Executive Summary

Table of Contents

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Background to the study ...............................................................................................................3 Electronics and IT Hardware .......................................................................................................8 IT and ITES Industry ...................................................................................................................9 Gems and Jewellery.....................................................................................................................10 Building, Construction Industry and Real Estate Services .....................................................11 Auto and Auto Components .......................................................................................................12 Leather and Leather Goods........................................................................................................13 Banking, Financial Services, and Insurance .............................................................................14 Furniture and Furnishing industry ...........................................................................................15

10. Textile and Clothing industry ....................................................................................................16 11. Organised Retail ..........................................................................................................................17

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Executive Summary

1. Background to the study
Introduction Skills and Knowledge are key factors for the economic and social growth of the country. As the proportion of population in the working age group of 15 to 59 years is projected to increase, about 13 million persons are expected to join the workforce annually. It is necessary that the workforce be adequately skilled to realise the ‘demographic dividend’. The scale and scope of skill building required is outlined in the National Skill Development Policy. The National Skill Development Corporation (NSDC) has been formed in this context to support skill development initiatives. The overall objective is to skill 500 million persons by 2022. A careful assessment of human resource and skill requirements would be a starting point in this direction. In this context, NSDC mandated ICRA Management Consulting Services Limited (IMaCS) to undertake a study on mapping of human resource skill gaps in key sectors in India till 2022. Scope of Work The scope of work of this study was to ‘Map the human resource and skills in key sectors in India till 2022’. Terms of Reference The Terms of Reference for this study was as follows: 1. Normalise existing data pertaining to various skill gaps 2. Mapping of human resource and skills covering: a) Analysis of macro-environment and competitiveness of key sectors b) Forecasting of human resource requirement in key sectors c) Demand-supply gap of human resource in key sectors d) Identify reasons for supply bottleneck in key sectors e) Identify likely requirement/potential demand for skills in key sectors till 2022 f) Skill gap analysis – current vis-a-vis future.

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Executive Summary

Key sectors identified for this study NSDC had identified the following sectors for the study: 1. Automobile and Auto Components 2. Banking/Insurance and Financial Services 3. Building and Construction Industry 4. Chemicals and Pharmaceuticals 5. Construction Material/Building Hardware etc 6. Educational and Skill Development Services 7. Electronics Hardware 8. Food processing/Cold Chain/Refrigeration 9. Furniture and Furnishings 10. Gems and Jewellery 11. Health Care Services 12. ITES or Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) 13. ITS or Software Services/Products 14. Leather and Leather Goods 15. Skilled labourers in unorganised sector e.g. domestic workers, handicrafts, etc. 16. Media, Entertainment, Broadcasting, Content creation and animation 17. Organised Retail 18. Real Estate Services 19. Textiles, Apparels and Garments 20. Tourism and Hospitality Services, Travel Trade 21. Transportation, Logistics, Warehousing and Packaging. Approach to the Study The study was carried out in two phases: Phase 1: Environment Scanning and Competitiveness Analysis Phase 2: Mapping of human resource and skills Phase 1: Environment Scanning and Competitiveness Analysis

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Executive Summary

In this phase, we provided an overview of the macro environment of key sectors. We also assessed the outlook of these sectors and the critical success factors required to operate in these sectors. The following aspects were analysed for the key sectors: Market size and growth Market structure – major players and competition Key success factors in each sector Human resources supply scenario (organised and unorganised) Future outlook for the industry and sector Key trends that will have an impact on the future skill requirement of sectors. Phase 2: Mapping of human resource and skills Our approach to mapping of human resource and skills spanned the following:

Figure 1: Approach for assessment of human resource and skill requirements

Mapping of current employment pattern: The purpose of this phase was to map the current employment pattern in sectors and the proportion of employment at various levels of core and noncore functions. This was carried out by analysing the historical employment trend in the identified sectors through detailed interactions with leading industry players. In addition to mapping of the proportion of employment at various functions, we also mapped the proportion of human resources currently employed across different educational qualifications. Identification of human resource requirements: The objective of this phase was to estimate the human resources requirement to support the growth potential of key sectors under consideration. We undertook macro-econometric modelling to project future size and human resource requirements. We also took into account potential increases in value addition, productivity improvement and changes in industry structure and business practices.

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Executive Summary

Mapping current and future skill requirements, and gaps This module encompassed two parts: Part 1: Mapping current and future skill requirement of identified sectors: In this part, we mapped the current and future skill requirement of identified segments by: Reviewing the value chain Identifying the broad level activities in the sectors – operational and support activities Identifying level wise (3 to 4 levels) competencies to support these activities. Identifying skills required to operate in the future by looking at key segment growth drivers like changing technology changes, changing business practices, Government regulations etc.

Part 2: Identification of skill gaps: In this part, we identified key skill gaps by analysing the demand (human resources requirement from the sectors under consideration) and supply (educational institution/training institutes). Methodology IMaCS adopted a combination of primary and secondary research for this study. Primary research We interacted with several stakeholders covering Government, Industries, Industry associations, educational institutions, training providers, etc. Collection and analysis of secondary data We used secondary research and analysis, wherever necessary. For this purpose, IMaCS reviewed information available in the public domain, from sources it considers reliable and also leveraged information collected during the earlier assignments executed/information provided by NSDC. As part of this process, we undertook a process of normalisation available information. Sectors covered in this Executive Summary Out of the 21 sectors, 12 sectors have been profiled in this document, namely:

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Executive Summary

Electronics and IT Hardware IT ITES Gems and Jewellery Building and Construction Real Estate Services Auto and Auto Components Leather and Leather Goods Banking, Financial Services, Insurance Furniture and Furnishing Textiles and Clothing Organised Retail. The remaining sectors will be profiled on completion of the study. This document details the findings of the study, summarised in the following table: Table 1: Incremental human resource requirement (in million) till 2022 Industry Incremental human resource requirement (in million) Electronics and IT Hardware IT and ITES Gems and Jewellery Building, Construction , and Real Estate Services Auto and Auto Components Leather and Leather Goods Banking, Financial Services, and Insurance Furniture and Furnishings Textile and Clothing Organised Retail Total
Source: IMaCS analysis

3.3 5.3 4.7 47.0

35.0 4.5 4.25 3.4 26.2 17.3 151

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Executive Summary

2. Electronics and IT Hardware
Overview of Electronics and IT Hardware Industry in India The Electronics and IT Hardware sector comprises of various segments such as Consumer Electronics, IT Hardware, Telecom Equipment, Strategic Electronics, Components, and Industrial Electronics. The consumption of Electronics was US $ 28 billion in 2005 in India. Out of this, the Indian Electronics and IT Hardware sector production amounted to Rs. 947 billion in 20091 and has grown at a CAGR of 16.4% since 2002. Going forward, it is estimated that the demand for electronics (consumption) in India will be US $ 126 billion in 2010 and US $ 363 billion in 2015.2 Human Resource Requirement till 2022 Our analysis reveals that the Electronics and IT Hardware industry has the potential to grow at a Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of about 17% till 2022 considering the fact that the GDP is expected to grow at a rate of 7.5% to 8% over this period. Therefore, we expect the production of Electronics and IT Hardware to increase to Rs. 7,520 billion by 2022. Consumer Electronics, Computers, Telecom Equipment, and Industrial Electronics would contribute to a large portion of the size of the industry. This would translate to the overall employment in the industry increasing from the current level of 0.9 million to over 4 million by 2022, i.e., an incremental human resource requirement of about 3 million to 3.2 million in this sector. Key Skills in Demand Out of the above requirement, the following would be the indicative of the key skills in demand: Manufacturing (requiring about 1.5 million persons) – spanning basic manufacturing skills, safety and quality processes, high tech manufacturing skills Servicing and support (requiring about 0.7 million persons) – covering skills related to L1 and L2 servicing of mobiles, and telecom equipment Selling skills for sales of consumer electronics, computers and computer equipment, telecom equipment and solutions. Management of e-waste.

1 2

Annual Report 2008-09 of Department of Information Technology, Government of India Council of Electronics Hardware Associations (CEHA)

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Executive Summary

The above areas alone would account for more than 70% of the incremental human resource requirement and need specific thrust for skill building.

3. IT and ITES Industry
Overview of the IT and ITES Industry in India Globally, IT Services is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6% to 7% till 2012 and ITES is expected to grow at 10 to 12% over the same period. The Indian IT and ITES Industry recorded a turnover of US $ 60 billion in 2009, with exports accounting for about US $ 47 billion and contributing to over 70% of industry revenues. The industry has grown at a CAGR of close to 30% between 2004 and 2009. Human Resource Requirement till 2022 Post 2020, growth drivers in addition to traditional IT and BPO services to large companies (in the Fortune 500) in US and EU will arise from Small and Medium Businesses (SMBs), public sector, healthcare, media, and utilities. A significant portion of the growth would be driven by markets in BRIC countries, APAC, Japan, and Rest of the world. It is expected that the Indian IT and ITES Industry would record about US $ 220 billion in exports and US $ 60 billion domestically by 2022, totalling to about US $ 260 billion growing at a CAGR of 12.8%3. Accordingly, the industry would employ about 7.5 million persons directly by 2022, up by 5.3 million persons from the current employment of 2.2 million persons. A large portion of this employment is expected to occur in the ITES (BPO/KPO) exports sector, followed by IT exports and then in the domestic market. Key trends that would drive skill requirements The key trends that would drive skill requirements would span the following: Continuing demand arising from maintenance and application development Increasing value-addition from IT services to Consulting and Solutioning Increasing play in Infrastructure Management, Migration, Solutioning, Green Computing apart from newer verticals and markets Larger share of KPO services especially in Medical and Legal KPOs.

3

NASSCOM Perspective 2020 and IMaCS analysis

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Executive Summary

Skill building would also be required in areas pertaining to specific programming languages, solutioning skills, project management, communication and soft skills from an IT perspective. Training in process workflows, Legal/IP advisory, and healthcare processes would be required from a BPO and KPO perspective. It is expected that these drivers of skill requirements should form the contours of skill development in this industry. There is also a definite case for train the trainer programmes and standardisation of training content in the industry.

4. Gems and Jewellery
Overview of the Gems and Jewellery Industry in India The Gems and Jewellery sector in India plays key role in the Indian economy. In 2008, exports from the sector accounted for about 12% of India’s total exports. The industry provides employment to around 3.2 to 3.4 million4 people directly and consists of the two major segments of gold and diamonds. Gold is primarily retailed in the domestic market and the domestic demand for gold jewellery was estimated at Rs. 550 billion in 2007. Cut and polished diamonds are primarily exported – India is the largest diamond cutting and polishing centre in the world and dominates the diamond processing trade with 11 out of 12 diamonds being cut and polished in India. The growth of exports between 2002-03 and 2007-08 was about 14% amounting to Rs. 837 billion in 2008. Human Resource Requirement till 2022 Our analysis of the potential of the Gems and Jewellery industry in India reveals that the industry is will enjoy a growth of about 8.5% in the period up to 2015, and about 7% in the horizon till 2022 thereby recording revenues of Rs. 1,700 billion. The export segment is expected to witness a growth of about 12.5% till 2022 and reach a size of Rs. 4,400 billion. Thus, in all, the Gems and Jewellery industry (domestic sales and exports) would grow at 10.3% on a CAGR basis till 2022. This would translate to the overall employment in the industry increasing from the current level of 3.3 million to about 7.9 million by 2022, i.e., an incremental human resource requirement of about 4.5 million to 4.7 million in this sector till 2022. Key Skills in Demand

4

GJEPC study on employment in Gems and Jewellery industry in India

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Executive Summary

Out of the above requirement, the highest incremental requirement of human resources persons would be for persons who are minimally educated, yet can handle simple and/or repetitive tasks (persons such as cutters, those engaged in polishing, etc.). Considering skills of specific interest to the Gems and Jewellery industry, about 1.3 million persons with jewellery fabrication skills will be required till 2022. Around 1.1 million persons with the skills of grading, faceting, polishing and cutting will also be required in the same period. Together, these account for more than 50% of the human resource requirement. The skills of setting, polishing, and faceting are potential areas to channelise skill building initiatives in the Gems and Jewellery industry.

5. Building, Construction Industry and Real Estate Services
Overview of the Building, Construction Industry and Real Estate Services Industry in India The Construction sector in India accounts for the second largest economic activity after agriculture and provides employment to about 33 to 36 million people. The sector consists of the Real Estate (residential, commercial, SEZs) and Infrastructure (utilities, urban infrastructure, transportation infrastructure) segments. The size of the Construction industry was around Rs. 2.1 trillion5 in 2008 – of this, the Real Estate segment contributed to over Rs. 500 billion (i.e. 24%) and the Infrastructure segment contributed to about Rs. 1,600 billion (i.e. 76%). India’s Construction industry has grown at a CAGR of about 11.1% over the last eight years on the back of massive infrastructure investment and rapid rise in housing demand. Human Resource Requirement till 2022 Given the expected investments in power, ports, airports, roads, and under JnNURM, as well as the growth required in the sector to enable potential GDP growth, we expect that the GDP of the Building, Construction and Real Estate sector will grow at a CAGR of 9.5% to 10% till 2022, in real terms. The GDP economy of Construction would be about Rs. 8,000 billion in constant prices at 2022. Of this, Real Estate (including housing and commercial) would account for 30% and Infrastructure (mainly, electricity, roads and bridges, railways including MRTS and telecommunications) would account for the rest. This would translate to the overall employment in the industry increasing from the current level of around 36 million to over 83 million by 2022, i.e., an incremental human resource requirement of about 47 million to 48 million in this sector.
5

GDP value at 1999-00 constant prices

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Executive Summary

Key Skills in Demand It should be noted that while the sector will continue to employ a large portion of human resource with a relatively lower education profile, the skill levels would need to be continually upgraded even for those with minimal education. Substantial skill building efforts will be needed at the ‘skilled workforce’ level – for example, for carpenters, electricians, welders, operators, plumbers, masons, crane operators, supervisors, and others. The incremental human resource requirement in the ‘skilled workforce’ alone is expected to be above 9 million. The Real Estate, Electricity, and Roadways segments would drive employment in the Construction sector.

6. Auto and Auto Components
Overview of the Auto and Auto Components Industry in India The Indian Automotive Industry today is being seen as one of the most competitive amongst the automotive industries of the world. It is also a significant contributor to the Indian economy and provides providing direct and indirect employment to over 13 million people6. The Auto and Auto Components sector comprises of the ‘core segments’ of Automobiles and Auto Components, and the ‘enabler segments’ of Auto Finance, Auto Insurance, Dealerships and Service Centres. Since 2000, the industry has grown at a CAGR of about 14% and its size in 2008-09 was estimated to be around Rs. 1,910 billion. India’s Automotive Mission Plan envisages the size of the Indian Automotive Industry to grow at 11.5% p.a. over the next decade. This implies that the industry size would be in the range of US $ 165 to 175 billion by 2022. Human Resource Requirement till 2022 Given the expected growth, an additional employment of 25 million people by 2016 and 35 million by 2022 is envisaged for this sector. Of this, incremental direct employment (consisting of employment at OEMs, component suppliers and raw material suppliers) till 2022 is expected to be around 12 million and incremental indirect employment (consisting mainly of employment in the service sector, i.e. in auto finance, auto insurance, etc. and employment generated for drivers) till 2022 is expected to be around 23 million. Key Skills in Demand

6

SIAM – Automotive Mission Plan 2006-2016

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Executive Summary

Out of the above requirement, the following would be the indicative of the key skills in demand: Skills required by Auto and Auto Component Manufactures (requiring about 7 million additional persons) – spanning basic manufacturing skills, design and development skills Driving skills, i.e., drivers (requiring about 5.1 million additional persons) – especially critical for commercial vehicles Skills required in the Auto Financing, Insurance and allied services (requiring about 15.3 million additional persons) Skills required in dealerships of vehicles, sales and spares, servicing (requiring about 3 million persons). The above areas together will account for about 75% of the human resource requirement and thus need specific thrust for skill building.

7. Leather and Leather Goods
Overview of Leather and Leather Goods Industry in India India has a share of 2.62%7 in the global leather trade during 2006, and with the exclusion of nonleather footwear, the share is slightly higher at 3.41%. The Leather industry comprises of various segments such as Finished leather, Leather footwear, Leather garments, Leather goods, and Saddlery & harnesses. The total size of Indian Leather industry is estimated to be approximately Rs. 257 billion8 (US $ 5 billion) with exports of leather and leather products accounting for nearly 70% of the total industry size. Finished leather product is the largest segment accounting for nearly 75% of the industry’s total exports. Going forward the Centre for Leather Exports (CLE) has developed a plan to target increase in exports of leather and leather products from India from US $ 3.5 billion in 2007-08 to US $ 7 billion by the year 2010-11 at a CAGR of 26.1%. Human Resource Requirement till 2022 Indian leather exports is projected to increase to Rs. 788 billion by 2022 from Rs. 167 billion in 2008 at a CAGR of 12%. The domestic industry at the same time is expected to account for about Rs. 250 billion by 2022 growing at a CAGR of 8%. To support this growth we expect that the total employment in the leather industry is expected to increase to 7.1 million persons by 2022 from the current level of about 2.5 million persons, i.e., an incremental human resource requirement of about
7 8

Council for Leather Exports estimate Council for Leather Exports estimate, 2007-08

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Executive Summary

4.6 million persons (domestic and exports). Footwear would be the largest employer accounting for over 44% of the total employment. Key Skills in Demand Out of the above requirement, the highest incremental requirement of human resources is in the minimally educated segment, (for activities such as cutting/clicking, stitching, finishing, etc.). Such skills can be obtained in lesser time duration as compared to engineering or ITI courses. As many as over 2 million persons are required in the above segment. Thus, the skills of tanning, cutting, stitching, and finishing are potential areas to channelise skill building initiatives in the leather industry going forward. Out of this stitching would be the major driver of human resource requirements where appropriate skills are required (requirement of about 1.4 million ‘stitchers’ between 2008 and 2022).

8. Banking, Financial Services, and Insurance
Overview of Banking, Financial Services, and Insurance Sector in India Banking, Financial Services, and Insurance (BFSI) sector in India comprises of many segments such as Banking, Insurance, Mutual Funds, Non Banking Financial Companies (NBFC), etc. Banking and Insurance are the two single largest segments of BFSI contributing approximately 6% to GDP for the year ended 2007-08. Its contribution to GDP has grown at a CAGR of 11.5% over the period 2000 to 2008. Various studies have indicated that the penetration level of banking and financial services in India is low compared to other developed/developing countries and there is significant potential for the expansion of financial services. This expansion will take place primarily by increasing penetration in smaller and under penetrated cities and towns. Human Resource Requirement till 2022 The BFSI sector employs approximately 4 to 4.5 million people in the four major segments, namely Banking, Insurance, Mutual Funds, and NBFCs. Out of the total people employed in the sector, approximately 2.5 to 3 million people are employed through various financial intermediaries such as Direct Selling Agents (DSAs), Insurance agents, Mutual Fund Advisors, etc. These are also known as ‘Feet-on-street’ profiles. Given the expected growth in the financial sector, it is expected that about 8.4 million persons would be employed in the BFSI sector by 2022. The incremental human resource requirement between 2008 and 2022 is expected to be about 4.2 million.

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Executive Summary

Key Skills in Demand The BFSI sector would have niche requirement of high-end skills in complex and highly specialised areas such as risk management, credit evaluation, financial engineering, etc. The incremental human resource requirement in these areas would be about 0.5 million persons. However, a large portion of the incremental human resource requirement would be in the ‘Feet-onstreet’ profiles. This would be due to increasing need for penetration of financial services and increase in population, especially in cities. The incremental requirement in these areas alone would be about 3.7 million. Skill building has to span across simple skills which can be obtained in lesser time such as basic financial planning, selling skills, soft skills, across banking, insurance, and mutual funds sectors.

9. Furniture and Furnishing industry
Overview of Furniture and Furnishing Industry in India The domestic Indian Furniture and Furnishing market is estimated to be around Rs. 69,000 crore in 2007-08 accounting for around 1.5 % of the GDP. The domestic Furnishing market is valued at Rs. 20,750 crore in 2007-08. India is also a key player in international Home Furnishing market with exports of furnishings worth Rs 7,400 in 2007-08. The domestic Furniture market is estimated to be worth Rs 48,200 crore with exports of Rs 1,485 crore in 2007-08. Human Resource Requirement till 2022 Given rising consumption, real estate growth, and increasing demand in Organised Retail, the size of the Furniture industry is expected to grow from Rs. 594 billion currently to about Rs. 3,200 billion by 2022, growing at a CAGR of 13%. This industry would employ about 1.3 million persons by 2022, leading to an incremental employment generation of about 0.9 million persons. Along similar lines, the Furnishing Industry is expected to grow at a CAGR of about 13% and clock Rs. 1,36,000 crore in revenue by 2022. This industry is likely to result in the creation of 2.5 million additional jobs till 2022. Key skills in Demand

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Executive Summary

The following table depicts the key skills which will drive human resource requirements in the Furniture and Furnishing industry. Table 2: Focus areas for skill building in Furniture and Furnishing industry (human resource requirement in ‘000s) Sector Areas where skill building is required Carpenters Operators (finishing, etc.) Stitching, sewing, stuffing, threading Incremental human resource requirement (in ‘000s) 310 233 2,147 2,691

Furniture Furnishings Total
Source: IMaCS analysis

The total requirement of human resource across the above areas where skill building is required is about 2.7 million persons till 2022.

10.

Textile and Clothing industry

Overview of Textile Industry in India Indian Textile and Clothing (T&C) industry is currently one of the largest and most important industries in the Indian economy in terms of output, foreign exchange earnings and employment. The industry contributes 4% to the country’s GDP and 14% to the country’s industrial production. Indian T&C market is estimated at Rs. 2,00,000 crore (US $ 40 billion) in 2007-08. The textiles industry accounts for around 14% of total exports from India. The textile exports during 2007-08 amounted to US $ 20 billion. Human Resource Requirement till 2022 Our analysis of macro-economic indicators reveals that the Private Final Consumption Expenditure (PFCE) on clothing will grow at a CAGR of 7.5% between 2008 and 2022. Based on projected growth of GDP and exports, we expect that the exports of textiles will grow at a rate of 11% to 11.5%. Thus, the overall T&C sector will grow at a CAGR of 9.5% to a size of Rs. 6,730 billion. Out of this, the share of exports is expected to increase from just under 50% currently to about 60% in 2022.

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Executive Summary

It is expected that the overall employment in the sector would increase from about 33 to 35 million currently9 to about 60 to 62 million by 2022. This would translate to an incremental human resource requirement of about 25 million persons. Of this the Mainstream T&C sector (comprising of Spinning, Fabric Manufacturing, Fabric Processing, and Garmenting) has the potential to employ about 17 million persons incrementally till 2022. Key skills in Demand Across the mainstream sectors, the incremental human resource requirement for Supervisors and Technicians engaged in Fabric Manufacturing, Fabric Processing, and Garmenting is expected to be around 1.5 million persons. The incremental human resource requirement for Operators is likely to be 13.5 million persons till 2022. A large portion of this requirement will be in Garmenting. Key skill sets in demand would include Power loom Operators, Apparel Manufacturing/Garmenting Operators, Quality Control and Supervisory personnel, Sewing Machine Technicians and Operators. Skill building in these areas would be the key to industry competitiveness going forward. As is evident, this involves the humungous task of skilling about 15 million persons till 2022 – about 1 million persons per year.

11.

Organised Retail

Overview of Organised Retail Industry in India The Indian Organised Retail market has been ranked the second most attractive emerging market for investment after Vietnam. The Indian retail industry is estimated to be worth Rs 13-14 lakh crore in FY 2008. The Indian retail sector is highly fragmented in nature. The penetration of Organised Retail in the Indian market is much below the levels in other countries. Organised Retail, valued at Rs 96,500 crore in 2008, accounts for around 5% of the total retail market10. Organised Retail has been growing at an impressive rate of 35% to 40% annually in the last few years compared to 9%-10% growth in the overall retail industry. Human Resource Requirement till 2022

9

10

Source: Planning Commission Source: India Retail Report 2009

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Executive Summary

The growth of Organised Retail would be driven by increasing penetration of Organised Retail from current levels of 4% to 5% in 2008 to over 20% to 25% by 2022. Even in the medium term, this would be reflected in the required/expected increase in retail space from about 30 million sq. ft. in 2006 to about 500 million sq. ft. by 2013. Organised Retail is projected to grow from Rs. 96,500 crore (US $ 19 billion) in 2008 to Rs.17,36,000 crore (US $ 347 to 350 billion) in 2022. On analysing the current levels of retail space and the projected growth, it is expected that the human resource requirement would increase from the current levels of about 0.3 million to about 17.6 million by 2022, leading to an incremental employment opportunity of about 17.3 million persons. Key skills in Demand A large portion of the incremental human resource requirement would be in store-operations (requiring about 13 million persons till 2022). Much of this demand will originate from apparel retail, technology and lifestyle retail, generic/food and grocery retail. The growth of Organised Retail will also lead to an incremental requirement of about 1.3 million persons in relatively highly skilled areas such as merchandising and logistics. These skill sets are prospective areas for formulating skill building activities in the Organised Retail sector.

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