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Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

LS41/2

Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and
change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as
in the past.
Apply scientific ideas to construct an explanation for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern
organisms and between modern and fossil organisms to infer evolutionary relationships.

Science & Engineering


Practices

Constructing Explanations and


Designing Solutions

Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI)

LS4.A: Evidence of Common Ancestry


and Diversity

Constructing explanations and designing


solutions in 68 builds on K5
experiences and progresses to include
constructing explanations and designing
solutions supported by multiple sources
of evidence consistent with scientific
ideas, principles, and theories.

Apply scientific ideas to construct

an explanation for real-world


phenomena, examples, or events.
(MS-LS4-2)
Construct an explanation that
includes qualitative or quantitative
relationships between variables that
describe phenomena. (MS-LS4-4)

The collection of fossils and their


placement in chronological order (e.g.,
through the location of the
sedimentary layers in which they are
found or through radioactive dating) is
known as the fossil record. It
documents the existence, diversity,
extinction, and change of many life
forms throughout the history of life on
Earth. (MS-LS4-1)
Anatomical similarities and
differences between various
organisms living today and between
them and organisms in the fossil
record, enable the reconstruction of
evolutionary history and the inference
of lines of evolutionary descent. (MS-

Crosscutting Concepts

Patterns

Patterns can be used to identify


cause and effect relationships. (MSLS4-2)

LS4-2)

Critical Concept
Assessment

. Scientific Knowledge is Based on Empirical Evidence


Science knowledge is based upon logical and conceptual
connections between evidence and explanations. (MS-LS4-1)
Students must create a presentation on how to create an exhibit
that can educate the general public about how paleontologists
study prehistoric life.

Objectives

Rubric: Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics


Standard 3-4
GRC
Documentation

S/E
Practices
Constructing
Explanations and
Designing Solutions

Apply
scientific ideas
to construct an
explanation for
real-world
phenomena,
examples, or
events. (MSLS4-2)
Construct
an explanation
that includes
qualitative or
quantitative
relationships
between
variables that
describe
phenomena.
(MS-LS4-4)

4
The solution
incorporates
characteristics of the
next grade band
descriptors.
Analysis includes
reasons as to why this
solution is more
scientifically sound.

Independently and
collaboratively designs
a solution to explain
how past events could
have impacted how the
earth is today and how
scientists discover
these events.

Designs a solution to
explain how past
events could have
impacted how the
earth is today and
how scientists
discover these
events.

The qualitative and


quantitative data
supports explanations
about these
relationships.

The qualitative and


quantitative data
supports explanations
about these
relationships.

Analyze others
solutions to determine
the validity of the
claims (MS-LS2-5)

1
Does not individually
or collaboratively
design a solution to
explain how past
events could have
impacted how the
earth is today and
how scientists
discover these
events.

Disciplinary Core
Ideas (DCI)

Apply scientific
ideas to construct
an explanation
for the
anatomical similariti
es and
differences among
modern organisms
and between
modern and fossil
organisms to infer
evolutionary
relationships.
Analyze and
interpret data
for patterns in the
fossil record that
document the
existence, diversity,
extinction, and
change of life forms
throughout the
history of life on
Earth under the
assumption that
natural laws operate
today as in the

Meets the standard


and makes additional
connections to
support a new claim
or shows a deeper
understanding.
Applies a wide range
of vocabulary fluently,
accurately, and
appropriately.

Uses qualitative and


quantitative data to
explain how past
events could have
impacted how the earth
is today and how
scientists discover
these events.
Uses claims to make
reasonable predictions
about these
relationships in a future
event.
Uses appropriate
content vocabulary.

Uses qualitative and


quantitative data to
explain how past
events could have
impacted how the
earth is today and
how scientists
discover these
events.
Explanations and/or
data use mostly
relevant facts and
may be basic or
superficial.
Uses some
appropriate content
vocabulary.

Does not meet the


criteria for
approaching the
standard.

past.

Crosscutting Clearly and accurately Analyze qualitative and


uses patterns from
quantitative data to
Concepts
Patterns

Patterns
can be used to
identify cause
and effect
relationships.
(MS-LS2-2)

Communication
in the
Discipline
Articulate and
defend claims
using
observations and
experiences as
support.

qualitative and
quantitative data to
identify cause and
effects relationships
(MS-LS2-1).

identify cause and


effects relationships
(MS-LS2-1)

Development,
organization and style
are appropriate to the
task, purpose,
audience, and
medium used.

Development,
organization and style
are appropriate to the
task, purpose, audience
and medium used.

Precise writing
presents a focused,
logical explanation
supported with
sufficient and relevant

Presents a focused
explanation supported
with sufficient and
relevant data, though
experimental
references could be

Explanations and/or
data use mostly
relevant facts and
may be basic or
superficial to identify
cause and effects on
relationships (MS-LS1).

Does not identify a


cause and effect (MSLS-1).

Writing is coherent,
but organization
and/or may not be
appropriate to the
task, purpose,
audience, and
medium used.

Writing lacks clarity


and/or is
inappropriate for the
task, purpose,
audience, or medium
used.

Explanation is logical
and focused, but
needs more
supporting evidence.

Claims are not


supported by
evidence.
Communicates some

data from
experiments.
Shows insightful
connections to other
concepts or real-world
problems.

more thorough.
Sources are cited and
explained where
information was found.

procedures, but lacks


important details.