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1920 automotivewiring

1920 automotivewiring

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AUTOMOTIVE WIRING MANUAL

The
Original and Official Collection of Blueprint \Viring Diagrams
and Trucks from 1912
all Motor Cars ^firing Connections of Generators. Starting Motors, Controllers, etc., of all Electric Starting and Lighting Systems: Practical Instructions on Testing, Repairing and Maintenance of Storage Batteries. Generators. Motors. Coils, etc.

Contains Guaranteed Correct Circuit Diagrams Covering
to

1920

inclusive; Internal

By

HARRY

LORIN

WELLS
I

*

j?

Price $15.00
'

1920

EDITION

PUBLISHED BY

AUTOMOTIVE PUBLISHING COMPANY
440

SOUTH DEARBORN STREET

-

-

CHICAGO.

U.

S A.

COPYRIGHT
^CHICAGO.

i

AUTOMOTIVE PUBLISHING Co.
U. S.
/

O
O
car owner.

R
electrical troubles,

WORD
thus rendering prompt and
efficient service to

those engaged in the repair and upkeep of automotive electrical equipment, this Manual will prove of inestimable value. Its use will greatly simplify the location

and repair of

the

the original and official compilation of blueprint wiring diagrams in book form. All diagrams are authentic and accurate, the sources or data from which made being the original shop or working blueprints of the car and equipment manufacturers, and not photographic reproductions from instruction books, trade periodicals, etc., the usual source from which inaccurate diagrams are frequently compiled and offered to the trade.
is

This Manual

may

reading the General Instructions one can understand how easily electrical circuits be traced, and appreciate the simplicity of trouble finding, making tests, etc.

By

hereby made to the car and equipment manufacturers, courteously furnished data and other aid in the compilation of this Manual.

Acknowledgment

is

who very

THE PUBLISHERS.

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS
Starting

A

Generator No.
,,r

Car
Abbott-Detroit

Year
1916-1917... 1919-1920.
.

Model
t>44

System

Type

Battery Voltage
6...
12...

Ignition

Coil

or

Wiring
8. C.
. .

Page
.

Remy
Gray
Delco

254

Remy
Eisemann
.

1

Acme Truck
Ahrens-Fox Fire Engine
Alien
Allen.
.

.

1914-1915...
.

Models All Models 34 and 33
All

4

Davis

.

.

Mag.

.

8. C.
8. C.

.

.

.

2
:<

MG-79
202 G. 4 400 400 400

Delco

.

.

.

W<wtinghoune

6...

West

MB
E....
V. ...

8. C.

.

.

4 5

.

Allen. ...

1914-1915... 1916
1916 1917
1918-1919.
.
.

Allen ....
Allen.
. .
.

35 37 Dim. Bulbs 37 Rest. Dim
Classic

Auto Lite
Westinghousc Westinghouse Westinghouse Auto Lite
Aut.il.it,-

GA

6...
6.
.

Conn
West West West

D. C..
8. C. 8. C. 8. C.
.

..
.
.

.

6
7
I I

6... 6... 6...
6.

V
V.... GA...

.

.

.

.

.

.

Allen
Allen Altor

41 and 18-A

1919-1920...
1915
1914

43

GH GH
129-B

Conn Conn

8. C.
8.

.

.

.

GA..

C.

.

.

.

10
11

Remy
Underslung
Disco

12.

Remy

8. C.

.

.

.

American American American Anderson Anderson Appereon Appereon
Apportion

12

1917-1918... 1920 1916 1919-1920... 1913 1913

A B
100

AB

20
4-45 and 4-55.

Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse

760 760 400 760

6... 6...

AK
AK
West
'

CC. CC.
V.
.

D. C.. 8. C.
8. C.
. .

.

.

12 13
14

.

.

.

.

.

6...
6... 6... 6...
6.
.

8. C. 8.

.

.

.

15

Remy
Bosch Bosch Bosch Bosch

C.

.

.

.

16
17

Ward-Leonard
Esterline

HG
Gl
K620
L621 208 208 L61

Mag. Mag.

D. C.. D. C..

.

.

.

.

18
19

Appereon Appereon Appereon Appereon Appereon Appereon Appereon Appereon
Atterbury Truck

1913 1914 1915
1915

55 and 45
4-45, 6-45, 6-58

Gray
Bijur
Bijur

4

Davis

.

D.C..
.

.

6.
6.
6.

.

.

4-40 and 6-45

.

.

Remy
Bosch

175.

.

D. C.. D. C....
8. C. 8. C.
.
.
.

.

20
21 22 23 24

1916
1916-1917...

6-48,8-58

Westinghouse Westinghouse
Bijur Bijur
Bijur

.

.

Mag.
175 ..
175.. 176..

6.

.

.

1918-1919..^
1918-19-20..

6-48.8-58,8-17,6-17. 8-18 A 8-18 A, 8-19, 8-20..
.

6... 6... 6...
6.
. .

1919-1920... 1920
1913-14-15

8-18

Bijur

M265 M255 M255
139

Remy Remy Remy Remy Remy
Delco Bosch. Bosch
Delco.

.

.

.

D. C..
8. C.
.

.

.

.

.

D. C.. D. C....
.

.

U.

8. A. Class

"B".

.

.

Delco

6...
6...
6...

8.

Auburn
Auburn.
. .

1914 1915

4-40,4-41,6-45,6-46.
6-40
4-38, 6-38, 6-40

Remy Remy
Delco

Auburn Auburn
Auburn. Auburn. Auburn.
Austin
Bell
.
. .

SL SL MG-58
166,240,241

Mag.. Mag..
2111.
2120. 2142. 2123.
II...

C. D. C....
. .

.

D.C....
8. C.
8. C.
8. S.
.
.
.

25 26 27 28 29 30

6... 6... 6...
6.
. .

U
32
:t:t

1916
1916 1918
.

Remy
Delco Delco

Remy
Delco. Delco.

.

.

6-40

A

6-44
6-39

MG-73 MG-83
168-E-230C G-87

C. C.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1917-18-19-20

Remy
Delco

6.

.

.

Remy
Delco

1917-1918... 1916

HK12
16

6...
12...

Ward-Leonard
Models
.

RM
220
166, 240, 241

AK

Bethlehem Truck
Biddle.
. .

1918-19-20..
1919-1920.
.
.

DX, EX, FX
All All Models.

Gray Gray

4 4

Davis Davis

6... 6...
6.
.

G4D
Conn

C. C. 8. C. 8. C.
8. 8.

.

.

.

34 35

.

.

.

36
37 38 39 40

.

.

.

.

.

.

s.c
S. C.
.

Bour-Davis.

.

1918-19-20..

Remy

Remy

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS

Continued

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS
Car

Confin

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS
Starting

Continual

&

Lighting

Generator No.
or

Car
Crawford Crawford

Year
1915 1916 1916 1916-1917... 1917-18-19..
1920".

Model
6
25-30

System
Westinghouse Westinghouse Disco

Type

Battery Voltage
6...
6.
. .

Ignition

Coil

Type
Wiring
S. C. S. C.
.
. .

System

or No.

Page
118 119 120
121

280 400

CrowElkhart CrowElkhart CrowElkhart CrowElkhart Cunningham Cunningham Cunningham Cunningham
Daniels Daniels

DD
VA
C162-C164

12...

CE 30-33 K & H 32,

H&L
. .

34, 36, 42, 44,

46

1913-1914.

M
4

Dyneto Dyneto Dyneto North East
Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Delco

6... 6...
6...
16.
..

C44 B1102
280 400 760 400 169 283 243

West West Conn Conn Conn Conn
Bosch

280

V

.

.

.

GA GA GA GA
Mag

S. S. S.

C C C
.
.

122
.

S. C.

122
123
124

D. C..
S. C.
.

.

.

1916
1916-1917... 1918-1919... 1916-17-18.. 1919-1920... 1916 1915 1916
1917-18-19-20

6
6...

.

.

V
V-3 A-8

West
West, or Del.

V
2162

6... 6... 6... 6...
6...

West
Delco

V
2127 283 243
1058-67

D-19

Dart Davis Davis Davis
Deering Magnetic
Detroit Electric
Detroiter
Detroiter

B&C
38 A-B-C
C-38, 6-E, 6-G

6-H,

I

&

K
66

Westinghouse Westinghouse Delco Delco

West West
Delco Delco Bosch

MG 73, 81, 83
G-105

6... 6...

2139

C C S. C S. C S. C S. C S. C S. C
S.

-

125 126 127 128
129

S.

130
131

132
.

1918
62, 63, 64, 65,

Owen

28...

Mag

D. D.
S. S. S.

C.. C..

.

.

.

133 134
135

Detroiter

1915 1916 1917
1916-1917... 1918-19-20..

D
6-45 6-45

Eemy
Auto Lite Auto Lite
Series 35

SL3

6...

Remy
Conn Conn Conn Conn
Eisemann. Delco Delco Delco Eisemann... Eisemann...
. .

GH GH
VA
C-69, C-284

6... 6... 6... 6...

GA GA

C C C
.

136
137 138 139

Dixie Flyer Dixie Flyer

L-3

"L"

Dodge Dodge Dodge Dodge Dodge Dodge Dodge Dodge
Dorris Dorris Dorris Dorris Dorris Dorris Dorris Dorris Dorris
Dorris

Wire Str Single Wire Str Two Wire Str
Single

1915 1916

1916 1917-18-19.. 1920 1913
1913-1914.
.
.

Internal Diag

30

Dyneto Dyneto North East North East North East North East North East North East North East North East
Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse

COM COM
Mag
2128 2128 2128

D. C..
S.

C.

.

.

.

MGD MGD MGD MGD MGD MGD MGD MGD
400 208 208 280 208 208 208 760 760 760

12...
12... 12...

S. C. S. S.

.

.

.

140
141

C C
. . .

142

12... 12...
12...
12...

S. C. S. S. S. S.

Mag Mag

C.

.

.

.

143 144
145

12...
6...
6. 6.
. .

N-E N-E
West
Bosch Bosch

H H
I

1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1919

.

.

V Mag Mag
280

S. S.

S.
S.
.
.'

I-A-4 I-A-6 I-B-6 I-C-6

6...
6. 6.
. .

West
Bosch Bosch Bosch Bosch Bosch Bosch

Mag..

S. S.

.

.

6... 6... 6... 6...

Early Models

K-4
6-80

1920

Mag Mag Mag Mag Mag

S. S.
S. S.

C C C C C C C C C C C C C

146 147 148 149

150
151

152 153 154 154

155 156

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS Cotina
Car

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS

Continued

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS Continud
Car

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS
Car

Continued

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS-Continu.d
Car

CIRCUIT
Car

DAGRAMS OF CARS

Continued

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS Continued
Car

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS

Continued

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS Continued
Car

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS
Car
Year

Continued

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS-Continued
Car

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS Continued

CIRCUIT DIAGRAMS OF CARS-Continued

STANDARD AND INTERNAL DIAGRAMS
System

Diagrams of
Standard Wiring Standard Wiring
Single I'nit (Early Model Inti>ni:il Wiring Internal Cireuits. Mnti>r-( ieiieratnr with Regulator.
i

System
663 664 665
(Late
Detroit

Diagrams of

.

R-S Motor Generator,

Installation for cars not originally

i

'halmrrs
'liallliers
'Ii.'iliii.T-

'

Disco

AlliM

M.xleU

Vr-Kent
Lite

Ignition SyMein lard Wiring, Series

Dimmer, Grounded System.

Lit--

neetieut Ignition, Ty|>o II A N-D Switch Generator, Field Winding Internals GC-GD Generator, Field Winding Internals

GB
(
',(
',

666 667 Con668 669 670
671

Disco
Disco Disco Disco

Dyncto Dyneto Dyneto Dyneto Dyneto

Auto Auto

Lite
Ijte.
Lite.

Generator, Internal Connections

GH
(ill

Generator, Internal Connections
Generator, Internal Connections
(

Auto Lite Auto Liic.
Bijur

Bijur.

Motors, Internal Circuits Model Generator and Model Internal Circuits (L-61 and B-10, 3 Brush Regulation, K676 646, Gen. 11-75, Voltage Regulator Generator w th Regulator. Internal Circuits, Standard
Internal
'in -nit.*,

M D-MC-M V

GH

M

672 673 674 Motor. 675

Dyneto Dyneto-Enti Eisemann Magnetos.
Esterline

.

.

.

(

'onneetions
. .
.

677

Bijur Bijur

Two

Single Terminal

Terminal Type L-61 Generator, Internal Circuits .678 Type L-61 Generator, Internal Circuits,

Fischer

Genemotor

Grounded System
Bijur

679
Internal
Circuits,

Front

Head Type L-61 Generator,

Grounded System
Bijur

680
681 682

1918 Demountable Type, Voltage Regulator, Internal Circuits

Gray Gray Gray Gray Gray

A A A A A

Davis Davis Davis Davis Davis

Bosch Bosch Rushmorc.
Connecticut

Standard Lighting System
.
.
.

Hoinze
Heinze-Springfield Jesco

Connecticut Ignition Connecticut.
.

Connecticut

Deaco
Delco Delco Delco Delco

683 Automatic Ignition System 684 Internal Circuits, Type O Switch, GA Coil, A No. 16 Igniter. 685 686 Igniter System, Type G or GJ, E or EJ Systems Internal Circuits, Type H Automatic Ignition Switch 687 Internal C'ircuits, Voltage Regulator, Generator 688
Internal Circuits
Internal Circuits, Motors, Generators,
All

Lcece-Neville

National

& Motor &

Generators,

Models

1912-13 6-24 Volt System, Internal Motor Control

689-696 Generator

North East North East North East North East
Philbrin

700 equipped Standard Installation, Generator Model 100, Motor Model 200 701 702 Single Unit Standard Wiring Two Unit Standard, Models 30 U>39 703 Two Unit Standard, Models 40 to 49 704 Internal Circuits, 12 Volt Motor Generator with Regulator. 705 Standard Wiring for Entz Starting A Lighting System 706 Single Unit, 4 Terminal Unit, Standard Wiring. Models AAB 707 Two Unit, DA Motor A GA Generator, Standard Wiring. 708 Internal Circuits, Motor Generator, Model B 740 Internal Circuits, Generator and Controller, (Type CA Gen709 erator, 3 Brush Regulation) Motor Generator, Internal Connections 710 Internal Circuits, Chalmers and White Installation 711 G-4 Internal, E-M External 712 Generator with Automatic Cutout 713 Internal Circuits, Double Deck Model for Fords 714 Type GSL-102 Standard Wiring and Internal Circuits .... 715 Standard Grounded System 1913-14 716 Standard 2 Wire System 1913-14 717 Standard Grounded System 1915 718 Standard Grounded System 1915, Internal Wiring 719 Two Unit, Internal Circuits 720 721 Magneto Circuits Two Unit, Internal Circuits. 722 Internal Circuits 723-725 Internal Circuits, Cutout and Generator, Motor and Generator with Cutout 726 Standard Wiring 727 Internal Circuits, Models A A B 72N Internal Circuits, Models 729 Internal Circuit, Model L, Generator, Ground Return 730 System
.

.

GAD

Control Panel 6-24 Volt System Voltage Regulator, Internal Circuits

697 698 699 xxv

Model H, K or R, Starting Motor Duplex Ignition System, Internal and External Wiring
Internal Circuit,
Internal Circuits

731

Remy

732 733-736

STANDARD AND INTERNAL DIAGRAMS
System
Diagrams of
Standard Wiring
.

Continued

Page
737 738 739
.

System

Diagrams

of

Page

Rushmore
Simms-Huff. Simms-Huff.
Splitdorf Splitdorf
Splitdorf
. .
.

.-

Westinghouse
Westinghouse

Internal Circuits

.

.

12 Volt,

Motor Generator,

Internal Circuit
_.

Standard Wiring, Connections of Complete System with 752 Separately Mounted Regulator Standard Wiring, Showing Single Reduction Motor and
Vertical Ignition System 753 Internal Wiring and Mechanical Connections of Double

Splitdorf-Apelco

Splitdorf-Apelco U. S. A. Liberty Ignition U. S. L...

Wagner. Wagner.

Generator and Regulator, Internal Circuit .740 Internal Circuit, Motor Generator, Switch and Cutout. 741 Internal Circuit, Generator and Regulator TU-1 742 Internal Circuits, Generator with Cutout, Generator with 743 Regulator Internal Circuits, 12 volt, Motor Generator with Cutout .... 705 742 1919-1920, Aviation Circuit Diagram Internal Circuits, 12-24 Volt, External Regulator, External Armature Type 744 666 Internal Circuits, Motor and Generator with Regulator Internal Circuits, EM-165 Generator with Cutout 696
.
. .

Westinghouse

Reduction Motors and Switch for Automatic Screw Pinion Shift 754

Westinghouse
Westinghouse

Ignition Circuits, Horizontal Ignition System, Vertical Ignition System 755 Internal Circuits, 3rd Brush Generator with Separate Cut-

Internal

.

.

.

Westinghouse Westinghouse
Westinghouse

Motor and 3rd Brush Generator with Self Contained Cutout 756 Internal Circuits, Generator Frame Nos. 150 and 750 (R. H. 757 Rotation)
out, Starting

Wagner Wagner

.

Internal Circuits, 12 Volt, Single Unit,

Motor Generator,

Internal

Circuits,

Motors, Generators,

Switches,

Wagner-Ward-Leonard
Ward-Leonard Ward-Leonard
Westinghouse Westinghouse
. .

.

.

.

745 Internal Circuits, Model 36-T Motor, Model 45-T Generator. 746 6-12 Volt, Two Unit as Installed on Various Motor Cars and Trucks not originally equipped 747 Internal Circuits, Voltage Regulators 748 Internal Circuits, Generator with Regulator Cutout 749 Internal Circuits, Connections for Separately Mounted 750 Regulator Internal Circuits, Connections for 3rd Brush Gen. and Self .751 Contained Cutout, Starting Motor, Starting Switch
.
.

Early Models

Regulators, Cutouts, etc

Relay 758-763

Round Generator with Separate

Regulator, Vertical Ignition

Westinghouse

Westinghouse Westinghouse Westinghouse

Reduction Motor, Ammeter, Fuse Block, Starting 764 Switch, Rev. Lighting and Ignition, Switch Standard Motor, Lighting and Ignition Generator, 2-Gang Lighting and Ignition Switch, Ammeter, Fuse Block. .765 3rd Brush Generator, Separate Cutout, Starting Motor, 766 Starting Switch 767 Lighting and Ignition Frame No. 760, (R. H. Rotation) 768 Starting Motor Connections
.

SGL

or both are effected by short circuit, open circuit, poor contact, or ground, the strength of the machine will be reduced proportionately.
if either

GENERATORS AND IGNITION COILS
the

the armature shaft is for reversing the current as it leaves the armature, since it is a fluctuating or alternating current that is generated in the coils. This can be readily seen because the number of lines of force is increased during one-half of the revolution and decreased during the other half.

The commutator on the end of

One of the fundamental principles of electricity is that if number of magnetic lines of force passing thru any closed

or closed electrical circuit be changed, a voltage will be induced in this coil which will cause a current to flow, the magnetic effect of which is to oppose the change in the original number of lines of force. The voltage, as induced, depends upon the length of time required to change the magnetic influence, the more rapid the change, the higher the voltage. The operation of all direct current generators, as well as gasoline
coil

motor ignition systems, depends upon

this principle.

In the case of the generator, the number of magnetic lines of force threading any coil of the armature is a maximum when the plane of the coil is at right angles to the path of the field force from the field coils. This can be readily seen if we take, as an example, a two-pole generator with a single coil on the armature. If we imagine the poles to be in the horizontal position and the plane of the coil in the vertical position we have a condition of maximum number of lines of force threading the coil. Now, if we turn the coil thru any appreciable angle, the field coils and pole pieces remaining stationary, the number of lines of force is decreased and a voltage is generated (the amount depends upon the speed of rotation) in the coils of the armature. By increasing the number of coils in the armature the voltage is increased and kept more nearly constant.

In the case of ignition systems, we have a similar condition, namely, the change in the number of lines of force threading the coil. Ignition coils, primary and secondary, are wound about the same iron core so that any change in magnetic influence of one is transmitted directly to the other with a minimum of loss. When current is flowing thru the primary or low voltage coil of the system, from a battery, in the case of battery ignition, and self-generated by the magnets, in magneto ignition, it builds up a heavy magnetic field, the lines of force of which thread the secondary. When this current is cut off by the opening of the breaker points, this magnetic influence ceases. The change in the number of lines of force thru the primary causes a countervoltage to be induced in the primary, the current from which must be absorbed or a bad arc develops at the breaker points. The condenser, a vital part of all ignition systems, is employed for this work, as further described herein.

Inasmuch as both the primary and secondary coils are wound on the same core, the effect of the change in the magnetism of the primary has the same result in the secondary in that a voltage is induced. The coil relationship is such that this secondary voltage is very high and forces itself across the gap of the spark plug, causing the ignition spark.

IT ION
The internal combustion motor derives
its

power from

motor
noted.

the expansive force developed by the charge of gas which is compressed in the explosion chamber being suddenly raised a low to a high temperature. To raise the temperature df this gas one must supply heat This heat is generated by burning of a part of the gas (gasoline) which is comAs in the case of any burning material, a definite ised. length of time is required, depending upon the quantity, before the material is entirely consumed. This last statement must be borne in mind at all times when considering ignition
i

sparking position. If the ignition takes place too early, the will have a knock that is very characteristic, whereas it' it be too late, loss of power and excessive heating will be

problems.

To start the burning of any combustible substance an igniting flame or its equivalent, the heat value of which is measured by the inflammability of the substance, must first be applied. This igniting flame, in the case of the gas in an automobile engine, is supplied by the spark which occurs between the electrodes of the spark plug. It is very essential that this spark occur at the proper time relative to the position of the piston in the cylinder as .well as that the valves be in the proper The gas must be compressed to its highest point when the combustion is completed. AVere there no time element to be considered in the burning of the gas, ignition could take place when the piston is at its highest point. However, in order to have the motor operate at its proper efficiency, the
position.
is so set that the charge is ignited before the piston reaches the top dead center. Since the amount of this advance of the spark before center depends on the speed of the motor as well as its load, considering all forms of ignition the same,

In the majority of battery ignition systems the breaker is held to the drive shaft with some form of friction device. This cam can be easily moved and thus change the sparking position beyond the limits of the control lever. In the high tension magneto the breaker mechanism is permanently located on the armature shaft, usually with some form of key. For this reason the only method of altering the sparking position beyond the range of the control lever is thru the driving yoke or timing gears of the motor. Alteration of the relationship between the distributor gear and armature gear does not affect the sparking position of the magneto, but does move the high tension conductor relative to the segments in the distributor when the magneto spark occurs..

cam

spark

provision both

manual and automatic

is

made

for varying the

There are at present two distinctive types of ignition in use on automobile engines, namely, battery ignition and magneto. The principle of operation of each is the same and it is identical with that of the generators, i. e., the inducing of a voltage in a coil of wire by changing the number of magnetic lines of force threading the coil. The ignition system is made up of a primary and a .s> <<> mlnri/ coil, a primary circuit breaker, a condenser and a distributing system for both the primary and secondary current. The primary coil is one of a comparative few number of turns of rather heavy wire wrapped around a core of soft iron. This coil, as its name implies, is 'the first one to function in the operation of the

,

ignition system. The secondary coil is composed of a greater of turns of very small wire. Since the secondary coil depends upon the changes in the magnetic influence of the primary coil, and in order to eliminate as much as possible the loss of this magnetic influence thru leakage, both the primary and secondary coils are wound upon the same core. The primary circuit breaker is a mechanism used for opening the primary circuit at regular predetermined intervals. The condenser functions in the ignition system in the same way as an air chamber on a water pump, that is, it absorbs the surge in the pressure at one interval and discharges the accumulated pressure at another interval. An electrical condenser is made up of a number of sheets of electrical conducting material, usually tin or aluminum foil, separated by sheets of insulating material, such as paper or mica. Its complete operation is outlined below. The primary distribution system, in the case of battery ignition, is that set of wires which feed the primary current from the battery to the coil and breaker points, and in the magneto that wire or system of wires which are used to short circuit the magneto primary circuit breaker and thus make it inoperative. The secondary distribution system is that which distributes the secondary or high voltage current from the secondary coil to the spark plugs. In the case of multi-cylinder motors this secondary distribution system usually takes the form of a distributor head moulded from a high tension insulation with inserts moulded in place. The high tension current is fed to the center of the distributor head and thru some form of rotor distributed to these inserts and from them thru the spark plug wires to the plugs.

number

opening the circuit of the primary coil this magnetic influence ceases, which induces a high voltage in the secondary coil. In the design of the ignition unit the relationship between the primary and secondary coils is such that this induced voltage is sufficient to jump the gap at the plug. At the time of opening the primary circuit there is a considerable voltage induced in the primary coil itself and this voltage tends to force current thru the gap at the breaker points even after they have been slightly opened. Were this condition allowed to exist the breaker points would very soon burn away. It Instead of the is at this point that the condenser functions. arc forming at the breaker points the condenser, thru what we may term its elastic characteristic, absorbs the current from this self-induced voltage and almost immediately discharges it back thru the primary coil. Since a reversal of
the direction of flow of the current reverses the direction of flow of the magnetic lines of force, the discharge of the condenser reduces the length of time required for the number of lines of force threading the secondary coil to change from maximum to zero. This reduction of the time element for the change increases the secondary voltage because the induced voltage in any coil depends upon the time rate of change of the magnetic influence threading the coil.
action of the high tension magneto is identical with that of the battery ignition, altho the resultant operating The high tension magneto, being a characteristics differ. self-contained unit, develops its own primary energy thru the rotation of the armature between the poles of the strong horse shoe magnets. The generation of this primary current is explained by again referring to the topic of generators in that the number of magnetic lines of force is changed by the rotation of the armature in the magnetic field. The primary

The

-In both the single spark battery ignition and high tension magneto ignition the primary coil is first energized, its magnetic field encircling and threading the secondary 'coil. Upon
XXXI 1

tlu-

magneto is so located that primary current is at its The magneto armature, under this condition, ttest value. -ually from one-eighth to live-thirtyseconds of an inch of

iker of the high tension contact points open when the

when the spark control lever is in the retarded position. Since the primary voltage, together fully with the primary current, increases with an increased speed tat ion of the armature, it is possible to break the primary nit earlier in the relative position of armature and pole
leaving the pole shoe,
pit

There is otic characteristic in high tension magneto ignition that is not found in battery ignition, due to the rotation of the secondary coil in the magnetic field. This causes what is called the "after burning" of the spark. Also, since the current as generated in the primary coil of the magneto is alternating, the direction of flow thru the breaker points is reversed \ time that they separate. This fact reduces the tendency of burning of the points and eliminates the formation of a cone and crater condition which is so often found on battery
iirnitioii

cutout consists of an iron core having two windings thereon, namely, a shunt and a series winding. The shunt winding is connected across the generator so as to receive the 1'u 11 voltage of the generator across the terminals, and when the machine attains a speed at which it develops a voltage over that of the battery, the shunt winding is sufficiently energized to close the cutout. When the cutout is closed a small current is caused to flow in the series winding connected in the main circuit from the generator to the battery, and this coil is enerThe pull due to the series winding, which is much gized. greater than that of the shunt, reinforces the pull due to the shunt winding and firmly holds the contacts of the cutout in
their closed position.

A

systems which have no current reversing feature rporated in the ignition switch.

speed of the generator is decreased to a value at voltage is lower than that of the battery, or when the generator is at rest, a momentary discharge of the battery thru the series winding takes place and demagnetizes the coil. The instant the coil is demagnetized, the tension spring attached to the cutout pulls its contact arm away from the core and opens the circuit.

When the
its

which

i'1'TOUTS

OR REVERSE CURRENT RELAYS

and disconnects the generator to the battery. When the generator is at rest, the contacts are hold open by a tension spring on one of the cutout, contacts. When the generator attains a speed sufficient to develop a voltage of 6.5 volts, in the case of 6-volt systems, the cutout is automatically closed and the generator is connected to the battery.
XXXI
1 1

The cutout or reverse current relay automatically connects

VOLTAGE REGULATORS
Most voltage regulating units consist of a core having a single winding, this winding being connected across the generator. The current in the winding and the resulting magnetic pull of the core will depend upon the pressure developed by the generator. Opposite one end of the core is a vibrating reed or contact arm, which is spring retracted away from the

this reed is spring retracted away from the so that there is a by-pass aro*und a core resistance coil, which is in series with the field winding of the generator. With the vibrating reed in this position, the shunt field winding receives the full pressure developed by the gencore.
it

When

makes contact

above and below a straight line, the mean value of these ripples being 7.75 volts, the constant value for which the regulator
is

adjusted.

erator. With increasing generator speed the voltage increases until the armature develops 7.75 volts, in case of a 6-volt system, and at this electrical pressure the regulator begins to function and will maintain 7.75 volts across the generator brushes at all higher speeds.

CONSTANT CURRENT GENERATORS.
regulation)

(Third brush

The voltage regulation of all third brush generators is effected by means of the reactive magnetic flux set up by the
current flowing thru the armature.

rise

increasing generator speed the voltage will tend to above 7.75. If, however, this value is exceeded by a very small amount, the increased pull on the vibrating reed of the regulating unit will overcome the spring pull and it will be drawn towards the core, thus opening the contacts and inserting the resistance in the generator field circuit. The added

With

The amount of current generated depends primarily upon the speed at which machine is driven and the position of the regulating brush with respect to the two main brushes.
Beginning at zero speed, the voltage
is,

of course, zero, and

resistance in the field circuit decreases the exciting current in the field winding and the voltage developed by the armature tends to drop below the normal value of the 7.75 volts. If the voltage drops slightly below the normal, the pull of the spring on the regulator reed predominates and it again moves away from the core and closes the contacts which short circuits the resistance and permits the exciting field current to increase. This cycle of operations is repeated at rapid intervals and maintains the generator voltage constant at all speeds above the critical value at which it develops 7.75 volts with the resistance cut out of the field circuit.

with increasing speed the voltage increases until the armature develops 6.5 volts, at which value the shunt coil of the cutout is sufficiently energized to cause the cutout switch to close.

After the cutout is closed, the generator begins to deliver current to the battery.

of vibration depends, to a large extent, upon speed, the regulator reed vibrating one hundred to one hundred and fifty times per second. The actual voltage developed by the generator is made up of a series of very fine ripples

The rapidity

The constant current generator has a single shunt winding distributed over its poles and the regulation is effected by having this winding connected between one of the main generThe ator brushes and an auxiliary or regulating brush. the location of maximum current generated depends upon the third brush with respect to the main brush to which one side of the shunt field is connected. Moving the third, or
regulating brush, in the direction of rotation of the armature, increases the generator output, and in direction opposite to the rotation of armature decreases the output.

LOCATION AND CORRECTION OF FAULTS
to fully understand and intelligently trace the trouble that occur from time to time in the electrical ;its and equipment on motor cars, it is essential that the iianic be- able to read the blue-prints covering their electrical wiring. Many equipment and motor car manufacturers iuc instruction books containing prints covering their electrical equipment, but as a rule these are so small and the lines repre-

To be able

faults or

it is impractical to d hours in tracing them out. To enable the user of this Manual to render service on the electrical equipment of motor with the fullest possible efficiency, we have compiled and laid out in plainly readable blue-prints wiring diagrams of all and the internal circuits of their various electrical units.

;ng tin- wires are so close together that

the various

The wiring diagrams contained in the instruction books of motor car manufacturers are drawn to scale, which
Drawing No. 2

large starting motor and generator, and a very small lighting and ignition switch. In the following blue-prints the publishers have not attempted to make drawings to scale, but have placed the units in as nearly as possible to their positions on the car, as is practical, and have also enlarged such units as coils, switches, circuit breakers, etc., which have many wires leading to them, thereby making the tracing of circuits an

means a comparatively

easy matter. The accompanying illustrations represent the wiring of the same car drawing No. 1, which shows a perspective view, is drawn more or less to scale with units placed in their exact position, while drawing No. 2 is laid out flat and with emphasis made to the units which have the greater number of wires leading to them.

Drawing No.

1

In tracing electrical troubles from wiring diagrams always bear in mind the fact that it is necessary to have a complete
XXXV

a current may flow; also that if any circuit crossed with another circuit or comes in contact with the ground (or car frame in the case of a single wire system) this constitutes a short circuit, or a direct path other than the one originally intended, through which the full force of the current will flow and which usually results in a certain portion of the
circuit in order that
is

lead to the starting switch, and from there back through the ammeter, through fuse to lighting switch, through lighting switch, through wire "G" to head lamps, through head lamp bulbs to frame of car and through frame of car to battery.

wiring being burned out. Take for example drawing No. 2: should wire "A" come in contact with the ground (or return circuit) at point marked "B", a short circuit would result and the full force of the current from the battery would flow from the negative post of the battery through wire "A" to point "B" and return through the ground "G", with the result of burning cable "A." Or, should cable "A" have sufficient carrying capacity to carry the load, the battery would become discharged in a very short time. In case of lighter wires, or those having less carrying capacity, as in wire "C," should it come in contact with the ground circuit at point "D",the result would be that wire "C' would become so hot that the insulation would burn off and the wire would burn or become disconnected. Should the ground occur at point marked "E", the current would flow from the battery through wire "C" to horn, through horn to point "E," returning to the battery through the ground circuit, with the result that the horn would blow until ground connection at point "E" was disconnected or the positive or negative terminal lead was disconnected from the battery. Should wire "F" become broken or poor electrical contact occur at any point from the switch to the ignition coil, the result would be an open circuit, thereby making it impossible for current to flow from the battery through ignition switch (in "on" position) to ignition
coil.

Let us suppose that the right head lamp does not burn, when lighting switch is put in the "on" position, although the left head lamp burns- with its natural brightness. This shows conclusively, by looking at figure No. 2, that there is a completed circuit as far as through the left head lamp, which centralizes the trouble in lead "H" from the left head lamp to the right or the right, head lamp bulb or lamp connection.
the foregoing information and the following blueone can readily repair or adjust any part of the elecprints

With

equipment of any car. However, just as the repair and adjustment of the mechanical elements of the car require special tools and gauges, satisfactory work on the electrical equipment necessitates the use of electrical tools and measurtrical

ing instruments.

Probably the most universal and convenient tool for checking various points about the electrical equipment, both assembled or removed from the car, is a pair of test points. A very satisfactory set of test points can be made from an electric light extension cord by cutting one of the conductors and soldering a brass point made from one-quarter inch brass
rod six inches long, to each end, or extension of the cut wire. the plug in the light socket and the current turned on, the lamp will light if the points are in contact, either directly or thru some electrical conductor, and will not light if the points are not in contact. With these test points it is possible to determine the presence as well as the location of open or short circuit, cross connections and grounds. As an illus-

With

To

in illustration

trace a circuit, taking for example that of the headlights, No. 2: begin at the battery, following the main

(ration of the use of the test points: it is desired to locate ;ble in a two-unit starting and lighting system of which OTIC pole of both the motor and generator is normally grounded. The difficulty is that the battery does not stay charged. The generator is found to be of the third brush ntrolled type and mechanical corrections, such as cleaning e commutator, sanding in the brushes and tightening all f the connections docs not correct the fault. First remove he inherent ground connection and insulate all of the brushes from the commutator. This can be done very easily by placing

paper between each brush and the commutator. remove the connection to the battery or cutout relay. The generator circuits are now isolated, and by referring to the blueprint showing the internal connections of the unit one can determine the correct connections and circuits. For instance, the shunt field is connected across the third brush and the positive post of the machine. If we place one of the points on the third brush and the other on the positive
a piece of

post of the generator, the lamp will light if the circuit be continuous, but not if the circuit be open. If this shunt field be there is no magnetic field thru which the armature must re to generate any current. One usually finds an open circuit of this nature in the leads connecting the different coils of the field or that leading to the brush or brush pigtail. Correction can be made by soldering intact and winding tape the connection. Supposing that the circuits are all comThe blueprints plete, then test for short circuit or grounds. show what these circuits should be and one can very readily, with the test points, determine whether or not they be properly connected to or insulated from each other.
!

of the machine and the machine frame. This condition, if present, can be determined by testing for circuit between the conductors of the various circuits and the machine frame. For instance, as in the case just cited, of the generator with brushes insulated from the commutator, place one of the test points on one of the brushes and the other point on any part of the machine frame. In case of ground, the lamp will light. The armature can be tested for ground by placing one of the test points on the commutator and the other on the armature shaft. If ground is found in the armature coils, as well as short or open circuit, it is advisable to return the complete armature to the factory for repair since very extensive equipment is necessary to properly dip in insulating varnish and bake after the coils nave once been disturbed. This same practice should prevail when one encounters difficulty within any coil of wire used in connection with electrical work when the coil has been treated with varnish. Supposing a ground were found between a field coil and the pole piece correction can be made by inserting suitable insulation between the coil and pole piece at that point where the insulation is broken.
;

the more common troubles encountered is that of grounds or failure of the insulation between the conductors
XXTV11

One of

Failure of the insulating bushings or washers that are used with the binding post studs which act as the conductors through the machine frame or housings can be corrected only by replacement of the bushings or washers. The wear of the brushes leaves a carbon dust deposit on all of the parts in the commutator end of the machine, and if this accumulation becomes sufficient, short circuit or ground will ensue which makes the machine inoperative. It is very essential that the commutator end of the machine be kept clean and free from this dust at all times as it tends to work into the bearing points of the brush holder, causing the latter to become so sluggish in its action that the brush cannot follow

the variations of the commutator. With this condition present excessive arcing at the brushes results, and the brushes and commutator will both burn away in a very short time, necessitating new brushes, turning off the commutator and possibly new brush springs. Another condition that will cause excessive arcing at the brushes is that of high mica in the commutator. The copper may wear away faster than the insulaIn tion, the latter projecting above the surface somewhat. all generator commutators the mica should be undercut about 1-32 inch with a hack saw blade, which will eliminate this
difficulty.

No garage can be considered complete unless an ammeter and a voltmeter of suitable calibration be listed in their equipment. The electrical equipment of an automobile may be satisfactory in every way, apparently, and still give the owner of the car a great deal of trouble. For example, the
motor

may be charging the storage battery when the running but still the battery does not hold its charge. One may suppose that the charging rate of the generator is not sufficient to keep the system in condition but without some means of measuring the actual current flowing he remains in the dark. Further it is very inconvenient, at times, to test for short or open circuit or ground with the test points. For example, it is desirable to determine whether an open circuit exists on a lighting circuit on a car. By placing the ammeter in that particular circuit with the switch in the "on" position one can determine whether current be flowing or not. If there is current flowing, which is in excess of that drawn by the lamp, a short circuit exists which permits the current to flow thrti the circuit, but not thru the lamp which is of
generator
is

condition would be caused by a loose or dirty connection in the circuit which introduces a high resistance and causes an excessive voltage drop at that point which, tho allowing current to flow when the higher voltage of the test lamp circuit is employed, virtually opens the circuit on the lower voltage. This condition is usually found more in the starting system than the lighting or generating, and its location can sometimes be determined by the heating of the connection. However, the more satisfactory method is to measure the voltage drop, with the current turned on, across all of the connections in the circuit, with a voltmeter of suitable scale and calibration. That which shows the greatest drop is, of course, the one that is giving the trouble. For example, a starting system fails to operate even tho the battery be fully charged and all connections tight. The commutator of the starting motor is inspected, sanded smooth if necessary and still the starter- will not crank the motor. By measuring with a voltmeter the drop across the various connections, we find that the voltage thru the starting switch is very much lower than that of the battery. This condition would absolutely prohibit sufficient current reaching the starter to develop any appreciable power. Upon dissembling the switch a very unsatisfactory contact surface would be found, either burned or dirty or, due to loss of tension of the springs, the contact surfaces are not held

rather high resistance. Again, the test points may show continuity of circuit but still no current will flow when in its normal operation. This

together tight enough. further use of the ammeter and voltmeter together is to test for open or short circuits in armature coils. To test for an open circuited coil, disconnect the field coils from the machine, but leave the brushes in contact. Now connect a dry cell in the circuit so that about eight amperes will flow thru the armature. With a pair of soft points as leads from the voltmeter, measure the voltage drop between adjacent bars of the commutator. sudden increase in this voltage

A

A

xxxvm

state, the

same condition

results.

the

minute

both plates discharge, slightly dissolving in the electrolyte, and recrystalling out, one upon the other, until there are appreciable crystals formed, making a white and shiny layer over the whole plate. battery in this iition acts very similarly to one which is worn out, in that its capacity in ampere hours has fallen far below the manufacturer's rating, leading one to believe that a great deal of the active material has fallen out of the plates. The remedy for a sulphated battery is a long, slow over-charge, at about one quarter the normal charging rate. This continued ovrr-char^o is necessary because of the difficulty of breaking sulphate down by means of an electric current. In fact, the fault is corrected in part only after the treatment prescribed. Great care should be exercised in this charge, as well as for any other correction or in the operation of a storbnttery, that the temperature of the electrolyte never eds 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperatures above this point arc accompanied by a hardening of the plates, resulting in lower terminal voltage on discharge, and carbonizing of the irators which reduce their insulating value and cause pre-

eryst.-ils of lead sulphate, of all lead batteries during

This is due to which are formed on

either

Breakage of a pillar post or strap connector is noticeable by the wabble, or excessive heat generated at the faulty

connection

when the battery

is

being discharged at a high rate.

A

which

may confront the battery repair man very easily explained, but at times difficult to detect, is the failure of separator insulation due to excessively strong The strong acid very rapidly attacks the wood electrolyte. fiber of the separator and makes it appear as mussy wet chocolate. The specific gravity of the electrolyte in this case is usually at least 1320 and the voltage on charge is normal but falls off rapidly on discharge. Remedy for this fault, in case the plates have not been too heavily sulphated, is replacement of separators and very low electrolyte, bringing the gravity back with a slow charge.
condition that
is

One

REPAIRING BATTERIES

LEAD CONNECTOR-SEALED TYPE
Before starting
to dismantle

a battery, a sketch should be

made showing the

inter-cell connections

and position of termi-

mature

failure.

nals for guidance in re-assembling.

Failure of insulation in a storage battery, as well as any internal short circuit due to foreign material or high sediment, is shown by partial or total loss of voltage of that cell, or if only a very slight internal short circuit, by rapid loss of charge.

%

To remove terminals and cell connectors center-punch the tops of each over the terminal posts and drill to a depth of inch drill for 12 volt batteries and inch inch, using for 6 volt batteries. Do not drill deeper than necessary as it involves extra labor in building up the post again when re-

%

%

assembling.

Evidence of a broken jar of the electrolyte.

is

very apparent through leakage
xiiii

To remove top connections after being drilled, place a flat piece of steel along edge of case to prevent marring or crush-

and pry ing of edges; then use lever underneath connector Brush off the accumulation of lead and dirt from top of substances battery. Care should be exercised to keep foreign from the inside of the battery, especially metal which may become lodged between the plates and cause short circuiting.
off.

an angle on top of jars to drain. While the elements are draining, apply flame around the terminal posts and lift off
at
covers.
/

in the holes in the covers. be done before bringing an open flame This should always near the battery, as an explosive gas, (hydrogen), is generated in the battery during both charge and discharge. Explosion of this gas in the confined space of the battery cell usually results in a broken jar. The moulded rubber vent plugs being revery brittle and easily broken, the use of pliers for their not advisable. moval is

Remove vent plugs and blow

If separators are in good condition, and a jar replacement is necessary, set the element in electrolyte or water until ready to replace. If separators are to be changed, separate the positive and negative groups by grasping the elements firmly by the posts and working slowly back and forth.

only

Soften the sealing by playing a soft flame over the comnot burn pound. Care must be taken so that the flame does flame back and forth, not the covers. It is. best to play the to melt steadily in one place as this will cause the compound for several minutes brings better small flame used and run. results than a strong flame which melts only the surface compound and leaves that below hard.

The smallest opening in a separator may cause a short cirwhich may not be discovered until the battery has been in use again for some time. When separators have turned black, they are carbonized and their life is virtually gone. To remove separators, take a long bladed knife and run it between the plate and the separator. It is always best to renew the separators. Separators should never be allowed to become dry, but should be kept immersed in a very weak solution of
cuit
electrolyte.

A

(to prevent adhering) and dig the compound. After all the compound has thus been out removed apply the flame to the inside of the jar (through vent tube) for an instant, then run a hot putty knife around the

Use a heated screw driver

Inspect plates to determine whether or not they require replacement. If battery has been overheated through overcharging or snort circuiting, this will be indicated by brittle and buckled plates, with active material granular and falling away from the grid. Plates in this condition will have to be
replaced.

edges between jar and cover.

Place the battery on the floor and, holding firmly between the feet, grasp the terminal posts with two pairs of pliers and lift the element and cover out together. Let the elements rest
XL1V

the positive plates can be ascertained by the blade of a knife. If they are fairly hard and have using neither lost too much of their surface nor become extremely

The condition of

buckled they can be used again.

The condition of the negative plates is very often such that In this case the they may be used attain with new positives. should he immersed in water to prevent the five' group
mil

drying out through heating by exposure to thP

air.

it hap])ens that one or two plates in a group replaeement while the balance of the plates are in good In this ease ne\v plates may be used in replacement. iticii. nip of Imckled plates which, when re-assembled, will not go into the jar readily, should be replaced with a new group.

Occasionally
:re

place the positive and negative Always make sure that it is free from lead scrapings or foreign substances of any kind, as these substances will adhere to wet separators, which will cause short circuiting of the plates. Intermesh the positive and negative group. As the negative group contains one more plate than does the positive, both outside plates will be negative.

To assemble an dement,
tl.it

groups on a clean,

surface.

Invert the case over a sink and thoroughly cleanse the jars inserting a hose and injecting a stream of water into each. hy Be sure that all sediment and foreign matter is removed before replacing the elements.

Lay the element on its edge and insert the separators between each pair of plates, the grooved side of the separator next to the positive plate. Carefully check up separators after assembling, as omitting a separator would cause considerable trouble.
the pillar posts and lower gently into This should be done very carefully to avoid breaking

Inspect the jars carefully for cracks or holes. Jars exhibiting such, regardless of the size of the imperfections, uld be replaced with new ones.

Take the element by
the jar. the jar.

To remove a jar fill it with boiling water and allow it to stand for a few minute's. This will loosen the sealing compound surrounding the jar. Grasp the edges of the jar with two pairs of pliers and pull it straight up. Care should be so as not to damage adjacent jars.
The new jar should be heated before being placed
case.

If the cover does not fit close to the terminal posts, or the wall of the jar, the openings should be calked to prevent the melted sealing compound from flowing into the jar.

Pour
in the

the

compound

so that

it

will

fill

When the jar has been heated either with boiling water or flame, it should be pushed into place, taking care that the top of the jar is level with the others. If not lined up, the top connectors will be uneven, and as a result present a very
amateurish-looking job.

with the top of the case. over the whole surface. evenly
to a height level

all spaces and reach Also see that it flows

.

Before applying connectors, ,see that the terminal posts
are free of
all

compound and

dirt.

XLV

Using an ordinary pocket knife, clean the inside of the connectors. Then clean the tops of the connectors with a file, to remove dirt and oxide, so that they can be properly united.
Before applying the terminal connectors,
a voltmeter to see if they are set up properly. should be applied so that the positive of one to the negative of the next cell.
test all cells
cell is

with

The connectors
connected

100 F., lower the charging rate, or discontinue charge until the cell cools. The strength of the electrolyte used for filling the battery largely depends upon the condition of the plates. If all new plates are used, gravity should be 1.300 if positive renewal, 1.285 ; if old and sulphated plates, 1.100, and if old
;

and not sulphated

plates, 1.250.

In welding connectors and terminals to the posts, fuse the top of the post with the edges of the hole in the connector. Melt strips of lead and allow the molten metal to run into the hole in the connector. Care must be taken to see that the top of post and the inside edges of the connectors are properly melted together before adding additional lead. If this is not done, poor contact will result. Care should be taken not to melt the outer edges of the connectors. After burning the connectors and terminals, mark the positive terminal (+) and the negative ( ).

If the battery has new plates, twice its rated capacity will be required for the development charge. If the plates are old and badly sulphated, more time may be required.

Any cells which have not been repaired should be left out of the circuit during the first half of the developing charge. They may then be connected into the circuit and the whole
battery brought to full charge.
the charge is complete, adjust the gravity of the To do this remove some elecelectrolyte to 1.280 to 1.300. from the cell and replace with pure water until detrolyte sired gravity is reached or remove electrolyte from the cell and replace with 1.400 acid, according to whether the cell reading is high or low.
;

When

CHARGING
Fill battery with electrolyte and start to charge at one half the normal charging rate and continue until gravity stops rising. During the development charge take occasional temperature readings and if the temperature of any cell exceeds

Clean off the top and sides of battery, cover terminals and connectors with vaseline and the battery is then ready for
service.

XLVl

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