel Project approval forwarded through post will not be accepted if found
incomplete and applicant will be asked to complete the application and furnish the required
documents / information.
******

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

ANNEXUREII
CLASSIFICATION I RE-CLASSIFICATION OF OPERATIONAL HOTELS
1.
Classification for newly operational hotels if approved by Ministry of Tourism at project
stage, must be sought within 3 months of completion of the project. Operating hotels may opt for
Classification at any stage. However, hotels seeking Re-classification should apply for
reclassification at least six months prior to the expiry of the current period of classification
2.
If a hotel fails to apply for Re-classification six months before the expiry of the classification
period, the application will be treated as a fresh case of classification

AR

3.
Once a hotel applies for Classification/ Re-classification, it should be ready at all times for
inspection by the inspection committee of the HRACC. No request for deferment of inspection
will be entertained

4.
Classification will be valid for a period of 5 (Five) years from the date of approval of
Chairman HRACC or in case of Re-classification, from the date of expiry of the last classification,
provided that the application has been received six months prior to the expiry of the current period
of classification, along with all valid documents. Incomplete applications will not be accepted

KU

5.
The application should indicate whether a few rooms or all rooms are to be let out on a Time
Share basis. Hotels which propose to let out part of or all its rooms on time-share basis will not be
eligible for classification under this scheme.
6.

Hotels applying for Classification must provide the following documentation:

i.

Name of the Hotel

Name and address of the promoter/owner with a note on their business antecedent in not more
than 60 words
Complete postal address of the hotel with Telephone, Fax and Email a d d re s s

iv.

Status of the owner / promoter;

a)

If Public/private limited company with copies of Memorandum and Articles of Association

c)

AR

b)

iii.

If Partnership, a copy of Partnership Deed and Certificate of Registration

If proprietary concern, name and address of proprietor/certificate of registration


Mandatory for applying for Classification/Re-classification.

v.
vi.

Date on which the hotel became operational


Details of hotel site with postal address and distance (in kms) from
(a) Airport
(b) Railway Station
(c)

City centre / downtown shopping area

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

7.
a)

Details of the hotel:


Area of Hotel site (in sq. metres) with title - owned / leased with copies of sale/ lease
deed
Mandatory for applying for classification (one time)

b)

Copy of Land Use Permit from local authorities Mandatory for applying for classification
(one time)
Star category being applied for

d)

Number of rooms and size for each type of room in sq. ft. (Single/Double /

Suites - all rooms to have attached bathrooms


e)
Size of bathrooms in sq.ft.
Air-conditioning details for guest rooms, public areas

g)

Details of public areas: Lobby / lounge

ii)
iii)
vi)
vii)
viii)
ix)

(i) Lobby/lounge
Restaurants with no. of covers
Bar
Shopping area
Banquet / conference halls
Health club Business centre Swimming pool
Parking facilities (no. of vehicles which can be parked)

KU

f)

AR

c)

h)
Facilities for the differently abled guests: dedicated room with attached bathroom,
designated parking, ramps, free accessibility in public areas and at least to one restaurant,
designated toilet (unisex) at the lobby level etc. All operational hotels will require conforming to
the requirements by 01.09.2010

AR

i)
Eco-friendly Practices(a)Sewage Treatment Plant (b) rain water harvesting (c)waste
management (d) pollution control method for air, water andlight(e) Introduction of non CFC
equipment for refrigeration and air conditioning and other Eco-friendly measures and initiatives.
All operational hotels will require conforming to the requirements by 01.09.2010.
A Sewage treatment plant will not be a mandatory condition for hotels which have obtained
completion certificate for construction before 1.4.2012.
j) Measures for energy and water conservation, water harvesting (use of CFL lamps, solar energy,
water saving devices / taps etc.)
k) Details of Fire Fighting Measures
I) Security features viz. CCTV, X-Ray check, verification of staff etc
m) The architecture of the hotel building in hilly and ecologically fragile areas should incorporate
creative architecture keeping in mind sustainability and energy efficiency and as far as possible in
conformity with local art and architecture with use of local materials

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

n) Any other additional facilities


8.
Copies of certificates I No Objection Certificates to be furnished (copies should be
current / valid and duly attested by a notary / gazetted officer):
a)

Certificate / license from Municipality / Corporation to show that the establishment is registered
as a Hotel
Mandatory for applying for Classification/Re-classification. It should be current and valid.

b)

No Objection Certificate from concerned Police Department to run the Hotel


Mandatory for applying for Classification/ Re-classification. It should be current & valid.
No Objection Certificate from Municipal Health Officer / Sanitary Inspector giving clearance to
the establishment from sanitary / hygiene point of view.

AR

c)

Mandatory for applying for Classification/Re-classification. It should be current & valid.


d)

No Objection Certificate from the Fire Service Department (Local Fire Brigade Authority.

Public liability insurance (optional)

f)

Bar License:

h)
i)

Building Plans sanctioned by the competent authority and occupancy /completion certificate
by the competent authority
Mandatory for applying for Classification (one-time) unless additional rooms are added.
If classified earlier, a copy of the Classification Order issued by Ministry of Tourism
For Heritage property, certificate from the local authority stating the age of the property and
showing the new and old built up areas separately

g)

KU

e)

Mandatory for applying for Classification / Re-classification. It should be current & valid.

AR

j) Clearance / NOC /approval required from any other (local) authority (viz. Consent to Operate
from the State Pollution Control Board / Ministry of Environment & Forests etc., Coastal
Regulation Zone) whichever is applicable.
i.

No Objection Certificate (NOC) from Pollution Control mandatory for


Classification/ Re-classification (current and valid).

ii.

Clearance from Ministry of Environment and Forests and CRZ clearance


if applicable- Mandatory for classification (one
time).

k) Approval / NOC from Airport Authority of India for projects located near the Airport NOC from
Airport Authority of India. Mandatory for applying for classification (one
time)
I) Application fee

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

The above-mentioned approvals / No Objection Certificates are the responsibility of the


owner / promoter / concerned Company as the case may be. The approval of the Ministry of
Tourism is no substitute for any statutory approval and the approval given is liable to be withdrawn
without notice in case of any violations or misrepresentation of facts
9.
All applications for Classification and Re-Classification must be complete in all respects viz.
application form, application fee, prescribed clearances / NOCs / certificates etc. Incomplete
applications will not be accepted
10.
Hotels will qualify for classification as Heritage Hotels provided a minimum of 50% of the
floor area was built before 1950 and no substantial change has been made in the facade. Hotels,
which have been classified/, re-classified under Heritage categories prior to issue of these
Guidelines will continue under Heritage categories even if they were built between 1935-1950.

6,000

2- Star
3- Star
4- Star
5- Star
5- Star Deluxe
Heritage
(Grand, Classic, Heritage categories)

8,000
10.000
15,000
20,000
25,000
15,000

KU

Approval being taken separately.

1-Star

AR

11.
The application fees payable for classification/reclassification are as follows. The Demand
Draft may be payable to Pay & Accounts Officer, Department of Tourism, New Delhi
Star Category
Classification / Reclassification fees in Rs.

12.
Upon receipt of application complete in all respects, the hotel will be inspected by a
classification committee which will be constituted as follows:

AR

(a) For 4, 5, 5 Star Deluxe and Heritage (Basic, Classic & Grand) categories:
Chaired by Additional Director General (Tourism), Govt, of India/ Chairperson (HRACC) or a
representative nominated by him
Representative from FHRAI
Representative from HAI
Representative from IATO
Representative from TAAI
Principal Institute of Hotel Management
Regional Director, Indiatourism Office / local Indiatourism office
Member Secretary HRACC
In case of Heritage category, a representative of Indian Heritage Hotels Association
(IHHA)
(The HRACC representatives / nominees of FHRAI, HAI, IATO and TAAI should have
requisite expertise and experience of the hospitality and tourism industry (hands on
experience)

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

(b) For 1, 2 &3 Star hotels:

AR

Chairperson, Secretary (Tourism) of the concerned State Govt, or his nominee who should
not be below the rank of a Deputy Secretary to the Government of India. In his absence the
Regional Director, Indiatourism who is also Member Secretary, Regional HRACC will chair
the committee
Regional Director, Indiatourism Office/ local Indiatourism office
Representative from FHRAI
Representative from HAI
Representative from IATO
Representative from TAAI
Principal Institute of Hotel Management
(The HRACC representatives / nominees of FHRAI, HAI, IATO and TAAI should have requisite
expertise and e x p e r i e n c e o f t h e h o s p i t a l i t y a n d tourism i n d u s t r y (hands on
experience)
(c) The Chairperson and any 3 members will constitute a quorum

KU

(d) The recommendations duly signed by the committee will be sent to HRACC Division
(Ministry of Tourism, Government of India) by next day through speed post and the
recommendation of the HRACC inspection committee will be approved by the
Chairperson (HRACC)/ Addl. Director General (Tourism) expeditiously ( Point amended
w.e.f. Oct 2011).
(e) Appellate Authority: In case of any dissatisfaction with the decision of HRACC, the hotel
may appeal to Secretary (Tourism), Government of India for review and reconsideration within
30 days of receiving the communication regarding Classification / Re-classification. No request
will be entertained beyond this period.
Hotels

will be classified following a two stage procedure:

13.

a. The presence of facilities and services will be evaluated against the enclosed
checklist available at AnnexurelV

AR

b. The quality of facilities and services will be evaluated by the HRACC inspection
committee as per the prescribed parameters.
14.
The hotel is expected to maintain required standards at all times. The Classification
Committee may inspect a hotel at any time without previous notice. The Committee may request
that its members be accommodated overnight to inspect the level of services.
15.
Any deficiencies / rectifications pointed out by the HRACC must be complied with within
the stipulated time, which has been allotted in consultation with the hotel representatives during
inspection. Failure to comply within the stipulated time will result in rejection of the application.
16.

The Committee may assign a Star category l o w e r but not higher than that applied for.

17.
The hotel must be able to convince the committee that they are taking sufficient steps to
conserve energy and harvest water, garbage segregation, and disposal / recycling as per
Pollution Control Board (PCB) norms and following other Eco-friendly measures.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

18.
For any change in the Star / Heritage category, the promoter must apply afresh along
with requisite fee.
19.
Any changes in the Building Plans or management of the hotel should be informed to the
HRACC, Ministry of Tourism, Govt, of India within 30 days otherwise the classification will stand
withdrawn / terminated. In case of change of company name / hotel name, a copy of the fresh
Certificate of Incorporation or a copy of the Resolution of the Board of Directors regarding the
name change alongwith any other relevant documents may be submitted.
20.
The minimum size of rooms and bathrooms for all categories have been specified in the
Guidelines. Hotels of 1, 2, 3 and 4 star categories availing subsidy / tax benefits / other benefits from
the Central / State Government would be subject to a lock- in period of 8 years so that these hotels
continue to serve as budget category hotels. Hotels would be permitted to apply for up- gradation to
a higher star category after the completion of the lock in period.

AR

21.
Applicants are requested to go through the CHECKLIST OF FACILITIES AND SERVICES
contained in this document while applying for Classification / Re-classification. The checklist may be
duly filled up and signed and stamped on each page which should be submitted alongwith the
application

22.
The Hotel should adhere to the tenets of the Code of Conduct for Safe & Honourable
Tourism for which the following action would have to be taken:

KU

(i)
A signed copy of the Pledge and Undertaking of commitment towards Safe & Honourable
Tourism should be attached with the application. The format of the Pledge & Undertaking - Code of
Conduct for Safe & Honourable Tourism are attached at AnnexureV and AnnexureVI respectively
(ii)
On the day a new staff member joins the Hotel, he / she would be required to take / sign the
pledge. The pledge would be incorporated in the appointment letter / joining report of the staff

(iii)
Two focal points/Nodal Officers would be nominated (i.e., from HRD, security side etc.) at the
time of applying for approval by the Hotel in the case of hotels which have more than 25 personnel.
In the case of Hotels with less than 25 personnel, one focal point would have to be nominated

AR

(iv)
The training would be provided to the staff of the classified / approved hotels by Ministry Of
Tourism under its Capacity Building of Service Providers (CBSP) scheme in connection with Safe &
Honourable Tourism. The focal points of the hotel would be
trained first within first six months of MOT approval. Subsequently, the trained focal points in turn
would impart further in - house training to the staff which would be arranged within next six months.
(v)
The Pledge of Commitment towards Safe & Honourable Tourism would have to be
displayed prominently in the staff areas / back areas of the Hotels / Restaurants etc. and in the
office premises of all the Head of the Departments (HODs)
(vi)
The signatories of the Code of Conduct would be required to maintain a record of action
taken by them in compliance of the provisions of this para, which shall be kept in their office &
shown to the Committee (s) at the time of Classification/Reclassification.
23.
It will be mandatory for the hotel to participate in the skill development initiative of the
Ministry of Tourism to meet the manpower needs for the tourism and hospitality industry. For this,
the following action would have to be taken:

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

(i)

Classified hotel would be required to train a minimum number of persons, in every calendar
year in the short duration Skill Development Courses under Hunar Se Rozgar scheme as
per following norms:
Rooms per
Hotels

100+
50 to 100
20 to 50

1s' Year

2na Year

3rd Year

4,n Year

5tn Year

No.
of No.
of No.
of No.
of No.
of
persons to persons to persons
to persons
to persons
to
be trained be trained be trained
be trained
be trained
20
20
25
25
30
10
10
15
15
20
5
5
5
5
5

A minimum of ten persons will constitute a training class. Since a hotel with rooms between
20 to 50 will not be expected to have facilities / infrastructure necessary for the conduct of
trainings, an arrangement can be worked out between 2 to 5 hotels to conduct this obligatory
training (only the theory part) in one cluster and the practical part being carried out in the
respective hotels.

(iii)

Operational guidelines for the training programme will be circulated separately.

(iv)

Each hotel would achieve the above mentioned yearly target and submit it to Ministry of
Tourism in the reclassification application so as to be considered for reclassification.

KU

AR

(ii)

24.
Incomplete applications will not be considered. Efforts will be made to ensure that all cases
of classification are given final decision within three months from the date of application receipt
complete in all respects.

AR

******

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

ANNEXUREIII

FORMAT FOR UNDERTAKING


(To be on official company letterhead)
To
The Secretary (Tourism) Govt, of India
Ministry of Tourism New Delhi
UNDERTAKING

AR

I have read and understood all the terms and conditions mentioned above with respect to Project
Approval / Classification-Re-classification under the Star / Heritage categories andhereby agree to
abide by them. The information and documents provided are correct and authentic to the best of my
knowledge.

KU

I understand that the Ministrys approval is no substitute for any statutory approval and the approval
given is liable to be withdrawn in case of any violation or misrepresentation of facts or noncompliance of directions that may be issued by the Ministry of Tourism, Govt, of India, without
notice.
It is to certify that the hotel would not seek upgradation to a higher category for a period of eight (8)
years in the event the hotel avails of subsidy / tax benefits / other benefits from the Government.

AR

In case of any dispute/ legal measure, the same may be eligible in the jurisdiction falling under the
NCT of Delhi.
Signature and name in block letters Seal of

the applicant

Place: ___________

Date: ____________

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]


ANNEXURE IV
CHECKLIST OF FACILITIES FOR CLASSIFICATION I RE-CLASSIFICATION OF HOTELS
FACILITIES & SERVICES
1*
2*
3* 4*
5*/5*D Yes/
COMMENTS
No

Establishment to have
necessary trading licenses

all

Establishment to have public


liability insurance

24 hr. lifts for buildings higher


than ground plus two floors

Bedrooms, Bathroom, Public


areas and kitchen fully serviced
daily

All floor surfaces clean and in


good shape

AR

Minimum size of bedroom


excluding bathroom in sq. ft

KU
N

120

130

140

Minimum 10 lettable rooms, all


rooms
with
outside
windows/Ventilation.

120

Air-conditioning - % of Rooms 25%

GUEST ROOM

25%

50%

Mandatory for all hotels. Local


laws may require a relaxation of
this condition. Easy access for
the differently abled guests

Full time operation 7 days a


week in season

AR

GENERAL

100%

200

100%

Floor may be of any type

Single occupancy rooms may


be 20 sq ft less. Rooms should
not be less than the specified
size.
Air-conditioning / heating
depends on climatic
conditions & architecture.
Room temp. Should be
between 20c % 28c.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Minimum bed width for single 90


cm and double 180 cm

Mattress thickness minimum 10


cm

Minimum bedding 2 sheets,


pillow & case, blanket, mattress
protector / bed cover

Suites

Hairdryers

KU

Coir, foam or spring foam

Blankets available in air


conditioned rooms as per
seasonal requirement in non
A/C rooms. Mattress protector
is desirable in 1* and 2* and
necessary for all others.

2% of room block with a


minimum of 1 suite room

Where
not
provided
in
bathroom, must be available on
request
All 3 Star, 4 Star, 5 Star and 5
Star deluxe hotels shall provide
a hair dryer facility in the room
on complementary basis. In 1
Star and 2 Star, this facility will
be made available on request
on complementary basis.

N
U

AR

Safe keeping / in room safe

Definitely required between


each checkin. On alternate
days for 1 & 2 Star hotels

AR

A clean change of bed and bath


linen daily & between check - in'

1, 2 & 3 Star hotels to have


facilities for safe keeping in
the reception.
All 4 Star, 5 Star and 5 Star
deluxe hotels shall provide a
safe.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Minibar / Fridge

Contents must conform to local


laws
All 3 Star hotels shall have the
facility of a mini fridge and all 4
Star, 5 Star and 5 Star deluxe
shall have the facility of mini
bar with effect from 1.4.2014.

All category hotels to provide


two sealed bottles of branded
bottled water of minimum 500
ml. per person per day on
complimentary basis. Ultra
violet treated water will not be
acceptable.

AR

Drinking water with minimum


one glass tumbler per guest

Guest Linen

Sufficient lighting, 1 per bed

AR

A bedside table and drawer

be

Necessary for hotels of 1, 2 & 3


Star category to have a
wardrobe.

In one star or two star hotels


this may be without doors.

1 per two twins and two for a


double bed.

3*, 4*, 5* and 5* Deluxe, must


have remote

A 5 amp earthed power socket

to

KU

Wardrobe with minimum


clothes hangers per bedding

linen

Shelves /drawer space

Good quality
provided

TV - cable if available

A writing surface with sufficient


lighting
Chairs

Awastepaper basket

Preferable one per bedding

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Opaque curtains or screening


at all windows

A mirror at least half length


(3)

A stationary folder and


containing stationery

A do not disturb notice

Night spread / bedcover

Energy saving lighting

Linen Room

All

All

All

All

All

It will be mandatory w.e.f.


01.09.2010 for all 1 & 2 Star
category
hotels
to
have
attached
bathrooms.
All
bathrooms to have sanitary bin
with lid

30

36

36

45

25% of bathroom in 1 & 2 Star


hotels to have western style
WC. No higher ceiling / cap on
the maximum size

N-

30

AR

1 Bath Towel and 1Hand towel


to be provided per guest

Bath Mat
Guest toiletries to be provided minimum 1 new soap per guest

AR

Minimum size of bathroom in


square feet

Number of rooms with attached


bathrooms

KU

BATHROOM

All 4 Star, 5 Star and 5 Star


deluxe hotels shall install
blackout curtains by 1.4.2015

well ventilated

Quality products depending on


the star category

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Bottled toiletry products to be


provided

Clothes - hooks in each bath /


shower room

The bathrooms of all Star hotels


shall have hooks for at least 3
garments in the bath room.

A sanitary bin

These must be covered

Each western WC toilet to have


a seat with lid and toilet paper

All Star hotels shall provide


water sprays or bidets or
washlets or other modern water
based post-toilet-paper hygiene
facilities.

Floors and walls to have non porous surfaces

AR
M
KU
N

It will be mandatory w.e.f.


01.09.2010 for all 1 & 2 Star
category hotels to provide hot &
cold running water

Where shower cabin is not


available, a shower with shower
curtain will suffice
In 4 Star and above hotels, some
rooms should offer this option to
guests.

AR

Hot and cold running water


available 24 hours

Shower cabin

Bath tubs

This condition shall be applicable


to all new hotels that will start
operating from 1.4.2016. For the
hotels which have come into
operation or will come into
operation before 31.3.2016,
these facilities will be mandatory
from 1.4.2022.

Water saving taps - showers

Energy saving lighting

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

PUBLIC AREA
Lounge or seating area in the
lobby

Lobby shall h a v e furniture and


fixtures which shall include chairs
/arm chairs, sofa, tablesand fresh
floral display.

Valet (Parking) services to be


available

Availability of Room, F & B and


other tariff

AR

Heating and cooling to be


provided in public areas

KU

Reception facility

AR

Door man on duty for 4 Star and


below 4 Star categories the
presence of a door man on duty
in the lounge or sitting area in the
lobby shall not be mandatory.
However, in such areas the
presence of staff on duty shall be
obligatory around the clock, 24*7.

Manned minimum 16 hours.


Call service 24 hours. Local
directions to hotel including city
street maps to be available.

Temperatures to be between 20
degrees Celsius to 28 degrees
Celsius
Air-conditioning common areas
like
Lobby,
Restaurants,
Varandas, bar where they are
open to nature on one or more
sides shall not be mandatory for
beach, lake, backwater, river, hill,
mountain, forest or nature Hotels
& Resorts.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Public rest rooms for ladies and


gents with soap and clean towels,
a washbasin with running hot and
cold water, a mirror, a sanitary
bin with lid in unisex & ladies
toilet
ROOM AND FACILITIES FO

R THE DIFFERENT LY ABLED GUEST


N

Bathroom

Ramps with anti-slip floors at the


entrance. Minimum door width
should be one meter to allow
wheel chair access

To be p r o v i d e d in all public
areas. Free accessibility in all
public areas and to at least one
restaurant in 5 Star and 5 Star
Deluxe

Unisex. Minimumdoor width


should be one meter. To be
wheel chair accessible with
low height urinal (24
maximum) with grab bars

AR

Public Restrooms

Minimum door width should be


one meter to allow wheel chair
access with suitable low height
furniture,
low
peep
hole,
cupboard to have sliding doors
with low clothes hangers etc.
Room to have audible and
visible (blinking light) alarm
system

AR

the

for

KU

At least one room


differently abled guest

Minimum door width should be


one meter. Bathroom to be
w h e e l chair accessible with
sliding door suitable fixtures
like low wash basin low height
WC, grab bars etc. No bath
tub required.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

FOOD & BEVERAGE


1 & 2 Star categories should
have minimum one dining room
serving all meals. Room service
not necessary

3 Star category

One Multi-cuisine Restaurant


cum coffee shop open from 7
a.m. to 11 p.m. and 24 hr. room
service

4 Star category

GradeA cities:
One Multi-cuisine Restaurant
cum coffee shop open from 7
a.m. to 11 p.m., one Specialty
Restaurant and 24 hr. room
service

KU

AR

1 Star & 2 Star category

AR

5 Star category

GradeB cities:
One Multi-cuisine Restaurant
open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. and
24 hr. room service

GradeA cities:
One Multi cuisine Restaurant
cum 24 hr. coffee shop / all day
dinning,
one
Specialty
Restaurant and 24 hr. room
service
GradeB cities:
One Multi cuisine Restaurant
cum coffee shop open from 7
a.m. to 11 p.m., one Specialty
restaurant and 24 hr. room
service

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

5 Star Deluxe category

GradeA cities:
One Multi cuisine Restaurant
cum 24 hr. coffee shop / all day
dinning,
one
Specialty
restaurant and 24 hr. room
service

Cutlery to be at least stainless


steel

AR

Bar

Ihi would include the hotels g in Gurgaon,


Faridabad, Ghaziabad, )A, and Greater NOIDA
N

Plastic ware accepted in pool


area

All categories should use good


quality metal cutlery. Aluminum
cutlery prohibited

Wherever
bar
license
is
prohibited for a hotel as per
local law, the bar will not be
mandatory and wherever bar is
allowed as per local laws, then
the hotel will have to obtain bar
license first and then apply for
classification to the Ministry of
Tourism.

KU

Crockery & Glassware

Ministry of Tourism may review and revise ities


falling under the Grade A - Grade B time to
time.

e A: Delhi,** Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore,


Note The the c from
Pune, Hyderabad, Secunderabad.
**De fallin NOIC
e B Cities in the rest of the country excluding Grade A
cities

AR

GradeA cities:
One Multi cuisine Restaurant
cum coffee shop open from 7
a.m. to 11 p.m., one Specialty
restaurant and 24 hr. room
service

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

KITCHEN / FOOD PRODUCTION AREA


Refrigerator with deep freezer

Capacity based on size of F & B


service

Segregated storage of Meat, fish


and vegetables

Meat, fish and vegetables in


separate freezers

Colour coded synthetic choppinq


boards
Tiled walls non slip floors

Wooden
prohibited

Head covering for production


staff
Daily germicidal cleaning of
floors

Good quality cooking vessels /


utensils
All food grade equipment
containers
Drinking water

Ventilation system

Garbage to be segregated - wet


and dry
Wet garbage area to be airconditioned
Receiving areas and stores to be
clean and distinct from garbage
area

Pest control

STAFF

AR

First - aid training for all kitchen


staff

Staff uniforms for front of the


house

boards

AR

KU
N

N
N

Six monthly medical checks for


production staff

chopping

Use
of
aluminum
vessels
prohibited except for bakery

Water treated with UV + filtration

To encourage recycling

Uniforms to be clean and in good


condition

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

This may be relaxed outside the


metros / submetros for 1 and 2
Star category hotels

20%

20%

40%

40%

80%

Hotels of 4 Star category and


above should have formally
qualified Heads of Departments.

English speaking front office staff

Percentage of Supervisory staff

The supervisory or the skilled staff


may have training or skill
certification as follows:

20%

20%

30%

30%

60%

KU

Percentage of Skilled staff

AR

Degree / diploma from Central or


State IHMs / FCIs or from
NCHMCT affiliated IHMs or from
other reputed Hospitality schools

Degree / diploma from Central or


State IHM / FCIs or from
NCHMCT affiliated IHMs or from
other reputed Hospitality schools
Skill training certificate issued
under the guidelines and scheme
of the Ministry of Tourism

U
AR

The supervisory or the skilled staff


may have training or skill
certification as follows;

STAFF WELFARE FACILITIES


Staff Rest Rooms

Staff Locker Room

Separate for male and female


employees with bunk beds, well
lighted and ventilated

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Toilet facilities

Separate Dining area &


Facility

CODE OF CONDUCT FOR SAF

Full length mirror, hand dryer with


liquid soap dispenser

E & HONOURABLE TOURISM


N

Pledge
to
be
displayed
prominently in the staff / back
areas / office premises of all the
Heads of Departments (HODs)

Training for Code of Conduct for


Safe & Honourable Tourism

At time of joining (orientation


programme and subsequent inhouse training)

Maintenance of Action Taken


Report
with
regards
to
compliance of the provisions of
the Code

Focal Points / Nodal Officers

M
KU
N

Two nodal officers to be


nominated (i.e., from HRD,
Security side etc.) for hotel with
more than 25 personnel and one
focal point for Hotel with less than
25 personnel

Wheel chair to be available on a


complimentary basis in hotels of
all categories

Provision of wheelchair for the


differently abled guest

Valet (parking) services to be


available

Dry- cleaning /laundry

AR

Signatories of the Code of


Conduct to maintain record of
action taken in compliance of the
provisions of the Code

N
U

GUEST SERVICES

AR

Display of Pledge

In house for 5 Star Deluxe


hotels. For 5 Star category and
below may be outsourced

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

A/

Tea/coffee making facilities in the


room to be made available on
complimentary basis in all 4 Star
5 Star & 5 Star Deluxe categories.

Iron and Iron Board facility

A/

Iron and iron board to be made


available on request in 1 to 3 Star
category hotels on complimentary
basis. For 4, 5, 5 Star Deluxe
categories to be available in the
room on complimentary basis.

Paid transportation on call

Shoe c l e a n i n g , s h o e
horn & slippers

KU

Ice (from drinking water) on


demand
Acceptance of common credit
cards
Assistance with luggage on
request
A public telephone on premises.
Unit charges made known

AR

Tea / Coffee making facility in


the room

Guest should be able to travel


from hotel
Free facility to be Provided for in
house guests.
Complimentary on request

There should be at least one


telephone no higher than 24 from
floor level in 5 and 5 Star Deluxe
(to also cater to differently abled
guests

A prominently displayed message


board will suffice for 1 & 2 Star
categories

Name Address and telephone


numbers of doctors with front
desk
Stamps and mailing facilities

Doctor on call in 3, 4, 5 & 5 Star


Deluxe

AR

Wake - up call service on


request
Messages for guests to be
recorded and delivered

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Newspapers available

This may be placed in the lounge


for 1, 2 & 3 Star hotels

Access to travel desk facilities

This need not be on the premise


for 1, 2 & 3 Star categories

Left luggage facilities

This must be in a well secured


room / 24 hour manned area

KU

AR

All 4 Star, 5 Star and 5 Star


Deluxe hotels shall provide
luggage racks, portable or fixed,
for two large suitcases by
1.4.2015. This will be stated on
the hotels website under the
head Facilities and Amenities
provided on complimentary basis
and mentioned to guests while
checking in.

Health - Fitness facilities

Florist

AR

Utility shop / kiosk

Beauty Salon and Barbers Shoo

Provision for emergency supplies


toiletries /first aid kit

Indian system of treatments


should preferably be offered

The presence of a utility


kiosk/shop will not be a
mandatory
condition
for
classification under one to four
Star categories. For 5 Star & 5
Star Deluxe categories one utility
kiosk or shop will be a must. No
separate book shop shall be
necessary.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Money changing facilities

Metal detectors (door frame or


hand held)

CCTV at strategic locations

X-Ray Machine.

Money changing facility to be


made available

SAFETY & SECURITY

AR

For 5 Star Deluxe category, it


would be Necessary to have an
X-Ray Machine at the guest
entrance
for
screening
of
baggage

Verification.

All hotels should conduct a


antecedent verification of their
staff and suppliers by the Police /
private security agencies.

All hotels to conduct periodic fire


drills and maintain Manuals for
Disaster Management, First Aid
and Fire Safety. Quarterly drills as
per Law.

N
N

AR

Staff trained in fire fighting Drill.

KU

Under belly scanners to screen


vehicles.

Manual checks may be conducted


for staff and suppliers at
designated entry points

Security arrangements for all


hotel entrances.

Each bedroom door fitted with


lock and key, viewport /
peephole& internal securing
device.

A safety chain / wishbone latch is


acceptable in place of viewport /
peephole.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

N'

Fire and Emergency Procedure


notices displayed in room
behind door.

Fire and emergency alarms


should have visual & audible
signals.

First aid kit with over the counter


medicines with front desk.

Fire Exit signs on guest floors


with emergency / backup power.

All hotels in the categories 4 Star,


5 Star & 5 Star Deluxe shall
provide a telephone within an
arms reach of the toilet seat. This
condition shall be applicable to all
new hotels that will start operating
from
1.4.2016. For hotels which have
come into operation or will come
into operation or will come into
operation before
31.3.2016, this guideline will be
applicable from 1.4.2022.

AR

KU

Telephone facility within arms


reach of the toilet seat.

COMMUNICATION FACILITIES

These can be battery Operated.

AR

Smoke Detectors.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

All Star hotels shall provide at


least two multi-purpose sockets
capable
of
handling
US,
European
Community
and
Japanese plugs at or just above
the table level. It should be
possible for guests to charge a
laptop
and
cell
phone
simultaneously. This condition
shall be applicable to all new
hotels that will start operating
from 1.4.2016. For the hotels
which have come into operation
or will come into operation till
31.3.2016, this guideline will be
applicable
from
1.4.2022.
However, till such time as this
facility
is
provided
on
a
permanent basis, it will be
mandatory for all Star hotels to
provide
multi-socket
adapter
plugs on request.

4 star and above should have


direct dialing and STD / ISD
facilities. 1,2 and 3 Star category
hotels may go through a
telephone exchange

This can be a paid service. Upto 3


Star, PC can be in the executive
offices, Internet subject to local
access being available

AR

A telephone for incoming &


outgoing calls in the room.

KU

AR

Provide atleast two multipurpose sockets.

PC available for guest use with


internet access.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

E-mail service.

Fax, photocopy and printing


Services.
In room Internet Connection /
Data Port.

Subject to local internet access


being available. Wi - Fi wherever
possible.

Business Center.

This should be a dedicated area.


(This provision maybe relaxed for
resort destinations, tourist and
pilgrimage centers).

Swimming Pool

This can be relaxed for hill


destinations. Mandatory to have
trained
Life
Guard.
Board
containing Dos & Donts, No
Divingsign, pool depth etc. should
be displayed at a strategic
location in the pool area
All 4 Star, 5 Star and 5 Star
Deluxe hotels shall provide a
luminous LED wall clock with
numerals of three inches or more
on display near their swimming
pools.
It will be desirable for all 5 Star
Deluxe hotels to have airconditioned porches and heated
swimming pools.

AR

KU

AR

Subject to local internet access


being available.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Parking Facilities.

Conference Facilities.

As per norms laid out in para 23


of guidelines

Eco Friendly Practices:


(a) Sewage Treatment Plant.

(b) Rain water harvesting.

c) Waste management.

A Sewage Treatment Plant will


not be a mandatory condition for
hotels which
have
obtained
completion
certificate for construction
before 1.4.2012.

d) Pollution control methods for


air, water and light.

(e)

AR

Introduction of non CFC


equipment for refrigeration
and air conditioning and other
Eco-Friendly measures and
initiatives.

KU

No. of people to be trained under


Hunar Se Rozgar.

Should be adequate in relation to


the number of rooms & banquet /
convention
hall
capacities.
Exclusively earmarked accessible
parking nearest to the entrance
for differently abled guests

Note 1.

Display of classification status by the hotel:-

AR

All hotels should clearly indicate on their websites the facilities and amenities provided to guests free of cost
like complimentary breakfast (indicating broad classification like Indian breakfast, Continental breakfast or
American breakfast), iron and iron board facility, shoe cleaning facility, shoe horn and slippers, other free
facilities like dental kit, shaving kit, etc. If any facility is provided only on request but is included in the room
rent, this should be mentioned on the hotels website under the head Facilities and Amenities provided on
complimentary basis and also mentioned to the guest when the hotel staff introduces the room to him/her on
arrival. In case the complimentary breakfast is not a buffet, the guest must be shown a list stating in English
the name of all complimentary items.
It will be mandatory for all the hotels classified under the categories 1 to 4 Star to display their classification
status prominently outside the hotel and at the reception from 1.4.2014 as per a scheme to be evolved in
consultation with FHRAI and HAI.
Note 3:
Time-sharing accommodation will also be considered for classification as per the guidelines for
Classification/Re-classification of hotels.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

Note 4 :
D Desirable N
Necessary

AR

KU

AR

There is no relaxation in the Necessary criteria except as specified in the comment column

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

ANNEXURE-V

PLEDGE FOR COMMITMENT TOWARDS SAFE & HONOURABLE TOURISM AND


SUSTAINABLE TOURISM (For internal circulation and use of the hotel)

AR

I / We solemnly pledge and reiterate our commitment to conduct our business in a manner
that befits the culture and ethos of our rich and ancient civilization, and the tolerant and
accommodating nature of our multicultural society and protects all individuals, especially women
and children from all derogatory acts which are contrary to the spirit of our country. We hereby
commit to abide by the Code of Conduct for Safe and Honourable Tourism.

Recognizing that every earth resource is finite and fragile, I / We further pledge to fully
implement sustainable tourism practices, consistent with the best environment and heritage
protection standards, such that my/our present tourism resource requirements optimize both local
community benefit and future sustainable uses.

Name

AR

On behalf of In the presence of

KU

Signature

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

ANNEXUREVI
Format of UNDERTAKING in respect of the Pledge for Commitment towards
Safe & Honourable Tourism

(To be on official company letterhead)

To
The Secretary (Tourism) Govt, of India Ministry of Tourism New Delhi

AR

UNDERTAKING

It is to hereby confirm that I / We have read and understood the Code of Conduct for Safe
and Honourable Tourism adopted on 1st Oct. 2010 as per copy attached with application with
respect to Project Approval / Classification - Re-classification of hotels under the Star / Heritage
categories and hereby agree to abide by them.

KU

That I / W e have read solemnly pledge and reiterate our commitment to conduct our
business in a manner that befits the culture and ethos of our rich and ancient civilization, and the
tolerant and accommodating nature of our multicultural society and protects all individuals,
especially women and children from all derogatory acts which are contrary to the spirit of our
country. I / We hereby commit to abide by the Code of Conduct for Safe and Honourable Tourism.

AR

Recognizing that every earth resource is finite and fragile, I / W e further pledge to fully
implement sustainable tourism practices, consistent with the best environment and heritage
protection standards, such that my / our present tourism resource requirements optimize both
local community benefit and future sustainable uses.

Signature
Name in BLOCK LETTERS
Seal

Place: __________

Date:___________

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

GUIDELINES FOR CLASSIFICTION


OF HERITAGE HOTELS
Definition:

AR

Heritage Hotels cover running hotels in palaces/castles/forts/havelies/hunting loges/


residence of any size built prior to 1950. The facade, architectural features and
general construction should have the distinctive qualities and ambience in keeping
with the traditional way of life of the area. The architecture of the property to be
considered for this category should not normally be interfered with. Any extension,
improvement, renovation, change in the existing structures should be in keeping
with the traditional architectural styles and constructional techniques harmonising
the new with the old. After expansion/renovation, the newly built up area added
should not exceed 50% of the total built up (plinth) area including the old and new
structures. For this purpose, facilities such as swimming pools, lawns etc. will be
excluded. Heritage Hotels will be sub-classified in the following categories:

Heritage:

KU

This category will cover hotel in Residences/Havelies/Hunting Lodges/Castles/Forts/


Palaces built prior to 1950. The hotel should have a minimum of 5 rooms (10 beds).
Heritage Classic:

Heritage Grand:

This category will cover hotels in Residences/Havelies/Hunting Lodges/Castles/Forts/


Palaces built Prior to 1935. The hotel should have a minimum of 15 room (30 beds).

This category will cover hotels in Residence/Havelies/Hunting Lodges/Castles/Forts/


Palaces built prior to 1935. The hotel should have minimum of 15 rooms (30 beds).

AR

Room & Bath Size:

No room or bathroom size is prescribed for any of the categories. However, general
ambience, comfort and imaginative readaptation would be considered while
awarding sub-classification classic or grand.
SPECIAL FEATURES:
Heritage:
General features and ambience should conform to the overall concept of heritage
and architectural distinctiveness.
Heritage Classic:
General features and ambience should conform to the overall concept of heritage

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

and architectural distinctiveness. The hotel should provide at least one of the under
mentioned sporting facilities.
Heritage Grand:
General features and ambience should conform to the overall concept of heritage
and architectural distinctiveness. However, all public and private areas including
rooms should have superior appearance and decor. At least 50% of the rooms
should be air-conditioned (except in hill stations where there should be heating
arrangements). The hotel should also provide at least two of the under mentioned
sporting facilities.

AR

SPORTING FACILITIES:

Swimming Pool, Health Club, Lawn Tennis, squash, Riding, Golf Course, provided the
ownership vests with the concerned hotel. Apart from these facilities, credit would
also be given for supplementary sporting facilities such as Golf, Boating, Sailing,
Fishing or other adventure sports such as Ballooning, Parasailing, Wind-surfing,
Safari excursions, Trekking etc. and indoor games.

KU

CUSINE:
Heritage:

The hotel should offer traditional cuisine of the area.

Heritage Classic:

The hotel should offer traditional cuisine but should have 4 to 5 items which have
close approximation to continental cuisine.

AR

Heritage Grand:

The hotel should offer traditional and continental cuisine.


MANAGEMENT:

The Hotel may be managed and run by the owning family and/or professionals.
Note: Classification in any of the above categories will be given keeping in view the
overall standard of the property. The hotel would be judged by the quality of service
and the years of experience that the owner/staff have had in the business.
GENERAL FEATURES:
There should be adequate parking space for cars. All public rooms and areas and the
guest rooms should be well maintained and well equipped with quality carpets/area
rugs/good quality duries, furniture, fittings etc. in good taste and in keeping with the

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

traditional lifestyle. If carpeting is not provided, the quality of flooring should be very
good (This is not to suggest that old and original flooring whether in stone or any
other material should be replaced unnecessarily). The guest rooms should be clean,
airy, pest free without dampness and musty odour, and of reasonably large size with
attached bathrooms with modern facilities (e.g. flush commodes, wash basins,
running hot and cold water, etc.). There should be a well appointed lobby and/or
lounge equipped with furniture of high standard with separate ladies and gents cloak
rooms with good fittings.
FACILITIES:

KU

AR

There should be a reception, cash and information counter attended by trained and
experienced personnel. There should be money changing facilities and left luggage
room. There should be a well equipped, well furnished and well maintained dining
room on the premises and, wherever permissible by law, there should be an elegant,
well equipped bar/permit room. In the case of Heritage Grand and Heritage Classic
Bar is necessary and desirable in the case of Heritage Basic. The kitchen and
pantry should be professionally designed to ensure efficiency of operation and
should be well equipped. Crockery, cutlery, glassware should be of high standard
and in sufficient quantity, keeping in view the lifestyle and commensurate with the
number of guests to be served. Drinking water must be bacteria free; the kitchen
must be clean, airy, well lighted and protected from pests. There must be a
filtration/purification plant for drinking water. There must be three tier washing
system with running hot and cold water; hygienic garbage disposal arrangements;
and frost free deep freezer and refrigerator (where the arrangement is for fresh food
for each meal, standby generator will not be insisted upon).

SERVICES:

AR

The hotel should offer good quality cuisine and the food and beverage service
should be of good standard. There should be qualified, trained, experienced,
efficient and courteous staff in service and clean uniforms and the staff coming in
contact with the guests should understand English, Housekeeping at these hotels
should be of the highest possible standard and there should be a plentiful supply of
linen, blankets, towels, etc. which of the highest possible standard and should be a
plentiful be of high quality. Each guest room should be provided with a vacuum
jug/flask with bacteria free drinking water. Arrangements for heating/cooling must
be provided for the guest rooms in seasons. Places which have telephone lines must
have at least one phone in the office with call bells in each guest room.
Arrangements for medical assistance must be there in case of need. The staff/room
ratio must be in keeping with the number of guest room in each property. These
hotels must be run on a professional basis while losing none of their ambience and
services. The hotel should be environment friendly. The gardens and grounds should
be very well maintained. There should be an efficient system of disposal of garbage
and treatment of wastes and effluents. The hotel should present authentic and
specially choreographed local entertainment to the guests. They should also have,
wherever possible, arrangements for special services such as wildlife viewing, water
sports, horse/camel/elephant riding or safaris etc.

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

APPLICATION PROFORMA FOR APPROVAL OF HERITAGE HOTEL PROJECT


1. Proposed name of the Hotel:
2. Name of Promoters:
(a note giving details of business antecedents may be enclosed)
3. Complete Postal address of the Promoters.
4. Status of owners/Promoters:

AR

Whether:

a) Company
(if so, a copy of the Memorandum & Articles of Association may be furnished)

OR

KU

b) Partnership firm (If so, a copy of partnership Deed and Certificate of


registration under the Partnership Act may be furnished)
OR

c) Proprietary concern (Give name and address of the proprietor)

5. Location of the property alongwith postal address:

AR

(a) Area
(b) Title

6. Details of the property

Whether outright purchase/ownership (if so, a copy of the registered sale deed
should be furnished)
OR

On Lease
(if so, a copy of the registered lease deed should furnished)
(c) Whether the required land use permit for the conversion into hotel on it have
been obtained. (If so, a copy of certificate from the concerned local
authorities should be furnished).
(d) Distance from Railway Station:

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

(e) Distance from Airport:


(f) Distance from main shopping Centres:
7. Details of the Hotel Project ( a copy fo the project/feasibility report should also be
furnished).
(a) No. of guest rooms and their area:
Number

Area

AR

Single
Double
Suites
Total:
(b) No. of attached baths and their area:

(c) How many of the bathrooms will have long baths or the most modern
Shower chambers (Give break-up):
Number

Area of each

KU

(d) Details of public areas:

i) Lounge/Lobby
ii) Restaurants/Dinning room:
iii) Bar (if any):
iv) Shopping (if any):
v) Banquet/Conference Halls (if any):
vi) Health Club (if any):
vii) Swimming Pool (If any):
viii) Parking facilities:

AR

(e) Blue prints of the sketch plans of the project. A complete set duly signed by
the promoter and the architects should be furnished including/showing
among other things, the following:i) Site Plan:
ii) Front and side elevations:
iii) Floor wise distribution of public rooms/guest rooms and other facilities.

8. Approval:
Whether the hotel project has been approved/cleared by/under the following
agencies/Acts wherever applicable:
(a) Municipal authorities;
(b) Urban Lands (Ceiling), Act:
(c) Any other local/State Govt. authorities concerned.
9. Proposed Capital Structure:
(a) Total estimated cost:

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA

Notes:- Facility Planning [6th Sem]

(i) Equity:
(ii) Loan:
(b) Equity Capital so far raised:
(c) (i) Sources from which loan is proposed to be raised:
(ii) Present position of the loan:
10. Acceptance of Regulatory conditions:
(This should be furnished in the prescribed proforma, as per sample attached):
11. Application Fee:

AR

Demand Draft for Rs.12,000/- for hotel projects planned for Heritage, Hotel category
drawn in favour of Pay & Accounts Officer, Department of Tourism, New Delhi
must be attached with the application:

AR

KU

*****

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT CATERING AND NUTRITION, KUFRI, SHIMLA