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a Eric Marienthat’s a COMPREHENSIVE JAZZ Baz STUDIES & EXERCISES a fer all instruments TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER 1. “MAJOR CHORD SCALE EXERCISES” Part 1. Scales and Exercises. Part 2. Motif Exercises. Part 3. “Finger Busters” Part 4. Extended Motifs Part 5. Ideas for Improvi CHAPTER 2. “MINOR CHORD SCALE EXERCISES” Part 1. Scales and Exercises. Part 2: Motif Exercises Part 3. “Finger Busters” Part 4. Extended Motifs Part 5 Ideas for Improvising. CHAPTER 3. “UNALTERED DOMINANT CHORD SCALE EXERCISES” Part 1. Scales and Exercises....nnense Part 2: Motif Exercises. Part 3. “Finger Busters” Part 4. Extended Motifs... Part 5 Ideas for improvising... CHAPTER 4, “MELODIC MINOR SCALE EXERCISES” Part 1. Scales and Exercise Part 2: Motif Exercise: Part 3. “Finger Busters” Part 4. Extended Motifs Part 5 Ideas for Improvising CHAPTER 5. “DIMINISHED CHORD SCALE EXERCISES” Part 1. Scales and Exercises. Part 2: Motif Exercises 131 137, Part 3, “Finger Busters” 147 Part 4. Extended Motifs. Part 5 Ideas for Improvising 149 154 CHAPTER 6. “PENTATONIC AND BLUES SCALE EXERCISES” Part 1. Scales and Exercises. Part 2: Motif Exercise: Part 3. “Finger Busters” Part 4. Extended Motifs Part 5 Ideas for Improvising. 158 172 182 189 Introduction The inspiration for writing this book was to create a series of technique building exer- cises as well as some useful melodic and harmonic studies and incorporate them into one for- ‘mat. Setting up a daily practice routine is vital to becoming a more proficient player. This book uses various scales and melodic motifs to explore ways of approaching different chord types. The idea is to study these scales and exercises in a way that will be useful for improvisation while, at the same time, providing a practice routing that simply helps improve your technique. This book is based on the six chord scales most commonly used in improvising, no mat- ter what style of music. They are: The Major Chord Scale 2. The Minor Chord Scale (specifically Dorian Minor) 3. The Dominant Chord Scale (The Mixolydian Mode) 4. The Melodic Minor Scale 5. 6 . The Diminished Scale ‘The Pentatonic and Blues Scales Each chapter is dedicated to a different scale and is divided into five parts: PART ONE: “CHORD SCALE EXERCISES” Part One introduces the chord scale of each chapter. Each key has its scale and cor- responding exercise and each exercise has a different melodic and rhythmic treatment. It’s important to learn each scale and working on them in this way creates a more interesting and useful practice routine. PART TWO: "MOTIF EXERCISES” This is an exercise that starts with a single short melodic idea. The idea, or motif, is first played in half-steps both ascending and descending. With each succes- sive exercise the interval between motifs grows wider by half-steps until the interval between motifs reaches an octave. Even though the motif stays the same, as the inter- val widens, each exercise presents a new technical challenge. PART THREE: "FINGER BUSTERS” The idea behind this set of exercises is to help build strong technique and endurance, just as the name implies. Each “FINGER BUSTER” corresponds with the chord type of its chap- ter. The most benefit will come if each exercise is repeated at least four times. Try to build up to the point where you can make it to the end of number 50 with as few breaks as possible. You can almost think of this as the “workout” portion of each chapter and if you stay with it, you should really notice the benefit. PART FOUR: "EXTENDED MOTIFS” One valuable way to practice is to take a melodic phrase and practice in every key. Part Four uses this idea and is based on five different phrases written chromatically. Each phrase is derived from the chord type emphasized in that chapter. As the phrase changes key, keep the key of the chord in mind as well. Some of these exercises tend to be quite long in order to cover as much of an instrument's range as possible so feel free to break them up to make them easier to finish. PART FIVE: "IDEAS FOR IMPROVISATION” This final section of each chapter deals with a solo that was written to show different. ways to use the chord scales over various sets of chord changes. As you play through each solo you'll see phrases pointed out to show how they relate to the chords and how various scales are used. I'm sure that, as you play through them, you'll find many more ways to use these chord scales and melodic ideas. Tips on How To Use This Book 1. Try to always use a metronome to practice with. As | said before, this is as much of an exer- cise book as it i a harmonic studies book. The metronome is an important technique build- ing tool because it guides you and makes sure that all your notes are being played evenly. Make sure that you can hear it as loudly as you can hear yourself and keep each note right in time. As you practice, set the metronome at different tempos and never play an exercise faster than you can control. The best way to become faster on yout practice slowly and be very definite with each note. istrument is to first 2. Before you sit down to practice, decide which exercises you want to work on and set a goal for yourself. For example, practice parts One, Two and Three of a chapter one day and Four and Five the next. Or take certain lines out of each chapter and create your own routine. However it’s put together, if you set a goal for yourself before you start, you'll probably be more likely to stick with it and really maximize your practicing time. 3. This book was written as a way of showing how you can use melodic ideas to become more familiar with certain chords and chord scales while building technique at the same time. But it's just the beginning! The optimum way to use this book is to work on the written exer- cises first and then challenge yourself by coming up with some of your own ideas and motifs and practice them in the same format. By practicing ideas off the top of your head, you'll be exercising your brain as well as your fingers! Notes This book was designed to fit the range of most instruments. Since certain instruments don't have a range lower than low B or higher than high Ft, optional notes are provided so that all of the exercises can be played on just about any instrument. These optional notes are writ- ten in parentheses and hopefully don’t create too much of a distraction. ‘Asso, during all the time 1 spent working on this book | struggled with the question of “courtesy accidentals” and whether or not to use them. I's important to practice remembering accidentals written early in a measure so that you don’t forget to use them on the same notes later in the measure. But, at the same time, concentrating on playing an exercise correctly can be hard enough without having to think about remembering accidentals in measures that are more complicated. | suppose that the bottom line is to just keep your eyes open! Vd like to thank Chick Corea, Michael Brecker, John Patitucci, Frank Gambale, Pat Kelley and Eddie Daniels for their valuable advice during the writing of this book CHAPTER ONE MAJOR CHORD SCALE EXERCISES Part One: Scales and Exercises C Major Scale + Exercise Ct Major Scale + D Major Scale 1073, 2714, 3125, is613 E Major Scale Exercise E Major Scale Exercise Loos F Major Scale Exercise , Ft Major Scale L613 10 G Major Scale Exercise A’ Major Scale Exercise ELs6113 A Major Scale 12 BY Major Scale Exercise B Major Scale ELs6113 Part Two: Motif Exercises 41 Minor 2nd's is6113 Minor 3rd's be? te be ge ye b Major 3rd's ba FLs6113 15, Perfect 5th's ph Minor &th's Major 6th's Minor 7th's Major 7th's 113 Minor 2nd's Ls6113 Major 2nd's Minor 3rd's Major 3rd's pro) 18 Perfect 4th's Tri-Tones Perfect 5th's b ¢ Minor &th's Major 6th's Minor 7th's ti ELs6113 Minor 2nd's st3 20 Major 2nd's EL9si13 21 Minor 3rd's Prod 22 Perfect 4th's Tri-Tones 96113 23 Minor 6th's Major 6th's Minor 7th's Major 7th's Bisst13 24 Part Three: “Finger Busters” 4 2 3 E9613 25 sss 26 Part Four: Extended Motifs L963 Urs 28 L963 2g sas 30 Part Five: Ideas for Improvising This section deals with @ solo written over the tune, “Confirmation”. Because this tune involves Major chords, a lot of the ideas in this chapter can be applied. As you play through this solo, try to see how each phrase fits into the chord above. The strong parts of the chord (root, 3rd, and Sth) are used as pivot points and the scale tones and chromatic passing tones are used to help shape the phrases. Dmaj7 _ofe os FR) Bm Bh? Am v7 G7 Fm BT fn b5) FT) By? 196113 31 Chm hs) FFT) Bm By? A pb? engin Em ar Daa? é chnhs) Rnb) ah? Am sits 32 Dimaj7 Am D7 h Fv b j Boy Em ay Dmaj7 #1, This is a good example of a phrase that emphasizes the stong parts of each chord and uses scale and passing tones to create a melody. #2. This is one of many 2-5-1 progressions in this tune. As you can see by the chart below, the Il and the V chords are related or "Diatonic” to the | chord, All the notes of any scale are refered to as being diatonic to that scale. If you use @ C Major scale, for example, and build on each degree of that scale, you can see how the diatonic chords are formed: i Chord Chart e a a Dm7 es6113 33 WV maj7 F maj7 Vil m7(b5) Bm7(}5) The root, Srd, Sth, and 7th of each chord tells you what type of chord it is. As you can see in this case, the‘It, "V", and “I” chords became Dm7, G7,and CMaj7. Of course, there are many different types of |-V- Is, This is only one example and as you can see, this tune is based on ILV-'s. #9, Most types of chords include notes that do not appear in the basic chard scale but sound good and add different color or characteristic to your melody. These notes are called "tensions. Here are the aveieble tensions for Major chords: Ex.2 11th 431 C Major ont a ° Available “Tensions” ‘Take another look at the diatonic chord chart. Each of the scales are diatonic to the key of “C”. Esch of these saven scales are called “Modes”. Here is the same chart with the names of each mode: 3 lodes e Clonian 34 E Phrygian _ F Lydian fo G Mixolydian > 2 + = £ = = A Aeolian B Locrian An F Maj7 chord with the tension (#4) or (#11) would be called F Maj7(#11) and would use an F Lydian scale as its chord scale. Here are some melodic examples: Ex.4 Fmsj 711) x5 Gimaj7 (fit) FL96113 35 Ee Emaj7(fi) Quick Reference Mai.f611) or Lydian Maj. 7th(411) Maj. 13th(#1 1) i *min. 7th{t5) *You can use the Major scale @ minor 3rd above the root of the chord. Cm7(#5), for example, would use an Eb Major scale starting on C as its chord scale. 36 CHAPTER TWO Minor Chord Scale Exercises Part One: Scales and Exercises C Minor 7th Scale (C Dorian) rs Exercise ‘ a s F Minor 7th Scale (F Dorian) L963 37 B) Minor 7th Scale (Bb Dorian) 7 + Exercise mses 38 E) Minor 7th Scale (E) Dorian) Exercise 196113 39 Ab Minor 7th Scale (Ab Dorian) Exercise C4 Minor 7th Scale (C} Dorian} + Exercise F} Minor 7th Scale (F} Dorian) L963 41 B Minor 7th Scale {(B Dorian) sss 42 E Minor 7th Scale (E Dorian) Exercise i EL96113 43 A Minor 7th Scale (A Dorian} mss 44 D Minor 7th Scale (D Dorian) Exercise G Minor 7th Scale (G Dorian) Exercise, L613 45 Part Two: Motif Exercises 41 Minor 2nd's sits 46 Major 2nd's 4 $ Minor 3rd's BLs6113 47 Major 3rd's ¢ Perfect 4th's 5 Tri Tc réTones b by os 48 Minor 6th's 4 Major 6th's 6 $ Minor 7th's Major 7th's b b eb by L613 493 Minor 2nd's Major 2nd's 50 Minor 3rd's Major 3rd's b b be obey, Perfect 4th's Tri-Tones. h Perfect Sth's ELss113 51 Minor 6th's Major 6th's Minor 7th's b Major 7th's Minor 2nd's 52 Major 2nd's E9613 53 Minor 3rd's Major 3rd's mosis 54 Tri Tones Perfect 5th's be pe 2nd time only Minor 6th's b 2nd time only Major 6th's 2nd time only Minor 7th's bi E6113 55 Major 7th's 56 Part Three: “Finger Busters” 3 a 2 EL961I3 57 cron) 58 Part Four: Extended Motifs ELs613 59 60 E1613 61 asa L613 63 Part Five: Ideas for Improvising This section deals with a solo written over a minor blues progression and it incorporates both min.7th tnd Dom.7th chords. As before, play through the solo and see how the phrases fit into the chord chenges above. Dm Gm Dn D7Alt Gm Dm Ep7att Bp7at ATAIL Dm pralt Gm ATA 64 D7Alt Gm Dm Ep7att Bp7alt ATAlt Dm Dm Ep7att Bra ATAM Dm ELs6113 65 p7alt b ae Dm Ep7att Brat mosis 66 Throughout this solo, various types of minor scales are used. The one you choose depends on your melodic preference. Since we've covered the dorian minor scale, here are some ideas using other minor scales over the Min.7th chord. Ex3 Dm D Natural Minor Ex4 G Harmonic Minor Gm * B)Melodie Minor 7 + * In this context, the Melodic Minor scale is the same both ascending and descending. Bhm E9613 67 Quick Reference (HORD TYPE: Min, 7th Min. Sth Min. 14th Min, 13th *Min.(Maj7th) **Dom. 7th6S613) ***Dom. 7falt) *Use a Harmonic or Melodic Minor scale. **Use Harmonic Minor scale starting on the Sth degree. far example, for C7(9)613) you could use an F Harmonic Minor scale starting on C. ***Y0u can use the Melodic Minor scale a half-step above the root of the altered chord as discussed in Chapter 4, CHAPTER THREE UNALTERED DOMINANT CHORD SCALE EXERCISES Part One: Scales and Exercises C Dominant 7th Scale * Exercise D Dominant 7th Scale Exercise ' + 4 E9613 69 D Dominant 7th Scale Exercise s E> Dominant 7th Scale Exercise ais 70 E Dominant 7th Scale Fs6i13 fA) F Dominant 7th Scale F4Dominant 7th Scale Exercise 72 G Dominant 7th Scale Exercise Ab Dominant 7th Scale Exercise FLS613 73 A Dominant 7th Scale Exercise 6 + B) Dominant 7th Scale Exercise 74 B Dominant 7th Scale Exercise BL96113 75 Part Two: Motif Exercises 4 Minor 2nd's $ $ Major 2nd's ‘ 76 Minor 3rd's 4 s Major 3rd's b $ Perfect 4th's ‘ 4 petonee bi b 4 ¢ Perfect 5th's b $ Minor 6th's Major 6th's 5 be ah E1s6n13 77 Minor 7th's b, b 4 4 Major 7th's Minor 2nd's 78 aie 2nd's Minor 3rd's b AiaG Srd's E9613 73 Perfect 4th's Tri-Tones lip > Perfect 5th's \\o > Minor 6th's Ip > Major 6th's ad Minor 7th's 6 Major 7th's é 2 Octaves ad 96113 Minor 2nd's Bs6113 81 Major 2nd's Minor 3rd's oss 82 Major 3rd's b. Perfect 4th's by Perfect Sth's h e963 Minor 6th's Major 6th's Minor 7th's Major 7th's 83 B4 Part Three: “Finger Busters” 2 3 196113 86 Part Four: Extended Motifs E9613 87 seus 88 LO6II3 89 moons 91 Part Five: Ideas for Improvising Tis section deels with a solo written aver @ set of "Blues" Changes. As you play through this solo, as in the last. chapter, see how each phrase fits into the chord above. The strong parts of the chord (root, 3rd, and 5th) ere used as pivot points and the scale and chromatic passing tones are used to help shape the melodies. #1 Fy G7 p7alt G7 Evalt k b b Am7 FT G7 DTA g2 G7 TAI Am? F7 G7 D7Alt b G7 E7Alt Am7 F? G7 p7Ait GT E7AM Am7 Fv G7 p7Alt G7 FL96113 93 #1. Note how this first phrase emphasizes the strong parts of each chord and uses scale and dromatic passing tones to shape the melody. #2. 0n 8 Dom.7{sus4) chord the 4th replaces the rd in the chord voicing and becomes a strong sound inthe chord. This phrase pivots on the note, “C* which is the 4th of the G7(sus4) chord. The Dominant 7th scale (or the Mixolydian Mode) comes from the Sth degree of the Major scale. For sample, the G Mixolydian scale has the same notes as the C Major scale. You can also think of the Mixoydian scale as @ Major scale with a fiatted 7th. If you relate this scale to its Major scale origin, it mmay make it easier to play. Ex. C Ionian D Dorian E Phrygian F Lydian G Mixolydian A Aeolian B Locrian 4s pu already know, “tensions” are notes that: do not appear in the basic chord but sound good and give the chord different colors and characteristics. Here are the available tensions for Dominant. 7th chords: E2 Tensions 2 Gl 4 Bl 6 fe ta ts tah fas ra haa The scales used for playing over altered Dorninant chords which may be notated as C7(alt), for example, tre discussed in Chapters 4 and 5. Here are some other ideas for playing aver Dom. 7th chords: 3 c7 —e + was ‘The Dom.7(sus4) chord shifts the emphasis of the phrase or melody from the Srd to the 4th: Ex.6 ] $e > 7 2 == x iz = =| 4 = 3 4 [ol o SI o Here are some other ideas for playing over Dom.7(sus4) chords: Ex.7 ELs6i13 95 One type of Altered Dominant chord scale that should be mentioned in this chapter is the Dom.7(#4) or the Lydian Dominant scale. Here is an example of a C7(#4) chord scale: Ex.10 ¢ #a ik) 2 3 11) 5 6 P77 8 Here are some other ideas for playing over Dom. 7(#4) chords: engin he Ex.12 ass 96 Quick Reference CHORD SCALE: DOM. 7TH or MIXOLYD, LYD, DOM. CHORD TYPE Dom. 7th Dom. 7thi¢11) Dom. Sth Dom. 7th(t4 13(13) Dom.1 1th *Maj7thit5) Dom. 13th Dom. 7th{sus4) *Use Lyd. Dom. scale a whole step above the root of the chord. For example, over C Maj7(#5) you can use the D Lyd. Dom. scale starting and ending on C. (It may be helpful to note that the D Lydian Dominant scale has the seme notes as the A Melodic Minor Scale.) EL96113, 97 CHAPTER FOUR MELODIC MINOR CHORD SCALE EXERCISES Part One: Scales and Exercises C Melodic Minor + 38 G Melodic Minor Exercise FLs6113 99 D Melodic Minor A Melodic Minor Exercise E Melodic Minor Exercise 5 E1613 101 B Melodic Minor Exercise 102 F¥ Melodic Minor L963 103 Ct Melodic Minor Ab Melodic Minor Exercise E} Melodic Minor Exercise E9613 105, B) Melodic Minor Exercise F Melodic Minor Exercise Es 106 Fis6113 Part Two: Motif Exercises 1 Minor 2nd's 96113 108 Major 2nd's Minor 3rd's Major 3rd's bi b. ELg6113 103 Perfect 4th's Tri-Tones b Minor 6th's % Ems 110 Major 6th's by Minor 7th's Minor 7th's bi Minor 2nd's 4 5 EL96113 111 Major 2nd's $ 5 ae Minor 3rd's : by Ss ee be = . 7 7 G — # ¥ Major 3rd's ; Perfect 4th's 5 ELs6n13 113 Tri-Tones 4 Perfect 5th's s Minor 6th's $ Major 6th's 5 4 ¢ Minor 7th's ‘ 5 Major 7th's $ 3 114 Minor 2nd's te b ELS6113 115 Major 2nd's Minor Srd's Major 3rd's, b Tri-Tones 4 Perfect 5th's 4 b Minor 6th's b 6 babel bebe Pe Major 6th's t Minor 7th's 4 Major 7th's 6 bn bebe? be be be ae 6 E9613 117 Part Three: “Finger Busters” fe seis 118 == =F be, pie FEA be bebe t pe fe—tbe bp bee dp he be bol —— Leelee ¥ ii £ poner tiers SSS 11] a E t-tete le # —— bey, SSS = 36] be to abt the obe t === (5) =F spactisr tele t ole FLs6113 119 sus 120 Part Four: Extended Motifs 4 by 96113 121 oes 122 Exss113 L96113 125, osti3 126 Part Five: Ideas For Improvising This section deals with a solo written over several different types of chords that can all use the Melodic Minor scale as their chord scale. As you practice the solo study how the scale is being used and how it, relates to the chord above. Li Bmi7bs) ETAIt ia pagu 1D cfu7b5) L963 127 FTAlt Bm7h5) ETAlt Am7 Emaj 745) Eh maj75) b seis 128 curbs) FaAlt Bm795) TAI Am? EVAlt Am? EvAlt Am? EVAlt Am7 EL96113 129 #1..On min.765) chords, you can use the Melodic Minor scale a minor rd above the root of the chord. fr example, on a Cfm7(5) chord, use E Melodic Minor starting and ending on C¥. Scale used over Cfm7(}5) E Melodic minor a #2, On altered chords (that include b13's in their voicings), you can use the Melodic Minor scale a half- ‘ap above the root of the chord. For example, on an Fé7(alt) use G Melodic Minor starting and ending on Fh. Scale used over F{{Alt) &2 G Melodic Minor be a fe ft 43. On any minor triad or min.(Maj7) chords, you can use the Melodic Minor scale starting on the root the chord. For example, on an Am or Am{Maj7), one scale you can use is A Melodic Minor. 44. On a 13(81 1) chord or any Lydian Dominant chord, (C7(#1 1) for example), you can use the Melodic Ninor scale @ Sth above the root of the chord. For example, on D13(#11) use A Melodic Minor starting tnd ending on D. & 3 ‘Melodic Minor Scale used over D13 (Lyd) * #5. On Maj7(15) chords, you can use the Melodic Minor scale a minor Grd below the root of the chord. fer example, on F Maj7(#5) use D Melodic Minor starting and ending on F. &. 4 D Melodic Minor Scale used over F Maj745) — In ss 130 Quick Reference CHORD SCALE: MELODIC MINOR: CHORD TYPE: Minor 7th Minor Sth Minor 11th Minor 13th Min.(Maj7th) *Min.7(5) **Dom.7¢8}013) **Dom.769)9) **Dom.7069)011) **Dom.769)(11 11613) **Dom.76¢9)(41 1613) **Dom.7¢9)49)(41 1)613) **Dom.7(49)(11)613) ***Maj7(5) * For Min.7(5) chords, use the Melodic Minor scale a min. 3rd above the root of the chord. Ex. For Cm7(5), use B Mel. Min. starting on C. **For all of these Dom. 7{alt) chords, use the Melodic Minor scale a half-step above the root of the chord (as long as the 13th is fiat) Ex. For C7(alt), use D> Mel. Min. starting on C. *** For Maj7(#5) chords, use the Melodic Minor scale a minor 3rd below the root of the chord. Ex. For CMaj7(#5), use A Mel. Min. starting on C. 131 CHAPTER FIVE DIMINISHED CHORD SCALE EXERCISES Part One: Scales and Exercises C Diminished Scale + Exercise C} Diminished Scale 132 D Diminished Scale Exercise EL96113 133 E} Diminished Scale E Diminished Scale Exercise 134 F Diminished Scale Exercise : . $ F# Diminished Scale Exercise E9613 135 G Diminished Scale Exercise A) Diminished Scale A Diminished Scale sa 136 B) Diminished Scale Exercise B Diminished Scale Exercise L963 Part Two: Motif Exercises 41 Minor 2nd's Major 2nd's Minor 3rd's Major 3rd's 7 ELs6113 1393 Perfect 4th's heb Tri-Tones Perfect 5th's Minor 6th's Major 6th's 4 k Minor 7th's b Major 7th's b wens 140 Minor 2nd's 196113 Major 2nd's Minor 3rd's Major 3rd's sous 142 Perfect 4th's Tri-Tones b pales b : Perfect 5th's b. Minor 6th's é Major 6th's bab Minor 7th's t ob, b 4 Major 7th's ELs6113 143 Minor 2nd's ws6113 144 Major 2nd's Minor 3rd's Bs6i13 145 Tri-Tones b b Perfect 5th's 146 Minor 6th's 4 Major 6th's 4 Minor 7th's b = Major 7th's pabebedeh EL96113 147 Part Three: “Finger Busters” ses 148 EL96113 149 Part Four: Extended Motifs bet e113 150 L963 wus EL96113, 153, sts 154 Part Five: Ideas for Improvising This section deals with a solo written over several different types of chords that can all use the Diminished scale as their chord scale. As you practice this, try to see which Diminished scale is being used and how it relates to the chord above. cfrb90s) Chm cf7b903) cmt FPrb909) Bmil FAT 03) Bmit Se ) be bebe ft he be be Ebb» Apa L913 155 Chm Bhaim7 Bpm7ps) choo fn Cemtt Bm Ls6113 157 #1. Any altered Dom.7th chord with @ natural 13th can use a Diminished scale as it’s chord scale. Ex. 4 chooas) bs fs 5 13 7 #2. If a Dominant chord is altered in some way, (in this case with a bSth), and doesnt indicate a flat 13th or a natural 13th, you can you the Diminished scale. #3. On Diminished chords, it usually sounds better to use the traditional whole step/half step Diminished scale. #4. A Major triad with the minor 2nd in the base, (F#/G), can use an Ff Diminished chord. 136113 CHAPTER SIX PENTATONIC AND BLUES SCALE EXERCISES Part One: Scales and Exercises C Minor Pentatonic * Exercise C Blues Scale + ELs6113 1593 cH Minor Pentatonic Exercise gs 160 ce Blues Scale ohne o ‘ ‘ eL96113 161 D Minor Pentatonic D Blues Scale Exercise 162 E} Minor Pentatonic Exercise $ ™ , + E) Blues scale Exercise s FLS6113 163 E Minor Pentatonic Exercise E Blues Scale Exercise assis 164 F Minor Pentatonic Exercise F Blues Scale Exercise EL96113, Fi ¢ Minor Pentatonic Exercise 166 F4 Blues Scale Exercise G Minor Pentatonic Exercise EL96113, 167 G Blues Scale Exercise Ab Minor Pentatonic Exercise ‘ assis 168 A) Blues Scale Exercise A Minor Pentatonic ELs613 169 A Blues Scale Exercise B) Minor Pentatonic seus 170 + $ B) Blues Scale L613 174 B Minor Pentatonic Exercise > z B Blues Scale us 172 Part Two: Motif Exercises 41 Minor 2nd's Major 2nd's L613 173 Minor 3rd's Major 3rd's b te Perfect 4th's b Tri-Tones 6 Perfect 5th's b Minor 6th's b be b, Major 6th's be te b 6113 174 Minor 7th's by Major 7th's be Minor 2nd's L613 175, ss113 176 Minor 3rd's 4 Major 3rd's ‘ s s s Perfect 4th's 4 BLs6113 177 Tri-Tones 4 bi be th abeb + 4 Perfect Sth's 5 7 e ? . Minor 6th's , Major 6th's Minor 7th's = poe —— a oe a an F WF =< 0 e113 178 Major 7th's ; ' b be fb, bed + Octaves be Minor 2nd's L613 179 Major 2nd's 180 Minor 3rd's > > Major 3rd's bz Perfect 4th's ELo6it3 181 Tri-Tones = i Perfect 5th's z Minor 6th's be by, Major 6th's > Minor 7th's > Major 7th's im ite 182 Part Three: “Finger Busters” 2 3 ELS6113 183 184 Part Four: Extended Motifs E1613 S613 186 L963 187 Bs6t13 EL96113 189 Part Five: Ideas for Improvising This section deals with @ written solo that shows some ideas for using Pentatonic and Blues scales over verious types of chords. These are only a few examples of chords that these scales work over but, 8s you can see by the “Quick Reference” at the end of the chapter, there are many more. s6t13 190 be beh Bhm7 bebe te te be dep, Web Abm7 L963 Dm7 b Gm7 , Bhm7 par ar Ebmit Gsus ba He by b . cu 191 ATH9 Dav #1, Here is an example of a Pentatonic and a Blues scale used over Dominant 7th chords. #2. Pentatonic and Blues scales work great over Minor chords. #8. On Major{sus) chords you can use the Major Pentatonic scale which starts and ends on the 2nd (egree of the Minor Pentatonic scale and uses the same notes. Ex. D Major Pentatonic 7 4 2 3 5 6 8 B Minor Pentatonic ss 192 Quick Reference CHORD SCALE: MAJ, PENT. ‘MIN. PENT. ‘BLUES SCALE CHORD TYPE: All Maj6 chords All min. chords All min. chords. All unett. Doms. (including min. All alt. & unatt. *Dom.7(45)49) sus chords). Doms. **Maj7(011) * ** All Dom.(sus) chords. *Use Major pent. scale a minor 6th above the root of the chard. For example, on C7(#5)(#9), you can use the Ab Major pent. scale. ** Use minor pent. @ helf step below the root of the chord. For example, on CMsj7(#11), you can use the B minor pent. scale, *** Use minor pent. a 4th below the root of the chord. For example, on C7(sus), you can use the 6 minor pent. scale. EL96113 COMPREHENSIVE JAZZ STUDIES « EXERCISES A complete book of jaz Tee Verse eee Ro ened Oe Ce Cam Ty Porm COMET UNm ee tne ee eet mM Mee eC Marienthal is one of the hottest saxophonists in the world today. This book gives away all of Eric’s secrets for success. Topics covered in the book include: Ce elce meter e ace od ees mee Extended Motif Exercises Ideas For Improvisation fact TUE UCM CN ROMMEL Ke CRO coerce ows, and films. Eric attended the Berklee College of Music and recently was given the EE Ee yet six solo albums for GRP records and is now recording ished Alumnus Award. He has recorded albums for Polygram Records. Eric has performed con certs and given master classes in over fifty countries throughout the world. In addition to the Chick Corea »ktric Band, Eric has recorded and performed with Pee Ter taeeaen tS Came aCe Streisand, Billy Joel, Johnny Mathis, Liza Minelli Pe eee eas a cpm eet eC a more ria ae j 2 att ENA TO ED\G TRICKS OF THE MODERN SAX oN TRADE aS een) Eee LUCL ae CUE Neat Crna romana Puen es