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the finest guitar lessons on the planet

234 SEPTEMBER 2014

20 YEARS OF THE FINEST GUITAR TUITION

cream of
Learn the licks and techniques
that made Cream-era Clapton
a giant of blues-rock guitar
four-part

Harmony

bernie

marsden

Star video lesson with
this great British
blues-rocker

play BRITISH R&B

ROLLING
STONES
Brian Jones & Keith
Richards’ early years

Why understanding it will
make you a better musician

style studies...

PAUL SIMON

Acoustic picking legend

WALTER TROUT

Fender Stratocaster firebrand

Sunny
Tackle a jazz-pop classic from the
greatest jazz guitarist of all time

SIMPLE MINDS

Sonic sculptor Charlie Burchill

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. you understand. Tapping the feature titles on the cover or the contents page takes you straight to the relevant articles. His brand-new CD. Phil’s something of a legend. but recently ‘replaced’ it with the one you see below – a reissue ’63. Bridget is a Royal College of Music. I was one of thousands of people struck by Clapton’s style. Once again. We Will Rock You. Any web and email links in the text are tappable. charlie griffiths Guitar Institute tutor Charlie first came to fame in Total Guitar’s Challenge Charlie series. and I know Van Halen and Eric Johnson were equally captivated by that EC era. and that period in his long and rather distinguished career. Then think about the impact that this brief period (two-and-a-bit years) had on modern guitar playing. hold Clapton. September 2014 GuitarTechniques 5 .zinio. A great player. pretty much in pitch but an octave down. tap the play buttons to enjoy video masterclasses on your iPad or smartphone. go to bit. too. is out now! john wheatcroft A truly phenomenal guitarist.ly/guitartechniques (if you live in the UK) or bit. I could tell which notes were picked. then fast-forward or scroll back at will. pat heath BIMM Brighton lecturer. Paul plays with prog legends Carl Palmer and Neal Morse. that’s often what we in GT tell readers to do. examiner. the hours of solid practice I put in. but a legend in Gypsy Jazz. the finest guitar tuition you can buy ! There was something ‘perfect’ about his whole thing – the phrasing. Andy is a phenomenal player in a host of styles. Welcome. Middle Child. If you’re not that big on EC. You can also find us on www. Gary Moore told me the same story. Tap the links Finding your way around the magazine is easy. See you next month… Neville Marten. Look out for his album Trigger in 2014! Stuart Ryan Head of Guitar at BIMM Bristol. ESP product demonstrator and all-round busy musician Pat takes over from Terry Lewis on 30-Minute Lickbag. It was brilliant! I heard all Eric’s inflections. PLUS! Get a FREE iPad/iPhone sample of GT. Shaun has taught many who are now top tutors. I’d ask you to try a few of the ideas presented in the feature. everything was dead right in Cream. and how that whole vibrato thing worked. andy saphir A top teacher at the Guitar Institute (ICMP). Shaun Baxter One of the UK’s most respected music educators. Pat! bridget mermikides Guildhall and Royal Academy trained. playing to those vinyl LPs. the tone. metal and fusion guitarists. Like a fool I sold it. which ones were bent.ISSUE 234 SEPTEMBER 2014 Just some of your regular GT technique experts. with a moving cursor showing you exactly where you are in the music. phil hilborne The UK’s original magazine guitar tutor. and it was my main instrument for many years. in such high regard. Tristan is also mega busy on the folk circuit playing with Jackie Oates. the timing. His latest book/CD The Tradition is available now. and is a most welcome regular contributor to GT. and so many other players (including me). Kindle Fire and Nook is now even better! jacob quistgaard Royal Academy trained. car. I bought a red mid-60s ES-335 in 1972. which ones were hammered on. You might then understand why Jon. Jon Bishop is a genuine Clapton fan too. paul bielatowicz One of our greatest rock guitarists.com (NB: Zinio editions do not yet have interactive tab or audio). No ‘Jack of all trades and master of none’. Quist is a superb player who can turn his hand to any number of styles and topics. He mixes just the right degree of flash with consummate taste. Marc.com Don’t miss our amazing digital edition Our digital edition for iPad.ly/guitartechus (overseas). He’s also one of the UK’s top rock. a respected classical player and award-winning blues guitarist. For full details and how to receive our digital edition regularly. He’s a master at all styles. Since I had no other distractions at the time (job. His album Jazz Metal was hailed as a milestone. I’m sure that learning everything he did at half tempo taught me how to play – and weirdly. Play the videos Certain of the articles have accompanying videos full of useful insight and additional information. iPhone. girlfriend). Simply tap the ‘play’ button. too! Animated tab & audio Most songs and lessons have the audio built in.marten@futurenet.. he nails every one with ease! Phil Capone Phil is a great guitarist who specialises in blues and jazz. either to a metronome or to click tracks. Eddie. tristan seume One of ACM Guildford’s leading tutors. for whatever reason (I know he has his detractors). and wanting to be able to do the kind of thing he did. he regularly plays guitar in the Queen musical. and as hard to tell from an original as I’ve ever seen. John heads up the guitar facility at Tech Music Schools in London. Gary. Editor neville. Mick. He teaches at ICMP in London. jon bishop Jon is one of those great all-rounders who can turn his hand to almost any style. You can hear it in the work of guitarists as different as Mick Ronson and Marc Bolan. as you will hear from his rather superb examples in our main feature this month. Our turntable had a 16rpm setting which meant I could slow 33rpm albums down so they played at half speed. My choice of first Gibson guitar was as a direct result of Clapton. too. writes for GT and Total Guitar and has published 10 top tuition books. Stu is an acoustic guitar virtuoso who performs throughout the UK. just like Eric’s. eventually began to pay off. but via my initially fruitless attempts to copy what he was doing on Cream records. Welcome eric clapton taught me to play guitar! Not personally.

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talkback  Tell us your views. James Taylor and more… bernie marsden Part 1  68 This issue. musical and theoretical issues. 16 Jon Bishop explores EC’s late-60s soloing secrets. Charlie Burchill.. Shaun Baxter turns his focus to creating harmony-guitar parts in the neo-classical style. plus news and regulars. blues  60 rock  64 Creative Rock  74 session styles  80 British R&B  84 Acoustic  88 music reading  92 John Wheatcroft takes an in-depth look at the soulful and incendiary playing style of US blues great. Martin Cooper hits the stadiums of the 1980s with a look at the grandiose style of Simple Minds guitarist. it’s time to look at notes on the stave. packed with taste and technique. This issue.• C ON T E N T S • SE P T E MBE R 201 4 • Learning Zone Lessons Introduction  57 30-minute lickbag  58 Music editor Jason Sidwell introduces this month’s lessons with more words of wisdom. A complete transcription of this masterwork. September 2014 GuitarTechniques 7 . Walter Trout. then play along with two complete backing tracks. jazzy. COVER FEATURE ERIC CLAPTON Nail his greatest licks! Stuart Ryan admires the picking technique and variety in Paul Simon’s acoustic style. FEATURES WES MONTGOMERY Sunny Welcome  5 Theory Godmother  26 SPECIAL feature 8 David Mead addresses your technical. watch and learn how Bernie Marsden approaches a minor blues-style solo.. plus Neil Young. HARMONY Learn four-part harmony Charlie Griffiths continues his 14-part series on reading music notation. 95 New guitar CDs and DVDs reviewed and rated. we want to know! 9 Intro  10 Subscriptions  49 back issues  94 Session and playing insight from Mitch Dalton and Carl Verheyen. TONY GALE / PICTORIAL PRESS / ALAMY Andy Saphir concludes his series focusing on session players with a trip to the movies – check out his cool. TAB GUIDE  50 Bridget Mermikides returns to the great Russian composer. to create a compelling solo arrangement of this famous. to show you how understanding it will make you a better player. 40 Bridget Mermikides delves into the realm of four-part harmony. Next Month  98 Learn Cold Day In Hell by Gary Moore. Learn these classic licks. Save time and money – get GT delivered! Missed one? See how you can get it – here! Albums  transcriptIon #2 pyotr tchaikovsky Scène from Swan Lake VIDEO MASTERCLASS Nev discusses the one and only Eric Clapton. intermediate and advanced levels. 70s-style film theme. BIMM’s Pat Heath has six more licks for you at easy. BB King. timeless theme. REGULAR FEATURES transcriptIon #1 COVER PHOTO: MICHAEL PUTLAND / RETNA / PHOTOSHOT Phil Capone’s new column takes a look at the authentic R&B boogie of The Rolling Stones’ early hits with Keith Richards and Brian Jones. from the greatest guitarist ever to thumb an octave. 96 Our terms and signs explained.

Guitar Techniques.net – every wish is your Godmother’s command! Shaping Up Dear Theory Godmother open and fretted strings. F and G seem unique in their shape. . . . try relaxing it and letting the fingers flex in an ‘open palm’ sort of configuration. . . without Martin. works. should your letter be the lucky one.David Mead chord that performs such a unique role Ex 4 that it’s hard to find anything that will G7 G7 C fit in its place. Could you tell me which ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙ 4 ˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ &4 ˙˙˙ I should be looking˙at. .blackstaramps. which ring on annoyingly when they should be silent. do you make a fist with your picking hand when holding a pick? If so. . but there are plenty of alternatives that can be called upon to bring their own particular effect to a piece. EXAMPLES 1 – 7 The open chords of A. It’s also rather low in pitch. E. If you study these you should find the issue of mapping chords on the fretboard becomes far more logical. The thing I have the most problem with is rhythm parts where you play a chord. 2nd fret. I’ve plotted some different shapes for a C chord in Ex 3. which is probably why it’s disregarded in many chord books. I’ve scoured the internet for lessons on muting and watched my fill of YouTube videos.g. and the way in which the hand is positioned can greatly influence muting efficiency. which makes memorising multiple shapes much easier. You’re absolutely right in saying that A. . . BA1 2BW. F and G are unique shapes – the only thing I’d say there is that F is merely an edited form of the E shape (see Ex 2). A string 2nd fret and D string 1st fret? This would be easier to learn for beginners. giving you a greater area with which to mute the strings. using the CAGED idea. While the picking hand mutes as above. 1 inside G7 Ex 5 Ex 5 b b Bm7 5 & 44 ˙˙˙ ˙ 3 2 3 2 0E 1B 0G 2D 3A 4 6 4 6 4 ˙˙ 4 b bb wwww ˙ ˙˙˙ & 4 b w ˙ 4 6 4 6 4 ˙ ˙ 0 1 b D 7 b˙ b b ˙˙˙ b˙ Flat 5th resolving . in a G7 chord the two notes that form the b5th are B and F. as the fourth finger in particular is no longer curled into the palm. but I still don’t seem to be able to make the grade. you run into trouble because it turns the chord into B augmented. Flat 5th resolving . please? chords ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ Alan Flat 5th . You will also find players using unoccupied digits of either hand to mute them. Bath. A string. In theory. This makes E B G D A E that all-important fleshy palm edge more extended. The standard V-I move that we find at the end of many progressions. Whether these substitutions suit the music at hand is another question – it’s the principle of resolution we are discussing here.uk and tell us which you’d like. C. Mark The simple answer is that the chord you describe is a B major (see Ex 1). . will always be the strongest resolution. E. and I’m sure you’ll discover many more ways of substituting the V-I. .David Mead Mute Point Dear Theory Godmother Blackstar are giving our star TG letter one of their brilliant pedals each month. . This is a GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Theory Godmother . . Substitute Teacher Dear Theory Godmother Regarding chord substitution. but only a three-note version – as the minute you play the open G. both ends are covered by the hands collaborating. Bm7b5 (Ex 6) and D diminished (Ex 7) – try both of them before C and you will hear a resolution. E D 7 4 6 4 6 4 Ex 6 1 0 0 0 2 3 b˙ b b ˙˙˙ b˙ D 7 Ex 6 D 7 b b ww & 44 bb b www E B G D A E C G7 resolves to C . co. As Ex 4 shows. . Now look at the Db7 in Ex 5. So why isn’t a B just an E shape but dropped down the strings e. Another thing worth noting is that muting is a job shared by both hands. . although it will sound different. 1 0 0 0 2 3 b ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ G7 ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ 1 0 0 0 2 3 2 E B G D A E 1 0 0 0 2 3 2 Ex 5 Ex 4 E B G D A E 1 E B G D A E GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Theory Godmother . it has the same two notes – B and F (despite the B being referred to as Cb because of the key signature!). inside G7 G7 resolves to C .Q&A Theory Godmother Star LETTER PRIZE Post your playing posers and technical teasers to: Theory Godmother. E string. and how this resolves into ˙ ˙ ˙ n the˙˙I chord. one thing puzzles me. D. Try exploring other chord voicings that have the same resolution at their centre. As an example. C. Visit www. Ex 6 b C Bm7 5 3E 5B 5G 5D 3A 3 2 3 2 ˙ n ˙˙˙ & 44 ˙˙˙ ˙ ˙ E 1 0 2 3 ˙˙ 4 6 4 6 4 C ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙˙ What you're hearing . mute the strings with the picking hand and strike them again for a percussive attack. Play ˙through the˙ example ˙ and you will hear how the resolution What you're hearing . which leaves us with the other five. Ex 4 After years of trying. any chord that contains 3 5 6 5 the5same interval a similar 4 will perform 5 5 3 resolution. and that is finding an able substitute for the V chord. despite its different surroundings. Other chords that contain the b5th between B and F include C major’s VII chord. Experiment with bringing the fretting hand into play. and gives us the basis for the infamous CAGED system. or email me at info@davidmead. Martin 8 GuitarTechniques September 2014 G7 ˙ & 44 ˙ Flat 5th . . . but B is just an A shape only two frets up with the first finger on the 2nd fret. so a resolution into C will still work: try it and compare the two – the G7 to C and Db7 to C – and you should hear the same resolution. All of my muted chords still seem to have notes – mainly open strings – in them. For instance. So if the chord you’re playing is a combination of 1 0 The02 power of the V chord resides in 2 3 3 the diminished 5th (flat 5th) interval buried (see Ex 4) between the chord’s C 3rd˙and 7th. Most major chord shapes are based on those five shapes moved to various points on the fretboard either as barre versions or plain movable shapes. too. D. But picking-hand muting is performed1 by laying the0fleshy edge 0 1 0 of the palm10 on the strings 2 near the 3 bridge. the fretting hand helps by relaxing its grip on the strings just enough to produce ‘dead’ notes. 30 Monmouth Street. and also check your fretting hand position – I’m confident your muting will improve. I’m still not able to mute strings very well. 6 4 0 1 0 2 3 5 5 Ex 7 Ex 7 C 0 1 0 2 3 Ddim C 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 3 ˙ & 44 b ˙˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ E B G D A E ˙˙ ˙˙˙ Ex 7 Ddim C It’s a difficult ˙ problem to˙˙address b ˙˙˙ what you’re & 44 seeing ˙˙˙ doing.

I have done them but the downside is – and this happened in LA – that bar owners rather like free entertainment and may eventually only book those acts that don’t charge. This old dog can learn new tricks! I want to comment on ‘open mic’ gigs. singers and so on. seemingly genuine ‘artist’ who’s knowledgeable and bands. the 5th mode of E Harmonic Minor and not a straight B Phrygian. Some took it far enough to make it their living. To clarify: E Harmonic Minor contains E. Email: neville. D# (the D# is the ‘colour’ note that propels you to the scale’s root – E). Em-B7-Em. Alan Orgill (Oggi) Jason Sidwell: Yngwie’s really referring to B Phrygian Dominant.  You may like to subdivide your scale choices so that the spicier sounding E Harmonic Minor or B Phrygian Dominant gets a reduced usage. but depending on which key you’re in the scale has a different name”. might survive. They consist of exactly the same notes. It’s great that people want to play. and to make music that people want to hear. as they do need to earn a living. G. And yes. Like many of us. is probably as big as that Plant and his band were superb. I. C. with this one. got semi-pro gigs (or lived in squats and ‘went pro’) and ended up earning from it. It’s a problem. A. anything! Then. with Bonham’s DNA in were Robert Plant and his the shape of Bonzo’s son Jason. and I really hope that it does not turn out that way. In that case. If they had any sense they’d see that the next raft of great players. Hendon her own front lawn (which. 30 Monmouth Street. I may not have answered your question. No STAR LETTER PRIZE wonder. B Phrygian is relative to E Harmonic Minor. as did others.com using the header ‘Talkback’. of course. C. D. too. I have noticed a lot of folk are doing gigs for free. E. Steve. that means we got fans that came every single week and we literally packed the places. can we book you back? Is three months okay?” Well. What do you think? Of course every muso wants to try out before an audience. I have just started reading Relentless by Yngwie J Malmsteen. too. illuminating the sound of a B7 chord. Planty! hand – like she was singing on Nige. “For example. in venues they want to attend. Em-Cmaj7-B7-Em. family get-togethers and such? Steve Webb (Ex Jess Roden. PLAYING REAL GOOD. so thank you! IT’S AN ‘YNG’ THING! I am just getting to grips with theory but something has come up that I don’t understand. A (the D# provides the major 3rd for the mode. A (D provides the minor 3rd. FOR FREE RETNA / PHOTOSHOT I love your magazine. that Robert doesn’t feel the need to Our friends at Sound Technology reform his old band. there is always a new lick or approach to learn. Playing free can result in pro and semi-pro musicians not being able to make a living in the long run. F#. field!). we got good enough to play in bands. since he made such a great noise. who was – as he did so well with Alison Krauss on their album rubbish. but I’m glad of the rant. HardWire pedal to our Star Letter From wailing sex-God front man he’s become a writer every month. but Robert Plant: with his band. F#. her initial. a scale like E Natural Minor (E F# G A B C D) would work great (as indeed would B Phrygian) over the Em chord as it’s easier on the ear. that is Led Zeppelin. are donating a fab DigiTech and seemed to be having such fun. But surely a halfway house would be that venues pay for regular acts but put on open-mic nights. and if the punters like them they’ll happily pay a few pence extra on a pint when said new ‘artist’ (who would then not be allowed to play for free in the same venue) is booked back. And her band was totally Imagine having that repertoire to on it – great guitar playing from draw from. who can and can’t play Raising Sand. Gary Farr’s Lion) Most of us didn’t get into music to be paid for it at all – we got into it because learning the guitar was the greatest thing since. perhaps in ways (like me!) we could never have imagined when we fumbled that first one-digit G7 chord. it’s post-Glastonbury time and everyone has capable of standing head to head with modern artists their own opinions about who was great. You could then shift to B Phrygian Dominant over the B7 to add tension before the resolution to the Em. Yes. gave them a really new twist with extra ‘world’ instruments and a generally darker. and also very Well. G. illuminating the sound of a Bm chord).Write to: Guitar Techniques. bluesier feel. C. and getting paid is becoming harder each year. no! Back in the 80s I played in pub bands and we had weekly residencies. Bath BA1 2BW. By bringing in stupid laws that prohibit places from putting on live music (which has always pulled in punters).marten@futurenet. All this though is perhaps beyond your question’s parameters so I’ll leave it there! But I hope this clarifies and endorses your thoughts. If people know that ‘so-and-so are on at the such-and-such every Tuesday’. too – maybe once a week. and who shouldn’t still be It’s really good that allowed to. the V chord of E minor). they can make it a regular haunt and music. F#. Em-Am-B7-Em and Em-F#m7b5-B7-Em. D#. So progressions such as. then. to form Star LEtter Write one and win a prize! ROCKIN’ GLASTO! interested in all styles of ethnic music. Well done. but can I suggest they play free at school dances. and venues. major success – and still spirit and her personality had cut it alongside superstars of the vast crowd in the palm of her today. Surely the great man can’t be wrong? I look forward to your reply with interest. would However. and joyous outfit perform. is auditioning before their very eyes. September 2014 GuitarTechniques 9 . But even here in Scandinavia where I live. And whether or not musicians such as Plant can you subscribe to the “Dolly was exist as artists in their own miming” conspiracy theories. we’d do pubs and they’d say. “You’re the best band we’ve ever had in here. G. no right. nor indeed should we simply castigate venue owners. and the feel and band leader Kent Wells. would be ideally suited to E Harmonic Minor (B Phrygian Dominant) for soloing over. even at 62 and still on the road (200+ gigs a year). they share all the same notes except B Phrygian contains a D. and E Harmonic Minor contains a D#. E. well. but the closure of music pubs and clubs means there are fewer venues. B Phrygian contains B. in truth. B Phrygian Dominant contains B. and on page 36 he states. I don’t think it’s the performers’ fault. one of cohorts? They took brilliant old I was almost as happy to watch this Glastonbury 2014’s big hits tracks we know and love. experience of really great players – especially on Dolly’s play-off including Skin Tyson and Justin where he wailed away not unlike Adams on guitars – and yet not a Michael Landau or perhaps a being constrained by the monolith David Grissom. I was in a band with some amazing local players. I always buy it ’cos. B. which means less opportunity to play. we have created the self-fulfilling prophecy of hundreds of closed-down pubs up and down the country. it’s hard when you watch venues cashing in on all those players (of wildly varying quality) whose desire to perform in public means they’d happily do it for free. what I really love to see Led Zep get together wanted to say was how great once more. many decades after their one can deny that her songs. It’s very sad.

He was born with albinism. visit www. He became one of the key players associated with the Gibson Firebird. You can also subscribe to www. G# is of course the major 3rd of E. at the Lovely Days Festival in Austria.com. and grew up in Beaumont. He produced a trio of Grammy-winning albums for Muddy Waters. and though he never reached the levels of super stardom of contemporary blues-rock pioneers such as The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Cream. Alternatively. Winter is survived by his wife. Brian Setzer. Columbia Records executives signed him for $600.000 – which was then the biggest advance in record industry history. is due on 1 September via Megaforce. aged 70. Texan guitarist John Dawson ‘Johnny’ Winter. 2. After seeing his 1968 performance with Michael Bloomfield and Al Kooper at Manhattan’s Fillmore East. B Dorian Mode Groove This progression continuously moves between Bm7 and E. E Minor Pentatonic (E G A B D).” 10 GuitarTechniques September 2014 He began playing at an early age. Use B Dorian (B C# D E F# G# A) to make it nice and jazzy and try emphasising the natural 6th (G#).quistorama. Step Back. as: “We both had a problem with our skin being the wrong colour. E Blues scale (E G A A# B D) and E Natural Minor (E F# G A B C D) will all work well. a condition that left Winter with a lack of pigmentation in his hair. A Minor Epic Acoustic The strummed acoustic riff uses the chords Am – C – Dadd4. Joe Bonamassa. at the end of a European tour. quickly developing a fiery slide style using both open E and open A tunings. Use these tips to navigate our bonus backing tracks. and fell in love with the blues after hearing it on the radio. For more variety and a jazzier flavouring. followed by a bar of 3/4 – counting 1-2-3-4-1-2-3. he remained true to his roots throughout a varied and rewarding career. For free scale maps and hundreds of tracks. His death came just four days after playing what would prove to be his final performance. a guitar he once described as “the best of all worlds”. Winter was born John Dawson Winter III in 1944. The groove may be a little tricky at first. try A Dorian mode. especially on the E chords. try the symmetric Diminished scale (E F G G# A# B C# D) and play around with moving your licks and patterns in minor 3rd (three-fret) intervals. Billy Gibbons. and brother Edgar. keep it simple and get your blues chops out with the B Minor Pentatonic scale (B D E F# A). 7/4 Fusion Groove This track is in E and revolves around an E7#9 chord (commonly referred to as the Hendrix chord!). 1. skin and eyes. Winter released his debut and played Woodstock in 1969. but try thinking of it as a bar of 4/4.youtube. Susan. featuring a cast of celebrity cameos from the likes of Eric Clapton. Jam tracks by Jacob Quistgaard. Joe Perry. but to get more fusion out of it. adding the blue note (D#) for extra colour. Slow Minor Blues (Em) As all the chords are minor. 4. Winter’s final studio album. You can use E Minor Pentatonic (E G A B D). B Minor Pentatonic can add nice colour to the Im chord (Em) as well. and most definitely great. MICHAEL PUTLAND / RETNA / PHOTOSHOT RIP Johnny Winter The legendary bluesman Johnny Winter died on 16 July in his hotel room in Zurich. You can rely on A Minor Pentatonic (A C D E G) throughout. Winter said in a biography by Mary Lou Sullivan that his condition helped him identify with African-American musicians. so landing on a G# here will always hit the spot. Dr John and more.com/QuistTV to get all the latest free jam tracks and licks! . Experiment with both B and A Minor Pentatonic scales – not just following the chords (Bm/Am). Texas.• G u i t a r T e c h n i q u e s • SE P TE M B ER 2 0 1 4 • Jam tracks tips The late. with its natural 6th step (A B C D E F# G). 3. was nominated for Grammys in his own right and was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall Of Fame in 2003. Leslie West.

When the Carl Verheyen Band goes on tour. you’ve got a great neck pickup. but nonetheless. Since the Strat’s bridge pickup is not mounted on a metal plate like the Tele. and still have plenty of sustain and Somewhere along the road I found a way to make the Strat’s three singlecoils and vibrato bridge really work for me. too. It’s amazing how many things Leo Fender got right. On all my Strats I rewire the rear tone knob so I am able to control and roll off the bridge pickup’s treble. The sound I look for here can best be described as “glassy”. Visit www. but somewhere along the road I found a way to make three singlecoils and the vibrato bridge really work for me. So in the key of D. bar 2 involves rapidly playing 4th and 3rd simply a Minor Pentatonic that’s had the minor 3rd replaced intervals quickly across the fourth and third strings.carlverheyen. there’s both warmth and bite to the sound that works with many types of music. my attention turns to the sounds and marriage of wood and pickups. work imitated exactly on the next pair of strings. Jan Hammer and Dream Theater. Simple. saturation. After playing my lick. clear sparkle tones you get from the middle pickup are a big part of Jimi Hendrix’s studio recordings. even 60 years later. the guitar had just three positions for the selector. playing a very high melody over a 75-piece string section. Words I use to describe it are “fat” and “woody. If you can dial in a clear ‘beam’ from C# downwards. I love the way it distorts. intervallic phrases or vice versa.by Phil Hilborne heard from Jeff Beck. the Strat’s back pickup is equally at home with country chicken pickin’ and rock solos with heavy distortion. The clean. fat distorted tones for soaring solos. way beyond its original country music intentions. nothing gets the music across like a Strat. Instead. This is a great rhythm sound. This month: it’s all about Strats. I’ve used it on solo electric intros with delay and chorus for those shimmering tones that no other guitar can match. so without offsetting the three-way switch and hoping it would hold. This scale is from beat 2. or the classic Gibsons. Middle-Bridge Split. PHIL HILBORNE’S ONE-MINUTE LICK Descending Pentatonic Dominant Lick odd-note grouping displaces the rhythm causes the sequences Here’s a nifty phrase that incorporates the ‘Dominant to end up at the last 16th note – beat 1 of bar 2. Middle Pickup. the guitar became a workhorse for many styles. My tone was smooth and sweet. Watch by the major 3rd. Remember. capable of hollowbody jazz tones with the tone knob rolled off and clean funky rhythm guitar that’s not too biting or trebly. Then an old friend sold me a Sea Foam Green 1961 Fender Strat for $500. The vibrato bridge is still one of the most musical around. Here are some of the tones I look for: Neck Pickup. don’t sell it! But I insure it for considerably more these days. as it’s easy to rush when you switch from linear to You could also see this set of notes as being a D7/11 arpeggio. because I never want the sound to ‘mush out’ below C# on the 4th fret of the fifth string. And with the addition of the five-way pickup selector in the early-70s. The section Pentatonic’ scale (aka the ‘Indian Pentatonic’). Neck-Middle Split. Bridge Pickup. A good lightweight Strat is hard to beat for versatility. the timing. blending with the cellos and basses but cutting through the violins. This also makes for some gorgeous. then DESCENDING DOMINANT PENTATONIC LICKon similar phrases of your own. A strong neck pickup should have the most ‘sonic girth’ of the entire guitar. And the tonal spectrum is much broader than its little brother the Telecaster. plus a few other guitars. Rock guitarists and country players have used it so much over the years that it’s almost become cliché. even at 60 years old. Similar ideas to this can be or D Mixolydian with the 2nd and omitted. It’s the warmest place on the Strat. a classic guitar sound everyone should own. The middle was a go-to pickup for funk players. After hefting a Strat and making sure it’s not a heavy log. way before the word ‘vintage’ became associated with electric guitars. beautiful to hear and behold. you don’t get that extreme ‘ice-pick to the ears’ tone that can spike you pretty hard.com for more about Carl and his music. elegant and. I’ve used the middle-bridge split with massive distortion. I still own that instrument due to my policy: if it sounds good. This can best be described as the classic Stratocaster ‘cluck’ tone.” The sound I have in my mind is Stevie Ray Vaughan’s thick solo sound with a full bottom end. back in ’54. Even though I use many instruments on my records. I have a confession: I own 14 Strats. back in his day the five-way switch hadn’t been invented as a retrofit for the Strat.off the record Each month. lick starts off with a 10-note sequence played in 16ths. the notes are D F# G A C. session ace and Supertramp guitarist Carl Verheyen offers well-chosen word of wisdom on life as a guitarist. I’m not sure how it happened. I bring two or three Strats. It gets a little more complicated when I add a saturated distortion pedal into the mix. The GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 6th intervalsONE MINUTE LICK . This repeating ©»¡£™ £ œ œ™ œ¡ £œ œ œ œ¡ œ £œ ¡œ œ£ ¡ ™ ¡ œ£ œ œ ¡ ™ ¡ ™ ™ ~~~~~~~ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ¡ ™ œ ™ œ¡ ™ ™œ ™ ¡œ ™ ¡ ™ # 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ ¡ œ œ Ó ™ œ ™œ ™ œ œ œ ˙ & 4 ˙ D7 ¡ E B G D A E 14 10 1 13 10 14 15 14 10 13 10 13 10 12 10 13 15 13 10 12 10 1211 12 11 12 11 12 12 12 12 12 10 12 12 12 10 12 10 9 ~~~~~~~ ™ 10 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 11 .

Mitch Dalton’s

You may recall our hero had been booked
to play a solo piece and also accompany
the leading ladies in a ‘folk’ episode of
Midsomer Murders. Here, the tension
mounts, certain mysteries are solved,
and Mitch gets a free lunch…

EMILE HOLBA

Scene 2. May 31st. Woodstock
Recording Studios, Shepherd’s
Bush. 10.30am
I’m booked for four hours. I arrive
and am greeted by a welcoming
committee comprising Jim
(producer), Renny (director), the
studio engineer, a TV production
co-ordinator, a photographer and
a ‘behind the scenes’ camera man.
I’m offered a coffee. It never
arrives. Relaxed and confident, I
prepare to record – something.
Ah! It’s going to be The
Midsomer Ballad (written by folk
legend Seth Lakeman). And there
is Seth. Joy of joys! As far as I’m
concerned, he is International
Rescue made flesh. He plays me
the song. On a bouzouki. The
‘strange sounding guitar’ demo
mystery is solved (remember I
couldn’t work out how he’d played
it?). He tells me he tunes his guitar
to DADGAD with a capo at the
10th fret to replicate the sound.
Obvious! I learn the tune and the
tuning. Very fast. Lucie arrives
(actress Lucie will be miming to
my guitar playing). We record the
song to click, having routined the
arrangement for about 10
minutes. A couple of changes,
then a clean take with me listening
on cans to Lucie’s pre-recorded
voice and the click. Done!
“Great! See you on location.
We’ll record Rakie’s songs and
your rag on stage on Tuesday
(Rakie is the other actress for
whom I’ll be providing backing;

12 GuitarTechniques September 2014

the ‘rag’ is the tune I ‘composed’
on the spot last time). You’ll be
required on Friday, too, when we
shoot Lucie’s scene. We’ll need
you to act as a consultant to ensure
that she mimes to your playing in
a suitably authentic fashion.”
At 12.30, I’m back in the car.
It’s taken two hours and I don’t
have a parking ticket. Result! Two
minutes later, I can remember
nothing of what has just occurred.
Or what needs to happen next…

longer separate fact from fiction,
and the day takes on a dream-like
quality. I lurch through the second
tune, enact some business
relevant to the plot and somehow
re-invent Mitch’s Midsomer Rag
to the required minute-and-a-half
length. We film it. A lot. The
audience love it. Every time. Why
wouldn’t they? They’ve been paid
to be there. “That’s a wrap!”
booms out from somewhere near
fake Lower Crosby Village Hall.

Scene 3. June 3rd. Exterior:
Sydenham, Oxon. 10.00am

No such thing as a free lunch

I arrive at a picturesque village
that has been transformed into
‘Lower Crosby’, the fictitious
setting for the ‘10th Annual Folk
Festival’, complete with bunting,
posters, a private house converted
into a pub, a crowd of extras and a
tiny stage on the village green. It’s
cold. I rapidly lose all feeling in my
hands. We go straight into it. Jim,
Rakie and I run through her song
in about a minute and a half. Rakie
(looking like a million dollars)
sings and I (looking like the
ultimate Shabby Failed Folkie)
play her guitar part. Then she
lip-syncs to a playback of her vocal
while she mimes to my/her part
on her cheap prop-style guitar.
Considering she can’t play, it looks
pretty good. Renny doesn’t hang
about. Mime is money.
At this point I lose the ability to
comprehend simple instructions,
let alone execute them. I can no

A black BMW limo appears and
transports me to lunch. Location
catering. Very acceptable. I like
this and the fact that I’ve finished
for the day. Except that I haven’t.
“You’re in shot during the next
scene”, explains Renny. “Barnaby
interviews Rakie and you can be
seen playing your rag.”
And so the merry day wears on,
punctuated by cries of “Cut!” as a
succession of tractors, RAF jets
and geese ruin 50 per cent of the
scenes. The countryside is louder
than Jeff Beck. Trust me.
Next time: the final scene. But
things don’t start well as I arrive
at… the wrong village.
Mitch’s credits include Herbie
Hancock and Melody Gardot,
Robbie Williams, Monty Python and
Van Morrison; James Bond movies,
TV shows and commercials. Meet
Mitch Dalton & The Studio Kings is
out on Regius Records.

RGT Guitar Tutors
Conference
The 2014 Registry Of Guitar
Tutors’ Annual Conference,
sponsored by Fender, will be
held on 21 September at the
University Of West London. The
conference will have an acoustic
theme, with trade stands and a
range of seminars covering
technique and education topics.
The programme is suitable for
both experienced guitar
teachers and those interested in
starting to teach. Attendance is
by advanced booking only. The
cost for the entire event is £47 (or
£39 for RGT members). Bookings
can be made via www.rgt.org or
call the RGT on 01424 222222.

Play Guitar Now!
– Lead Soloing
The latest title in Guitar
Techniques’ popular series of
Play Guitar Now! book and DVD
titles, Guitar Soloing, is out now.
Aimed at improving beginners
and lower intermediate
guitarists, top tutor Milton
Mermikides shows you all the
techniques you need to get on
quickly as a lead player. He also
shows you licks in the styles of
Clapton, Hendrix, Gilmour Slash
and many others – with full video
lessons and tab in the magazine.
Play Guitar Now ‘Guitar Soloing’
is £6.99, and available from
www.myfavouritemagazines.
com and good newsagents.

.
.
.
ith
w
s
d
n
co
e
S
60

A minute’s enough to find out what makes a great guitarist tick. Before his
limo left for the airport, we grabbed 60 seconds with... Paul Gilbert
GT: Who was your first influence
to play the guitar?
PG: It was The Beatles, The
Partridge Family, The Osmond
Brothers, and my uncle Jim.
I heard Led Zeppelin and Jimi
Hendrix soon after.

PG: When I saw Eddie Van Halen in
1979… I don’t think I’ve ever been
as inspired.
GT: Is there a solo you really
wish you had played?
PG: Actually I have more envy for
singers than guitarists – the guys
that can hit those high notes. If I
could go to a music store and buy
a vintage McCartney, Mercury,
Zander, or Dio… But guitar solos?
I probably would have messed
them up with widdly-widdly. I’m
glad Neal Schon is Neal Schon.
Nobody could have written and
played those melodies better.

GT: What was the first guitar
you really lusted after?
PG: Whatever was in the Sears
‘Wishbook’ catalogue in 1973.
Knobs, switches, and pointy
cutaways were important. And
then I saw Jimmy Page in The
Song Remains The Same, and I
wanted a Les Paul.
GT: What was the best gig you
ever did?
PG: It was at clinic years ago, in a
city in the middle of Taiwan.
I just played everything right.
Not a single clam… lots of
inspired bending… and merciless
tear-your-face-off shred. I rocked
those 229 people!
GT: And your worst playing
nightmare?
PG: Every time that I play my
hometown in Pennsylvania,
something goes wrong with my
gear. It’s my fault. I imagine that
all the people that I knew in high
school must be in the audience,
and I want to impress them, so I
stomp on my pedalboard so hard
that it pulls out the power cable.
GT: What’s the most important
musical lesson you ever learnt?
PG: When I was 11, my uncle
heard me play, and he said, “You
should put your hand on the
bridge, so all the strings don’t ring
out.” He also said something
about practising all the time. And
he told me to that I had to buy an
album called War Heroes, by Jimi
Hendrix. Those three certainly got
me headed in the right direction.
GT: Do you still practise?
PG: I don’t run scales up and down
with a metronome. I think I’d quit
guitar if I had to listen to that
again. But I love to practise new
sounds that I find. The fretboard is

GT: What’s the solo or song
of your own of which you’re
most proud?
PG: I like Green-Tinted Sixties
Mind. It’s got a good intro, and the
audience always responds well
when I play it. In general, I don’t
pay much attention to my own
music after I’ve played it. It’s like a
meal that I’ve already eaten. It’s
like, “On to the next! Where’s the
menu? I’m hungry!”

Paul Gilbert:
inspired bending
and tear-yourface-off shred!

GT: What would you most like to
be remembered for?
PG: I played drums with Cheap
Trick! What else could I ask for?

still full of unsolved mysteries. I love
to play and to listen, preferably
both at the same time.
GT: Do you have a pre-gig
warm-up routine?
PG: If it’s really cold, I’ll try to find
some way of warming up the room.
I brought a space heater on my last
European tour. I kept blowing fuses
backstage! But my challenges are
usually more mental than physical.
My set often has new songs that I
barely know, so I’m just trying to
remember the lyrics, arrangement,
and where the good notes are.
GT: If you could put together
a fantasy band with you in it,
who would the other players be
(dead or alive)?

PG: Bon Scott on vocals. Angus
and Malcolm Young on guitar. Cliff
Williams on bass. And me on drums!
I’d like to play drums with The
Beatles as well, but I’m not good
enough to handle the tricky stuff on
I Feel Fine.
GT: Who’s the greatest guitarist
that’s ever lived?

I imagine all the
people I knew in
high school must
be in the audience,
and I want to
impress them.

GT: And what are you up to at
the moment – tours, gigs,
albums, new gear etc?
PG: I just finished a solo album
called Stone Pushing Uphill Man. I
think it’s good… too many notes,
probably, but many of them are
bent, so it’s all right. I also just
finished a new Mr. Big album. It’s
good too! It has just the right
amount of notes, since there is a
producer involved. I’ll be touring
with Mr. Big later this year. I have
an online guitar school with a
company called Artistworks, so
I’m teaching there daily. And new
gear? Yes, my 25th Anniversary
signature guitar is out from
Ibanez. It’s a maple flame Fireman.
I love that guitar like a ripe
nectarine in season.
More from www.paulgilbert.com

September 2014 GuitarTechniques 13

That Was
The Year...

1975

Margaret, Rembrandt
& Gabriel
FENDER DISCONTINUES ITS JAGUAR GUITAR!
Introduced in 1962, the Fender Jaguar is finally
dropped from the production schedule in its
unlucky 13th year, due to disappointing sales
compared to the cheaper Stratocasters and
Telecasters. With its twin single-coil pickups
and offset body shape (as first used on the
Jazzmaster) it’s a sad loss, tempered by its
inevitable rise thanks to a new wave of players.
HANDSHAKES ALL ROUND as an American
Apollo spacecraft docks with a Soviet Soyuz
spacecraft in orbit for the first time; NASA launches Viking 1 as
part of its Mars Mission; Rembrandt’s The Night Watch painting is
slashed while on show in Amsterdam; and the Space Mountain
attraction opens at Walt Disney World in Florida.
GUILD INTRODUCES THE D-40C Bluegrass Jubilee Cutaway
adding a sharp Florentine cutaway to allow easy access to the
upper frets on this popular model. This dreadnought sports a
solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, bound body and a
solid one-piece Honduras mahogany neck. It has a rosewood
fingerboard and the natural-finish body is bestowed with a
tortoiseshell pickguard.
NEW MUSICAL RECRUITS include Jack White, KT Tunstall,
Michael Bublé, Enrique Iglesias, Natalie Imbruglia, Jack Johnson,
Tom Delonge and Spice Girl Mel B. Demobilised are T-Bone
Walker, Tim Buckley and Pete Ham of Badfinger. Ronnie Wood
joins The Rolling Stones; bassist Steve Harris
forms Iron Maiden; Led Zeppelin sell out
three concerts at Madison Square Garden,
New York in four hours; Ritchie Blackmore
leaves Deep Purple and forms Rainbow;
Peter Gabriel leaves Genesis and drummer
Phil Collins takes on lead vocals.
MICROSOFT IS FOUNDED by Bill Gates
and Paul Allen; Japanese mountain
climber Junko Tabei is the first woman
to reach the summit of Mount Everest;
oceanic explorer Jacques Cousteau finds
the wreck of HMHS Britannic which sank
in 1916; and both VHS and Betamax systems compete to
become the accepted video-recorder standard.
FOLLOWING A REFERENDUM the UK votes to stay in the
European Community; the Group of six industrialised nations
is formed under the heading of G6; in Scotland, the first
petroleum pipeline connecting Grangemouth and Cruden
Bay is opened for business; the price of petrol increases by
nearly 70 per cent during the year as inflation spirals;
Margaret Thatcher is the new Prime Minister; and the war in
Vietnam finally comes to an end.
A SMALL RUN OF STARCASTER guitars and
even the odd bass slips out of the Fender
factory. It’s the Big F’s answer to Gibson’s ES-335
with a bound semi-hollow asymmetrical
double-cut maple body, arched top and
f-holes attached to a bolt-on maple neck
with a new headstock shape and a maple
fingerboard. The electronics are OTT, with
two volume and two tone controls plus a
master volume and three-way selector, all
for the twin humbucking pickups.

14 GuitarTechniques September 2014

Join the record
breakers at
Lyme Regis in
September

Guitars On The Beach 2
6 September sees the return of the
Guitars On The Beach world-record
bid in Lyme Regis, a repeat of the
2013 event which saw 2,267
guitarists of all stripes gather
together on the town’s beach to play
Buddy Holly’s Rave On, setting a
record as Britain’s Biggest Band in
the process. This year, there will be
a repeat performance of Rave On,
and special guest Ian Gillen will
lead the assembled six-stringers in
a mass rendition of Smoke On The

Water. Status Quo’s Rocking All
Over The World completes the set.
The organisers of the Fendersponsored event hope to surpass
the world record for the greatest
number of guitarists playing one
song together – a record held since
2009 by a Polish event, which
amassed 6,546 players. The Lyme
Regis event will also have 20 live
bands on the beach – to take part,
see www.guitarsonthebeach.co.uk,
where you can sign up for free.

Jimmy’s Pages

dates, which are sprinkled
throughout the book alongside
other memorabilia, including visas,
tour schedules and more. “I wanted
to make it as thorough as possible,”
Page says of the book, which has
been two years in the making. “So
that meant trawling through all the
thousands of files that
photographers had
taken, and pulling from
my personal collection as
well. There’s a photo of
me playing the guitar by
the fire at Bron-Yr-Aur
cottage. It’s the most
complete document that
there’s ever going to be, because of
the amount of time that I’ve put into
every aspect.” Jimmy Page will be
available from bookstores from
October; see www.jimmypagebook.
com for more info.

Jimmy Page has announced the
October release of an eponymous
autobiography, through Genesis
Publications. The 512-page book is
a photographic essay featuring 650
photos handpicked by Page from
magazines, photographers
including Ross Halfin,
Kate Simon, Gered
Mankowitz, Dominique
Tarlé, Pennie Smith, Jim
Marshall, and from Page’s
own archives. Each one is
captioned by Jimmy, who
oversaw the structure and
design of the book.
Page has also added unseen
photographs, memorabilia and
reproductions of every one of his
passports. Jimmy’s passport
stamps were used to verify all tour

HOT FOR TEACHER your RGT TUTOR
Who? John Bruce Town: Hayle, Cornwall
Styles Taught: Rock, pop and acoustic
Speciality: Everything! Levels: Beginner to
advanced, RGT electric, acoustic and rock up
to Grade 8 Sight-reading: Beginner to
advanced Charges: £75 for five half-hour
lessons Special: Fully-equipped music school
(Cornwall Music Academy) where we teach all
instruments and specialise in the RGT Grades
with a 100% pass rate Tel: 01736 752247
Email: info@cornwallmusicacademy.co.uk

.

C. such as playing in a different key. so the progression looks like this: A7 | D7 | A7 | A7| D7 | D7 | A7 |A7 | E7 | D7 | A7 | E7 We can also refer to each of the three chords in the blues as a Roman numeral. His technique and approach is unusual. Try this for yourself and you can see how challenging it is to get the vibrato consistent. so you can change your pickup and effects settings. Many thanks to Pete Riley for performing and recording the drums. and to help replicate the ‘Gibson feel’.check out the live Crossroads and Spoonful from Wheels Of Fire. the results will immediately start to sound a lot more like Eric Clapton. the results do sound more authentic. he seemed to lay down the blueprint for a style of playing that influenced guitarists from Mick Ronson to Van Halen.Play: ROCK ON THE CD TRACKs 4-7 Cream of Eric Clapton Jon Bishop looks at the soloing style of blues-rock virtuoso Eric Clapton. so you can incorporate these now-classic ideas into your everyday lick bag. and the chord progression is a 12-bar Dominant blues. though. This lesson is designed to unlock many of those ‘early Eric’ soloing secrets. This switching between the two Pentatonic scales helps the lead phrases to fit in with the underlying chords. and often includes large bends in his solos. and as sonically perfect as a guitar tone could be. You’ll notice from the examples that Clapton is a master of mixing the Major and the Minor Pentatonic scales in just the right places to fit the chords. Each example is separated by a two-bar drum fill. Many. including the thumb. D. Cream-style blues-rock jam. and they also add a bluesy flavour. and adds an extra level of sophistication to the sound. technically impressive. The Les Paul. So it’s this era we’ll be looking at here. and from Marc Bolan to Eric Johnson. say his two-year stint with Cream cemented a playing style with superb Technique Focus Finger vibrato and bending Eric Clapton’s finger vibrato and string-bending technique was very much at the heart of his late60s style. E. it’s well worth persevering. C#. string bending and vibrato that was fluid. but Cream’s four original albums are psychedelic gems packed with virtuosity and experimentation from all three players . one of the most influential and best-loved guitar players of his generation. The A Minor Pentatonic works nicely over the D7 and E7 chords. creative. Eric moved over to playing Fender Stratocasters in the 1970s. We’re using the quick-change 12-bar format. is removed from the neck and waves in the air. However. but Eric often plays A Major Pentatonic (A. The second track puts these ideas into context in an all-out. Eric is also a masterful string bender. A7 is the I chord. The only effects used were a Fulltone Clyde wah-wah for Examples 1 and 8. The audio examples in this feature were recorded with a 1995 Gibson SG. You can play a quite acceptable solo using just A Minor Pentatonic (A. E. G). SG. ES-335 and even the Firebird were used live and in the studio. from Brian May to Gary Moore. have fun. These quarter-tone bends help the notes to fit. All of the pickup selections and effects are notated alongside the relevant examples. This system allows us to label the ideas that fit each of the three chords and then easily transfer them to other situations. try playing your own EC-style solo using some of the techniques and concepts showcased. Get The Tone 7 7 8 8 4 Gain Bass Middle Treble Reverb Clapton’s Cream recordings feature him using a variety of Gibson guitars. so there will be plenty of scope to try out a variety of new ideas. After you’ve played through the examples. but the ideas can of course be played on any type of guitar. As ever. so if it’s the EC sound you’re after. If you combine these finger vibrato and bending styles with shape one of the Minor Pentatonic. The 3rd of A7 (C#) is particularly descriptive. And so that you can try out your new EC-flavoured soloing ideas. The first track features 10 examples that isolate a specific element of Eric Clapton’s finger vibrato and stringbending technique was very much at the heart of his late-60s style. his signature-model Stratocaster features a built in mid-boost circuit. B. 16 GuitarTechniques September 2014 TONY GALE / PICTORIAL PRESS / ALAMY ABILITY RATING . plugged into a Marshall 6100 Anniversary amplifier. Both tracks are in A. He frequently bends all the minor 3rds in the scale slightly sharp. TRACK RECORD They only had just over two years together. Then listen to 2005’s reunion to see how Clapton’s style has evolved. Moderate Info Will improve your Key: A Tempo: 135bpm CD: TRACKS 4-7 Lead feel and phrasing Articulation & finger vibrato Stylistic awareness Eric clapton’s bluesbreakers debut is one of the most significant milestones in popular music. Clapton hints at this by bending the C in Am Pentatonic slightly sharp in a blues ‘curl’. and Sitting On Top Of The World from Goodbye to hear this in action. and a blocked off vibrato unit. as when applying finger vibrato the only part of the fretting hand in touch with the guitar is the finger that is fretting the note. We’ll identify many of Eric’s key techniques and soloing innovations from that time. and see you next time. Sometimes. F#) over the A7 (I chord). The rest of the fretting hand. On this one album. we have two backing tracks complete with tabbed-out solos. D7 the IV and E7 is the V chord. the Clapton style. and describes the tonality of the A7 chord well.

ERIC CLAPTON STYLE Eric Clapton playing one of several Les Pauls in early Cream September 2014 GuitarTechniques 17 .

∑ Ó BU ~~~~ ~~n ¿ BU Ex & 2 Big Bends 22 10 8 10 Bend Drum Break 10 A 7 (12) 77 99 77 flat 55 77 55 99 77 Bend 55 77 55 (12) goes Neck Pick Up with Overdrive goes flat √ 10 99 D8 7~~ 77 55 ~~ j œ77 n œ55 7œ7 7˙7~~~ n œ ˙ ~~~ XX BU . Used White Room. the wah-wah is a potent tool that adds another sonic dimension. œ œ nœ œ œ ERIC CLAPTON 4 # ∑ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ ˙ 4 Wah Wah Pedal nœ nœ œ ¿ Ex 1&Adding The J Drum Bridge Pickup withIntro overdrive and reverb ©»¡£∞ ƒ A7 A7 ~~ D 7 j 2 ~~ jBU ~~ œ œ # n œ 2 # œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ nœ . and then in the rhythm that the notes are played. and he often AA launches into this type of idea during a solo. Experiment with rocking it in pedal. .Play: ROCK ON THE CD TRACKs 4-7 CD TRACK 4 EXAMPLE 1 Adding the wah-wah pedal This first example combines some classic EC vocabulary with the wah-wah is to use the wah like an expression pedal. The trick here is to repeat a EE B 7 7 of three notes over and over using a semiquaver subdivision group 8 (16th 5 G D Ex 3 Using Repeating Phrases A Ex 3 Using Repeating Phrases Drum Break E 13 Bridge BridgeP/Up P/Upwith withOverdrive Overdriveand andWah WahWah Wah & E B G D A E ### E7 19 19 17 17 19 1919 19 ((24 24)) 7 7 7 EE77 2 2 n œ # # n œ # ## # œ5œ œ7œ œ8œ œ5œ œ7œ œ8œ 8 ∑ ∑ && D 7 A7 ~~~ nœ œ nœ j DrumBreak Break Drum ### œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & 22 88 55 88 55 88 77A 7 77 D7 ~~~ n œ # # # œ5 œ n œ8 œ5 œ œ8 œ5 œ œ8 œ5 œ œ8 œ5 œ œ8 10œ ~~~ œ 8 10œ n œ8 œj & 7 7 7 7 7 13 9 ' 14 EE BB GG DD AA EE 16 B 16 77 99 14 G WomanTone Tone D ExEx4 4 Woman Drum Break A September 2014 E 19 Neck P/Up with Overdrive and 18 GuitarTechniques AA77 Toneon on11 Neck P/Up with Overdrive and Tone E '' # 15 œ œœnnœœ œ jœj œœ œBU DD77 ' œœ œœnn˙˙ / '' 12 14 1/14/4 AA77 14 12 n œ œjj œœ œœ œ ' n œ' E777 œ . 14 12 77 10 12 ~~ ~~ j œ œ œ 77 w ~~~~ 14 16 jj 77 14 14 œ w ~~~~ ~~~~ . n œ in size. GUITAR TECHNIQUES 3 4 on Bad Love. The#really ƒ big bend happens in bar five. œ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ ˙ 8 55 88 55 88 5 7 ~~~ œ nnœœ œ ~~~ œ œ # n œ œ œ œ œ # n œ œ œ œ œ # # # # œœ œœ œœ œœ œ5œ œœ 8 œ5œ œœ 8 œ5œ œœ 8 10 œ 8 10œ nnœ8œ œœjj œœ. and EC is no~~ fretter! This five-fret bend is helped by the reduced tension the third j to œ n œof7warm Drum Intro .. The ERIC Ex 1 Adding The Wah Wah Pedal ©»¡£∞ A7 D7 A7 ~~ 2 j j œ œ ~~ # n œ GUITAR #TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3œ4 œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ nœ . Be sure to œ up # n œ n œ # œ J œ œ œ ƒ . nœ ˙ . trickCLAPTON here sparingly. so a three-note phrase displaced and resolves every three beats. nœ œ œ 7 5 5 9 14 7 14 AA77 E Ex 4 Woman Tone B 5 8 5 8 G 7 7 A7 D A Neck P/Up with Overdrive and Tone E 16 7 œ5œ œ7 œ8 œ5 œ7 œ8 œ5 œ7 œ8 E7 / ' ~~~ . 15 17 17 (20J ) & n ¿X (24) 19 17 19 19 17 Ex 2 Big Bends 19 19 Bridge Pickup with overdrive and reverb E B G D A E E B G D A E 9 9 9 99 99 1 1 EE BB GG DD AA EE B 11 G D Ex 2 A E 7 17 19 Big Bends Drum Break √√ # ## ## #Repeating Phrases . time with the pulse. The wah-wah effect is featured in tracks like Tales Of Brave Ulysses. œ œ nœ œ œ 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3œ4 # ERIC CLAPTON 10 8 10 ∑ ‰ ‰ ‰ GUITAR MAGAZINE 2 3 4 œ nœ œ ˙ ¿ ERIC CLAPTON & TECHNIQUES 4 Wah Wah (12) 7 9 9 7 9 7 5 7 5 J5 7 5 œ7 n œ5 ExEx1 1 Adding Pedal X 7 5 7 AddingThe The Wah Wah Pedal Drum Intro 7 Bridge Pickup with overdrive and reverb Bridge Pickup with overdrive and reverb ©»¡£∞ AA77 AA77 ©»¡£∞ ƒ 2 BU ~~ ~~ ~~~~ DD77 jj jj n œ . 7 7 D7 7 7 / A7 && j œ on 1 œ œ œ j œ nœ œ n˙ n œ œ œ œ œ œ ### œ J œ ∑ Ó ‰J ‰ ~~~ ‰ 88 & ~~~ Ex 4 Woman Tone 5 8 5 8 5 10 10 5Drum 88 55 88 55 88 10 10 88 Break A87 5 D87 5 / A7 77 77 77 77 77 j œ77 Neck P/Up with Overdrive and Tone on 1 œ œBU œ n ˙ / j n œ œ œ ### œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ J œ J (17 ) 15 13 15 13 ∑ Ó ‰ ‰ ‰ & 14 14 12 14 12 DD 77 16 X nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ EE BB GG DD AA EE B 1313 G D A E 19 19 17 19 19 is notes). You can repeat these type of ideas as long as5 you dare –8in Cream. n15nœœ 17œœ Ex 3 Using && Bridge P/Up with∑∑Overdrive andÓÓWah Wah 2 DrumBreak Break # # # Drum ∑ & E B G D A E 9 Neck NeckPick PickUp Upwith withOverdrive Overdrive 7 Ex E E3 Using Repeating Phrases 15 15 17 17 Bend goes flat jnnœœ ˙˙ . œ/ ~~~ / ' E 77 E 1/411//44 ' 1144 55 55 ~~ œ . The first bend in this example is a tone-and-a-half (three and the fact it is played so high upjthe˙neck.stranger ~~~~ Drum Intro œ œ œ n œfrets)˙ string. and2later. w ˙~~~ using them. Presence Of MAGAZINE The Lord. ~~~~ BU œ œ œ w j n œ ˙ n œ ### 17 œœ œœ 2017 n œ ∑ Ó . œ n œ ˙ . There are four semiquavers per beat. Eric could 8 5 8 go5 on for ages! 8 5 8 7 ~~~ ~~~ œ œ ˙ 7 1/4 1/4 7 ' n œ' ~~~ ~~~ n œ5 œ œ5 œ7 œ ˙ 7 ~~ j œ œ 7 w ~~~~ . . and is a whopping five before attempting such heroics. œ œ ~~ 2 n œ # Ex 2 Big Bends œ œ # # n œ n œ œ œ œ œ 10 8 10 # œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ n œ œ 4 œ œ œ CD TRACK EXAMPLE 2 Big bends ∑ ‰ ‰ ‰ 7 9 9 ∑ ‰ 7 nJ5œJ 7 5œ œ7œnnœ5œ ‰ ‰A 7 (12) 9 7 5 7 5 œ7 n œ5 œ ˙7 X¿ 4 D7 &&Neck# Pick 44Up with Overdrive √ Bends of over a tone in size can sound dramatic. œjœBU œ~~ (20) 17 œ~~ JJ ~~~~ ww~~~~ ~~~~ Bend goes flat BU œ n œ œ ˙~~~ ~~~ (24) 19 17 19 19 17 n ¿X 19 19 E7 Bend Bend n œ œBend goes flat œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Bend œ flatflatœ œ œ œ œ goes goes ~~~~ BUBU goesœflat ~~~~ ~~~~ BU ~~~ BU (20 17 17 (20) ) 17 17 DD77 AA77 nn2017 œœ œœ œ n œ œ œœjj ˙ 17 17 19 17 17 BB 2017 CD TRACK 4 EXAMPLE 3 Using repeating phrases Drum Break 2017 G 22 ∑ G Bridge P/Up with Overdrive and Wah Wah DD The three-note repeating phrase is a Clapton speciality.

2 technique xxxxxxxxxx is unusual. n ˙ Drum Break A7 D7 A7 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 19 Bridge Pick Up with Overdrive /' // œ œj ˙~~ n œ œ . œ n œ # œ n œ œ n ˙ ∑ ‰ ‰ Œ œ œ nœ œ œ & Ex 7 Linking Pentatonic Boxes . Eric’s finger-vibrato the note. but every guitar is a little different. This reduces the overall friction and with some practice.A7 E7 ~~~ / n œ ' ~~~ œ n œ œj œ . You may 7 well find the best results come from a neck pickup selection with the tone control right down low. ∑ Drum Break ~~ œ œ œ œœ œœœ D7 ¿ j œ nœ / ~~ ' œ~~ œ œ n œœ œœ œœ œœ œ n œ n œ ‰ œ œ œ. the only part of the fretting hand in touch with the guitar when the vibrato is added is the finger that is fretting Ex 5 Adding Finger Vibrato Bridge Pick Up with Overdrive ### ∑ Ó. 12 12 ‰ E7 14 ~~~ 34 Ex E 7 B G D A E power trio like Cream. 15 (17 ) 15 14 13 œ œ w ~~~~ j œ ~~~~ ~~ 1/4 BU E B G D A E 9 CD TRACK 4 12 14 12 12 14 12 14 12 10 12 14 16 14 14 19 CD TRACK 4 EXAMPLE 5 Adding finger vibrato As mentioned in the Technique Focus section. & Ex 5 Adding Finger Vibrato 2 xxxxxxxxxx Drum Break Bridge Pick Up with Overdrive E B G D A E & ### Ó. ‰ œ œ œœœ A7 14 A7 j ~~ / ~~ ~~ ~~~~ ~~ œ BUn œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 10 œ 10 œ 10 X¿ (13) 10 12 œ 10 œ ‰ œ œ n œœ8 œœ8 œœ8 œœ8 œ n œ n œ'/ 'œ œ œ . j œBUœ œœ 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 12 12 14 12 12 12 12E 7 12 14 œ œ œ œœ j œ 14 12 16 (18 ) œ œ 16 BU Linking Pentatonic Boxes ˙~~~ ¿ . A7 œœ œ œ œ . As explained. is removed. Experiment with the controls on7your guitar. and the rest of the fretting hand. œ /' 2 j œ /' # œ n œ ## œ œ . A7 j nœ œ ‰œ œ ' ~~ œ œ œ œ œ. on 1 or 0. ‰ 14 14 14 16 j ˙~~ n œ œ . ### œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ n œ œ œ ERICœ CLAPTON & STYLE ˙ D7 14 ~~~ E B 5 8 5 8 5 8 5 8 5 8 10 G 7 7 7 7 7 D The ‘Woman Tone’ in this example refers to the sound of a Gibson guitar A E with the tone control turned down low. including the thumb. ˙~~~ ¿ . can provide a fluid and expressive finger vibrato. and works particularly well for filling out the sound in a 25 ' ~~ BU ~~ 1/4 X 12 (13 ) 10 12 10 8 8 8 8 CD TRACK 4 EXAMPLE 6 Using double-stops 11 7 9 9 9 9 9 7 5 7 7 & Ex 6 E B G D A E E B G D A E 2 ∑ ### Using Double Stops # # & # 2 ∑ Drum Break E7 œ œ n12œ 12œœ œœ 12œœ œ œ 12œ 12œœ œœ 12œœ œ œ 12œ 12œ 12 14 2 # # # œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ D7 & 12 14 12 # # # œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 & 14 16 14 14 14 16 14 14 16 D7 E B G D A E 12 12 12 12 A12 7 12 12 12 14 12 œœ œ œ œ . nœ ˙ . œ n œ j 2 # E A7 14 14 14 14 14 Bridge Pick 14 Up 16 with Overdrive 14 14 14 16 14 D7 14 16 14 14 16 14 14 14 A7 16 (18 ) 14 34 14 4 16 14 14 114 4 . The trick here is to dig in with the pick and give it Drum Break Bridge Pick Up with Overdrive 31 31 œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œœplentyœœ of feeling. This reduction of the 16 tone control accentuates the middle frequencies and provides a musically ' ~~~ 1/4 8 10 8 EXAMPLE 4 Woman Tone Ex 4 ' Woman Tone œ œ œ n˙ œ nœ œ Ó ‰J ‰ J A7 Neck P/Up with Overdrive and Tone on 1 & ### ∑ Drum Break D7 j œ 14 13 15 1/4 7 5 5 7 interesting lead tone. ‰ 11 11 11 7 9 9 9 9 9 7 5 9 11 7 7 D7 1 14 4 12 ~~ 25 E Ex 6 Using Double Stops B 10 10 10 G 11 11 9 11 D E7 Bridge Pick Up with Overdrive A Using double-stops (playing two notes together) is a classic rock ’n’ roll E soloing concept.

Eric using a Les Paul he borrowed then bought from Andy Summers 20 GuitarTechniques September 2014 ON THE CD TRACKs 4-7 MICHAEL PUTLAND / RETNA / PHOTOSHOT Play: ROCK .

but sounds impressive. ' ### ' œ œ 5 10 10 8 n œ # œ n œ œ n ˙ ∑ ‰ 5 6 ‰ œ nœ œ ' 7 5 œ 5 & 7 5 7 œ n ˙3 . so it is worth having a few ‘turnaround licks’ up your sleeve. œ n œ œj . EC’s 1 style was heavily influenced by blues guitarists like Freddie A7 E 7 /4King. The turnaround can be a bit trickyjto navigate 2 n œ œ n œœ œœ œœ œœ ∑ Ex 9&Turnaround Phrases Break Bridge Pick UpDrum with Overdrive E7 2 œ n œœ œœ œœ œœ n œ ### 2∑ 8 8 8 8 & 8 10 10 10 10 8 ### E B G D A E Drum Break 49 E B G D A Ex 10 E 49 2 Ending Phrases 2 # # # Ex 10 Ending Phrases ∑ & Bridge Pick Up with Overdrive œœ œ œ nœ 8 8 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 10 8 8 effectively. especially when played high up the1 j j /4 fretboard œ – check out Eric doing itn œin Crossroads. Drum Break A7 D7 A7 Bridge Pick Up with Overdrive / 2 // œ5 œj ˙~~ n œ8 œ . it sounds huge! j œ œ œ œ œ BU j œ œ œ œ œ œBU 17 17 17 17 17 œ 17 17 17 17 ' 1/4 8 9 7 5 5 EXAMPLE 8 Fast unison bends 7 5 7 ### Œ 9 G 5D 7 6 D A Bridge P/Up withupOverdrive Wah Wah a note and then&playing a note of the same pitch on an adjacent E Bending 37 string sounds great and helps to beef up the sound. j œBUœ œœ 12 14 12 12E 7 12 14 ˙~~~ ¿ . and many of his turnaround ideas stemmed from adapting Freddie’s approach. ' / ### ' œ œ n œ # œ n œ œ n ˙ ∑ ‰ ‰ œ œ & n œ Ex 7 Linking Pentatonic Boxes œ œ n˙ . œ œ E7 ‰ 14 14 14 16 (18 ) 16 14 CD TRACK 4 EXAMPLE 7 Linking pentatonic scale boxes Ex E 7 B G D A E 14 14 14 16 positions on the neck. Drum Break 7 5 A7 14 14 14 14 14 Bridge Pick 14 Up 16 with Overdrive 14 14 14 16 14 34 j œ D7 14 16 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 14 16 A7 16 (18 ) 14 16 14 14 14 144 E B G D A E 9 37 E Ex B 8 2 Fast Unison Bends 5 5 114 4 ~~ 9 10 ' 2 ∑ Ex 8&Fast Unison Bends j nœ ‰ √D 7 Drum Break 2 ∑ ### Bridge P/Up with Overdrive & Wah Wah E B G D A E 10 8 & Drum Break 43 2 E B G D3 A E 43 3 E B G D A E E B G D A E ‰ (√) A 7 / # # ' & # nœ (√) A 7 / # # # n œ /' ' & 14 20 (22) œ 19 ' 1/4 47 J 20 (22) BU œ 14 14 œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ J jBU nœ œ 1/4 19 ~~ œ œ ~~ ~~ œ œ 19 ~~ 5 3 jœ œ œ œ œ / /' œ œ œ œ n œBU ' 17 17 17 17 œ œ œ œ (22) 20 17 17 n œ 19 17 20 (22) 17 17 17 17 20 (22) 1144 20 BU 17 17 17 17 17 20 (22) 20 (22) 17 17 17 17 BU 20 ( 22) 17 17 17 17 20 17 19 œ œ œ œ j œ œ œ œ œ œ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œœ j œBUœ œ œ œ œ j œ BUœ œ œ œ œ j œBUœ œ œ œ œ œjBUœœ 19 ( 21) 17 17 17 17 19 ( 21) BU 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 19 ( 21) 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 19 ( 21) BU BU 17 17 17 19 (21) ' 1/4 j œ œ 19 ( 21) 19 œœ œ œ BU 17 17 17 17 CD TRACK 4 œ œ œ œ œœœ œ ' œ nœ 7 tricky to play. œ A7 14 7 7 BU 5 8 5 ' ~~ 7 1/4 7 (9 ) 7 5 7 7 7 ~~ 2014 GuitarTechniques 21 USeptember A5 ¿ œœ Œ Ó . 2 and 5. This idea is not overly √ Œ BU 17 17 19 (21) 17 17 17 19 ( 21) CD TRACK 4 EXAMPLE 9 Turnaround phrases Ex479 Turnaround Phrases ' ~~ œ n œ œj œ œ ~~~ œj œ œ n œ œ œj œ œ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ ˙ œ D7 A7 E7 / ' œœ j ~~~ j œ n œ œ œBU ~~ j œ œ n œ BU j jœ œ œ n œ œBU ~~ / œ œ n œ œ ~~~ œBUœ 5 œ œ ˙ n œ ' 8 5 œ œ œœ 8 8 8 5 ( 9) (9 ) 5 7 (9 ) (9 ) 7 7 5 5 7 The last few bars of a 12-bar blues are referred to as the turnaround – the point in the sequence signals its Bridge Pick Up with that Overdrive E 7end and prepares for the beginning D7 of the next time around.G D A E # # # œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ D7 & 31 12 14 12 12 A12 7 # # # œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ D7 12 12 œœ œœ œ œ œ . j œ œ 14 14 9 7 BU 9 7 5 7 5 7 ( 9) 7 BU 8 7 (9 ) 5 7 7 7 ~~~ BU 7 (9 ) / ' ~~ œ n œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ n œj œ œ œ ‰ nœ œ œ œ nœ . and this is a great help when improvising. œ 12œ œ j œ E B G 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 D 14 16 14 14 14 16 14 14 16 A This phrase links the A Minor Pentatonic shapes 1. Clapton often constructs runs this way. œ n œ œj . A7 œœ œ œ œ . Linking the E 34 Pentatonic boxes into one big scale shape aids fluid transitions between & 12 12 12 12 ‰ ERIC CLAPTON STYLE ˙~~~ ¿ . ~~~ BU Linking Pentatonic Boxes / 2 œ ˙~~ n œ œ .

~~~œ œ~~ œj n œ œ œ œ œ ~~ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # # # # # œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ~~ œ œ~~~œ œ œ~~ ¿ œjj n œ œ œ œ œ œ & ## # # # œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ~~ œœ œ~~~œ œœ œ~~ ¿ œ n œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ & # #œ œ œœ ¿ & ~~ ~~~ ~~ BU ~~ X BU(13) 10 12 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 10~~ 10~~~ 10 8 9 8 9 9 11 11 11 ~~~ ~~ X BU(13) 10 12 11 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 10~~ 10 10 8 9 8 9 9 11 11 11 11 8 7 7 CD TRACK 4 A5 ' ~~ œ ~~ j n œ U œ œ œ œ œ nœ ‰ nœ œ œ œ œ œ n œj œ œ œ œ œ . You may have to have a couple of listens to the backing track to nail the timing. There are many well-used conventions for ending a blues song. œ~~~ œœ . œ ~~ / 1/4 8 9 8 8 œ nn œœ œœ œœ œ nœ œ œ œ 14 12 8 8 14 14 12 14 E n œœ n œœ n œœ CD TRACK 6 C natural note against the A7 chord. try bending it slightly sharp (a blues ‘curl’). œœj n œJJ n œ œœ œœ nn œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ. and the ' TRACKs 4-7 BU BU 7 7 10 9 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 7 7 5 5 ~~~A 7 œnœ œ œ œ ~~~ A7 n œ œ œ~~~œ n œ œ œ œœ nn œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ~~~ 5 ~~~ 5 8 5 5 5 5 7 7 5 7 5 ~~~ 5 8 5 5 7 5 A7 5 7 5 5 7 7 7 8 5 7 5 7 5 5 7 5 7 5 ' œœ n œœ /' œ n œ nn œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ n œœ ' œ n œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ n œœ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ A7 œ œ œ 12 12 A 7 1/4 A 7 1/4 14 ' 1/4 1/4 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 . Eric uses this trick all the time. ‰‰ n œJœœ ‰ n œJ ~~~ 12J 10 12 11 / œ œœ nn œœ œjj œ n œ /'' œ œj œ œ n œ œj œ n œ /' œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ D7 14 D 7j Dœ7j BU BU (9 ) 7BU 7 (9 ) 7 (9 ) 9 9 X 12 (13) 5 5 ' n œœœ ' œœ n œœ ' œ nœ ' D7 D7 1/4 D7 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 14 14 5 5 5 BU œ n œ '' œ œ nœ 'œ œ nœ œ ' 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 12 1/4 '' ' 1/4 BU 8 ( 9) 7BU 8 7 ( 9) 8 7 ( 9) 1/4 5 1/4 7 5 5 7 7 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 œ~~ œ œœ nn œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œ n œ œ~~ ‰ ~~ œ ‰ œœ œ n œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ n œ nœ ‰ ~~ ~~ ~~ 7 9 898 898 898 898 7 5 D7 ~~ j n œ nEEœ77 ~~œj n œJ nEœ7 œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ~~ . # œ 22 GuitarTechniques September 2014 œ & . 1/4 A7 2 14 5 7 5 8 5 7 ( 9) 7 5 5 7 7 5 7 7 5 X (4 ) 7 5 3 5 55 3 5 2 2 0 EXAMPLE JAM PIECE [Chorus 1. œ œ . œ Œ Ó n œ œ œ n œ œ œ ¿ œœ rall ß BU BU / ~~ ~~ ' 5 2 ∑ Bridge Pick Up with Overdrive ### ~~ 1/4 EXAMPLE 10 Ending phrases The ending of the blues is another area that is worth spending some time on. bars 1-14] The jam starts out with a two bar drum count-in. When playing a GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 CHORUS 1 A7 CHORUS 1 Drum Intro E B E G B D E G A B D E G A D E A E E B E G B D E G A B D E G A 6 D E A 6 E 6 ©»¡£∞ # 4 Drum22Intro # #©»¡£∞ # 4 Drum2∑Intro & ## #©»¡£∞ ∑ & Bridge # # 4Pickup with ∑ & Bridge 4 overdrive and reverb Pickup with overdrive and reverb Bridge Pickup with 2 overdrive and reverb 2 2 ERIC CLAPTON JAM ERIC CLAPTON JAM ERIC CLAPTON JAM / ' A7 / œ œœ nn œœ œjj œ n œ œ œ~~~ A7 n œ ' ‰ # œ ~~~ œ œj œ œ n œ œœj œœ n œ œœ œ~~~ œ n œ /' ‰ ## œœ œ œ nœ œ œ nœ ‰ / BU BU ~~~ ' 5 BU ~~~ 5 '// 8 BU 5 (9 ) ( 9) 5 7 BU BU ~~~ 5 ' 88 8 7 5 ( ) ( ) 5 7 D7 œœ œjj œ n œ œ œ œœ œj œ n œ œ œ œœ œ œ n œ œ œ 8 9 8 9 8 9 8 9 9 7 8 9 9 7 8 9 9 7 A7 D 7j Dœ7j A7 CHORUS 1 A7 14 14 9 / # # # n œ /'' & ## # ## n œ /' œ œ & # n œ œœ œœ & 14 14 E B E G B D E G A B D E G A 10 D E A 10 E 10 '' ' 1/4 1/4 1/4 7 7 7 7 7 7 ' nœ 'œ nœ 'œ nœ œ ' 8 5 7 5 5 5 7 7 5 5 7 14 7 9 7 (9 ) 7 8 9 7 ( 9) 7 5 7 7 7 5 14 14 14 1 8 A7 D7 D7 A7 A7 9 11 10 11 10 10 11 (12 ) 9 (12 ) E7 E7 E7 9 7 9 7 ' An œœ7 2 n œœœ //' CHORUS n œœJ ' An œœœ7 œœJ n œJ n œ œJ J J 1/4 14 14 ' 1/4 12 1/4 CHORUS 2 A7 CHORUS 2 5 5 7 7 5 5 7 7 √ ~~~ √ . œ ~~ BU ~~ BU( ) 5 9 7 5 7 5 ~~ BU12 7 ~~ ### / # & ## # # œ / œ~~ ~~. œ & .& n œ œ n œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œj œ nœ 2 ∑ ### Play: ROCK2 E B G D A E ' ~~ œ n œ œj œ œ ~~~ œj œ œ n œ œ œj œ œ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ ˙ œ j œ œ Drum Break 8 8 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 10 8 8 BU 7 9 5 8 7 ( 9) 5 ~~~ BU 7 (9 ) 5 7 ON THE CD 5 8 5 7 (9 ) 7 49 Ex 10 Ending Phrases 7 (9 ) 7 5 & E B G D A E 7 one we have used here is a classic. and its Major/Minor ambiguity is what gives that ‘bluesy’ sound. The opening chorus uses a selection of classic Clapton-style phrases based around shapes 1 and 2 of the A Minor Pentatonic scale. œ~~~ n√ œ . This will help it to fit in the Major context.

~~~ Admittedly. n œ ~~~~ . BU in bar 19 are classic Clapton fare. √ œ n œœ Jœ œ~~~ . œ œ œ ¿ . J .B G E D B A G E D6 A E 6 8 9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 11 9 11 ~~ 11 10~~~ 10 10 11 11 10 11 ~~ 10 X 12 (13) BU 10 12 10 X 12 (13) 10 12 11 11 ~~ 10 10 7 7 9 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 7 5 9 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 7 5 ERIC CLAPTON STYLE D7 A7 ~~ j n œ En œ7 / / ~~~ ' œ œnœ œ œ œ œ j j n œ ### nœ ' œ œ E7 Dœ7 œ A7 n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ/ œ n œ œ œ œ œ6 J ~~ / œ œ…continued œ . 5 8 5 in really hard with the pick. reason why you BU BU ~~ / ( ) ~~~ BU ( ) ( ) / ' 7 7 12 9 7 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 ' 7 7 5 7 5 7 5 5 7 5 14 14 14 14 14 7 9 7 9 7 (12 ) ' œ n œ ' ~~ n œ ' œ ~~. J œ ' ~~~~ ' ' ' 1/4 1/4 1 5 /4 7 5 1/4 7 12 13 1/4 7 7 12 13 7 5 7 5 ' n œœ œ ' n œœ œ ' ' 7 ( 9) œ nœ 'œ œ nœ 'œ ' ' œ œ 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4 15 15 12 12 5 7 5 8 5 ' œœ n œœ /' œ n œ n œ œ œ œœ n œœ œ n œ n œ œ œ A7 1/4 5 7 5 7 5 œœœœœ œœ œœ œ 14 ' ' 1/4 12 12 13 15 13 1/4 13 15 5 7 7 A7 1/4 1 D 7 /4 13 14 14 8 D7 1/4 14 7 7 (9 ) 5 7 √ n œœ œ œ~~~ . œ. starts œ œ [Chorus œ n œupœto the ‘dusty end’ up& to shape 4 of the A Minor Pentatonic at the 12th fret.œandn œthe œsoloœmoves œ . Playing with a nice feel and good intonation can be challenging phrase in bars 17 and 18 and the~~ big bend up here. j Aœ7 n œ œ œ. The repeating fretboard. / The double-stops' in bar 23 three will sound all the more exciting if you dig Gibson SG5 offers is a great'help. j Jœ œ œ n œ œ . n œJœ ' nœ œ œ . so practise extra access that the BU BUthese /ideas slowly. bars 27-36] œ solo # barsn œ15-26]œ Theœexcitement J to build. J J ~~~ j . ¿ . j nœ nœ œ EXAMPLE & # # JAM' PIECE œ n œ œ CDœ TRACK j œ œ n œ j œ ' œ~~~œ œ œ œ œ œ n The œ œnow moves œ ofœtheœ œ [Chorus 2. j œ œ œ œ œ ¿œ & # J E B G E D B A G E D 26 A E 26 œ œ œ Dœ7 œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ' 14 D7 £ ¡ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œDœ7 œj œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ¡ œj ™œ œ n ¡œ œ£ œ¡ £ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œj ™œ œ n ¡œ œ£ œ¡ BU ( 21) 19BU 19 ( 21) BU BU BU BU 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 BU 17 17 19 ( 21) 17 17 17 17 17 17 20 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 20 17 ( 21) 19BU 19 ( 21) D7 19 ( 21) 17 17 ( 21) 19BU 19 ( 21) 17 (21) 19BU 17 19 17 17 19 (21) 17 19 17 œ œ œ œ n œDœ7 n œj œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ£ œ¡ n ™œ ¡œ £œ œ¡ ™œ ¡œ £œ œ¡ ™œ œ¡ Jœ œ œ œ n œ j £ £ ¡ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ n ™œ ¡œ £œ œ¡ ™œ ¡œ œ œ¡ ™œ œ¡ ‰ J September 2014 GuitarTechniques 23 BU ~~ (22) 22 20 17 BU 17 17 17 17 BU 17 17 17 17 17 17 20 17 17 20 17 17 20 17 17 j œ~~ n œj œ~~‰ n œ 20 . œ ~~ n œ œ n œ œ & # # nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ~~~œ . œ ¿ j # # # EJ7 œ œ œœœœ √ ¿ & # # œ ¿. w~~~~ J J J œ œ nœ w & # nœ œ œ œ œ J ¿ . ‰ n œJ J ‰ n œœJ ~~~ 12 13 14 14~~~ 12 1/4 E7 1/4 9 7 CHORUS 2 A7 CHORUS 2 1/4 A7 E7 # # & ### œ & # œ E B G E D B A G E D 14 A E 14 14 14 E B G E D B A G E D 10 A E 10 1/4 12 12 13 12 12 13 13 15 12 13 15 12 13 15 12 13 15 12 13 15 12 15 12 7 D7 A7 (√) ~~. œœ œ œ œ . œ n œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ # # # (n√œ ) œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ¿ œ œ œ œ œ . the5 Paul. 3.Dœ7j n œ œ . particularly over a Les but there’s no 8 can’t play these ideas on any guitar. ~~ BU ~~~ ~~~~ (20) 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 17 17 13 13 13 13 13 17 15 13 15 13 ~~ BU ~~~ X 14 14 12 ~~~~ (20) 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 17 17 14 12 10 X E B G E D B A G E D 18 A E 18 17 13 13 13 13 15 17 13 X 15 17 15 13 X 14 15 13 12 14 12 14 12 10 12 2 xxxxxxxxxx 2 xxxxxxxxxx E7 # # # œEœ7 n œ œœ & # # œ nœ œ œ & # œ E B G E D B A G E D 23 A E 23 œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ7 Aœ œœ A7 œœ œ œ œ . j œ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 12 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 14 16 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 (18) 16BU 16 12 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 14 16 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 16 (18) 16 E7 CHORUS 3 A7 CHORUS 3 A 7j œ œ j œ œ BU X 14 X 14 X BU 17 17 17 17 19 ( 21) X 19 ( 21) 17 17 17 17 (√) A 7 / j nœ œ œ (√#)# # An œ7 /' & # # ' ¿ j n œj œ Jœ J & # n œ ¿ ¿j ¿ BU RP RP / 14 14 E D7 BU √ .

jœ œ œœœ j œ œ œ œ œ j œ œ œ œDœ7 j œ œ œ œ œ n £œ œ j ™œ œ ¡ £ ¡ # # # EœJ7 ¿ √ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ ¡œ & # # Eœ7 ¿ . n œ # œ ~~ ¿ (22) (22) (22) RP RP RP (22)RP (22) RP(22)RP # # # A 7 n œ œ œ œ n œ œ œj œ & # # Aœ7 œ œ œ n œ œ œj œ & # ## # œ nn œœ œ œ œ n œ œ œj œ œ & BU E B G E D B A E G E B D 37 G A D E A 37 E 37 20 X (√) A 7 j (#√#) AAn œ77 œ n œ œ œj œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ & (#√# #) nn œœ œ n œ œ œœj œ œ œ œ œ & # ## # œ n œ œ & RP RP RP BU E B G E D B A E G E B D 33 G A D E A 33 E 33 20 5 7 5 5 7 5 5 7 5 7 5 BU 3 7 7 7 9 7 5 7 5 5 BU 7 9 (12 ) BU 7 9 (12 ) 9 7 5 7 5 5 7 9 (12 ) 9 7 5 7 5 5 U ~~ ~~ ¿ aœ œ nœ U œ Uœ ~~ aœ œ nœ œ œ ¿ a œ œ n œ œ~~œ ¿ ~~ ~~ X ( 4) 7 5 3 ( 4) 7 5 3 ( 4) 5 3 5 X 5 3 5 X 5 3 5 A5 œœ Œ Ó œœ Œ Ó œœ Œ Ó ß œ ß 2 ß 2 A5 A5 0 2 2 2 0 2 0 7 5 7 5 7 5 . nn œœ œ œ n œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ J BU BU ~~ X BU ~~ ( ) BU21~~ X BU 20 j ¿ œj œJ ¿ œœj œJœ ¿ ¿. …continued ¿ œœj œ œ œ œ œ œœj œ œ œ œ œ œœj œ œ œ œ œ œœj œ œ œ œ œ œœj œ œ œ œ œ n £œ œ¡ œœj ™œ CD & # ## #JAMJœJ PIECE œ EXAMPLE nTRACK œœœ6 ¿ BU & BU BU BU BU BU [Ending. ¿ √ j œ œ œ œ œ A 7j œ œ œ œ œ j œ œ œ œ œ j œ œ œ œDœ7 j œ œ œ œ œ n £œ œ j ™œ œ ¡ £ ¡ n œ¡ œ£ œ¡ ¿ . you may need to take a couple of G E D B A E G E B D 26 G A D E A 26 E 26 14 X 14 X X BU 17 17 17 17 19 ( 21) X BU 17 17 17 17 19 ( 21) 17 17 17 17 X 19 ( 21) 14 listens to the backing track to get the timing bang on.. we’re using the ending phrase we worked E X on B in Example 10. ' œ ~~~ '' ~~~ ~~~ 1/4 1/4 1/4 rall BU 1 rall /4 BU rall1/4 5 5 5 1/4 7 7 7 7 7 7 20 E7 D7 œ Eœ7 n œ œ œ œ œ œ œj n œ . Clapton would rely on good eye contact with Jack and Ginger. n œ œ œ n œj œ œ œ œ œ n œ . As mentioned before.B A E G E B D 23 G A D E A 23 E 23 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 12 12 14 Play: ROCK E7 12 12 12 12 12 14 12 12 12 12 12 14 CHORUS 3 A7 CHORUS 3 A 7j CHORUS 3 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 14 16 14 16 14 14 16 14 16 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 16 14 14 14 14 16 16 (18) 16 16 (18) 16 D7 √ ON THE CD TRACKs 4-7 ¡ . Dn œ7 œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œjj nn œœ . bars 37-end] Here. 17 17 17 17 BU 17 17 17 17 BU 17 17 19 ( 21) 19 ( 21) BU 17 17 17 17 BU 17 17 17 17 BU 17 17 19 ( 21) 19 ( 21) 19 ( 21) 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 19 ( 21) 19 ( 21) 19 ( 21) BU 17 17 BU 17 17 17 17 20 17 BU 17 19 ( 21) 19 (21) 17 19 17 17 17 BU 17 17 17 17 20 17 BU 17 19 ( 21) 19 (21) 17 19 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 20 17 17 19 ( 21) 19 (21) 17 19 17 19 ( 21) D7 (√) AA 77 / j œ œ œ ~~ n œ j œ n œDœ7 n œj œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ£ œ¡ n ™œ ¡œ £œ œ¡ ™œ ¡œ £œ œ¡ ™œ œ¡ (√#) # A 7 /' nœ œ œ œ ‰ n œjj Jœ œ œ œ n œDœ7 n œj œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ££ œ¡¡ n ™œ ¡œ ££œ œ¡¡ ™œ ¡œ ££œ œ¡¡ ™œ œ¡ &(√#)# # n œ /' ¿ j n œjj œ Jœ œ~~ ~~ n œ œJ œ œ œ n œ œ n œj œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ n ™œ ¡œ œ œ ™œ ¡œ œ œ ™œ œ¡ & # ## # nn œœ ' ¿ ¿j n œ œ JœJ œ ‰‰ J & / '/ ¿ ¿¿j BUBU(22RPRP) (22RPRP) (22~~~~) BUBU(22) 22 20 17 BUBU(22)17 17 17 17 BUBU(22)17 17 1717 17 17 20 17 2017 20 172017 20 172017 '' X X BU(22RP) (22RP) (22~~) BU(22) 22 20 17 BU(22)17 17 17 17 BU(22)17 17 1717 17 17 20 17 2017 20 172017 20 172017 / (22) 22 20 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 20 17 17 20 17 17 20 17 17 X 14 14 14 14 E B G E D B A E G E B D 29 G A D E A 29 E 29 14 20 14 20 X 20 20 20 ( 22) (22) (22) X 20 17 20 (22) BU 20 (22) 20 17 17 20BU 20 20 17 17 20 (22) 20 20 17 A7 7 7 7 20 20 20 (22) 20 (22) (22) (22) (22) 20 ( 21) 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 œœœ œœœ œœœ 8 5 BU 7 ( 9) 7 5 7 8 5 BU 7 ( 9) 7 5 8 5 7 7 ( 9) 7 5 7 24 GuitarTechniques September 2014 X BU 7 (9 ) X BU 7 (9 ) X 7 (9 ) 20 X D7 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 ' ~~~ n œ 'œ n œj œ~~~œ œ n œ 'œ œ n œj œ~~~œ œ œ œ n œ . In the live Cream situation. 20 ( 21) 20 E7 j n œ # œ ~~ ¿. œ œ nœ . j n œj # œ ~~ .

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Indiana. This can be achieved by practising each formation extremely carefully. I wish you good luck getting the octaves up to speed and a fun time digesting and applying some of the pearls Wes delivers along the way. Another crucial thing about the performance is that Wes plays not only the melody – or ‘head’. Eric Johnson and Mark Knopfler to find some of his profound influence. Although holding down a day job. The melody is fairly straight at first. preferably with a neck humbucker or P-90. Once you have taken the time to ‘programme’ solid string-muting habits into your fretting hand. Much like his renditions of other famous tunes. keeping the tone warm but bright. However. this performance keeps modulating. meticulously working out a plan with regards to which of the fretting-hand fingers touches and deadens which string. Get The Tone 3 5 6 7 5 Gain Bass Middle Treble Reverb Ideally. you will be ready to take off as a fully-fledged octave-soloist. when 16th-note phrases will necessitate the use of both down and upstrokes. This brilliant performance of the classic tune Sunny has a few of those moments. Rather than remaining in the one key. you will allow for hard skin to form on your thumb. then Wes bursts into soloing. If not. Over time. note he plays. Pat Martino. especially if you haven’t played that much with your thumb before. perfecting his style. Also check out his Verve recordings. somewhat unintentionally. Legend has it that Montgomery’s incredible thumb technique evolved from him experimenting after receiving complaints from neighbours and family over the loud sound created by the pick as he was practising. His unmistakable sound and technique is instantly recognisable. James And Wes (with Jimmy Smith). to The Incredible Jazz Guitar Of Wes Montgomery. you can expect earning a sore thumb – as well as bags of killer jazz licks. The more subdued sound of his thumb put a stop to all objections and became. a vital part of his sound.Play: JAZZ ON THE CD TRACKs 8-9 Wes Montgomery Sunny Jacob Quistgaard transcribes this burning performance from an absolute master of jazz guitar – Wes Montgomery. but rather strumming them with your thumb. Jimi Hendrix. if you hadn’t mastered the art of playing in octaves before now. including Movin’ Wes. from the Montgomery Brothers’ Groove Yard. with the fire and passion of a true legend in the making. what you need here is a semiacoustic archtop. the backing track and recorded version are there for your reference and ease of practice. he actually maintains the octave-based phrases into his solo and keeps it up the whole way through! So. a brilliant testament to his soulful genius as well as the foundation he helped to lay for the more groove-orientated side of jazz. Since you are not finger-picking the notes separately. I recommend playing and practising the tune in segments. TRACK RECORD Essential listening is the entire Riverside catalogue. Perhaps the most famous trait of said style is his sole reliance on his thumb to pick every Rather than remaining in one key. try stringing a spare guitar with heavy gauge flat-wound strings and select the neck pickup. ending on a four-chord vamp in E Minor. he had already memorised all of Charlie Christian’s solos from Benny Goodman’s Solo Flight record. Born in Indianapolis. this performance goes up in semitones from C Minor. Moderate/Advanced Info Will improve your Key: Various Tempo: 146bpm CD: TRACKS 8-9 Octave playing Jazz licks Thumb control Wes Montgomery (1923-1968) left a massive mark – not just in the field of jazz guitar. motifs and ideas. as always. Montgomery developed a considerable ‘tip’ of hard skin that could then also be used to strike the strings effectively with upstrokes. If you build it up. Technique Focus The main thing you absolutely must get to grips with to play this tune is how to play octaves like Wes does it. on to Boss Guitar. 26 GuitarTechniques September 2014 DAVID REDFERN / GETTY IMAGES ABILITY RATING . You can find this performance on the great Talkin’ Verve: Roots Of Acid Jazz album. but also on contemporary guitar playing in general. a generous splash of reverb will add lushness to your sound. Remember. Tequila and A Day In The Life. starting from C Minor and ending on a four-chord vamp in Eb Minor. going up in semitones. Wes Montgomery didn’t actually begin playing seriously until he was 19. Wes spent years practising at night. Smokin’ At The Half Note and Goin’ Out Of My Head. his modus operandi has him playing the melody fairly straight at first. and was out there performing them. the essential part to master is muting unwanted strings with your remaining fretting-hand fingers. you definitely will after taking this tune onboard. Look no further than in the playing of guitar greats like George Benson. eight months after starting. Jam-packed with amazing octave playing. and then bursting into soloing. As a general rule. as jazzers prefer to call it – in octaves. which may seem a little alien at first. rather than just killing it in a single sitting and then not being able to use your thumb for days. and it’s safe to say his playing style can be heard in guitarists all over the world to this day. California Dreaming.

WES MONTGOMERY SUNNY Wes Montgomery thumbing his L-5’s flatwound strings September 2014 GuitarTechniques 27 .

Play: JAZZ

ON THE CD

TRACKs 8-9

PLAYING TIPS

CD TRACK 8

[Bars 1-40] The track starts out in the key of C Minor, with eight bars of
which Wes brings out repeatedly during the course of the tune. Take your
vamping on the chord sequence, which sets the harmonic tone for the rest
time finding a clean way to execute the octaves at first; remember it’s all
of the tune before the guitar enters with the main melody at the end of bar
about keeping unwanted notes from ringing, by way of muting with your
8. In terms of the harmony, notice that the second chord (Bbm9) introduces
excess fretting-hand fingers. This is especially important when performing
Quist's
aGUITAR
Db note, TECHNIQUES
which is basically
an unexpected
seen from
slides, as at the end of bar 11, for example. I recommend using your first
MAGAZINE
2 3 4minor 2nd interval,
the perspective of the tonic (at this point, C Minor). This is Wes
an essential
colour, and SUNNY
third fingers for sixth/fourth and fifth/third-string octaves; and first
Montgomery's

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1
28 GuitarTechniques September 2014
3

24
24

B bm9

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Sunny: Music & Lyrics by Bobby Hebb ©1966 Portable Music Company. Campbell Connelly and Co Ltd.
UK/EU reproduced by kind permission of Music Sales Ltd. US/Can reproduced by kind permission of
Hal Leonard Corporation.
A All
7 Rights Reserved. International Copyright
G 7Secured.
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PLAYING TIPS
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bbb

and fourth fingers for fourth/second and third/first-string octaves. Also,
make sure you play around with varying degrees of staccato as you go along
E
– I have noted some essential staccato additions, but would recommend
B
7
8
4
7 8
4
of expression
G taking the time to explore
8 10the8 possibilities
5
8 in10that
8 area as5an
D exercise in itself.
4 As5 you may notice, the melody
1
4is actually
5
fairly simple 1
A
8 6 as it is 3based solely on the
6 Minor
8 6 Pentatonic
3
from a harmonic point6of view,
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5
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8

8

8

1

5

5

5

5

b

1

w
wCD TRACK 8

scale, with just a few added colours from the slides and the inclusion of the
blue note (b5), as in bar 22. At bar 25, the melody is repeated with very few
8 6
changes, before landing on a ‘home’-sounding
C octave in bar 39. Straight
8
8
8
8
7 6
4
after that, though, we modulate up
5 a 3semitone to 5C# Minor in bar
5 40,
5instantly
5 climbing
5 up the
5 C# Minor scale –4adding
3 a major
1 7th step to make a
3 on the high
3 C# octave.
chromatic climb at the very end, resolving perfectly

8

6

8

6

5

3

5

3

E bb13

E .13
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œ
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J J
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m9
B

Cm7
Cm7

8
8
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3

4

6

7

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WES MONTGOMERY
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41
41

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8
8 11
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4
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7 9
9 10
10 5 8
5 8
1
4
7
1September 2014
4 6
6GuitarTechniques
7
29

E
E
B
B
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G
D
D
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E 33
33

8
8
5
5

7
7
4
4

Play: JAZZ

8 10 8
8 10 8
6 8 6
6 8 6

4
4
1
1

5
5
3
3

8
8
5
5

7
7
4
4

8 10 8
8 10 8
6 8 6
6 8 6

4
4
1
1

5
5
3
3

7
7
4
4

8
8
5
5

8 10 8
8 10 8
6 8 6
6 8 6

5
5
3
3

4
4
1
1

8
8
5
5

7
7
4
4

8 10 8
8 10 8
6 8 6
6 8 6

ON THE CD

4
4
1
1

5
5
3
3

6
6
3
3

TRACKs 8-9

C m7
A b11
œœ œ œ
C m7
A b11
œ
jj œ œœ œœ œœ nn œœ œœ
j
œ
œ
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j
b
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TIPS
nn œœ œœ 8
bb b bb œ ‰‰ œ ‰‰ ‰‰ œ ‰‰ œ ‰‰ œœ œ œœ œœ ## œœ nn œœ ‰‰ œœ .. œœ œœ .. ‰‰ # ## # ‰‰ œœ œœ œ œœCDœœTRACK
&
J
œJthe solo kicks
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[Bars&
41-56] Thisœ
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# œofn œ again,
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JJis where
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call-and-response
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J andJJthe Natural
J Minor scale.
J
added colours are the maj7th (B# or C), which – as the 3rd of the dominant
last beat of bar 48. Based around repeatedly hitting the top C# octave on the
D m11
D m11

G7aug
G7aug

chord (G#7) obviously is a strong note to use – as well as the D (b2 again),
E
8 11 8 (Bm9).
6
which
functions as
chord
E
B
8 11 8 6 7
8 the b3rd
8 of the second
8
8 of the progression
B
G also likes to mix
Wes
has such a strong
character
8 in the
8 Blues scale,
8 which 8
5 8 5 3 7
G
D
8 and
5 he3 is 4
5 to be5theoretically5 ‘correct’
5 to sound5great,
that
it
doesn’t
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D
A
5
5
5
5
4
the
A
E kind of player who can make phrases sound amazing, even if they aren’t
E 37
theoretically
perfect in the context of the chords. Notice how time and time

9th and 12th frets (third and first string); this motif repeats in the following
7 8 8
excitement,
7 8 8
6 four bars, each time with a slight change, adding colour
7 and
9 10
essential
flow
and
sense
of
development.
Notice
6 while maintaining
7
9
10
5
5 5
6
4 how
5 5
5
5
5
6
4 5 to 5
3 this culminates
4
6
7
in a huge Minor Pentatonic run, before moving straight
3
3
3 3
4 4 6 7
D Minor in
3 bar 56,3using
3 the D Harmonic Minor scale
4 (D E F G A Bb C) and its
maj7th again (C#) to travel towards the resolution on the high D octave.

37

C #m7
C #m7

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9
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41

9
9
6
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9
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8
8
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9
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12
9
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7
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9
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45

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Here. œœ. . weœ start œ œwithœ a great œ œrhythmic œ œmotif on the root (D) and can œ stillœ achieve [Bars And also. 3 3. œ. Take your time playing that lick very slowly 9 and can apply 9 you 7 will5eventually gain a really cool little technique you 8 10 11 9in 6 6 9 7 lots of other contexts. œ 3 œ œ 3œ . . even if you haven’t got massively hard skin on your thumb you 53 œ œœ œ œœ CCCm6 jœ m6 œœ œ œœ œ m6 j b œ & bb œJœ ‰‰ œJJœ ‰‰ ‰‰ Jœœ ‰‰ œJJœ ‰‰ bb œœj œœ & & b JJ ‰ J ‰ ‰ JJ ‰ J ‰ bb œœ œœ œ F13 œ œ F13 œœ F13 œ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ Dm7 Dm7 Dm7 10 10 7 10 7 7 E B E G B E D B G A D G E A D 57 E A E 57 57 13 13 10 13 10 10 œ. œ C #m9 A 11 œ œ . œ. œ œ œ œœ. before making the5final key change to Eb Minor in a similar fashion to the previous modulations. œ œœ. . . œ. Bar 61 sees a string of triplets. œ. œ. notice howœthe œ œœeffect.. b & b œœ & &b E B E G B E D B G A D G E A D 61 E A E 61 61 & bb & &b E B E G B E4 D G B A D G E A D 10 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 7 œ œœ œœ 6 xxxxxxxxxx 6 36 3 3 65 A E E 65 65 13 13 10 13 10 10 . . œ. œ. œ. 9 as11he had 9 6 for A D G 6 6 that 6 the6 protruding 6 6 hard 6 skin 9 formed 11 9 an 6 played so much with6his6 thumb E A D 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 53 E A almost pick-like tip. . Notice how the upstrokes are required again 9 7 5 8 10 11 69for 69 16ths 47 58 10 7 and 8 adding 6 6 9 are ascending on a A7 7 arpeggio 6 the in25bars 69-70. # # # # œ œ œ. œ. . 7 7 47 4 4 B b7 B b7 B b7 œ œœ œœ 9 10 9 10 69 10 7 6 7 6 7 7 7 57 5 5 œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ 10 10 7 10 7 7 10 10 7 10 7 7 6 6 36 3 3 œ #œ œœ ## œœ œœ ## œœ 6 6 36 3 3 B b7 B b7 B b7 œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ 7 7 57 5 5 E m11 E m11 E m11 œ œœ œœ ¿ ¿¿ ¿¿ 5 5 25 2 2 X X X X X X E m11 E m11 E m11 œ œœ œœ 10 9 10 7 9 10 79 7 7 7 7 8 8 68 6 6 10 10 7 10 7 7 11 11 8 11 8 8 œ œœ œœ 6 6 46 4 4 9 12 9 12 69 12 9 6 9 6 9 A 7#9 A 7#9 j A 7 # 9# œ œ œœ œœ œ # œ # œjj œœœ ‰ nn œœ œœ ## œœ # œ œ ‰ n œ œœ # œ ## œœ œ ‰ nn œJJœ #œ J 9 9 79 7 7 7 7 57 5 5 9 10 9 10 69 10 7 6 7 6 7 6 6 46 4 4 8 8 58 5 5 E b9 E b9 E b9 œ. œœ. the arpeggio are B 9 916ths 9 that 9 make 9 up 9 the 9 C Minor E 9 12 14 12 9 G 69 12 9 a quick 11 9down/ 69 hand (thumb) to achieve B E executed by flicking9the9 strumming 9 9 9 9 9 9 14 12 D 69 69 This 69 was 69 especially 69 69 69effective 69 B up/down stroke motion. œ. . . œ.. which creates part D #m11 D #m11 D #m11 G #7aug G #7aug G #7aug Pentatonic idea which develops into bar 62. œ j œ œ œ ## œœ œ C #m9 A 11 . œ. . œ œJœ ‰‰ ‰‰ œœJ JJ ‰ ‰ Jœ J 10 10 7 10 7 7 œ ## œœ œœ # œ œœ œœ œ # œjjj ‰ œœ ## œœ ‰ œœ # œ ‰ #œ 7 7 57 5 5 œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ A7aug A7aug A7aug bœ œ bœ bb œœ ‰ œ œ œ bb œJœ ‰‰ œœ bbb œœœ œœ œœ JJ œ b œ œœ œ œ 11 11 8 11 8 8 9 9 69 6 6 6 6 36 3 3 6 6 46 4 4 b 5 5 35 3 3 8 8 68 6 6 Dm7 B 11 œ œ œ nœ œ œ # œ # œ œ œœ œ j œœ œœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ b & b œ œ ⋲ ## œœ œœ ⋲ œ œ ⋲ œ œ ⋲ œ œ ⋲ œ # œ ⋲ ⋲ ⋲ œ n œ ⋲ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ Œ b b b b œ œ œ œ œJ n œ œœ E B G D A E E m11 7 7 69 5 5 b & b bbbb E B G D A E A 7aug 6 6 99 4 4 77 b jE m7 nœ œ nœ œ 10 11 7 73 8 10 10 11 11 7 7 œœ ‰ œœ J 11 11 8 8 8 8 œœ œœ ‰ J œœ œœ 11 11 8 8 9 9 12 12 13 13 6 6 9 9 10 10 D bm9 14 13 11 10 8 6 11 10 8 7 5 3 G b13 7 7 8 5 5 6 C b7 œ œ nœ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ ‰ J ‰ œJ n œ œ œ b œ œ œ nœ œ bœ œ 11 9 8 6 10 11 7 8 9 11 9 8 8 9 7 6 6 6 10 7 11 9 9 6 11 9 9 11 12 6 8 9 9 10 6 7 B b7aug . on beat92... œ. œ. œœ. œ œ œ nœ Œ bœ œ œ œ nœ Fm11 6 8 7 6 5 11 9 6 3 8 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 31 .. œœ œ œ œœ b Œ ‰ œœjj œœ œœCDœœTRACK & ## # # ## TIPS PLAYING ‰ b Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ ## œœ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ ‰ b Œ ‰ œ œ œ & 57-72] Here. . œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .. G 6 Wes.œbeing œ a œœsimilar œ note that is played the b3rd (F). œ. based on a descending Minor with an upstroke (G) is actually slid to (from the Bb).

adding you take your time. repeatedly 8 7 7 5 5 3 6 8 8 9 9 to bring 555 A) in555a tasty sequential lick666in bar 88. we go straight into an ‘enhanced’ octave shape. section finishes with8a classic blues phrase 7 6 7 7 8 6 777 7 7 8 6 11 10 8 3 6 in sliding up to the 5th (Bb) and then continuing 11bar 1085. the ‘blue’ note into play (b5. œ. Bar 81 sees another great motif. nnnœœœ œœ œœœ œœ Fm11 Fm11 14 11 14 14 11 11 999 11 11 11 11 11 888 666 8 88 b b jjj . This 11 12 12 scale. œœœ œ œœœ œœ 11 11 888 9 11 9 11 6 66 888 999 888 666 6 6 999 7 7 99 99 66 66 10 10 777 7 7 888 444 6 6 b C 7 œœ CCœœbb77 œœ œœ œœ œjjj œ nœ œ œœ œ œœ ‰ œJ œœœœ nn œœ J 9 9 11 11 11 6 66 888 11 11 888 9 9 666 11 11 888 66 66 10 10 10 777 œœ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œœj ‰ œ œœ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œœ ‰ 10 10 10 777 777 444 999 666 99 99 66 66 999 666 bm7 E E Ebbm7 m7 9 9 99 99 666 œ œ 888 7777 888 7777 888 7777 888 32 GuitarTechniques September 2014 7 7 444 777 444 888 666 777 444 bm9 D D Dbbm9 m9 888 666 666 444 666 333 777 444 œ œJ J 777 444 8 8 666 jjj nnnœœœ œœ nnnœœœ œœ 999 11 11 11 6 6 888 7 7 555 F m11 F Fm11 m11 bb œœ bœ b # B B Bbb777##999 œœ Œ œœœ œœ Œ œ œœ œœ 3 3 9 9 888 666 6 6 œœ œœ œœ. œœœjj œ. This becomes a recurring shape in E 12 12 13 13 E E the E remaining soloing and it’s a great. j. so make sure A A A 4 4 whips out some speedy with E E E E 69 555 555 69 69 b and muting habits along the way.. Wes D D 7 7 7 and first/second strings 7 7 7 respectively. 8 8 8 D A 44phrases 44 777 7 77 lots of position changes. I recommend 10 11 11 10 10 10 11first 11 and6fourth riffs using fingers to G 6 6 9 9 6 9 9 10 10 G G G 6 6 9 9 6 6 9 9 10 10 6 6 9 9 6 6 9 9 10 10 D 7 7 8 barre third/fourth In this passage.xxxxxxxxxx 444 xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx Play: JAZZ TRACKs 8-9 Bbb11 Dm7 B Dm7 B 11 11 œœ œœ œ œ j œ œœ œ œœ nn œœ œ œ # œ œ n œ # œ œ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ bb œ œ ⋲⋲ ## œœ œœ ⋲⋲ œ œ ⋲⋲ œ œ ⋲⋲ œœ œœ ⋲⋲ œœ ## œœ ⋲⋲ œ œ ⋲⋲ œ œ ⋲⋲ œœ nn œœ ⋲⋲ œœ œ œœ œ œœ ‰‰ œœ ŒŒ bb bb bb bb bb œ œ œœ œœ œœ nn œœ & & œœ CD TRACK œ œ œ J 8 PLAYING TIPS œœ œœ ## œœ œœ œœ œœ [Bars 72-86] Here. œœœ œ œœœ œœ 10 10 777 99 99 œœ œ 999 10 10 10 11 999 11 6 6 11 11 777 666 9 99 999 b D bm9 C C m9 C 777 œ œ œœGGGœb131313 jjj œœ œœ œœ DD m9 œœ œjjj n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ nn œœ œœ bb œœ œ œ œœ ‰‰ œœœœ nnœœ œœ b b bb b b œœœ ‰‰ ‰‰ œœœ ‰‰ ‰‰ œœœ ‰‰ ‰‰ JJ œ œœ œœ œœ n œ œ b b & œ œ & b JJ œ bb œœ œœ JJ JJ JJ œ E E E E B B B B G G G G D D DD A A A A E E E E 77 77 77 77 œœ bb œœ œ bb œœ b B 7aug B Bbb7aug 7aug Fm11 Fm11 Fm11 10 11 10 10 10 11 88 77 8 77 9 9 10 10 10 666 8 8 11 11 888 999 666 œ œœ œœ œ œœjj œœ œ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ 999 666 777 444 E E E999 999 666 b13 C C Cbb13 13 888 666 777 444 b # B B Bbb777##999 jj j œ ‰‰ œœ œœ ‰‰ nn œœ ‰‰ œœ nn œœ œ 444 222 777 444 333 111 777 555 999 666 œœ œœ J 666 333 . which is 10 repeated three times. j œœœ nn œœ. allowing yourself to ‘program’ in some good fingerings E m11 E Em11 m11 Dm7 ON THE CD A 7aug A A7aug 7aug the 5th (Bb) below both octave notes. powerful one with 999 which 999 to 12 12 12create 12 13 1313 13 B 10 10 11 11 B B B around which to solo. nnnœœœjj œ.. œœ n œ bœ œ nn œœ Œ œ œœ œœ bœ œ bbœœ œ œœ œœ Bbbb7aug 7aug B jjB 7aug . as a11 response. 69 bb b & b bbb b b E E E E B B B B G G G G D D D D A A A A E E E E 73 73 73 73 bm7 m7 jEjEEbbœm7 j nnnœœœ œ nnnœœœ œœ ‰ 10 11 10 10 10 11 11 77 77 œœœ œ œJœ J œœœ œ œJœ ‰ J 11 11 11 11 11 11 8 8 888 8 8 b œœ œ GG 1313 œ œœ œ nn œœ œ ‰ J ‰ JJ nn œœ œ 11 11 11 11 11 11 8 8 888 bm7 E E Ebbm7 m7 Gbbb13 D m9 D Dbbm9 m9 œœœ œ œœ 11 11 11 8 8 b 999 10 10 10 6 6 777 b C C Cbb777 œ œœ œ œ nnn œœœ œ œ nœ œœ bb œœ œ bb œœ 11 11 11 11 9 11 9 888 999 777 b 8 8 666 8 8 666 11 11 11 11 11 888 888 b E m7 E Ebbm7 m7 œœ bb b b bb œœ b b & & b bb E E E E B B B B G G G G D D D D A A A A E E E E 81 81 81 81 bb b b & bb bb bb b E E E E B B B B G G G G D D D D A A A A E E E E 85 85 85 85 11 11 888 11 11 11 11 11 888 888 œœ œ 11 11 11 11 11 888 888 œœ œœ œœ Œ œœ 9 11 9 11 6 66 888 jFm11 . and then mirrored on a different part999of the 10 10 14 13 11 10 11 12 14 10 999 11 14 13 13 11 10 888 in666bar784. as a call. bb œœ œœœ nn œœ bb œœ 10 11 10 11 10 11 10 11 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 10 10 11 11 10 10 11 11 10 10 11 11 77 77 66 66 G 13 œœ GGbœœb1313 œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œœ Œ œœ 9 9 11 11 11 6 66 888 jjj .

WES MONTGOMERY SUNNY PLAYING TIPS [Bars 87-147] Our now-familiar descending chord sequence allows for the colourful inclusion of ‘non-Eb Minor’ notes like the b3rd of Dbm9 (E) and the major 7th (D) of the Eb Harmonic Minor scale. b œ. you may want to experiment with various positions and 5 5 not just blindly follow the tab and assume that this is the only way to play it. Make sure you take your time with the extended staccato run from bar 109 onwards. œ 14 14 12 12 16 14 11 11 16 14 11 9 13 11 9 GuitarTechniques 13 13 11 8 September 2014 33 13 11 8 11 11 . Bb7). ¿¿ œ œ ‰ œj œ ‰ ‰ œj ‰ œ ‰ œj œ œœ nn œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ Jœ J b b œœ & b b bb Ó ‰ œ œ 9 9 6 6 b # X 7 X 8 7 8 X 4 X 6 4 6 7 7 4 4 8 8 6 6 b 7 7 4 4 8 8 6 6 b b 7 9 9 7 4 4 6 6 8 8 7 7 4 4 9 9 6 6 10 10 7 7 11 11 8 8 12 12 9 9 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 9 6 9 6 6 6 11 11 11 11 8 8 8 8 8 8 6 6 7 7 4 4 7 7 4 4 8 8 6 6 X X X X 11 11 8 8 8 8 4 4 6 6 10 11 10 11 7 7 b # 8 8 6 6 8 8 7 7 4 4 7 7 8 8 4 4 6 6 b7 ## 99 B B b7 j œ j œ œ œ œ ‰œ‰‰ œ œ J 10 11 11 10 8 8 7 7 8 8 6 6 m9 œ œ j BB b77 # 99 j EE b77 DD bm9 œ n œjj œ CC b1313 j BB b77 # 99 b b b œ œ œ œ œ ¿ œ œ ‰ œ nn œœ ‰ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ ⋲ ¿ œ œ J ‰ n œ œJ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ b œ b & b b J J J b7 E E b7 9 9 7 7 7 7 4 4 b7 E E b7 œ œ œ‰œ J 7 7 4 4 8 8 6 6 bm9 D D bm9 7 7 5 5 8 8 6 6 jnœ b b œ & b b bb ‰ œ nœ 8 8 6 6 108 108 108 8 8 5 5 bm9 D D bm9 b œ œj œ n œ ⋲ bœ ‰ œnœ œ 6 6 7 7 4 4 5 5 7 7 4 4 7 7 5 5 b13 C C b13 b7 ## 99 B B b7 œ. For the final phrase in bars b & b bbbb E E E B B B G G G D D D A A A E E E b bm9 D D bm9 E b7 7 E œ œ 9 9 6 6 8 8 6 6 b7 E E b7 bm9 D D bm9 b7 ## 99 B B b7 7 7 4 4 11 11 11 11 8 8 9 9 9 9 7 7 b E b7 7 E 12 12 9 9 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 10 10 7 7 Ó b 9 9 6 6 10 10 b 8 8 6 6 14 14 11 11 b13 C C b13 9 9 6 6 9 9 11 11 7 7 9 9 11 10 11 11 12 12 10 11 9 77 8 8 9 8 8 14 14 11 11 D bbm9 C bb13 B bb7 ## 9 D m9 C 13 B 7 9 œ. œ œ. œ 7 7 9 9 4 4 7 7 œ. œ nœ bm9 D D bm9 œ œj œ œ‰œ œ 7 7 8 8 4 4 6 6 b13 C C b13 8 8 6 6 œ œ 7 11 11 7 4 4 8 8 b7 ## 99 B B b7 C 13 B 7 9 j œ œ nœ œ bœ nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œJ ‰ œ n œ ‰ œ b œ ⋲ n œ œ œ ‰ b œ œ ⋲ œ œ œ J 7 7 4 4 8 8 6 6 8 8 5 5 8 8 6 6 7 7 4 4 7 7 8 8 4 4 6 6 7 7 5 5 103 103 103 b7 E E b7 E E E B B B G G G D D D A A A E E E B bb7 ## 9 93 93 93 b7 DD bbm9 E E b7 m9 E E E B B B G G G D D D A A A E E E b C b13 13 C B b7 7#9 9 B j œ œ œ n b œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ n œœj œ ‰ ‰ bœ œ J ‰ J nn œœ œJ J J b7 E E b7 œ. œ bœ œ œ œ 8 8 6 6 œ. œ œ. œ œ. because obviously. œ 12 11 12 11 10 10 8 9 9 8 8 8 b13 C C b13 œ. B 7. 9œ. œ œ œ œœ ‰ œ œJ œ ‰ œJ œJ ‰ b13 BB bb77 ## 99 C C b13 œ œ b & b bbbb œ œ Ó E E E B B B G G G D D D A A A E E E 96-97 for example. for example. n œ. perhaps cutting it into bars. you may prefer a different combination of strings – say placing more of the octaves on the fifth and third strings. œ 11 11 8 8 13 13 10 10 7 7 9 9 4 4 7 7 B bb7 ## 9 œ. œJ ‰ 11 11 14 14 8 8 11 11 11 11 8 8 11 11 9 9 8 8 Delay Delay slightly slightly 11 11 8 8 b D bm9 m9 D Delay Delay slightly slightly E D E b7 7 D bm9 m9 . half bars or even single beats at first. b œ. which means more upstrokes to execute. œ 7 7 4 4 9 9 11 11 6 6 8 8 8 8 5 5 9 9 7 7 œ. dead notes). œ 9 9 6 6 9 9 7 7 4 4 7 7 b7 E E b7 œ. œ nœ bœ œ. So I highly recommend experimenting beyond the given tab. œ œ. b œ. n œ b œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ j œ n œ b œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œœ œ ‰ n œ œ Œ œ nœ œ 11 11 8 8 9 9 6 6 10 10 7 7 9 9 6 6 E E E B B B G G G D D D A A A E E E 98 98 98 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 4 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 b13 C C b13 b7 ## 99 B B b7 b7 E E b7 bm9 D D bm9 b13 C C b13 . œ œ œœ . œ bœ œ. n œ. b œ. which is a standard way of playing on the Dominant V chord in a minor key (in this case. For many of these phrases. the possibilities are endless. Bar 98 and onwards sees more 16th-notes appearing (some of them percussive. œ œ bœ 10 10 14 14 8 13 8 11 11 7 13 7 11 11 6 9 11 6 9 11 œ. œ. C 13 B 7 9 j D m9 œ b œ œ œ ∫œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ ∫œ œ b œ œ J J J J 7 7 4 4 89 89 89 b13 C C b13 CD TRACK 8 b D D bm9 m9 œ.

. n œ. œ œ œ œ b œ œ... œœ œ œ. J 7 7 4 7 4 b jCC bœ13 n œ 13 n n œœjjC œb13 n nn œœ œœ nn n œœ œ n n œœ œJ œ n œ J 7 C b13 C b13 C b13 7 7 5 7 5 5 9 9 6 9 6 œ œ œ.. œœ b œ œ bœ b j C 13 j n œj C bœœb13 œj n n œœj C 13 œœj nnœ œ œ nn nn œœœ œœ ‰ œœœ œ ‰ œœ n n œœ J œ ‰œ n œ J 10 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 7 7 7 5 7 5 5 9 13 11 œ œœœ œ œ œ. œ œ 11 9 12 11 8 9 6 12 9 11 8 9 12 6 9 8 6 9 9 9 7 9 7 7 B b7 # 9 œœ BB bb77 ## 99 j œœ ‰ ‰ œjj œœ ‰ œJœ ‰ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ Jœ ‰ ‰ œœœ œJœJ ‰ J J 11 11 11 8 11 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 D bm9 D bm9 D bm9 7 7 4 7 4 8 8 6 8 6 6 4 œ œœ œœ œ œ ⋲ œœœ ⋲œ ⋲œ œ œœ œœ œ 7 7 4 7 4 9 9 6 9 6 7 7 4 7 4 4 6 4 B b7 # 9 œ œ œœœ œ 8 8 6 8 6 6 œœ B bb7 ## 9 j œœ ‰ B ‰7 9 œjj œœ œJœ ‰ ‰ œœœ œœ Jœ ‰ ‰ œœ œœ J bœ bb œœ bb œœ bœ 7 7 4 7 4 9 9 6 9 6 4 6 11 11 11 8 11 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 8 8 6 8 6 6 D bm9 . œœ. œ.. œœ œ 7 7 4 7 4 9 8 ∫œ ∫∫ œœ ∫∫ œœ ∫œ j œj œj œœ œ œ 8 8 6 8 6 6 œ œœœ œ œ 8 10 11 8 8 10 10 7 10 7 D bm9 D bm9 D bm9 7 7 4 7 4 j œj œœj œœ œœ œœ œ 11 11 13 14 12 11 10 9 D bm9 œ bœ œ b œœ DDnnbbœœm9 œœ b œœ nn œœm9bbb œœœ œœ b œ n œ b œ œ nœ bœ 7 7 4 7 4 8 8 6 8 6 6 12 13 7 11 jœ œ œjj œ. b œ. œ œœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ E b7 16 14 11 13 11 8 œ. œ D bm9 7 6 7 7 5 7 5 6 5 B b7 # 9 B b7 # 9 B b7 # 9 10 14 9 11 11 11 8 11 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 jC b13 n œjC œbœ13 n n œœjC b13 n nn œœ œœ nn n œœ œ œ n n œœ J n œ œJ 10 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 7 8 8 6 8 6 6 14 14 11 14 11 11 11 8 11 8 11 8 J 8 8 6 8 6 6 9 9 6 9 6 6 4 E b7 E b7 E b7 7 7 4 7 4 4 4 ‰ ‰ ‰ 11 11 11 8 11 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 b # œœ BB b77 # 99 œ œœ ‰ B b‰7 # 9 œœœ œJœ ‰ ‰ Jœ œJ ‰ ‰ œJJ J 11 11 11 8 11 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 10 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 7 E b7 E b7 E b7 11 11 8 11 8 9 9 6 9 6 7 7 4 7 4 7 6 4 œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ 9 6 9 6 10 10 7 10 7 9 9 6 9 6 7 7 4 7 4 6 7 6 4 9 C b13 œ œœ œœ œ 8 8 6 8 6 6 D bm9 D bm9 D bm9 œ œœ œœ œ 7 7 4 7 4 4 B b7 # 9 8 8 6 8 6 6 7 7 4 7 4 4 6 4 j b œj ∫ œ b œ ∫ œœ bb œœj ∫ ∫œ bœ ∫œ bœ ∫œ œ œœ œœ œ 9 6 9 6 10 10 7 10 7 6 7 9 9 6 9 6 6 C b13 C b13 C b13 œ œœ œœ œ 9 9 6 9 6 7 7 4 7 4 6 4 J 11 11 11 8 11 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 E b7 E b7 E b7 œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ 7 7 4 7 4 7 7 4 7 4 4 4 b jCC bœ13 n œ 13 n n œœjjC œb13 n nn œœ œœ nn n œœ œ n n œœ œJ œ n œ J 10 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 7 œ œœ œœ œ œ œœœ œ œ 8 8 6 8 6 6 6 6 4 6 4 4 J 11 11 11 8 11 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 E b7 j œj œœj ‰ œœœœ ‰ œœ ‰œ 10 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 7 10 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 7 œ œœ œœ œ 8 8 6 8 6 6 B b7 # 9 B b7 # 9 B b7 # 9 . j œ Œ ‰ œœj œœœ ‰ ‰ œœœ ‰ œj œœœ. n œ. j b œ œ b œ œnœ œ & b bbbb ‰ œ nœ ⋲ œnœ bœ ‰ œ œ œ œ nœ bœ E B G D A E6 8 8 5 6 xxxxxxxxxx 6 108 xxxxxxxxxx 6 xxxxxxxxxx b b & bb bb bb b b bb & b bbbb & b E B E G B E D G B A D G E A D 112 E A 112 E 112 b & bb bb bb bb b bb & b bbbb & b E b7 E b7 E b7 7 4 5 D bm9 D bm9 D bm9 œ. n œ œœ nn œœ.. ‰ bœ ‰ bœ 7 7 4 7 4 9 9 6 9 6 10 10 7 10 7 9 9 6 9 6 4 6 7 6 E b7 j E b7 n œ j E b7 n œ œ œœ œœ œ 34 GuitarTechniques 3 7 7 4 7 4 7 6 4 7 7 4 7 4 7 7 4 7 4 D bm9 D bm9 D bm9 8 8 6 8 6 6 œ. œ. b œ. œœ œ œ. . œ œ. . n œ œœ. ‰ bbb œœœ. n œ. œœ. œ nn œœ. œ œœœ. œœ b œ. œœ. œ. n œ. œœ. œ. œ. B b7 # 9œ. œœ œ œ œ œœœ œ 7 7 4 7 4 9 9 6 9 6 7 7 4 7 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 J 10 11 10 10 10 10 11 11 10 7 8 7 10 11 10 10 11 10 7 8 7 7 8 7 10 11 10 7 8 7 7 8 7 7 8 20147 September E b7 8 4 6 5 8 8 6 8 6 6 8 9 7 9 7 6 4 B b7 # 9 B b7 # 9 B b7 # 9 10 10 8 10 8 8 b j C 13 n œj C bœœb13 n n œœj C 13 nnœ œ nn nn œœœ œœ ‰ œ‰ n n œœ J œ‰ n œ J 10 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 7 7 7 5 7 5 5 7 7 4 7 4 j œj œœj ‰ œœœœ ‰ œœ ‰œ 9 11 œ. œ. œ. œœœ.. œœ nn œœ.. œœ œ b Jœ ‰ œ œ. œœ nn œœJ œ n Jœ J b œ.. . œœ... n œ. œ bb œœ. b b b & bb bb bb b b b ‰‰ œœœ œœœ œœœ. . b œ. Œ ‰ œœ Jœ ‰ ‰ œJ ‰ œœœ œ Œ ‰ œ Jœ ‰ ‰ Jœ ‰ œ œ J J J B b7 # 9 œœ B bb7 ## 9 œœ œ B 7 9 œ œœ ‰ ‰ Jœœ ‰ œœœ œJœ ‰ ‰ Jœ ‰ œJœ Jœ ‰ ‰ J ‰ JJ J 11 11 11 8 11 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 8 11 j j œ j n œj œœj ‰‰ nn œœ œ nœ œ ‰ nœ œ 9 9 6 9 6 9 9 7 9 7 7 9 E b7 b jE 7 n œ E b7 œ œ b œ œ œ œ œœ œœ bb œœ ‰ œœ œœ œ œœ bb œJœ ‰ œ œœ. œœ bb œœ. .. œ nn œœ 9 9 6 9 6 j œjj ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œ 8 8 6 8 6 6 œ. & b bbbb ‰ œ œ œ œ & b œœœ œ E B E G B E D G B A D G E A D 123 E A 123 E 123 6 6 3 6 3 10 10 7 10 7 E b7 E b7 E b7 b & bb bb bb bb b bb & b bbbb & b 5 œ. œœ... œ .. nn œœ.98 C b13 b # b b b b # b b b b # E 7 D m9 C 13 B 7 9 œ œ j B 7 9 j E 7 D m9œ n œj œ C 13 j B 7 9 j n œ THE œ n œ TRACKs œ œœ œ b b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ ⋲ ¿ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ n œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ b œ œ ‰ œON œ bCD œ œ ‰ b œ 8-9 b ‰ ⋲ & b œ œJ œ œ ¿ œ œ J J œ Jœ œ œ b œJ œJ œ n œ œ b œ n œ œ œ b Jœ œ ⋲ œ œ œ Play: JAZZ PLAYING TIPS E 11 11 CD TRACK 8 7 7 7 8 7 7 7 7 8 8 9 first beat 8 of bars8117/119/1217etc –8 whereas9the phrases 8 9 block of notes on the 4 4 4 ‘response’. 8 8 it’s a masterclass 8 8 X8 [Bar in call-and-response.. 5 4 4 4 4 in between constitute the 6 6 7 6 6 5 6 7 6 7 B 11 7 7 10 11 G 117] From here onwards. and D 8around a4recurring riff. œœ. œ œ œ. D bm9 6 E B E G B E D G B A D G E A D 120 E A 120 E 120 7 4 œ j ∫ œDD bbœm9 œ œj œ œm9 œ œ nn œœj œœ œj ∫ ∫∫ œœœ œœœ œœœ n œœ n œ œ œœ ∫ œ œ œ œ nœ œ ∫œ œ œ nœ nœ 14 10 11 14 11 9 7 8 11 10 14 10 11 9 11 7 8 69 11 7 8 6 E B E G B E D G B A D G E A D 116 E A 116 E 116 6 7 D bm9 C b13 . œ.. 4The ‘call’ 4 7the8 how to base your soloing is of course A X6 6 6 E 103 E b7 D bm9 C b13 B b7 # 9 jnœ . œœ œ œ. œ . œœœ. œœœ.

œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ 8 8 6 8 8 6 8 8 6 6 6 6 7 7 4 4 7 7 4 4 D bm9 D bm9 8 8 6 6 b j C 13 j n œj C bœœ13 œj nnœ œ n n œ œœ ‰ œ nnœ œ n œ œJ ‰ œ œœ œœ 7 7 4 8 8 6 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 11 11 9 9 10 11 10 11 10 11 7 11 8 10 7 8 7 8 7 8 14 14 11 11 B b7 # 9 œœ œœ jj B b7jj# 9 œœ ‰ œœ ‰ Œ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ Œ 8 8 6 6 8 8 6 6 8 8 6 6 11 11 8 8 9 9 6 6 E b7 E b7 10 10 7 7 jj œ ‰‰ œœ ‰‰ œ 8 8 6 6 9 9 6 6 œœ œœ JJ 7 7 4 4 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 E b7 E b7 œ. œœ œ œ œœ œ bœ bb œœ bœ 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 7 7 4 9 9 6 4 6 8 8 6 6 œ œœ œ œ. 4 6 7 4 potentially 8 8 8 8 6 6 8 6 7 6 4 4 4 6 4 6 6 E 10 11 10 B 7 7 7 7 7 9 7 10 11 10 E 10 11 10 G [Bar 135] Here’s another riff of sorts.E 5 116 116 E b7 E b7 œ.. G 7 8 7 8 A 6 D 7 8 7 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 E A 120 6 E 120 b & bb b bb bb b bb & b E B E G B D G A D E A 123 E 123 b & bb b bb bb b bb & b E B E G B D G A D E A 126 E7 7 126 bb bb b bb b bb & & b b E B E G B D G A D E A 129 E 129 bb bb b bb b bb & & b b E B E G B D G A D E A E 132 132 b jC œb13 C n œ 13 n n œœj œœ nn n œœ œœ n œ œœ n œ J J 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 E b7 j ∫Eœb7 œj ∫œ œœ ∫ œ œ ∫œ B b7 # 9 œœ B b7 # 9 œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ ‰ ‰ Jœ ‰ Jœ Jœ ‰ ‰ J ‰ J J 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 œ œœ œ œ œœ œ 9 6 10 10 7 9 9 6 7 7 4 6 7 6 4 9 b j CC bœ13 n œ 13 n n œj œ n n œ œœ nnœ œ n œ J J 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 11 11 8 8 jj b œ bb b b bb b bb œœ ‰‰ & & b b œ 8 8 6 6 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ⋲⋲ 11 11 9 9 j œj œ ‰‰ œœ œ 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 E b7 E b7 E b7 E b7 E B E G B D G A D E A E 136 136 j œj œœ ‰ œœœ ‰œ 11 11 8 8 14 14 11 11 œ œœ œ D bm9 D bm9 8 8 6 6 7 7 4 9 9 6 4 6 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 11 11 8 8 8 8 6 6 œœ œœ ‰‰ JJ D bm9 10 11 10 11 7 8 7 8 bœ ‰‰ bb œœ b œJ J 9 9 6 6 9 6 10 10 7 9 9 6 7 7 4 6 7 6 4 ‰ ‰ j œj œœ œ œœ œ œœ BB b77 # 99 œœ œœ ‰ ‰ œœ Jœ ‰ ‰ œœ J 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 9 jC b13 n œjC œbœ13 n n œœ œ nœ œ nn n œœ œœ œ n œ J J 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 J 7 7 4 4 4 6 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 8 8 6 6 œ œœ œ œ. œœ œ D bm9 D bm9 œ... œœ œ b b b b ‰ œœ œœ b & bbbbbb ‰ œ œ & b œœ œ.. œœ œ œ œœ œ 9 9 7 9 9 7 9 9 7 7 7 7 7 7 4 4 7 7 4 4 J 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 B b7 # 9 œœ B b7 # 9 j œœ œœ ‰ ‰ œœœj Jœ ‰ ‰ œ J bœ bb œœ bœ b j CC bœ13 n œ 13 n n œj œ n n œ œœ ‰ nnœ œ ‰ n œ J Pick 2nd notes as well 11 14 11 14 8 11 9 8 11 9 B b7 # 9 E b7 œœ B bœœ7 # 9 œœ Eœb7 n œ b œ œœ ‰ œJœ ‰ œ ‰ œœ n œ b œ œJ ‰ J ‰ JJœ ‰ œ nn œœ bb œœ J j œj œœ ‰ œœœ ‰œ J œ jj œ œœ œœ ‰‰ œœ œœ ‰‰ œœ œ ‰‰ œJœ œœ Jœ J J Pick 2nd notes as well 14 14 11 11 C b13 C b13 œ œœ œ b # E b7 E b7 œœ œœ JJ ‰‰ 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 8 11 8 11 6 9 6 9 œ œœ œ œ œœ œ b jC œb13 C n œ 13 n n œœj œœ nn n œœ œœ n œ œœ n œ J j œj ‰ œœ ‰ œ œ œœ œ 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 B b7 # 9 jj n œjjD bœm9 œœ ‰ nn œœ œœ œœ ‰ n œ œ 8 8 6 6 œ œœ ‰ Jœ ‰ J œœ B b7 # 9 œœ œœ ‰ ‰ œœ œJ ‰ ‰ JJ J œœDD bbm9 m9 œœ œ œ ⋲⋲ œœ œœ œœ 14 14 11 11 œ œœ œ D bm9 D bm9 ∫œ ∫∫ œœ ∫œ j œj œœ œ 11 11 8 8 E b7 E b7 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 j œj œ œ œ œ 10 10 10 7 10 7 7 7 D bm9 jD bœm9 œœ nn œœj œ bb œœ œœ nn œœ œœ bb œJœ 10 11 10 11 7 8 7 8 D bm9 jD bœm9 n œj nœ œ nœ œ nœ œ 10 10 7 7 11 11 8 8 9 9 6 6 j œj œœ œ 8 8 6 7 7 5 6 5 7 7 5 5 B b7 # 9 œœ œœ œ œœœ 11 11 11 8 11 8 8 8 14 14 11 11 11 11 8 8 C b13 C b13 9 9 6 6 bœ ‰‰ bb œœ b œJ J j œj n œ œœ nn œœ œ. œœ œ œ œœ œ ‰ ‰ J b # œœ BB b77 # 99 œ œœ œ œœ ‰ ‰ œJœ Jœ ‰ ‰ J J j œj œœ œ œœ œ 5 j b œj ∫ œ ∫œ bb œœ ∫ œ bœ ∫œ 6 E b7 E b7 œ œœ œ œ œœ œ D bm9 D bm9 œ œ œ œ œ ⋲œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œMONTGOMERY œ WES œ œ ⋲ œœ œœ œSUNNY PLAYING TIPS 11 11 CD TRACK 8 11 9 10 9 7 7 7 9 7 11 11 8Many of you will 8not have tried this style before. œœ œ 6 6 jC b13 n œjC œbœ13 n n œœ œ nn n œœ œœ n œ œœ n œ J œ.. based on the b3rd (Gb) and root (Eb) 7 8 7 8 B 7 7 7 7 7 9 7 10 11 10 D 7 the 8 7 4 4 4 4 4 6 4 and this idea takes us on another call-and-response journey till very end.. but 8 I heartily recommend 8 7 7 7 9 11 10 9 8you give it a go. n œ œœ B b7 # 9 œœ œœ ‰ ‰ œœ œJ ‰ ‰ JJ J œ ‰‰ œœ œ J 7 7 4 4 D bm9 D bm9 œœ œœ B b7 # 9 B b7 # 9 j œœj ‰ œœ ‰ 7 7 8 8 4 8 8 4 6 6 6 6 C b13 C b13 œœ œœ œœ œœ 8 8 6 6 j œœj ‰ ‰ œœ j œœj ‰ œœ ‰ 8 8 6 6 8 8 6 6 B b7 # 9 jj B b7jj# 9 œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ j œœj ‰ œœ ‰ 7 8 8 7 8 8 4 8 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 4 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 35 6 6 6 6 ... œœ œ œ.. as the96 rewards 7 are 6 4 4enormous.

C. 4 6 N. 9 4 7 4 7 8 7 10 11 6 9 4 7 4 7 6 4 8 6 8 j œ ‰ j œœ ‰ œœj œ8 ‰ œ C b13 œ 9 bœ ‰ bb œœ ‰ bb œœJ ‰ b Jœ9 J6 6 8 6 8 j6 b 6#j œ ‰B 7œ 9‰ j j œœ ‰B bœœ7 # 9‰ œœj œœj œ8 ‰ œ8 ‰ œ C b13 œ œœ œ C b13 œ œœ œ œ œ7 œ 8 9 6 8 6 j œ ‰ j œœ ‰ œœj œ8 ‰ 6 j 6 œ ‰ Œ j œœ ‰ Œ œœj œ8 ‰ Œ .D E A B E G D 129 A E 129 7 10 10 E 777 b 8 11 11 8 8 7 10 10 7 D 7 8 11 11 8 bm9 8 11 14 11 6 9 8 b7 #11 B 9 11C b13 9 14 11 E b7 7 11 8 10 10 11 7 8 D m9 7 8 7 10 10 7 7 b 8 11 11 8C b13 8 11 14 6 8 B8b7 # 911 j j œ œœ œ j œ œ n œ œœ œ œœ 6 9 œ j B b7 #j9 j6 n œ œ b b b # œ œ œ D m9 C 13 B 7 9 E b7 n œ b œ œ n œD bm9 b œ C bœ13 œ œ œ œœ œ œ ‰ œ 8-9 b j œ j œ œ œ œ ‰ œ TRACKs ‰ œœj ‰ œj œTHE b œ CD j j & b b b b b Eœœb7⋲ œ œ œD b⋲m9œ œ œœ ‰ nn nn œœœ CœœJb13 ‰ œœœ œœJ ‰B bœJ7 # 9‰ œJ ‰ Eœb7 nn œœ bb œœ œœ nnON œ D bœm9b œJ œ œ œ b b # b b b b ⋲ œœ œœ œ ⋲ œ œ J ‰ nn œj œœ ‰ œj œœ ‰ Jœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ n œ b œ n œj œ b œ ‰ Cœ13œ œ ‰B œ7 9‰ œ ‰ b œœ nn œœ Jœ œœ Jœ œ J œœ œ œj œj œj & b œœ n œ b œ œœ n œ œ b Jœ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ‰œ‰ J b œ n œ œ b TRACK 8 PLAYING & b b TIPS b œ ⋲ 11 11 14 ⋲ œ œ œ ‰ n œ 1111œJ ‰ œ 11œJ11 ‰ 14J ‰ 11J ‰ 9 n10œ b œ9 œ7 n œ 11œ b œ9 ‰ œ7 œ œ ‰ CD œ œ8 J 6 11 8 8 11 8 8 11 8 8 11 8 8 8 8 J b7 Eœ 8 8 9 Play: JAZZ E B G D E A B E G 132 D E A B E G D 132 A E 132 9 11 9 11 E b7 9 11 11 14 E B G D E A B E G 136 D E A B E G D 136 A E 136 b & b bbbb b & b bbbb b & b bbbb E B G D E A B E G 140 D E A B E G D 140 A E 140 6 6 9 8 8 11 D bm9 j6 6 9 8 8 11 6 8 6 8 E b7 6 6 8 6 9 7 8 10 11 6 9 D 8 bm9 4 7 b7 Eœ 6 8 6 8 E b7 6 6 8 6 8 6 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 4C b13 6 6 8 6 8 B b7 # 9 6 4 7 j j6 œ œj ∫bœ œ œ D m9 ‰ ∫ œ ‰ ‰ œ œj œœj œœJ œj ∫D bœm9 œœJ Eœb7 œœj ‰ œœj œJœ ‰ œœj ∫∫ œœ ‰ œJœ ∫œ ‰ œ8 ‰ œ œJ7 ‰ œ 10 œJ9 4 7 6 7 6 œœ œœ œ7 C b13 9 3 6 7 8 9 10 9 4 7 3 4 6 7 8 9 7 10 6 9 4 7 3 4 œ œœJ œœ J œ7 J4 10 11 7 7 10 8 11 4 7 7 10 4 7 36 GuitarTechniques September 2014 bœ ‰ bb œœ ‰ bb œœJ ‰ b Jœ9 J6 6 C b134 œ œ œb œ Cœ 13 œ œœ œ œ œ7 œ 8 C b13 9 4 7 8 11 6 9 4 7 8 6 4 11 9 8 11 6 9 œœ œœ œ8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 6 6 8 6 8 b B 7#9 6 j6 j œ ‰B b7œ# 9 ‰ Œ j j œœ ‰B bœœ7 # 9‰ Œ œœj œœj œ8 ‰ œ8 ‰ Œ 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 6 6 8 E b7 6 7 10 6 9 4 7 8 7 10 11 6 9 7 10 6 9 4 7 8 7 10 11 6 9 8 6 6 D 4 bm9 7 j œ œ n œD bm9 j œ œœJ nn œœ D bœm9 œœ nn œœj œœ J nœ œ œ j E b7 œ ‰ œj ‰ E b7 œ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ œœ ‰ 7 8 J4 7 6 8 j j œ ‰B b7œ# 9 ‰ Œ j j œœ ‰B bœœ7 # 9‰ Œ œœj œœj ‰ œ8 œ8 ‰ Œ œ C b13 œ 6 8D bm97 j n œ bœ ‰ nn œœjD œœm9 b ‰ nn œœjD œœm9 ‰nœ œ 10 8 11 14 11 8 11 8 11 14 11 8 11 B8b7 # 9 j j œ ‰B b7œ# 9 ‰ Œ j j œœ ‰B bœœ7 # 9‰ Œ œœj œœj œ8 ‰ œ8 ‰ Œ œ C b13 œ œœ œ C b13 œ œœ œ œ œ7 œ 8 10 7 8 10 11 10 10 7 7 10 10 7 7 10 10 7 7 b j œ ‰ nn œœjD bœœm9 ‰ b œ œœj n œ D bœm9 bb œœJ œœj ‰ nn œœj œœ ‰ bb œJœ œ8 ‰ n œ 11œ ‰ b œJ9 6 8 j b7 Eœ b b & b b b b œbj ‰ Eœ7 b & b b b b b œj ‰ œ b & b bbbb œ ‰ 8 E B G D E A B E G 144 D E A B E G D 144 A E 144 6 6 9 8 8 11 8 8 11 11 11 14 j b7 Eœ b b b & b b b œbj ‰ Eœ7 b & b b b b b œj ‰ b œ & b bbbb œ ‰ 8 10 10 7 7 11 8 10 10 11 7 8 7 8 10 11 10 11 7 8 C7 13 8 6 8 E b7 6 j ‰ œ œœ j E b7 œ œ ‰ œ jœ ‰ œœ œœ œ8 8 E b7 6 8 E b7 6 8 E b7 6 6 8 6 8 j ‰ œ œœ E b7 œj œ ‰ œ œ j ‰ œœ œ œ8 œ8 6 8 6 8 6 6 6 8 6 8 6 10 11 7 7 8 10 11 4 7 4 bœ ‰ bb œœ ‰ bb œJœ ‰ b Jœ9 J6 4 7 6 8 4 7 6 8 b C 134 6 4 7 7 8 10 11 6 9 4 7 7 D 8m9 6 b j œ n œD bœm9 j œ œœ nn œœ D bœm9 œœ nn œœj œœ œ7 n œ 11œ 10 4 7 8 7 10 11 4 7 8 7 10 11 4 7D bm9 8 j œ œ n œD bm9 j œ œœ nn œœ D bœm9 œœ nn œœj œœ œ nœ œ 7 10 11 4 7 8 7 10 11 bœ ‰ bb œœ ‰ bb œJœ ‰ b Jœ9 J6 C b13 4 6 6 8 8 B b7 # 9 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 B b7 # 9 6 6 8 6 œœ œœ œ8 j j œ ‰B b7œ# 9 ‰ j j œœ ‰B bœœ7 # 9‰ œœj œœj ‰ œ8 œ8 ‰ j œ ‰ j œœ ‰ œœj œ8 ‰ 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 œ œ œœ œœ N.C.C. œœ œ œ œ7 œ 8 6 6 6 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 8 6 6 6 œœ œœ œ7 C b13 4 7 6 9 4 7 6 N.

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brass. so singing harmonies in a pop band – perhaps doing Queen.play: THEORY ON THE CD track 10-27 Four-Part Harmony Bridget Mermikides explains the principles and practice of four-part harmony. Bass convention. arrange and compose a wide range of music. Musical logic and balance: Inherent in the craft of four-part harmony is a beautiful musical logic. and the ‘rules’ should be understood for what they are – merely stylistic guidelines. most courses on four-part harmony – aka four-part writing. You’ll get the most from these if. it becomes easier to absorb and appreciate these ‘rules’ not as abstract ideas. When two or more voices move together with too much similarity. based on the simple idea of four voices singing in harmony. This means that the range of each voice is well defined and most melodies are confined to same-note. there are examples – even from such masters of four-part harmony as J S Bach – of ‘forbidden’ parallel motion and the like. TECHNIQUE FOCUS The rules and logic of harmony sprang from people singing together. Each chord will be neither bland. actually helps them be singable). So go on… have a go! John Eliot Gardener) recording of all of J S Bach’s cantatas on no less than 56 CDs (SDG 2013) – but the two-CD Volume 1 is a great start. It can be found in countless chorales. better still. 1-6 (Decca 2004) by the Takács Quartet. not because they violate some arbitrary ‘rule’. Each voice will also have a ‘horizontal’ logic (which The reality is that the rules of harmony emerged from the pursuit of musical expression. and so each voice singing a leading tone will either move together (making them no longer independent) or if they don’t. so try Schumann Piano Works (DG 2001) recorded by Wilhelm Kempff. And that’s why such things as parallel octaves and doubled leading tones are rare – because they are likely to jeopardise a musical principle (and not sound good). wind or string quartets. Alto. for example. You might also hear that you should never double the 7th note of the key (known as a leading tone). Independence: Each voice should have its own independent melody. The wonderful effect of good four-part writing is that harmony emerges from multiple simultaneous melodies rather than as basic block chords. at that moment. from Bach to The Beatles and far beyond. These three basic principles explain all the ‘rules’ or guidelines you might hear. then one of the voices is likely to not sound logical. Now let’s focus on some techniques of four-part writing through a number of examples arranged for the guitar. but they will all be in the service of ‘singability. but looking at its main principles is a fascinating and extremely worthwhile thing to do. Why would this be a problem? Because two voices that move together in octaves sound like one musical line. Beatles or Bee Gees covers – is a great way to get to grips with it. and how understanding it can make you a more rounded musician and more knowledgable guitarist. Why? Because. You might. Or try Haydn: String Quartets. do so with other people. If you don’t like the idea of that. rather than the other way around. for each example. Tenor. independence and musical logic’. Alto. in that you won’t hear too many consecutive leaps up or down. First of all. there are great examples of romantic four-part writing in Schumann’s work. transcribing etc. but as evolving from core musical principles. A complete study of four-part harmony would take years to complete. but really embed the principles of four-part harmony into your brain. and leaps are balanced. nor too esoteric for the style. plus. The reality is that these ‘rules’ actually emerged from the pursuit of musical expression rather than the other way around. too: knowledge of chords. Once you understand the basic aims and principles of four-part harmony. you could try The Monteverdi Choir’s (under the direction of . We’ll encounter some ‘rules’ on the way. That said. songs and even in the basic concept of chords themselves. Tense chords will have a tendency to resolve to chords that sound more ‘seated’ – these generally start and end musical phrases. Beach Boys. you learn to sing along each part (if you can reach it) or. Why? Because a leading tone has a strong tendency to resolve up to the tonic. this jeopardises that effect. and are a perfect way to meet others with similar musical interests. Or perhaps you could become a member of a choir – they’re springing up everywhere since Gareth Malone’s TV series. in that certain tones will have a tendency to resolve in certain directions. 38 GuitarTechniques September 2014 GETTY IMAGES TRACK RECORD If you have a few months (and a bit of cash) to spare. is the cornerstone of Western music and its influence can be heard across the centuries. Tenor. a barber-shop quartet would not only stretch your vocal prowess. It’s music first. Bass) etc – might seem like a series of rules to memorise and strictly follow. other musical imperatives of melody and narrative were more important than the three principles. thus jeopardising the independence of the voices in the musical passage. ABILITY RATING Moderate Info Will improve your Key: Various Tempo: Various CD: TRACKS 10-27 Harmony and voice-leading Melody and bass separation Writing for four parts The history of four-part harmony. SATB (Soprano. which will help you understand. have heard of the avoidance of parallel octaves in four-part writing. in order to avoid ‘doing it wrong’. Four Seasons. These principles might be summarised as… Singability: Every part must be singable by a human. Singing harmony will feed back to your guitar playing. step-wise (scale) motion or well-considered leaps (chord tones). and this has implications on the range and contour of each of the four voices. and a sense of tension and release that the listener can appreciate. piano pieces. This can be found ‘vertically’. 76 Nos. Op. since they usually follow the Soprano. in that the chords produced have a balanced use of dissonance and consonance.

with the musical and film Jersey Boys The Beach Boys brought sophisticated vocal harmony to pop music in the 1960s September 2014 GuitarTechniques 39 .FOUR-PART HARMONY The Four Seasons’ brand of harmony is still popular.

Note that the guitar actually sounds an octave higher than written. In particular. and the very highest Soprano note is a top A on the guitar (17th fret on the first string). Tenor and Bass staff containing the Soprano and Alto voices (with their stems up and down (abbreviated as SATB). however degree (the root. 3rd or 5th) willwhave to double. 8 7 the tendencies 8 7 8 #œ #œ œ nœ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 5 7 8 7 œ8 & œ 5 tendency 6 tones 8 4 Melodic minor scale and tonic ww w 10 w0 Weaker tendency œ œ œ Melodic minor scale and tendency tones supertonic subdominant submediant 2 0 12 10 6 leading tone 7 œ ww w w œ Example 3 MAJOR SCALE AND TENDENCY TONES E 3 DEGREE NAMES 8 12 0 10 0 5 dominant 7 mediant 4 tonic 7 5 Weaker tendency œ6 Strong tendency #œ #œ 4 5 œ 5 5 Slight tendency œ 6 Strong tendency 6 œ œ7 œœ 6 Slight tendency 8 5 œ œ œ œ œœ œœ 4 5 7 5 7 5 .www sing a chord Soprano. when the leading tone and Subdominant appear together. 5 it is rare for the voices 10 Bass and Tenor. two of the notes in the scale have a tendency to resolve in a particular direction: E 5 7 B G Ex 3 D 5 6 8 5 scale degree 7 Major names and tendency tones A E E B G D AEx E E B Ex G D A E supertonic tonic & œ5 4 œ7 œ subdominant submediant dominant mediant 5 5 6 8 œ œ œ 5 œ œ8 tonic Strong tendency œ7 œ8 submediant subdominant supertonic 5 7 tonic mediant dominant leading subtonic dominant mediant tonic supertonic subdominant submedianttone tonic submediant subdominant supertonic 4 4 mediant 5 7 dominant tonic leading 7 Melodic minor scale and tendency tonestone subtonic œ œ œœ œ œ œ5 œœ7 6 œ8 œ5 12 œ œ #œ #œ œ nœ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 40 GuitarTechniques & œ September 2014 5 7 4 5 8 6 5 E B G D Ex A œœ w5 w5 ww20 œ œ TRACK 13 5 1 5 10 a very strong tendency to resolve the leading tone (7th note in the scale) has 2 5 5 Strong up to the root (the tonic). The 4 Voices of SATB and their ranges on the guitar ˙ TRACK 11 FOUR PART HARMONY FOR GUITAR GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Example 1b shows how these four voices translate to the guitar. examples of Tenor dropping below Bass. 4-Part voicing of C major Ex 1b. with the treble down respectively). 3 chord members are given to 4 voices with a doubled root w w 17 5 0 12 5 9 w w w w 10 5 10 10 ww 38 ww 8 w C Am 10 w 0 w w w w www ww w ww w w w5 3 8 12 0 5 12 & www1 ww5 5 8 13 1 5 10 w0 w5 w9 12 w2 w5 w SOPRANO ˙ ALTO TENOR BASS C E B G D A E E B G D A E E B G D A E E B G D Ex A E 2 position triads examples. or Alto exceeding A minor. and particularly the Bass have dominant tonicin one direction 8 mediant œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ more freedom of motion than the middle two voices). Alto. They fit surprisingly well. and we are using four voices. &The4 4 Voices ˙ on the guitar ˙ w ˙ SOPRANO ALTO TENOR BASS C ˙ GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 ˙FOUR PART HARMONY˙FOR GUITAR w ww 4 ˙ 17 8 3 8 & 4 ˙1 ˙ 13 8 1 ˙ w9 voicing of C major 4-Part Ex 1b. The 4th degree (the Subdominant) 5 degree (the Mediant).13let’s look œ www w B G 0 5 9 12 at howDeach voice principle is minimal motion with 2 moves in time.play: THEORY ON THE CD track 10-27 Example 1A THE 4 VOICES OF SATB AND THEIR RANGES track 11 FOUR PART HARMONY FOR GUITAR Here are the four voices from high to low: Soprano. In terms of spacing. as they appear in standard notation. 3 chord members are given 10 to 4 voices with a doubled root Root 3 3 0 8 5 Am C E 3 8 12 0 5 B 1 5 8 13 1 5 G 0 5 9 12 2 5 DEx 3 Major 2 scale degree names and tendency tones 10 A 3 3 0 Strong E 8 5 leading subdominant tendency supertonic submediant tone tonic dominant tonic mediant 2 & wwww ww ww ww w w www w œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ex 3&Major scale degree names and tendency tones 8 works Now we’ve seen1the basics of how5four-part harmony vertically. (the exception is the gap between w8 voicings of C major and Ex 2 toRoot position examples. and the bass clef taking Tenor and Bass (again with stems up and is traditionally written on the two staves (treble and bass). 8 0 ˙ Particularly. Note that as triads have three notes. Four-part harmony respectively). and that’s why the top line of Example 1a and 1b differ. and could go some way to explaining why the guitar and voice go so well together. there should not be a gap of greater solution is to double the root (although as we’ll see later. w C Am ww – that is to say. wider). are extremely rare. The lowest note of the Bass range is the lowest on FOUR PART HARMONY FOR GUITAR GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 w ˙ wwvoicing of C major 4 ˙ of SATB and their ranges ˙ 4-Part Ex 1b. 1 13 and Tenor 8 1 w Ex 2 Root triads examples. 10 where the gap can be Voicing and spacing. are even stronger. The general 10 leading subdominant supertonic 3 submediant tone A 3 not tooE many leaps (the Soprano. The w w most common w w w w the same note. and it’s rare to see it not do so in2traditional four-part 10 Weaker tendency tonic0 0 tendency has a tendency0 to resolve to the 3rd writing. 5th is often w w w w w w wthehigher 17 8 3w 8 & between www position than an octave Soprano and Alto. Most importantly. The 4 Voices of SATB and their ranges on the 17 guitar 5 0 12 5 10 5 10 10 ˙ 10 3 ˙ SOPRANO ALTO TENOR BASS C8 8 0 ˙8 w8 17 ˙38 ww9 TRACK 12 1 13 1 Example 24ROOT POSITION TRIADS EXAMPLES ˙ ˙ 5 0 17 12 5 & 4 ˙ 10 Although the ranges cross. Theywcan double. GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Ex 1a The 4 Voices of SATB and their ranges ˙ SOPRANO & ˙ ALTO ˙ ? TENOR ˙ ∑ BASS ∑ ˙ ˙ ∑ ∑ ˙ ˙ Example 1B THE 4 VOICES OF SATB AND THEIR RANGES ON THE GUITAR the guitar. chord members are given to˙ with a doubled root Here are some representative 34 voicesconsiderably themselves actually crosstriads within a passage310 of traditional four-part writing. and between Alto doubled in a second inversion voicing) in the bass and then up.

but is a tendency of non-diatonic notes. This is because a flattened note moving upwards * an unidiomatic leap. but generally. we have a suspension. G andinD/F#). particularly when they occur together. ˙Ÿ~~~~ ˙ j j œ œ œG . Am/G and D7/F#). balanced motion with no Tendency 9 semitone. ˙. which10 30bar 1 and the D# 302 resolve up by a 10 1 in the second 1 chord of bar In this minor sequence. . motion is smooth and the Bass and Soprano have more represented in the four-note œ chords (C/B. making it musically illogical. so the ‘natural’ 7th (Subtonic) is sharpened to create a leading tone when the music resolves. the leaps are large. This is because classical harmony relies on the leading tone resolution. Sing each one and you can see how the sequence comprises four simple and singable lines. 4 0 aren’t) and 0a semitone sharper 9 Ex with inversions and suspensions D 6 4-Part Harmony 3 3 10 10 tonesA are nicely resolved: the D on the 3third string resolves5to C (Subdominant 10 to than the diatonic3 note tend to resolve up. The first example shows the bottom four notes of a barre-chord. There’s a strong tendency for the leading tone to resolve to the tonic. This is doubled the root position first inversion (C. E B G D A EE B G D AE EB G D A E & 44 & 44 1 0 1 0 30 1 0 3 3 3 1 2 20 1 0 2 2 2 1 2 00 1 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 31 2 3 0 11 2 3 3 1 5 1 3 2 0 1 0 1 23 2 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 2 31 0 2 3 1 1 1 30 0 0 3 1 Ó Ó 1 0 2 3 1 0 2 3 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 41 . but rendered more classically. Voices move minimally and sound independent. A˙ ˙.supertonic œ tonic & œ œ mediant œ subdominant submediant dominant œ œ œ leading tone œ tendency Weaker tendency œ 5 7 8 5 6 8 5 7 Example 4 MELODIC MINOR SCALE AND TENDENCY TONES scale is more complicated than the Major. However. and the subdominant resolves to the mediant in a different voice and octave. Tendency tones resolve as expected. so it can also be raised. with a larger interval from Bass to Tenor than between other voices. in the Soprano voice in bar 1). The C# in the Ex 6 but 4-Part Harmony with and suspensions E B G D A EE # œœœ D #dim7 #œ œœ D##dim7 œ ##5œœ 7œ 5 #6œ A m/E E E7 Amsus4 # œœ n n œœ n Eœ E 7 **n œ #*œEœ *delayed n Eœ7toneof resolution n œ leading *#4œ n7œ œ 5œ n œ * ** delayed n 4 resolution 7 of leading tone 04œ * **7 delayed 5 resolution of Am ˙˙ . Melodic minor scale and tendency tones E B G D A E œ œ œœ œ FOUR-PART HARMONY E B G D A The EMinor Ex 4 œ œ tonic œ 5 œ mediant 7 5 œ œ #œ œ 4 5 Slight tendency œ œ 7 5 œœ œ œ 4 5 7 5 tonic 4 7 Example 5 IDIOMATIC HARMONISATION IN four PARTS I IV V7 I PROGRESSION Let’s see how a C-F-G7-C (I IV V7 I) sequence might look on the guitar. and a slight tendency for the 4th to resolve to the 3rd (Subdominant to Mediant). it is avoided. the resulting leap 7 8 6 supertonic subdominant submediant œ œ & œ tonic mediant 4 7 œ #œ #œ œ dominant 5 5 7 œ nœ nœ œ subtonic dominant tonic leading tone 4 7 5 Strong tendency submediant subdominant supertonic 8 6 7 6 5 8 5 TRACK 14 from the 6th (Submediant) to the raised 7th can be awkward melodically (not especially ‘singable’). œœ œ A m/E œ œm/E Aœ œ œ 5œ 5œ œ 5 œ7 œœœ Amsus4 **wœ Amsus4 œœ **5œ w 5œœ 7 0w 5 5 5 5 6 5 5 7 5 5 5 7 7 5 5 5 4 leading 7 tone 7 5 0 65 75 5 4 4 7 5 05 06 05 05 7 Adaptation of the in 4-Part 05 5 7 Harmony 5 5 5 5 5 opening6of Bach's05Air on a G-String 5 6 7 7 5 5 5 4 7 7 5 0 TRACK 17 Example 7 0ADAPTATION OF OF BACH’S AIR G-STRING HARMONY C C/B A m THEAOPENING m/G Fmaj7 /F ON 7/F C/G in four-PART G C 6 D 7Da 0 0 0 0 0 This ‘real-word’ example takes an adaptation of the opening of Bach’s Air On A the 5th is doubled in the second inversion triad (C/G). and in the same direction for the last three chords. Each voice is in its range. However. Ex 5 Idiomatic harmonisation in 4-parts of I IV V7 I progression 2 xxxxxxxxxx Unidiomatic I IV V7 I progression Idiomatic I IV V7 I progression F G7 œœ œ œ œ Idiomatic œœ I IV V7 I œprogression œœ C F G7 œ Idiomatic œœ I IV V7 Iœœœprogression œœ œF œC œ G7 0œ 1œ 1œ 1œ 1 0 œ œ 0œ 2œ 0œ œ œ3 11œ 31œ 0 œ œœ œœ * œœ I IV V7 I progression n œœœ & Unidiomatic œœ + œœF 4-parts Ex 5 Idiomatic harmonisation in I IV V7 I œ progression parallel 5ths Out ofof range C G7 C parallel 5ths n œ parallel S&A Unidiomatic I IV V7 I progression œœ œœ in Soprano octaves/5ths leading tone unresolved œœ * œœF Out of range *+ subdominant & n œœC unresolved G7 œœ + parallel 5ths œœC in Alto œœ parallel S&A 5ths n œ œœ 2œ 4œ 9œ & parallel n9œœœ * octaves/5ths leading tone unresolved in Soprano œ 3œ 3 10 10 + *+ subdominant œ parallelunresolved 3œ 5 10 5ths 10œ in Alto n 1œ parallel 5ths 3œ 8 8 parallel Out of range G7 C F 2 xxxxxxxxxx Ex 5 Idiomatic harmonisation in 4-parts S &ofAI IV V7 I progression C œœ œœ C œœ œC 0œ 1œ œ 0œ 3œ C C E B G D A E E 0 B 1 1 0 1 octaves/5ths leading tone unresolved in Soprano G 2 4 0 2 0 0 9 9 TRACK 16 + subdominant unresolved D 3 3 10 10 in Alto AE 3 5Alto or Tenor. Every chord degree is Ex 7 Adaptation of the opening of Bach's Air on a G-String in 4-Part Harmony j B G D AE EB Ex G D A E 5 5 & 44 5 6 œœ œ œœœ œœœ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œCœ œœ Aœœœm A œœœm/G œœ œ C/B œ 0 0œ œœ œ 012œœœ œ 012œœœ œ 1œ 1 œ 0œ 0œ 3œ 3œ 2œ 2œ 0œ 0œ 30œ 3œ 0 0 0 # # œ˙˙ œ œ œ˙ œ œ œ ˙ ˙œ œ œ # ˙ Fmaj7 Dœ/F # œ Dœ7/F # œ ˙˙ ˙˙ 0 5œ 1œ œ 1˙ #32˙œ˙ 1œ 0œ 1œ 2˙ 0˙ 10˙ 2˙ # 5 1 ˙˙ ˙ ˙ C/G ˙˙ ˙ 1˙ ˙ 0˙ 2˙ 3˙ Ÿ~~~~ j œ œ˙ . 5˙ 5˙ ˙5 . as in traditional ‘tonal’ writing its 6th and 7th degrees may be altered.** would have It does happen.aAm. Plus two voices move in the same direction in octaves (and 5ths). Non-diatonic notes 3 that are flatter 10 E 1 1 3 semitone (Bb resolves down to A Mediant) and the leading tone (G#) resolves to the tonic (A)3via the 5th of the E78 than the diatonic note tend to resolve down by 8 Example 6 four-PART HARMONY WITH*INVERSIONS AND SUSPENSIONS b Am A7 9 Dm E7 Am bœ œœ œœœ # œœœ œœ œœ b œ # n œ Am A7 9 Dm E7 Am & œ Ex 6 4-Part Harmony with inversions and suspensions œœ œœ bœœ b œœm #Eœœ7œ œœm Aœ m A7 9 Dœ A œ # œ n & œ b6œœ œ œ 5œ 5œ 5œ #45œœœ 5œ 5œ 6œ 5œ # n 5 6 7 7 5 & 0œ 0œ 0œ 0œ 04œ 5 6 5 5 # D dim7 in bar 3. Again. this violates several of our principles: the top two voices drop below their acceptable limit 2 xxxxxxxxxx (so they’re unsingable). Notes0that are not in2the key (as these 2 parallel 5ths or octaves. Bar 2 shows the same sequence. Note how the melodic freedomCthan theC/B inner twoAvoices. The leading tone in the third chord is not TRACK 15 resolved by the same voice. ˙0˙ Ÿ~~~~~ 3˙ 0 1 0 Ÿ~~~~~ 0 ˙˙ ˙˙ C ˙˙ ˙˙ 1˙ 0˙ 2˙ 3˙ Ó G String (GT188)... Finally. the Bass has greater freedom than second chord in EB 1 3 11 30 1 1 8 8 have Ga smooth. Am ˙m. and Ex 7in Adaptation of theand opening of Bach'striads Air on G-String 4-Part Harmonynot the case in every harmonic context. The D (Tenor) is due to resolve to C (3rd of A minor) delays resolution toinversions sound momentarily suspended.. Also notice that the roots are always non-diatonic F#C/G in the bass voice of bar 2 resolves m A m/G Fmaj7 D /F # D 7/F # G C up a semitone to G. which sabotages their independence. ˙˙ Ÿ~~~~~ Ÿ~~~~ j j 0˙ 1œ œ 0œ .

œ 10œ œ10 œ 12 œ 9 œ 9 œ 12œ 12œ 10w 12 ## 4 Œ elaboration of the melody as in the opening of Bach's Chorale BWV 253 Ex 9 Rhythmic and & 4 Ó melodic 9 12 9 E A9 E A9 G 12 A 9 D 10A 9 E 12 A 10 D 10 E 12 A 9 7 A 10 12 E12 10 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ BWV œ œ œ w œ 253 œ œ Ex 9 Rhythmic elaboration of the melody œ as in the opening of Bach's Chorale # # # 4 andÓ melodic Œ A E A G A D A E A D E A E E7 A & 4 9 9 10 12 9 9 10 9 9 9 œ œ œ 10 12 12 10 10 12 12 10 12 10 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ opening of Bach's Chorale œ œ BWV œ œ œ w Ex 9 Rhythmic elaboration of the melody œ as in the œ 253 œ œ # # # 4 andÓ melodic Œ A E A G A D A E A D E A E E7 A & 4 œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w œ œ # # 4 Ó Œ 9 9 10 12 9 10 12 9 10 9 12 10 10 12 9 9 12 10 12 10 Example & 10# Addition 4 of Alto to Soprano part. We can introduce there is no unwanted parallel motion. making 4 Part Harmonisation œ4 0 5 œ œ0 w0 9 A 10 9 10E12 A9 10 12 10 10 G A 9 D 10A 9 12 12 11 9 11 9 E 9A A D E 12 10 10 12 9 11 12 11 9 E E7 12 10 12 9 12 A G D A E E B G D A E E B G D A E B G D A E Ex E B A E A G A D A E 2 1 2 2 4œ 2 4 5 ### 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ 0 5 0 Ó Œ 12 Addition of Tenor to Bass Part.Eœgiven A G A D A & 4 J 10 9 9 10 12 9 9 10 9 9 9 œœgiven Example 10 Addition of Alto to Soprano part. given simple harmonic progression PART HARMONY FOR GUITAR E B G D A E E B G D A E B G D A E E B G D A E E B G D A E E B G D A E B G D Example A E E B A 9 E A 9 10 12 9 G A 9 D 10 A 9 E A D E A 9 E E7 A œ œœ œœ œ n œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 10w œ œ œ œ # # 10ADDITION œ 9œ progression œ œ HARMONIC Addition of Alto to Soprano part. simple harmonic progression œ œ 10 10 12 10 10 12 12 10 10 12 12 10 12 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n12Gœ 11œ Aœ9 11Dœ Aœ9 Eœ9 12œ 11Aœ 11D˙ E Aœ9 œ9 Eœ9 . making 4 Part Harmonisation with Example 10 œ œ œ œ œ & 4 œ 2 œ nœ 2 œ # œœ 2 1 œ œ A E A 4 A D A 2 E4 5G 5 0 # # # 4 of Tenor to Bass0 Part.n œ so we’ll sequence and Soprano and Alto voices written above. E 712œ A11ww ### 4 A E A Ó Œ & 4 J œœ œ # # # 4 Ó Œ 10œœ9 10œœ9 10 1212œ 10œœ9 10œ n12œœ œ œœ9 10œ œœ9 12œœ œ 10œœ œ˙ 10œ 12œ œœ9 œœ9 12œœ . Notice how all the melody FOUR PART HARMONY GUITAR an extract from a work by the master of the style. 10œ 12œ œ 10ww 12 11 9 11 9 9 11 9 9 9 & 4 J 10 12 12 10 10 12 9 12 10 12 G D A E E B G D A E E B G Ex D A E B G D A Ex E E B 11 Addition of Bass to complement Soprano and Alto part 12 11 12 11 10 ### 4 9 9 Ó Œ œ 10 œ12 œand & 4 œ partn œ œ 9 œ 10 9 œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ 9 œ 9 œ œ œ œ 11 11 Addition of Bass to complement 9 9Soprano 9 Alto 10 œ 10 E12 A10 10 1212G 11A 9 D 11Aœ 9 E 129 A 10 D 11 10E12 9A 9 129 E10 12E 7 10Aw A 11 12 11 # TRACK 21 Example 11 OF BASS TO COMPLEMENT SOPRANO AND ALTO12PART # # ADDITION 4 Ex 11 Addition of Bass toŒcomplement Soprano and Alto part Ó œ œ œ œ It gets impractical to perform real-world chorale worksœon the solo guitar. we can create a simple bass & 4 # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ and œ part. œ Eœ andEœ7Alto parts. We’llEhearAit onceDalone. given simple harmonic Example 10 OF ALTO TO SOPRANO PART GIVEN SIMPLE œ œ œ ˙ PROGRESSION œ9 œ9 œ .play: THEORY ON THE CD track 10-27 Example 8 SIMPLE MELODIC OUTLINE OF SOPRANO PART IN A MAJOR TRACK 18 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 4 Baroque style Let’s turn our attention to four-part harmony2in3 the by examining BWV253 FOR is based around a simple melody in A Major. Notice how non-diatonic 10 12 12 10 10 12 10G in bar 2 E A G A D A E A D E A E12the10 E12 7J A some simple rhythmic independence from the Soprano part. Ex 12 Addition making 4 Part Harmonisation with Example 10 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ A0 œ0 Eœ0 Aœ0 œ0 nGœ Aœ Dœ Aœ #Eœœ & 4 Ó œ œ 3 3 œœ making Ex 12 Addition of Tenor to Bass Part. The opening to notes are chord tones of the underlying harmony. given Alto. A E AUsing the chord G A D A E then with A theœSoprano A œ œ w 2 1 2 2 1 2 # # Ex 11 Addition to complement Soprano and Alto 4 part 5 2 4 2 0 2 4 0 2 2 4 of Bass # & 4 Ó Œ A0 œ Eœ Aœ œ nGœ Aœ Dœ5 A0 Eœ Aœ œ Dœ œ Eœ # œ Aœ œ4 œ Eœ Eœ7 A0 œ w ### 4 Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 & 4 œ1 2 œ4 n œ5 2 withœ Exampleœ210 œ4 œ2 œ0 œ2 œ4 # œ1 2 œ0 œ2 œ2 Ex 12 Addition of Tenor to Bass Part. and also ensure (which is flatter than the diatonic G#) resolves down a semitone to F#. 10 1 2 14 Part 2 Harmonisation 0 2with 2Example 2 # # # September 42 GuitarTechniques 2014 œ œ œ œ 4 œ 0 2 4 œ Ó Œ 0 0 œ œ œ œ œ & 4 A Eœ A œ nGœ A Dœ A #Eœœ G D A E E B G D A E A D E 1 A 2 E œœ œ ˙œ œ œ œ œœ œ 4œ œ œœ 1 2 œ 0E 2 A 2A 0 D2 4E 4 œœ œ D˙ œ Eœ œ Aœœ œ œ Eœœ A œ3 œ 2 0 œ 2 1 2 2 2 œAœ4 œ2 D˙œ0 œ2 Eœ4 œ Aœœ œ œ4 œ0 Eœœ2 œ 2 0 2 4 0 2 E7 2 œœ E27 œœ E7 1 2 E7 œœ A w0 Aw 0 w w2 0 Aw A . Ex 8 Simple melodic outline of Soprano part in A major œ E A G A D A E A D E œ œ œFOUR œ œ œFOR GUITAR œ œ œ œ œ PARTœ HARMONY œ œ œ œ A GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 # # & # 44 Ó Œ Ex 8 Simple melodic outline of Soprano part in A major GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 A E AFOUR A E E7 A w œ œ œ Gœ Aœ Dœ Aœ Eœ Aœ Dœ Eœ Aœ œ Eœ Eœ7 A œ œ w Ex 8 Simple outline of Soprano part in A major # # # melodic 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 234 FOUR PART HARMONY FOR GUITAR Ó Œ & 4 A E A G A D A E A D E A E E7 A 9 9 12 9 9 10 9 9 9 œ œ 10 12 12 10 10 12 12 12 10 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ex 8 Simple outline of Soprano part in A major œ w œ œ # # # melodic 4 Ó Œ A E A G A D A E A D E A E E 7 A & 4 œ9 œ9 12œ œ9 œ œ œ9 10œ œ9 œ œ œ œ œ9 œ9 œ œ w # # 44 andÓ melodic 10in the 12 12 BWV 10 253 10 12 12 12 10 Ex 9 Rhythmic of the melody as opening of Bach's Chorale Œ elaboration TRACK 19 Example AND MELODIC ELABORATION OF THE MELODY & 9 #RHYTHMIC A E A G A D A E A D E A E E7 A The part below is an elaboration of the melody as in theœopening of Bach’s elaborated with some rhythmic variation and with the addition of some simple 10œ 9 œ œ9 outlined œ 9 œ 12in Example œ9 œ108 is nowœ12 œ 9 œmelodic Chorale BWV 253. J S Bach. E 7 œ Aw # # # 4 Ó Œ œœASopranoœœ part. use another guitar part to handle the Bass and Tenor voices. œ wTRACK 20 12 9 10 9 &the #chords44andÓSopranoŒ part. œ œ œœ simple œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ w Example 10 Addition of Alto to œœ œ œœ progression œ harmonic n œ œ Eœ œ Aœ D˙ E Aœ œ Eœ .#The simple skeletal melody variations.9A we can9 add10 the Now.

w . JœJ & # 44 & # 44 Ó œ . . . . 10 10 8 . œ. FOUR PART HARMONY FOR GUITAR j œ j œ j œ œ œ 1˙ œ œ 1˙ œ œ ˙ 1 12 10 8 8 12 10 8 8 12 10 8 8 œ. œ œ œ . œ... œ Jœ œJ J 10 8 7 7 9 9 10 10 15 14 7 10 8 7 7 9 9 10 10 15 14 7 10 8 7 7 9 9 10 10 15 14 . . œ. GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 FOUR PART HARMONY FOR GUITAR GUITAR Ex 13: GUITAR Ex 13: FOUR PART HARMONY FOR GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Haydn Melody Soprano Part TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Haydn Melody Soprano Part œ Ex 13: #Haydn Melody Soprano œ . . œ. . The main melody is given to the Soprano part. Part 4 Ó œ .. œJ & 4 Ó E B G E D B A G E E D B A G E D A E 10 8 10 8 10 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 7 10 7 10 7 10 1. .. Jœ œ œ œ œ . following the established principles. then with the other two voices (in the other guitar part)... 5 8 7 7 8 7 7 8 7 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ 10 7 10 7 10 7 13. making 4 Part Harmonisation with Example 10 A ### 4 & 4 Ó E Œ œ œ G A D A E A D E A E E7 œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ nœ œ œ # œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ 0 E B G D A E A 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 3 3 0 4 0 2 2 0 2 3 2 1 4 2 0 2 4 1 2 0 2 0 2 2 4 2 0 2 1 2 A w w 2 0 Example 13 HAYDN MELODY SOPRANO PART TRACK 23 Now we’ll take a famous melody by Haydn (which you might recognise as the German national anthem). 12 10 12 10 10 8 7 10 7 8 10 12 8 10 8 .. . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # . J & . 8 . . 17 A G E D A 13.### 4 & 4 Ó A Œ E A G œ œ œ œ œ A D A E nœ œ œ œ E B G 2 1 2 2 D 4 5 A 0 5 E Now we add the Tenor voice.. We’ll hear it Example 12 ADDITION OF TENOR TO BASS PART A D E A E E7 œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 0 4 2 0 2 1 4 2 4 0 2 2 A w FOUR-PART HARMONY TRACK 22 0 once (with the Bass). 17 œ.. œ œ œ œ . œ #œ œ œ œJ # œ œ œ Jœ # œ œ œ J ˙ ˙ ˙ œ.. Ex 12 Addition of Tenor to Bass Part. 8 . 5 ˙ # 2˙ & # 2˙ &# & 2 E B G E D B A G E E D B A G8 E D A 8 E 8 10 10 10 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 10 12 10 7 10 12 10 7 10 12 10 7 1. .. 22w . 7 œ œ œ. œ œ œ . œ œJ Jœ J 8 10 8 10 8 10 œ. 5 8 7 8 7 8 7 œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 10 7 8 10 7 8 10 7 8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 12 10 8 7 12 10 8 7 12 10 8 7 7 10 7 10 7 10 8 8 8 ˙ ˙ 1 ˙ 1 1 10 10 10 1. œ. . œ œ œ œ œ # . œ. œ. . œ œJ œJ J 15 14 15 14 15 14 2 w . œ œ œ œ & # . 17 E 8 . . œ. 8 . E B G E D B A G E E D B 13. . 1212 1010 1212 1010 1010 88 77 10 77 88 1010 1212 88 10 8 . œJ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ . September 2014 GuitarTechniques 43 .

. œœ œœ œœ œœ œ. œœj œ œ œ œ . œœ . J . .17 17 13. 10 8 7 9 10 7 . . j œ œ . & EE BB G G DD AA EE 77 10 10 99 1.. 12121212 .. J . œ j œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ . œ. 5 .play: THEORY ON THE CD track 10-27 xxxxxxxxxx 22 xxxxxxxxxx Example 14 HAYDN MELODY SOPRANO WITH ALTO HARMONY TRACK 24 Again. independence and balance are followed. . 88 10 10 77 88 j œ # œ œœ œœ ˙ ˙ 77 10 10 77 99 99 88 10 10 77 . # & 44 Ó EE BB G G DD AA EE 88 99 77 88 55 77 88 10 10 77 88 10 77 10 88 10 10 99 12 12 13 13 10 10 12 12 ˙ œ œ œœ ˙œ œ œ ˙ j œ . ˙ ˙ j œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . . 22 EE BB G G DD AA EE . œœ . J . .55 1. 88 77 10 10 33 55 77 44 77 11 77 88 ˙ # ˙ & 88 10 10 77 œœ œœ œœ œ œ Œ 55 77 55 77 77 88 77 77 œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ Œ 88 77 55 77 77 88 77 77 10 10 12 12 ˙œ . œ. ˙ .. œ. j œ œ J 15 15 14 14 12 12 12 12 88 2 œ . 11 œ œ œœ œœ . œ . . 5 3 4 j œ # œ œœ œ 1 . we’ll put the Bass voice on a different guitar part. 8 10 7 9 # 4 & 4 Ó E B G D A E œ 7 8 . Here.. 12 12 Example 15 HAYDN MELODY BASS PART ADDITION TRACK 25 This example takes a more classical approach than the ‘block-style’ chords of the Baroque choral style. J . œ. 10 10 10 12 12 10 12 12 13 13 10 10 12 12 10 10 55 77 13 12 12 13 11 12 11 12 77 88 10 88 10 10 12 12 88 10 10 88 12 12 10 10 88 10 11 99 11 12 12 88 12 12 15 15 14 14 12 12 12 12 . 5 7 8 10 œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ 7 8 10 10 œ œ 4 œ 5 œ œœ œ 8 12 13 10 12 8 7 œ Ó œ 0 œœ œœ 10 9 7 8 œ œ œ #œ 3 œ œœ 7 8 9 0 1. . the Bass part has a structural ‘interjection’ approach. w J . Haydn Melody Bass Part Addition # 4 Ó & 4 E B G D A E œ . œj 2 œ. J œ œ œ. let’s add an Alto part to Example 13. . . œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœjj œ # . 5 2 44 GuitarTechniques September 2014 7 œœ œœ œ œ œ ˙ ˙œ . Ex 15 Again. œ. Ex 14: 14: Haydn Haydn Melody Melody Soprano Soprano with with Alto Alto Harmony Harmony Ex j œ . ensuring the general principles of singability.. ˙ 5 5 ˙ œ. œœ œ .. œ Œ . 10 10 77 œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ 13. Ó Œ .

œJ J 5 œ œœ œ ˙ ˙˙ ˙ 9 10 8 7 9 10 8 7 10 7 10 7 œœ œœ 15 14 12 15 12 14 12 12 œ. œœ . w œ . Ó . œ. PART ADDITION 4 5 0 3 2 .. Ó Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ . 17 A E 13. . œœ œœ 2 . .. .. œ . ... œœ .. .. 5 E B G E D B A G E D 8 A E 8 E B G E D B A G E D A E 4 Ó 44 Ó 4 5 4 4 4 4 0 0 0 0 œ. 5 4 5 0 .. 15 14 12 15 12 14 12 12 œ. œ. j 2 œj 2 œœJ . . œ . . œ # œ 1.. 5 10 5 7 5 7 7 10 7 # &# ˙ & ˙ # &# & # &# & E B G E D B A G E D 13. œ œœ œœ œ œœœ œœ.. 5 5 œ œœ œ œœ 10 10 12 10 10 12 12 13 12 13 10 12 10 12 5 3 3 5 5 5 10 10 13 12 12 13 12 11 12 5 5 5 7 5 7 œ œ ˙ ˙ 5 5 3 3 7 8 8 10 7 8 8 10 5 3 4 5 9 7 9 12 8 12 12 10 89 12 9 œ œ œ œ 2 2 3 3 10 8 10 8 12 10 8 11 12 10 8 11 œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 FOUR-PART HARMONY 1 1 ˙ ˙ 8 12 8 12 ˙ ˙ 3 3 .. ...˙ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œ # ˙˙ œœ œœ œœ œ œœŒ œœ œœ œœ œ œœŒ œœ œœ &# ˙ & Œ Œ 1. œJ J ˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ 2 œ œ œ œ œj œ œœœ œ œœ œ œœ œj œœ œœ œ œ 11 10 4 7 œ Œ . œ œ œ 5 0 Œ Œ œ œ œ ˙˙ œ œ œ 5 j œœj œœJ J 5 7 8 7 8 5 œœ .... TRACK 25 5 . 1212 .. . Example 15 HAYDN5 MELODY BASS …CONTINUED 3 . œœ.. 12 12 . 3 3 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 45 . œ . . œœ œ . ˙ ˙ 3 2 œ œ œ œ ..# &# & E B G E D B A G E D A E E B G E D B A G E D A E . 1212 . .. œj # œ ˙œ . w J .. œ Œ . œ œ . œjj œœ. œœœ œœ œ œ j œ .. 0 j œ˙ . 17 7 8 7 8 5 7 5 7 7 8 7 8 5 7 5 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 7 7 8 7 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 10 12 10 12 8 10 8 10 5 5 5 5 5 2 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 2 3 5 œ œ. œ œJ J 4 4 4 4 5 .. w w . . œj œ œ œ...

J .play: THEORY ON THE CD track 10-27 ExampleS 16 & 17 HAYDN MELODY TENOR ADDED TO BASS PART Finally. 3 3 4 0 0 . G # & 44 Ó . œ. 12 12 10 10 12 10 12 10 11 D7 j # œ. Example 16 plays the Bass and Tenor once on their own. œ œ œ. œ . œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ # . we’ll add a Tenor voice to the Bass voice in the second guitar.. ˙ ˙ 0 3 7 8 1 8 Am/C A 7/C 0 0 œ˙ . TRACKs 26-27 and Example 17 plays it with the Soprano and Alto parts from Example 14 (which can be used as a backing track for this example). œ œ J C E B G D A E 12 13 13. ˙ # & ˙ 10 7 # 8 10 œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ 7 8 10 7 10 D7 G D7 œ œœ œ 3 2 4 5 5 7 5 7 G/D 4 5 8 7 D œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 3 3 0 0 0 7 8 D7 G /D 7 D 2 0 0 0 0 D7 7 10 12 8 10 3 0 3 0 2 3 2 0 .14) to complete 4 Parts (Ex. . œœ .. . independence and musical balance and logic are maintained. You can hear how all the voices work together to excellent musical effect. . . œ œ œ. j œ œ J 10 7 15 14 12 12 D G ˙ ˙ ˙œ . œ j œ œ œœ œœ œ œ . 4 3 œ J 4 . 17 . 12 G ˙œ . . 0 5 œ. œ œ J œ. 4 5 œ œ œ œ œ 1 11 10 7 G ˙˙ 7 3 12 10 9 D ˙ ˙ œ ˙ œ œœ œ # 4 8 j œ 8 7 j œ # œ œœ œœ A 2 j œ . . œ œ œ . Ó Œ œ E B G D A E E B G D A E œ . œ œ œœ œœ . 15 14 12 12 . w J . j 2 œ œ . œ œ J . 10 0 E m7 œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ. œ.. ensuring that all the principles of singability. 5 E B G D A E 7 8 . œ œ & . 5 2 & 5 7 .. œœj œ œ œ œ . w J w 0 3 4 0 4 . œ.. . . & E B G D A E G 7 œœ œœ œ œ œ #œ G /B Am/C Œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ 10 9 3 5 7 7 7 8 2 0 œœ œ œ œœ œœ Œ 7 8 7 0 œœ œœ 7 8 10 12 G œœ œ œ œœ œœ Œ D ˙˙ 12 13 œœ œ œ Ó œ 3 0 4 8 œœ œœ œ œ œ ˙ 9 1..15) # & 44 Ó E B G D A E 8 10 7 9 . œ Œ ... Example 16 and 17: Haydn Melody Tenor added to Bass part (Ex. 0 1 G 2 3 C 3 0 G 3 0 3 46 GuitarTechniques September 2014 3 0 13 12 12 G 5 7 D7/C 7 8 8 10 10 G/B C œ œ 3 0 0 3 8 9 œœ ˙ ˙ 3 12 12 8 G /D œ œ œ œ œ 0 2 10 9 0 9 8 A7 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 j œ 3 8 10 7 ˙ 8 12 D7 G œ œ ˙ ˙ 1 0 0 3 3 .

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play: classical ON THE CD Pyotr Tchaikovsky Scène from Swan Lake tracks 28-29 (Op. Swan Lake. This is used to smooth off the edges of the nails and keep them buffed to a fine polish. and captured the orchestral gestures as best as possible with arpeggios (and from bar 48. a dark sorcery and a deep love doomed to tragedy. but you can do far worse than the 2004 remastered EMI Classics two-CD set of Sawallisch and the Philadephia Orchestra. technically astonishing and perfectly judged evocative themes for orchestral works and the ballet. You have also doubtless heard it in numerous films and TV shows. As ever. For a more contemporary recording of Scéne. and is often played as an orchestral work in its own right. but Tchaikovsky’s melodic writing is so powerful that it translates very well. ABILITY RATING Moderate Info Will improve your Key: Em Tempo: Various CD: TRACK 28-29 Melodic phrasing Romantic repertoire Melody with chords This issue marks a return to the music of the phenomenal Russian composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840-1893). reducing an orchestral work down to six strings and two Using your nails Classical guitarists pluck the strings using the fingernails. Siegfried. Tchaikovsky’s accompanying music (Act 2. and finding Odette – whose true identity as a beautiful young girl trapped in the vision of a swan is revealed to him. his ballet works have a life beyond their functional origins. These need to be kept shortish -1-2mm above the fingertip . the better the tone! hands is a challenge. take your time to get the various techniques under your fingers. NEXT MONTH: Bridget arranges a section from Bizet’s Carmen Track record There are many powerful recordings of Swan Lake. No. You’ll want to have a technical fluency when coming to perform this. perfectly capturing a swan-like elegance. The ballet – adapted from Russian folk tales – enacts the story of Princess Odette (who takes the lead ballerina role) who has been transformed to a swan by a sorcerer.10 from the ballet Swan Lake composed from 1875-76. 50 GuitarTechniques September 2014 . Tchaikovsky. In this article. check out a collection such as Tchaikovsky: Ballet Suites (Berliner Philharmoniker 1996 Deutsche Grammaphon). In fact. This theme is an evergreen favourite for classical music lovers and the general public. for reasons of artistic licence!) As always. whose Dance Of The Sugar Plum Fairy I arranged back in GT192.10 Scéne – Lake in the Moonlight (Moderato). among other stunning ballet favourites. as the piece requires a fluid and expressive control of tempo for it to sound its best. and include among them the most loved and recognisable melodies in ‘classical’ music. hunting for swan in a moonlit forest clearing. referring to the tab captions for the trickier sections.and shaped correctly. I’ve arranged the stunning theme Act 2 No. Tchaikovsky: one of the all-time great composers I’ve transposed the original key of Bm down a 5th to Em to utilise the range and open strings of the guitar. The better the nails. also known simply as Scène) is both romantic and dramatic.20. such as the moving last scene of Billy Elliot (although the performance starts with Act II. so that they create a good plucking action and the best possible tone. Every serious player keeps a variety of nail files and buffers – a big favourite is very fine wet and dry sanding paper. to arrange and transcribe this famous theme from the equally famous ballet. No. the use of the tremolo technique) to mimic the tremolando used by the orchestral bowed strings. I’ve transposed the original key of B Minor down a 5th to E Minor. Tchaikovsky had an incredible talent for composing widely accessible. The opening of Act 2 depicts the other protagonist.10) Bridget Mermikides returns to the work of the Russian great. with a deeply tragic romantic conclusion. to utilise the range and open strings of the guitar more idiomatically.

SWAN .. œ œ œ œ7 7 7 7 0 0 0 0 7 7 7 7 C7 j C7 ¢œ C7 j œ C7 œœ œ£jb¢¢œœ˙ œœ œœ œ£j™b¢œ˙ œ œœ œ£™b ˙ œ œœ £™b ˙ ™˙ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 j œjj b œœ œj b œ œ b œœ œ b œœ œ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 œ œ œ œ # ## œœœ . œ. œ œ œ œ œ7 8 œœœ . œ œ œ œ j £œj œ . nœ.. œ # œ . œ œŒ œŒ œŒ Œ 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 p 2 p œ œ œ œ Bm Bm Bm Bm 3 j j œ œ œj œœ œ œj Óœ œ œ Óœ œ Ó Ó œ œ œ œ Classical Classical Classical Classical technique should be used throughout. œœ œ œ0 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 œ nn œœ œ nœ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ Em Em Em Em ¢œ ¢œ ¢œ ¢œ 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 Œ Œ œ Jœœ Jœ J J 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ¡œ ¡œ ¡ Œœ ¡ Œœ œ. n œœ˙ . œœ œ œ0 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 j œjj b œœ œj b ˙œœ œ‰ b ˙œœ œ‰ b ˙œœ ‰ ˙ ‰ ˙ 1 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 2 3 3 œ œ œ œ 3 3 3 3 j œjj œœ . 3 4 3 4 4 3 2 4 4 3 2 4 4 2 4 2 Em Em Em Em p 7 7 7 7 œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 A m/C A m/C A m/C A m/C ™œ £™ œ˙ £™ ˙œ £™ œ˙ £˙ 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 œ œ œ œ œ˙ œ˙ œ˙˙ œ˙˙ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ C C C C 7 7 7 0 a 0 p a 0 p a 0 p a p 2 2 2 2 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 5 4 5 4 5 4 5 4 ˙ œ ˙œ œ˙œ œ œ œœ nn ˙˙œœ œ˙œ œ œ œ nn ˙˙œ œœ œ œ œ nnn ˙˙ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 3 3 3 5 5 5 5 œ œ œ œ 3 3 3 3 œ œ œ œ œ˙ ™™œœ ¢¢œœ œ˙ ™œ ¢œ ˙œ˙ ™œ ¢œ œ˙˙ ˙ ˙ C C C œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 m m m m 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 a 0 3 m a 3 i m a p i m a p Em m i Epm i Epm Em 3 3 3 3 5 5 5 5 i i i i m m m m i i i i œ.SWAN . œ j œ. 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 C7 C7 C7 C7 F F F F œ nn œœ œ nœ œ nœ œ 3 3 3 3 7 7 7 7 œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 œ. œ # œ # œ # œ # œ œœ #œ #œ #œ œ #œ œ2 1 2 1 1 1 C C C C 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 œ œ œ œ 4 4 4 4 œ Jœœ Jœ J J 4 4 4 4 j œjj œj œ‰ œ‰ ‰ ‰ 0 0 0 0 œœ n ˙œœ˙ œ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœ n œœ˙ œ 2014 œ œ œœ œ 51 September n œ˙œ œ œ œœ œGuitarTechniques n œœ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ . œ. œ.. There is some indicated fingering for both hands for the first couple of bars to GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 3get 4 you started. ™œ . œ n œœ œ œœ œ0 n œœœœ œœ nœ nœ nœ 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 œ œ œ œ Em Em Em Em 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 D D D D 3 3 3 œ œ œ œ œ ‰œœ ‰œ ‰ ‰ 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 œ˙ œ˙ œ˙ œ˙ 4 5 4 5 4 5 4 5 #/C # # # # œ#/C/C. ˙. œœ . œ œ œœ . ˙œ .. œ .. œ. œœ # # œœ œ # œ œ œ œ22 2 3 2 2 4 3 2 2 4 3 2 2 4 3 2 2 4 2 F7/E F7/E F7/E F7/E j œjj œ œjb ˙œ œ b ˙œ œ b ˙œ b˙ 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 C7 C7 C7 C7 j œ œ. œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œœ œ œ œ7 0 8 œ7 ™œ . after that. 8 8 8 i i i i œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 0 m 0 p m 0 p m 0 p m p j œjj œj œ œ 7 7 p 7 p 7 p p 8 8 8 8 j C/G œjj C/G œ œ˙ œ œœj C/G œ œ ˙œœ œ ˙ œ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 j œjj œœ œœj œœ œ œœ œœ 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 2 3 3 F F F F œ. œœ . nœ. œ. ™œ .. œœ œ œ œœ œ œ 0 0 0 0 0 0 m 0 i m i m i m i 7 7 p 7 p 7 p p 7 7 7 0 0 0 0 Am Am Am Am C7/G C7/G C7/G C7/G 3 3 3 3 LAKE LAKE LAKE LAKE Em Em Em 0 0 0 8 0 0 8 0 0 8 0 7 7 7 7 0 0 0 0 5 4 5 4 5 4 5 4 œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ . and the main focus needs to be on the tune. j œ œ. œ # # œœ# . œ œœ£œ œ . The same applies on beat 3 of bar 4 with the C7 chord – this same principle should be used throughout the piece wherever there is a minim (two-beat note or chord) in the accompaniment. œ œ. œj œ . œ n œ˙œ .SWAN E. œœ . œ.Pyotr Tchaikovsky Scène from Swan Lake PLAYING TIPS cd track 29 [Bar 2] After the first chord. the harmony is still intact. œ 7 7 7 0 m 0 p m 0 p m 0 p m p j œjj œœ .. 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 Em Em Em Em n ˙œœ˙ . œ. œ˙œ . [Bar 13] A full barre is needed for the F# chord... ˙. œœ . nœ nœ..œ œœ œœ œ œ7 8 8 8 8 i i i i œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ . œ. œ œœœ œœjj bb œœ œ .. hold the C chord as long as physically possible so it sustains under melody. œ œœ œ b œœ œ œ œœ b œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 # # #. However. œ œ. # œ œ # œ # œ . the same kind of Bridget's Bridget's Bridget's Bridget's C GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 3 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 3 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 3 4 ©»¶∞ ©»¶∞ # 4 ©»¶∞ ©»¶∞ & ## 4 &# 4 & 4 & 4 E B E G B E D G B A E D G E B A D1 G E A 1 D E A 1 E 1 # & ## &# & & E B E G B E D G B A E D G E B A D6 G E A 6 D E A 6 E 6 # & ## &# & & E B E G B E D G B A E D G E B A D 10 G E A 10 D E A 10 E 10 # & ## &# & & E B E G B E D G B A E D G E B A 15 D G E A 15 D E A 15 E 15 # & ## &# & & Em Em Em Em Em Em Em Em ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ7 ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ7 ggg www ggg www gg www gg ww gg w0 ggg 0000 gg 00022 ggg 20020 gg 2022p ggg 02p p 0 7 7 7 0 0 0 0 D D D D £œ ¢£ ˙œ ¢£ ˙œ ¢£ ˙œ ¢˙ 4 5 4 5 4 5 4 5 Bm Bm Bm Bm œœ . nœ n œ1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m 0 i m i m i m i 7 7 7 0 0 0 0 C/G 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 j œjj œœ œœj œœ œ œœ œœ b b b b œ œ œ œ 1 1 1 1 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n ˙œ˙œ n œœ˙ n œ n œœ˙ n œ n œœ n œ œ nœ œ0 0 0 0 0 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 B7 B7 B7 B7 b 13 b 9 b 13 b 9 b 13 b 9œ bœœ13 b 9œ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 jEE m/B m/B œjjEœm/B œjEœm/Bœ œ œœ . ˙œ ˙œœ . so bring out that top line with rest strokes where possible.œ œ. ™œ . ˙œ .mSWAN ¡œ ¡œ ¡œ ¡œ 2 2 2 2 j ¢ œj œ œ¢ œj œ œ¢ œj Óœ œ¢ œ Óœ œ Ó Ó 3 4 3 4 4 3 2 4 4 3 2 4 4 2 4 2 1 1 1 1 C C C C p p 0 0 0 0i i i i œœ . the famous melody begins right away in bar 2. œœ££œœjj œœ . œ.. and again at 17 for the F chord. œœ œœj œ . œ˙œ . œ œ. œ œ. On beat 3 of bar 2. œ. œ œœ œ œ . œ œ œ œ7 7 7 7 0 0 0 0 Am Am Am Am œœœ . I’ve had to simplify the orchestral harp arpeggio accompaniment a lot to make it playable on the guitar. # œ # œ # œjj œœ . œ. # # œ#/C##œ F F F F œ œ œ œ 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 B7 B7 B7 B7 b 13 b b 13 b b 13 b bœ13 b 2 2 4 2 4 4 4 9 9 9 9 œ œœ œœ n œœœ œ nœ nœ 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 Em Em Em Em 2 2 2 2 ¢ œœ ¢œœ ¢¢œœ œ ¢¢œœ ¢¢œœœœ œ œœ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 5 3 1 3 0 1 3 0 1 3 3 0 1 3 0 3 3 œ œ œ œ nœ n œ˙ nn ˙œœ ˙ n˙ 2 2 2 2 œ nn œœ œ nœ œ nœ œ 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 œ œŒ œŒ œŒ Œ 0 0 0 0 Am/C Am/C Am/C Am/C œ œ œ œ 1 1 1 1 3 B B B B j œ.

œ 7 0 0 F7/E b # # F /C B j j œ. œ œ Am Am Œœ œ œœœ . an orchestra’s 4 2 2 3 size and power. œ œj ˙œ œ œ # œœ œ œ œ œ˙˙ œ œ # # œœœ . œ œ œ œ œ . Bm 7 3 D 4 5 4 5 4 5 Bm 7 7 0 # # Bœ œ3 œ Am˙˙ 3 œ & # # Bœ 3 œ Am˙˙ 3 œ ˙˙ ˙ œ & # ˙˙ œ 52 GuitarTechniques œ œ 2014 ˙ & # œ˙ September ˙ ˙0 0 E 3 Eœm.Bm j œœ . Em œ nE˙œœm. œ Jœ Œ œ0 œ J Am 3 0 Am 1 7 j œ œ œj œ œ œj Óœ œ œÓ Ó0 A m/C 0 0 8 0 0 8 0 7 0 Bm Bm. œ œ œ œ œ b ˙œœ œ œ J ‰ ˙ Am j œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó # œœ . Œœ œ œœœ . ON THE CD tracks 28-29 œ œ # œ œ œ œ . play: classical & PLAYING TIPS E C7/G 0 B 0 theme 1 3is repeated 1 3 1 version 3 [Bar 19] Here 3 the famous main – in the original G 4 5 2 2 3 it’s D much more 4 fully 4orchestrated at this point. 7 7 B7 13 9 Em j œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ 0 8 0 b b C7 0 0 0 3 7 0 0 3 1 2 3 2 œœœ n ˙œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ 3 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 5 0 3 1 0 2 3 2 Title 2 Title 2 Title C C # ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ C &# œ œ œ ˙˙œ œ œ œ ˙ & # œ œ œ ˙œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ ˙˙˙ 0 2 3 5 œ7 0 1 E B G E D B A G E E D B 23 A G E D 23 A E 23 # &# &# & E B G E D B A G E E D B 27 A G E D 27 A E 27 # &# &# & E B G E D B A G E E D B 32 A G E D 32 A E 32 0 7 7 0 0 D0 7 0 7 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 7 2 2 5 3 5 A m/C œœ .. Œ œ0 1 3 1 3 1 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 3 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 7 7 7 0 7 0 C/G 2 3 2 F 3 3 F 3 3 3 3 3 3 # 3 2 2 3 2 2 3 2 0 0 Am 3 j C7/G n Fœ œ Am œj bC7/G œ˙œ œ œ n F˙œ œ33 œ Am˙˙˙ 3 œ œ‰j b œ˙œ œ œ ˙ œ ˙˙˙ 3 œ œ‰ b ˙˙œœ œ œ n œ˙˙ œ œ ˙˙˙ œ n˙ ˙ ‰3 ˙1 3 0 n ˙1 1 1 ˙01 0 3 2 1 3 3 2 1 3 3 2 0 7 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 j # œj C/G œC/G œ œ # #FFœœœ# . œ Jœ œŒ œ œœœ .. œ œ ‰œ ˙œ˙ œ nn œ˙ œ n œ n˙ œ. œ œœ œ œ œœ œ7 0 j j œj œ .. Bm 3 4 4 3 2 4 4 3 2 4 4 2 B 7 0 0 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 3 4 5 4 4 3 2 4 5 4 4 3 2 4 5 4 4 2 Am 1 3 j œ œ œj œ œ œj œÓ œ œÓ Ó0 4 4 4 5 5 5 0 3 0 1 3 0 1 3 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 3 2 2 2 F 2 2 2 3 7 0 0 œœœ . œœ ˙. œ ˙. œ œ œ œ Œœ œ œ n œœœ œ œ œ œ Œœ œ œ œœ b œ nn œœ 0 3 0 3 Œ œ7 œ00 œ 0 1 0 7 2 3 b b b b œ BB 77 bœœ1313 b 99œ œ C7 0 0 8 0 0 8 0 7 0 Am C7/G œ œ Amœœœ . œ # œœ œ œ ˙˙ ˙ 3 0 œ22 3 1 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 0 2 1 0 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 b B7 b9 3 B 7˙ ˙b 9 3 B17 9 n Fœ œ3 œ œ œ3 œ n F˙œ œ3 œ n œ˙ œ3 œ # ˙ n ˙˙œ œ œ n ˙œ œ œ # ˙˙ n ˙˙ n˙ # ˙˙˙ 1 1 1 1 3 B 7 13 9 Em 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 j Cœ7 œ. œ œœ œj b œœ œ n œœ œ n ˙˙œœœ . œœœ˙ . œ œŒ œ œœœ . 3 it has1its own dynamics and 4we must capitalise4 on these. œ œ œ‰ œ œ nn ˙œ œ n œ œ œ . œ˙ œ œ˙ œ œ œœœ . œœ Eœm. œ œœ œj œ œœ . 3 1 j œ œ. œœ˙ . œ œœ œj bCœœ7 œ œœ . n œ b œ˙ # œ #œ œ J œ # œ œ ‰ nœ 0 œ œœ 7 0 8 0 F 1 1 2 2 4 2 cd track 29 1 While the guitar can’t recreate 2 0 dramatically than1 at the start.. ‰ 0 0 0 1 B B 2 3 4 4 2 4 4 2 4 2 Am 4 4 4 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 3 0 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 3 3 0 1 0 1 Am n Fœ œ3 œ Am˙˙ 3 œ n F˙œ œ3 œ Am˙˙˙ 3 œ n ˙œ˙ œ œ ˙˙˙ œ ˙ n ˙˙ n ˙1 1 1 ˙01 0 2 1 2 1 2 1 0 3 4 5 4 5 4 5 F 1 1 b B7 b9 3 B 7˙ ˙b 9 3 B 17 9 n Fœ œ3 œ œ œ3 œ n F˙œ œ3 œ n œ˙ œ3 œ # ˙ n ˙˙œ œ œ n ˙œ œ œ # ˙˙ n ˙˙ n˙ # ˙˙˙ 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 B7 B7 3 œ B7˙˙ 3 œ œ ˙˙˙ 3 œ œ ˙˙˙ œ ˙˙ . œ 5 œ œœ 7 3 j œ œ. j nœ. so 2can be played2more A 2 0 E 3 15 Em C Em # ˙ œ˙ œ œ n œ n œ œ & œ œ œ ˙ n˙ œ E B G D A E 7 0 0 19 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 2 3 œ.. œ˙œ . œ œœ . œ œ œ œ D œ˙ œ A˙m/C œ Bmœœœ˙ . œ œœ œ œ œ œœ 7 8 œ 0 8 Em 3 1 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 B7 B7 3 œ B7˙˙ 3 œ œ ˙˙˙ 3 œ œ ˙˙˙ œ ˙˙ 2 4 4 4 0 0 3 3 3 2 E m/B 2 0 D 3 0 3 0 3 0 0 2 0 2 2 0 0 4 2 4 2 4 2 Am 3 # Bœ œ3 œ Am˙˙˙ 3 œ # œ˙ œ3 œ ˙˙˙ 3 œ # œ˙ œ œ ˙˙˙ œ ˙ ˙0 0 4 0 0 F 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 2 Am/C jE m/B D Am/C œ œœjEœm/Bœ œ œ Dœ˙ œ Am/C nœ œ nœ œ œj œ . œj œj œ . œ˙ œ œ˙ œ ˙. œ #œ .

œ j œœ . # ˙˙Œ . & # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙. 7 4 p # & # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ ## œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ 0 7 œ ˙˙ œ ˙˙ 2 0 2 0 ˙ ˙ Œ Œ 3 2 3 2 œœ œœ ˙ ˙ Œ Œ 7 0 0 7 5 0 7 0 0 5 7 0 ˙ œœ ˙ œœ ˙ œœ September 2014 GuitarTechniques 53 œœ Œ œœ ˙Œ œœ Œ Œ . œ PLAYING TIPS Ó # & # & 2 0 2 C7/G œ œ Amœœœ . œ Óœ œ˙ . There expressive rubato in this piece. #œ Œ œ n˙ 3 2 0 0 4 2 4 2 4 2 4 2 3 ˙ Œ ˙ Œ ˙ œœ œœ ˙˙ Bœ7 ˙˙ œ 3 4 2 2 2 1 0 B7 3 B 7 13 0 4 2 2 2 2 3 3 b B 7 b13 B 7 13 # &# & E B G E D B A G E D A E E B G E D B A G E D A E # ˙˙˙ # ˙˙ ˙ B7 3 œ œ B7 3 3 4 2 3 4 2 2 46 b B 7 b13 B 7 13 ˙˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙ 2 2 B 7 13 B7 3 # ˙˙˙ # ˙˙ ˙ œ œ B7 3 3 4 2 3 4 2 2 2 b B 7 b13 B7 3 2 œ œ B7 3 3 4 2 3 4 2 2 2 2 b B 7 b13 B 7 13 B7 3 ˙˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙ 2 3 3 4 2 3 4 2 2 2 2 œ œœ œ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ #œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ B7 2 0 2 0 2 46 2 49 49 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 0 4 4 4 0 2 1 2 2 # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙. œ œ œœ œ Œ œ œ J œ J 4 3 F Am 3 3 j n œ œ œ ˙ œ bC7/G F œ3 Am˙˙ 3 œ œœ œ ˙ j˙ œ‰ b ˙œœ œ œ nn œ˙˙ œ œ ˙˙˙ œ ˙ ‰ ˙ 0 n ˙1 1 ˙0 0 E 0 B 1 3 1 3 1 3 0 1 3 G [Bar 34] The 4 piece5changes gear into crotchet 2 2triplets and 3 begins to build 2 D in intensity 2 4 until4 it hits the tremolo at bar 2 48. There is a gradual accelerando E A 0 is maintained until around 0 bar 60. 1 2 section. £˙ . Ó 7 7 7 7 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 a m i a m i p a m i p a m i p a m i p a m i p 4 4 4 4 4 4 p 6 a m i p a m i 6 w wwww wwww w Em Em œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 £˙ . # œ Œ œ3 n˙ . so do listen to the recommended orchestral 0 0 1 0 0 inspiration! 1 1 0 0 2 recordings for 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 b 3 4 2 # Bœ # ˙œ ˙ n Fœ œ œ œ œ œ B 7˙b 9 3 œ B7˙ œ ˙ 3 n˙ 3 ˙˙ 3 ˙˙ 3 # nn œ˙ œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙ œ ˙˙ œ ˙ ˙˙ n˙ # ˙˙˙ ˙ n ˙1 1 1 1 # # Bœ œ œ Am˙˙ œ ˙3 & 3 ˙ # #œ œ œ ˙˙˙ œ & ˙ ˙ 3 2 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 1 ˙b . and a faster tempo B E through this 3 0 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 G 32 4 5 2 2 3 2 D 4 4 2 2 A 2 0 E 3 B Am F B17 9 32 3 3 E B G D E A B E G 37 D A E 37 # & # & E B G D E A B E G 42 D A E 42 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 2 F 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 3 1 1 Am6/E 1 1 2 3 1 1 # ˙Œ . ˙ 2 2 2 1 1 1 3 Am6/E 1 1 1 1 3 2 œœ3 œœ œœ œœ 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 ˙Œ ˙˙ Œ˙ 2 2 0 0 E b Œœb b ˙œ Œ b˙ ˙œ 3˙ ˙˙ œ E 2 3 1 3 2 1 2 3 F Am 3 œ Am˙˙ œ ˙˙ œ n FœScène œ3 œ Am Pyotr Tchaikovsky ˙3 ˙ œ3 from ˙ 3Swan Lake œ œ ˙˙˙ œ nn œ˙˙ œ œ ˙˙˙ œ ˙ ˙ cd track 29 n˙ 3 3 4 0 1 4 4 0 B7 3 1 2 Am 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 3 1 1 1 0 1 2 2 3 1 1 0 1 0 3 0 B7 b 17 9 B 3 1 2 1 1 2 0 1 1 b B 7 13 3 œ œŒ œ œ bb3œ˙ ˙3 ˙ œ œŒ œ œ bb œ˙ ˙ ˙ 3 3 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 1 4 3 2 n Fœ œ œ œ œ œ B 7˙b 9 3 œ B7˙ œ ˙ 3 n˙ 3 ˙˙ 3 ˙˙ 3 # nn œ˙ œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙ œ ˙˙ œ ˙ ˙˙ n˙ # ˙˙˙ ˙ n ˙1 1 1 1 0 4 3 2 0 F 3 1 3 1 1 1 2 n Fœ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ 3 n˙ 3 nn œ˙ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ n˙ n ˙1 1 1 1 2 1 B 4 5 2 where2it calms and slows down until 4 2 is plenty of2room for 2 the end. Œ œ œ. œ œ Bm œ˙ . ˙ œ & œ œ œ ˙ ™˙ ˙ ™˙ ¢œ ¢œ 2 0 2 0 4 1 2 4 1 ˙Ó .4 5 D A E 27 4 2 3 Bm 4 Am j œœ .

w œ 0 0 2 2 0 ˙ww.& # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ON THE CD play: classical E B G D A E 0 0 0 PLAYING TIPS 2 # 4 2 0 4 4 4 4 2 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 0 5 5 5 ˙ ™˙ ˙ 7 4 2 0 # ˙ ˙ œœ œœ Œ œ Œ œ E B G D A E # w ww w 0 0 2 2 ¢œ 8 4 1 ˙ œœ ˙ œ Œ œ Œ œ 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 2 £˙ . www 7 0 0 0 œ 8 7 w w œœ Œ œœ Œ œ œ œ Œ œ Œ œœ Œ Ó œ œ Œ Ó 2 5 4 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 0 0 0 0 . œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ ˙ œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 & E B G D A E 2 49 & E B G D A E 2 w wwww w tracks 28-29 Em 0 0 2 0 ˙. ˙. www œ 7 0 0 8 7 Em cd track 29 ˙ œœ œœ Œ œ Œ œ 0 œ œ œ œ 7 0 0 5 7 0 7 0 0 5 7 0 ˙ œ ˙˙ ˙ 7 0 E m/G œw œ œ œ 2 7 0 w wwww w E m/B & 0 7 0 53 58 2 2 2 4 3 0 4 ˙. w 0 5 7 3 œ 0 0 2 7 0 ˙. Ó 2 64 54 GuitarTechniques September 2014 4 0 2 8 0 0 3 ˙ œœ ˙ œœ Œ œ Œ œ 7 0 7 8 0 7 0 w 5 2 8 5 ˙ww.

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fiery blues technique of Walter Trout. reading music.. Rock ........ session......... we hope you get lots from it........ your introduction to the rules and approaches to composing four-part harmony will inspire and inform your own music......... rhythmic counterpoint and various approaches to line movement..... video.......... Never let it be said we don’t like to provide variety and stimulation for all guitarists! R&b... Shaun will have you sweep picking arpeggios all over the fretboard in pursuit of generating appealing harmonised lead lines............. and allow you to talk about things like ‘oblique motion’ with a new understanding......... This issue: Notes On The Stave........ 58 Pat Heath throws down the gauntlet with six licks at easy................ While chords and harmony can sometimes seem ‘background stuff’ for lead-orientated guitarists... ....... Blues... Conversely............ Cacophony (insert own fave harmony band)............... On video! Bernie Marsd en shows you how he tackles a minor blues progression Page 68 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 57 ..... While we’ve run various articles in the past about this (check out GT215’s harmony guitars article)........... we get a lot of enquiries about creating harmony parts for two or more distorted guitars. Iron Maiden.................. Turning to lead guitarists.............. 64 Martin Cooper examines the style of Simple Minds’ much-underrated Charlie Burchill. as it covers chord tones.............. the four-part harmony article is a unique and important article for GT............. creative rock ......... 6  0 John Wheatcroft offers insight into the tasty.... it contains the foundations of music composition and arranging that only comes from a solid understanding of classical music.................................................. Reason being......................... The hope is..... making it almost a themed issue! You’ve already read the first one on page 38 which concerns the classical approach to four-part harmony arranging.. The second is Creative Rock which focuses on traditional lead guitar harmonising...................................................................... In many respects...................... .............. Shaun is at the helm this issue to tackle the topic.... it’s the first of its kind for this...................................... Bridget to pen this article........ acoustic......... and quite possibly any......... .................................... His introduction to playing ear-catching harmony lines is perfect. WE’VE TWO ARTICLES on harmony this month........... 92 Rockschool’s Charlie Griffiths teaches you to read music.......................................... While several of us at GT have classical music degrees..................... it seemed apt for our popular classical tutor........................................................... guitar magazine.......... 8  0 Andy Saphir signs off the Session series with a cool 70s-style jazz movie theme-inspired piece. we hope these two articles will prove educational and inspiring to read and play..... It should prove really useful for your own lead lines if you like The Eagles........... 6  8 Bernie Marsden tackles a minor blues in the first instalment of a two-part video lesson............. 8  8 Stuart Ryan checks out the sophisticated solo fingerstyle acoustic technique of Paul Simon......Learning Zone LESSONS GT234 30-MINUTE LICKBAG .... This is especially true if you’re a steel string acoustic player looking to get more sophisticated and ‘knowing’ with your approach................... intermediate and advanced levels... Bridget will have you focusing on areas such as how to sustain one note while other notes occur above or below (sometimes tougher than it may first appear).................... 74 Shaun Baxter brings you the first part of his lesson on creating harmony-guitar parts....... What both articles also provide is a fresh perspective on how to develop your playing chops...... Regardless of your guitar style though... 84 Phil Capone looks at the influential Brit R&B guitar syles of The Rolling Stones. Thin Lizzy......

You ggg 00 can 0 2 0 A madd11 2 C sus2/F G C to C chord ©»ªº with a ‘walking’ bassline..~~~ 0 0 33 ≥œ ≥ ≥0 ≤ ≤0 ≤0 gggg ≥˙30 . Lick 1 REM picking GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 D Em G D ©»•º œ Lick 1 #REM picking œ œ œ œ LICK BAGœ œ œ œ œ 2œ3 œ4 œ œ œ Pat Heath's # 128 D œ MAGAZINE GUITAR TECHNIQUES œœ œœ œœ œœ &©»•º œ œ œ E mœ œ G D œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Lick 1 #REM picking œ # 128 F œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Em œ œ œ œ G œ œ œ D œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &©»•º D œ 2 œ 2 œ 3 œ 2 œ 2 0 œ œ # 3 œ 3 œ œ2 œ2 œ3 œ œ3 œ2 œ œ0 œ œ0 œ0 œ0 œ3 œ0 œ2 œ3 œ œ3 œ2 œ2 œ3 œ œ3 œ2 2 œ & # 128 F 0 œ 0 0 0 œ2 œ œ 2 œ0 2 œ œ 0 3 2 2 0 3 ≥ ≥2 ≥3 ≤ ≤3 ≤2 ≥ ≥2 ≥3 ≤ ≤3 ≤2 etcœ 0 0 0 œ 0 3 0 2 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 F Pat Heath's LICK BAG — ˙ .. . moving0C around the C Major scale to create 0 easily vary the0 bass notes traditional acoustic C create sus2/Byour own G sus4 E m7piece..... gg 23 C 0 3 0 Lick 2 John Denver fingerstyle ≤ ≤œœ ≤ œœ≥ ˙˙ 44 Ó ≥‰ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ œœ≥ ≤ ≤œœ≤ etcœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ Aœœmadd11œœ ≥ œœ≥ ≥C sus2/F & G C C ©»ªº œ œœœ œ œœ œœ œC sus2/B œ E m7 œ C˙˙ œ œ œG sus4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Lick 2 John Denver fingerstyle œ œœ ˙ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó ‰ F A madd11 C sus2/F & œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœG sus4œœ œœE m7 œœœ C˙˙˙ C œ C œ ©»ªº4 G œ œ C sus2/B œ œ œ œ œ œ 1 œ 1 œ1 œ0 1 œœ œ1 1 œ1 œ1 œœ 1 1 1 1 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ00 œœ00 ˙˙02 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 & 4 Ó ‰ F0 2 œ3 œœ2 œœ2 œ3 œœ2 œœ2 œ3 œœ2 œœ2 œ3 0 2 œ3 œœ2 2 œœ0 0 œœœ00 œœœ00 œ œ ˙3 œ œ œ3 œ3p œp œp p a1 œ3p a1 p a1 œ3p a1 œ3 1 œ3 œ œ œ1 1 œ0 0 ˙1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m m m m etc 0 F 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 i i i i Em E B G D A E E B1 G D A E E B 1 G D A E 1 E B G D A E E B1 G D A E E B 1 Lick G D A E 1 3 3 3 0 2 3 2 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 p p p a p a p a p a 3 Jeff Leppard 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 etc 0 m m m m 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 i i 3 i i 0 2 3 3 3 0 2 3 2 0 3 B5 3 B5/A Gmaj7 A5 B5/A Gmaj7 3 3 3 3 3B5 1 A5 0 p p 3pDEF p a p a p a p a Lick 3 JeffLicks Leppard cd track 32 Intermediate Example LEPPARD m m m m etc Steve Clark was a massively influential writer. and three down. œ —g ˙ . œœ . Although This GUITAR chord progression is typical of an REM-style the may test you! Follow the picking of three up. œ. he could create timeless rock Hysteria.~~~ Em G œ œ gg ˙ . Play the open a pleasant guitar part with a defined beginning. œœ . don’t be fooled – to play the rhythm to the bass on the ‘1’ note of each triplet to keep in time. œ œ œ ggg ˙˙ .. Replicating B5/A Gmaj7 A5 B5/A Leppard Gmaj7 A5 songs from simple chord their classic 1987 album channels –B5 with lots of 80s-style delay. this is a riff doubled with clean and distorted sounds on two i i i i B 5 changes. at easy..~~~ Em œ œ œ 0 œ0 0 0 —gggg ˙˙330˙ . œ œ ggg G˙˙ .. accenting Pat Heath's LICKline BAG example is for beginners.. 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 —ggg 02 ~~~ 0 3 0 cd track 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 EasyLick Licks Example 2 JOHN DENVER FINGERSTYLE g 33≥3 31 2 John Denver fingerstyle 3 3 ≤ ≥ ≥ 3 3≤ ≤ 0 3 3 3 3 3 0 g ≥ ≥ etc ≥ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≤ g 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 A typical American-folk-style C – C/G fingerstyle turnaround. Easy Licks Example 1 REM PICKING cd track 30 TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 ballad. middle and end.~~~ œ —ggg G˙˙ . intermediate and advanced levels...lesson: 30-Minute Lickbag 30-Minute Lickbag Pat Heath of BIMM Brighton brings you a varied selection of fresh licks to learn. 3 p ©»¡ºº ## 4 & ©»¡ºº4 œ œ Lick 3 #Jeff Leppard F 4 # 4Let ring &©»¡ºº B5 œ œ ## 4 F & 4 Let2ringœ4 œ ≥ ≥ F E B G D A E E B1 G D A E E B 1 Lick G D A E 1 Let ring4 2 0 2 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ B5/A œ œ4 œ4 œ4 œ0 ≤4 ≤ ≥ ≥ 4 0 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ A5 œ Gmaj7 œ œ œ 4 œ4 œ œ4 œ4 0 œ2 3 œ ≤4 ≥ ≥ ≤4 ≤ ≥œ ≥ 4 4 0 2 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ B5œ œ2 œ2 œ4 œ0 œ2 ≤2 ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ 2 0 2 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ B5/A œ œ4 œ4 œ4 œ0 ≤4 ≤ ≥ ≥ 4 0 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ Gmaj7 œ œ œ4 œ4 œ4 ≤4 ≥œ3 ≥ ≤4 4 j œ œ œ j œ A5œ œ j œ4 œ02 œ ≤ ≥ 4 2 0 œœ J œœ J œœ9 J7 ≥9 7 3 3 ≥ ≥ 4≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ 4≤ ≥ ≥ 4≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ 2≤ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ 4≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ 4≤ ≥ ≥ 4≤ ≤ ≥ 9≥ ©»¡∞º A 2 4 4 0 œ4 œ œ3 œ œ4 4 0 œ2 œ œ2 œ0 œ 2 4 4œ œ0 œ4 œ3 4 4 20 7œ œ œ Lick 4 4 Chuck Berry Ó ≥ ‰ ≥œ #≤ œ ≤œ ≥ œ≥ œ≤ œ≥ œ œ≥ œ≤ œ ≤ œ ≥ ≥œ œ≤ œ≤ œ≤ œ œ≥ œ ≥œ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≥ œ≥ œ≤ ≤œ # ≥œ œj≥œœœ & 4 ©»¡∞º A œœœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ j œœœ œ œ Lick 4 4 Chuck Berry F œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ # œ 58 GuitarTechniques ÓSeptember 2014 ‰ œ œ œ œ œ &4 ©»¡∞º A œ 8 œ 7 œ 5 œ œ 5 œ œ5 œ5 œ5 œ5 œ5 œ5 œ5 œ5 œ5 œ5 œ5 E 4 Chuck Berry ~~~ œœ ~~~ œœ ~~~ ~~~ œœ9 7 ~~~ ≥9 7 ~~~ ≥ 9 7 ≥œœœ .. Brought to you by.~~~ œ2 œ œ œ gggg—˙˙˙02 . œ.

However. Try the picking 14 E B E G B D G A D E A E E1 B 1 G D A E 1 7 14 14 / 11 11 9 11 11 ' ~~ 11 9 X ≥9≥~~ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥9 ≥≥9 ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥9 ≤≤ ≤X≤ 11≥≥ ≥≥9 12≤≤ 9 ≤≤ 12≥≥ 9 ≥≥ ≥≥ 9 11 9 11 9 11 11 9 11 12 11 9 9 X 10 11 X 10 11 X 10 11 9 11 9 11 11 9 11 11 11 9 9 11 11 14 11 11 9 11 12 11 9 9 11 9 X ≤ ≥ ≥ ≥≤ ≤≥ ≤ ≥≤ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ September 2014 GuitarTechniques 59 . œ # œ œ œ nn œœ œ œ ## œœ~~ ~~ œ œ œ œ . try playing it while duck-walking across the room. confident E B E G B D G A D E A E E1 B 1 G D A E 1 the harmony in your mind. pattern suggested. œ . I recommend learning the ‘E shape’ Db Dorian scale (Db Eb E1/4Gb Ab A B) before attempting 12 12 7 7 9 9 13 13 12 12 12 7 7 13 9 9 9 13 13 12 12 12 7 7 13 9 9 9 13 13 12 12 12 7 7 13 9 9 9 13 13 12 13 9 cd track 35 / to deviate from it if you prefer. When you’ve learnt the lick.. and then look at the rhythm – B7 is very tricky.. and how the œmajor always keep your picking hand/' loose ~~ œœ œ œbutœ confident.. ¿ ¿ œ/ œ ¿ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ # œœ~~ œ œ #### 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ '/' ⋲ n œ # œ ~~ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ j /'/' # 4 œ œ‰ & ~~ 12 9 ~~ œ œ ¿ 11 99 12 9 12 9 ~~ ¿ ¿ 111211 99 ¿ 9 9 9 9 9 11 9 11 9 11 12 9 11 12 9 11 9 11 12 11 9 9 7 7 14 14 14 14 14 9 11 9 11 11 11 9 9 X X X X ' 1/4 ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ 1211≥≥ ≤99≤ 9 11 11 9 X X ≥ ≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥ ≤ 7 within this line – works around the minor 13 chord beneath. I recommend playing the chords first to get Lick 5 Joe Satriani 2 xxxxxxxxxx Em m m m Em m m m m m i i i i Lick 5 Joe Satriani i i i i ©»¡™º œ œ œ œ ©»¡™º ## 4 œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ £ £ £ £ & &©»¡™º44 ¡¡Eœœm£ œm œ ¡¡ œœ £ œm œ ¡¡ œœ £ œm œ ¡¡ œœ £ œm œ iœ iœ iœ i œ # 4 œ œ œ œ £ & 4 ¡ œ 12 ¡ œ £ 12 ¡ œ £ 12 ¡ œ £ 12 12 7 7 Em 7 Em 9 9 12 12 12 12 7 7 12 9 7 9 9 12 12 12 7 7 12 12 9 7 9 9 12 12 12 9 12 9 9 7 7 Am Am Am 10 10 12 12 5 5 12 12 9 7 7 7 10 12 B7 5 B7 Em 10 10 10 10 7 7 5 5 10 10 7 10 10 7 7 5 5 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 7 5 7 7 5 5 10 10 7 5 10 10 10 7 5 B7 E 12 12 12 12 B E 12 12 12 12 G B 12 12 12 12 D G 9 9 9 9 12 12 12 12 A D 7 9 7 9 7 9 7 9 E A 7 7 7 7 E 12 12 12 12 E3 B 3 G 12 12 12 12 D 9 9 9 9 AAdvanced Licks Example 6 JOHN PETRUCCI DORIAN BLUES 7 7 7 7 Lick 6 John Petrucci E Lick John Petrucci 3 6 attempting 1/4 Before this rather tricky Dream Theater-style lick. œ Lick 6 #John Petrucci œ œ œ œ œ # 4 # œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ~~ ⋲⋲ n œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ ‰‰ j œ ## 4 #œœ œ œ ‰‰ # & / # &©»¡¢™ 4 C m7œ œœ ¿ ¿ œ . but strong. ' nœ #œ œ œœ ¿¿j /' ¿ œ ~~ . but this chord creates a beautiful Harmonic Minor sound. œ œ œ # œ œj œœœœ œœœœ . to the point of being loose – and will of course sound best on a Gibson semi – but the core of this Lick 4 for the groovy blues feel. Chuck Berry ©»¡∞º A œœœœœœ . 'œ 6th – which is prominent C #m7 ©»¡¢™ this. To sound authentic. the execution of this can be relaxed. F E B G D A E 6 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 8 7 5 7 5 8 5 7 7 ≥ ≥≥ ≥≥≥≥≥≥≤ ≥ ≥≥≥≥≥≥≤ ≥ ≥ 1 5 8 5 6 5 5 6 7 0 7 ≤ ≥ ≥≤ ≥ ≥ ≥ 2Advanced xxxxxxxxxxLicks Example 5 JOE SATRIANI TAPPED 2 xxxxxxxxxx cd track 34 This is a difficult four-finger tapping technique to master. L L L L L L L L Lœœ Lœœ Lœœ Lœœ ≠ ≠ L ≠ ≠ L ≠ ≠ L ≠ ≠ L ≠œœ ≠œœ Lœ Lœœ ≠œœ ≠œœ Lœ Lœœ ≠œœ ≠œœ Lœ Lœœ ≠œœ ≠œœ Lœ Lœœ L ≠ L ≠ L ≠ L ≠ ≠ L L ≠ L L ≠ L L ≠ L L ≠œ ≠œ L Lœ ≠œ ≠œ L Lœ ≠œ ≠œ L Lœ ≠œ ≠œ L Lœ ≠ ≠L ≠ ≠L ≠ ≠L ≠ ≠L ≠ ≠ L≠ ≠ L≠ ≠ L≠ ≠ L L L L L L L L L L L ≠ ≠Lœœ ≠ ≠Lœœ ≠ ≠Lœœ ≠ ≠Lœœ ≠ ≠Lœ ≠ ≠Lœ ≠ ≠Lœ L ≠ ≠Lœ L ## ≠œ Lœœ ≠œ Lœœ ≠œ Lœœ ≠œ Lœœ œ # Lœ œ Lœ œ Lœ œ Lœ # œ œ œ œ & & ≠œœ œ Lœ ≠œœ œ Lœ ≠œœ œ Lœ ≠œœ œ Lœ ≠ œœ ≠œœ Lœ ≠œœ ≠œœ Lœ ≠œœ ≠œœ Lœ ≠œœ ≠œœ Lœ Lœ Lœ Lœ Lœ # # Lœ Lœ ≠œ Lœ ≠œ Lœ & ≠œ ≠œ L ≠œ ≠œ L ≠œ ≠œ L ≠œ ≠œ L ≠ œ ≠ œ ≠œ L L ≠œ L L ≠œ L L ≠œ L L L L L L ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ L ≠ L ≠ L ≠ L ≠≠ ≠≠ ≠≠ ≠≠ L L L L L L L L ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠≠ ≠ ≠ L≠ ≠ L≠ ≠ L≠ ≠ L ' Lick 5 Joe Satriani hammering with both hands is key. but feel free C #m7 ©»¡¢™ ' œœ œandœ relaxed. Then think about groove.# 4 & # 4 œ F ON THE CD œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ tracks 30-35 Let ring E B G 4 4 D 4 4 4 4 A 2 0 4 CHUCK BERRY Intermediate Licks Example E 3 1 4 œ œ œ œ 4 2 2 0 2 œ œ 0 2 œ œ œ 4 4 4 œ ~~~ œ j œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ Learning Zone 30-Minute Lickbag ~~~ œ œ 4 4 0 4 4 4 9 7 2 0 9 7 cd track 33 ≤ ≥ an≥ A ≤major≥3 triad:≥ then≤ switch ≥ ≥Pentatonic ≤ around ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≤ begins≥ and≥ ends ≤ ≥ to A Minor Here’s an intro that could appy to any classic Chuck Berry style tune. 4 Ó ‰ œ # œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ &4 œ œ.

over the backing track… NeXT MoNTH: John celebrates the regal licks of the one and only BB King Getthetone 9 6 5 7 4 Gain Bass Middle TReBle ReveRB Walter retired his trusty ’73 Strat some years ago. Feel free to push and pull the rhythms as you see fit. and don’t forget to explore mixing your own ideas with Walter’s. 25th year in music. So have fun. he delivers an emotion-laden style with complete conviction and authority. His live dVd. I’ve crammed in as much of Water’s vocabulary as possible. and cherrypicking the ideas that you like the most. you can also gain a great deal by taking licks. playing live is what Walt and the boys do best. turned into a nightmare. like so many things in music and art in general. it means more to me than ever before. Walter Trout. Track record Walter’s new album. Walter first wanted to be a jazz trumpeter. From the late-80s to the present day. this month. is awesome. leave the trumpet behind and dedicate himself to the blues. 60 GuitarTechniques September 2014 . it wasn’t long before Walter launched a solo career. rescued From reality: The Life and Times of Walter Trout (MLG 2014). and you’ll notice there are a lot of notes and almost My family and my music is my lifeline. echoing a similar sentiment expressed years before about Bloomfield and Clapton. Walter’s playing switches between phrasing that is both on and off the rhythmic ‘grid’. Walter Trout no rests! While it’s ambitious and worthwhile to learn this solo in full. There’s also a new biography. articulation and intent. These days. But a year on he heard Bob Dylan and persuaded his parents to buy him an acoustic guitar. Mike Bloomfield. The Blues came callin’ (Provogue 2014) is possibly his best to date.. let’s hope he can soon strap on that old Strat and get playing again. and now takes a guitar assembled from an old Fender neck and Seymour Duncan pickups on the road.. arguably. breaking them down and analysing the relationship between notes and the underlying changes. He stayed with them for three years before getting the call to live out a dream as a member of John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. Born in New Jersey in 1951. a new album. co-written by Walter and Henry Yates. with Canned Heat. Walter’s playing has energy. too. He was then swept away by Beatlemania and a teenage obsession with Paul Butterfield’s guitarist. including John lee Hooker and lowell Fulson. Strings are Rotosound 9-42 gauge. it’s an experience to witness trout at full throttle. His fans raised $232. relentless (ruf 2003) recorded at The Paradiso in amsterdam. who is thankfully on the mend after a serious illness. Moore’s own primary influence. in 1981. He studied fastidiously and even met legend Duke Ellington when only ten years old. a combination of approaches is usually the best way. trout and his band have released numerous CDs to critical acclaim. What should have been a celebration of his TraCks 36-38 Trout’s style takes the Bloomfield template and raises the intensity. this has led to several writers referring to him as the ‘american Gary Moore’. as Walter found himself waiting for a life-saving liver transplant. excitement. attitude and attack. John Wheatcroft takes a look at the incendiary style of American blues giant Walter Trout. Walter got his first real taste of life on the road. Exploit all pickup options and control the level of drive with your guitar’s volume control. Trout plays his heart out throughout. have led to trout becoming a huge name on today’s electric blues scene. book and film. recorded during his illness.000 to fund his medical bills. at times outlining the time with specific subdivisions.lesson: blues ON THE CD WalterTrout Brought to you by. Amp duties are handled by a Mesa-Boogie Mark IV set to Boogie’s suggested Death Metal settings! We’re after a single-coil-loaded solidbody into a high-gain amp with extra-wide rock vibrato. But so much is often said of his guitar style that it’s easy to forget that he’s a wonderful singer and songwriter. the 70s saw trout performing with many notable american blues men. and at others drifting across the beat and bar-line – as his hero Bloomfield did. with a legacy of touring providing them with a hugely loyal fanbase. we have two 12-bar choruses around a shuffle in E. like predecessors Eric Clapton and Peter Green. playing his favourite colour cream Fender Strat ABILITY RATING Moderate/Advanced Info WIll IMprove your Key: E ‘Blues’ Tempo: 115bpm CD: TRACKS 36-38 Speed and stamina Blues vocabulary Energy and intensity all at Guitar techniques were recently shocked to hear that american blues guitarist Walter trout was critically ill in hospital. the transplant went well and Walter is slowly regaining his strength. This provided the inspiration to turn from acoustic to electric. thousands of hours of practice plus years on the road.

Gary Moore. Even the D in bar 12 could be considered as the enharmonic equivalent of B7’s #9 (officially a Cx. Stevie Ray Vaughan or brother Jimmie. [Bars 5-8] We transition to A7 here by selecting notes that outline an A9 arpeggio (A C# E G B). and you can hear similar ideas in the playing of the late blues-rock ace. plus major 3rd (G#) and then Minor 6th Pentatonic (R b3 4 5 6). as these Walter-style turnaround bars ably illustrate. The low E (which is of course the root of the Dominant or V chord) that ends this chorus is no doubt an indication that we’ve not yet finished and we’re going around the block.learning Zone WalTer TrouT EXAMPLE WALteR tRoUt CD TraCk 37 [Bars 1-4] We begin with some Dominant 7th phrases in E that could be considered to be a combination of Minor Pentatonic (R b3 4 5 b7). before moving to some E Minor Pentatonic ideas over A. The open-string Blues scale ideas in bars 7-8 (R b3 4 b5 5 b7) are reminiscent of Hendrix. ©»¡¡∞ Swing #### 4 Ó & 4 œ œ √n œj œ E7 j nœ #œ ‰ œJ œ~~ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 12 12 13 14 ~~ 15 (17 ) 12 12 15 12 12 14 12 14 15 12 15 12 14 12 15 12 14 12 15 12 14 12 15 12 14 j œ ~~ œ œ nœ œ ‰ 3 3 3 12 15 12 14 12 15 12 12 14 œ œ ~~ BU BD 15 12 3 14 (16 ) (14 ) 12 5 6 3 A7 # # # # œ b œ œ n œ œ œ œ~~ œ œ ‰ & 3 7 6 3 8 5 3 3 ~~ 5 œ œ n œ œ œ œ œ~~ œ œ nœ j œ 7 3 ~~0 BU 5 9 8 10 (12) 10 8 10 8 10 8 E7 j bœ œ œ nœ œ œ 3 3 0 j œ œ n œ œ b œj œ n œ3 œ Let ring 3 3 2 0 0 0 2 2 4 3 3 2 0 2 5 & E B G D A E 15 ( 17) 1 3 E B G D A E ~~ BU 15 √ #### œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ & E B G D A E œ~~ j œ œ ‰ n œ Jœ œ 3 BU E B G D A E [Bars 9-12] You’d be wrong to think that it is only jazz players that outline the changes with their melodic choices. '' nœ 1/4 œ œ œœœœœ #### œ ' 1/4 1/4 3 0 8 ' 3 3 '' œœ 1/4 0 3 5 3 0 0 0 9 14 j œ 3 3 3 0 ' œ œ œ œ j ~~ œœ n œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ n œ œj œ œ œ /' œ œ nœ #œ œ ‰ œ œ œ B7 7 3 3 3 ~~ 9 7 5 7 8 9 3 3 BU 14 14 14 12 12 14 14 14 12 12 14 14 12 14 (16) 3 BU 15 ' 1/4 14 (16) 14 12 14 0 ~~ n œ September 2014 GuitarTechniques 61 . where x = ##). back to the I chord at least one more time. The repetitious hammeron and pull-off phrase in bar 3 is a particular Trout speciality. We’re framing in both B7 (B D# F# A) and A7 (A C# E G) chords with their appropriate chord tones and some choice embellishments typical of Trout.

giving gravitas and authority to his long. Make sure you approach your vibrato with intensity and width during this solo. and is a fair bit slower than many imagine. œ j nœ œœ n œ œ œ 3 3 ~~~~ BU 15 œ nœ (17 ) 12 12 15 œ œ œ 3 12 12 14 j œ 3 œ œ nœ œ 3 BU 15 12 15 12 14 (16 ) 14 12 14 17 (√) # # # # œœ œœ œœ j œ œ œ œ & E7 3 3 E B G D A E 12 12 12 12 12 12 BU 14 (16) 19 62 GuitarTechniques September 2014 12 3 j œ œ œ œ œœ n œœ œ 3 12 BU 14 (16 ) 12 12 3 œœ œ n œœ j œ œ œ œ 12 12 14 14 14 14 12 12 œ~~ 14 (16) 12 œ nœ œ œ 3 3 BU 14 14 j nœ 12 BU ~~ 15 (17 ) 12 15 12 14 . whereas the shallow and speedy variety can sound nervous and a little weak. Walter’s playing often bridges this gap between blues and rock. Walter’s is very wide for a blues player. to create a style of hybrid music he jokingly refers to as ‘Fred’. A characteristic of Walter’s E-form box-position Pentatonic phrasing is his fondness for incorporating a high double-stop on both first and second strings while adding legato embellishments such as in bar 16 and… œ œ #### œ œ & E7 E B G D A E 12 12 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ nœ œ E7 œ 3 BU 12 12 14 (16 ) ~~ BU 12 12 15 (17) 12 12 15 17 15 16 3 3 3 3 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 14 12 14 12 15 14 0 #### j n œ # œœ ~~ J œ .lesson: blues ON THE CD TraCks 36-38 EXAMPLE WALteR tRoUt CD TraCk 37 [Bars 13-16] Walter’s broom gets a bit of dusting here as he gives us ‘the’ Elmore James lick. The second answering half of this phrase sounds rather Chuck Berry-like. although this time in standard tuning and with no slide. Œ ¿j ‰ 12 √ 12 13 ' ' nœ œ œ ' 1/4 1/4 1/4 œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ ‰ J 3 ~~ ' ' 1/4 12 12 12 15 12 12 12 14 1/4 15 14 œœ n œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 12 15 12 14 ' 12 12 15 12 14 12 15 œ œ œj œ œ œj œ j œ 3 3 3 1/4 14 12 12 BU 15 (17) 3 12 BU BU 15 (17 ) 12 15 (17) X 14 (√)# A 7 # œ & # # J E B G D A E œ~~ n œ œ n œ œ Bœ7 œ j nœ 11 & E B G D A E œœ œœ œ j œ [Bars 17-20] …exactly like we see here in bar 18. held notes. 12 ˙~~~~ . with a combination of double-stops and bends.

97 * “Every now and then GT comes across a new product that is so good. a PC software application that will have you focused at getting great results with your playing. if you’re struggling. pull-off pattern in bar 23 that we encountered back in bar 3.guitarpracticedperfectly.learning Zone WalTer TrouT EXAMPLE WALteR tRoUt CD TraCk 37 [Bars 21-24] Walter uses double-stops to outline the move from B7 to A7 here. Theory.. Speed will come naturally. Chords. with a brief chromatic descent at the end of bar 21 before spelling out A7 with E Minor 6/A9 Pentatonic (E G A B C#) and we return to a variation on our hammer-on. B7 (√) # # # # œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ n n œœ œœ œœ & 3 E B G D A E 14 16 3 3 14 16 14 16 14 16 14 16 14 16 14 16 14 16 A7 œœ n œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ 3 14 16 13 15 13 15 3 13 15 12 14 15 j œ œ œ œœ 3 12 15 12 14 3 BU 12 15 12 14 ( 16) 12 12 12 21 (√) n œ ˙ ~~~ #### œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ & E7 3 E B G D A E 12 15 12 14 12 14 12 3 3 14 12 15 12 14 12 14 12 14 12 15 12 14 12 14 12 14 12 3 15 12 15 14 16 ~~~ 17 23 Learn to play. Ear Training. we have to tell everyone about it! This is the case with ‘Guitar Practiced Perfectly’. improve your skills and repertoire from beginners to advanced.com September 2014 GuitarTechniques 63 . perfectly Whether you are a budding bedroom guitarist. break the licks down into much smaller chunks and learn them slowly.. play. live musician or a music academy student Guitar Practiced Perfectly has you covered Study Scales. perfectly WHATEVER YOUR STYLE ROCK • JAZZ • BLUES • FOLK • POP • METAL Learn how to play & master the guitar The Ultimate Guitar Tuition & Practice Software Learn. fast!” Guitar Techniques enter this code in our cart: GT3468 For more information and for your copy visit our website NOW Download NOW from www. practice & improve your guitar playing. Rhythm. Sequencing and more • • • • • One off purchase fee Includes over 300 practice routines Structured Tutorial course to suit all levels of ability Practice in an order that you specify and can change Use the reporting feature to monitor your progress For a special GT only price of £24. Some of this is pretty speedy so.. Arpeggio..

See the Playing Tips and Get The Tone boxes for further info. By the mid-90s it was only Kerr and Burchill left. such as Gretsch guitars. many bands were asked to write new material for Mandela for that concert. alongside the likes of U2. Musically speaking. To some extent. with a revolving door of studio and past members frequenting studio and live dates with the band. soundscape style writing. and guitarist Charlie Burchill. In fact. NEXT MONTH: Martin uncovers the raucous but amazing style of Neil Young Get The Tone 5 5 6 7 4 Gain Bass Middle Treble Reverb Charlie Burchill has used a lot of high-end equipment over the years. and the next album. However. you could say it pulls more towards D major (D E F# G A B C#) as a tonal centre than it does G. Belfast Child. tracks 39-41 With a changing music scene and various line-up changes occurring in the 90s. The Police and Peter Gabriel. went on to become their first and only number 1 single on the UK charts in 1989. self-gratifying music of the past 50 years! The track this month incorporates many of the small chords. and the single that they premiered at the concert. Mandela Day. It’s all to do with ‘playing for the song’ this month. the band went on to become one of the biggest acts of the following decade. The band recorded Live In The City Of Light on the subsequent tour (1987). Martin Cooper goes all 80s with some stadium rock from the arena-shaking chime and pomp of Simple Minds. as well as playing huge gigs such as Live Aid in 1985 and the concert for the 70th birthday of the thenimprisoned Nelson Mandela in 1988. for release in October of this year. with the likes of U2 producer Steve Lillywhite and U2/Tom Petty studio (and now business) legend Jimmy Iovine both producing some of Simple Minds’ albums in the 1980s. so while it’s not overly difficult to play. Big Music. particularly as Burchill’s playing incorporates some similar delayed Charlie Burchill’s playing is the epitome of taste and restraint. and even though Jim Kerr has never been one to attract too much attention to himself. The ballpark to aim for is a clean-meets-dirty guitar tone – so not too much gain. or just two notes at a time. Celebrate. Sanctify Yourself and All The Things She Said. including the most recent collection. and always serves the song. They may not be quite as well-known names in the household as Bono or Sting. Charlie Burchill’s playing was always overshadowed by compatriots such as The Edge. harmonically speaking. and always serves the song. although the track sounds like it resolves on the V chord which is D. particularly impressive when we consider that the band’s heyday was in perhaps the decade that included the most over-the-top. single notes and delayeffected lines that Burchill has made use of over the past 30 plus years. they have also moved among production royalty.. included Mandela Day and . he has had ‘rock star’ marriages to both Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders and Patsy Kensit. ABILITY RATING Moderate Info Will improve your Key: G Tempo: 120 bpm CD: TRACKS 39-41 Guitar-part writing Playing ‘for the song’ Arrangement knowledge Simple Minds are one of the bands that hail from the classic era of stadium rock. his playing is the epitome of taste and restraint. along with long-term players such as drummer Mel Gaynor and bassists John Giblin and Derek Forbes. However. So.. plus quite a bit of reverb. and have recently been playing live on a Greatest Hits + tour. It’s in the key of G major (G A B C D E F#). scored massive hits with songs like Don’t You (Forget About Me) and Alive And Kicking in the 80s. You can find Don’t You (Forget About Me) on any of the ‘hits’ albums. you’ll need to think about the tone and timing all the way through. the band’s star began to fade. but still retain some grit. Street Fighting Years. 64 GuitarTechniques September 2014 LIVEPIX Track record 1985’s Once Upon A Time includes the hits Alive And Kicking. Matchless amps and TC Electronic and Fulltone effects. A lot of the lines are single notes. Charlie Burchill playing a Bigsby Forming amidst the equipped LP Std New Wave and punk scene in Glasgow in the late 70s. guitar parts and atmospheric. but only Simple Minds did. but founding members Jim Kerr on vocals and guitarist Charlie Burchill. They have also announced a new studio album. so make sure the definition is clear throughout. delay and chorus.lesson: rock ON THE CD Simple Minds Brought to you by. they continue to record and tour.

and thenMartin play tightly with some aggression strings from 21 onwards. 7 7 œ œ Csus2 3 3 10 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 3 8 7 0 A sus4 7 10 8 7 7 ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ 3 3 7 7 3 3 0 5 5 17 # .. œœ ..bar SIMPLE MINDS STYLE RHYTHM GUITAR ©»¡™º G/D # 4 . and pay attention to the muted GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 3 4 with a quarter-note triplet feel. œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ œœ œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ . Cooper's BIMM ROCK COLUMN . œ œ & . œœ . # 10 8 8 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ 5 5 5 7 7 5 7 7 œ 7 0 10 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 5 3 5 ˙ 7 ... . so in the first eight for the rest of the rhythm part. 1. 10 7 10 7 X 8 X 7 8 7 G w w 8 7 7 7 10 28 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 65 . space around the notes you actually play.Learning Zone simple mindS Example rhythm part cd track 40 There’s a delay set to quarter notes all the way through. & 1 E B G D A E X X 7 7 24 2 7 7 X 7 X 7 7 7 X 7 X 7 X X . 13 & E B G D A E . œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ œœ œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ ⋲ ¿¿ & . Make sure you mute any unwanted strings. œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ œœ œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ ... and letting the delay repeat them as you’ll probably be strumming the part even though there’s quite a bit of to create the effect. . . D 8 7 8 7 X 8 X 7 8 7 X 8 X 7 X X 8 7 8 7 X 8 X 7 8 7 X 8 X 7 7 7 7 7 X 7 X 7 7 7 X 7 X 7 X X 21. 25 # œœ . . bars you’re only playing four notes per bar. œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Ó D œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Ó œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Ó Ó . œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ & 4 . G E B G D A E . œ 3 3 7 7 7 7 œ œ D œ œ 3 3 7 7 ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ œ œ œ œ ˙ G/D 7 7 œ Let ring E B G D A E 9.. œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ . œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ œœ œœ ⋲ ¿¿ œœ ⋲ ¿¿ . 5 8 7 8 7 8 7 8 7 8 7 ≥≤≥ ≤ 8 7 8 7 8 7 7 7 ≥≤≥ ≤ œ œ œ # . Let all the notes ring into each other in the next 12 bars. . . ww ww G5 3 3 7 œ œ 3 7 7 . . With 1/4 note delay E B G D A E .

it’s also deliberately tasteful. It’s worth reiterating that we are playing for the song here. which are given extra emphasis by the delay.. So look and listen outGUITAR for the expression that’s put into the phrases.SIMPLE MINDS STYLE LEAD GUITAR GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 3 4 ©»¡™º GUITAR 2 3 28 4 # TECHNIQUES LEAD GUITAR 4 & 4 ©»¡™º 28 LEAD GUITAR # 4 28 & ©»¡™º 4 28 # 4 & 4 28 E B G D A E E B G D A E E B G D A E œ œ D & & E B G D A E E 31 B G D A E E B 31 G D A E 31 & & & E B G D A E E 35 B G D A E E B 35 G D A E 35 & # # œ œ3 D 28 œ ˙ œ ˙ œ 14œ œ5 ˙ 3 # # # # D 14 3 5 D 12 œ 14 œ 5 œ œ3 D 12 œ 14 3 œ5 12 14 3 12 14 D œ œ œ œ G œ œ G 15 29 œ œ œ œ3 15 12 ˙ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ 12 œ 14 œ ˙ œ ˙ 15 29 29 14 14 œ œ œ œ œ G ˙ 5 12 œ œ œ 12 G 15 5 œ œ 12 œ G 14 3 œ œ œ 14 12 œ œ œ 14œ œ 15 œ ˙ œ ˙ 15 14 w œ œ3 12 œ 14 3 œ5 5 12 14 3 5 10 5 12 14 5 10 66 GuitarTechniques September 2014 ˙ œ œ Martin Cooper's BIMM ROCK COLUMN . and not the soloist! Martin Cooper's BIMM ROCK COLUMN . such slides into some of TECHNIQUES 234 the notes..lesson: rock ON THE CD tracks 39-41 2 Title Example RHYTHM PART .CONTINUED & E B G D A E # D cd track 40 G w D w w 5 w w w 10 w w 5 31 Example lead PART cd track 40 Although the solo is slow.SIMPLE MINDS STYLE œ 14œ œ5 3 12 12 œ Martin Cooper'sG BIMM ROCK COLUMN .SIMPLE MINDS STYLE œ ˙ w w 10 14 œ œ 15 œ œ œ œ œ 12 12 12 œ œ œ œ 14 15 15 œ œ 14 œ œ œ œ 14 œ œ œ œ œ œ 14œ œ 15 15 15 14 w w w 14 œ œ œ 12 12 œ 12 œ œ 12 12 12 .

scales.99 from WHSmith and all good newsagents . or know someone that is? Then cut through the bull with this superb mag/DVD All you need to play lead! A magazine/DVD with riffs. soloing techniques and exercises.Learning to solo. plus two original pieces to learn On sale now! Just £6.

and help you work out when and where Bernie is adding extra flavour tones in. From a soloing point of view. NEXT MONTH: Bernie treats us to his personal take on a cool major blues Get The Tone 6 6 7 7 4 Gain Bass Middle Treble Reverb Bernie used his PRS SE signature guitar plugged into a small vintage Vox amp. memorise it and use it in future solos. Bm7b5. b7th. and a nice thing to include. The other ‘flavour’ tones come from A Natural Minor scale (A B C D E F G) which can be viewed as A Minor Pentatonic with an added 2nd/9th (B) and b6th (F). blues-orientated style has won favour with many guitar fans around the world. Any electric guitar will work well for this month’s performance. but the ideas are all straightforward. Em7. One of the key aspects of this solo is the use of space and pacing. When we caught up with Bernie. Everything is placed in a considered fashion. and the emphasis is always on the melody. and the other in a major key. Bridge or neck humbucker selection and the tone and volume controls were set to taste on the fly. hammer-ons. IVm and Vm of the harmonised A Natural Minor scale. Ian Paice. Once the string is bent to pitch. The notation contains all of the fingerings. and his rich. 5th. Bernie playing his Signature PRS SE model ABILITY RATING Moderate Info Will improve your KEY: A minor Tempo: 40bpm CD: CD-ROM String-bending Slow-blues lick bag Fretboard knowledge WE WERE LUCKY to have a few minutes with guitar legend Bernie Marsden recently. Bernie also adds string bending. The chord progression used in Bernie’s minor blues is constructed from chords Im. Track record The 2004 compilation album Whitesnake – The Early Years is well worth a listen. b3rd. pull-offs. Dm7 and Em7. the A Minor Pentatonic scale (A C D E G) is a solid ‘home base’. and this adds further interest and expression. G7. giving us the classic minor-blues chords in every guitarist’s favourite key. Bernie often adds finger vibrato to help with the intonation. For part one. bluesorientated style has won favour with many guitar fans around the world. Hopefully. For this solo. The b6th (F) is particularly useful over the IVm CD-ROM chord (Dm7). As you see. he was kind enough to play two solos for us: one over a minor blues backing track. they are either major 2nd (B) or the minor 6th (F). This b3rd interval is very descriptive of the chord’s tonality. articulations and phrasing from the video. as the F note is the b3rd of Dm7. Fmaj7. If you find one you like. finger slides and finger vibrato. Bernie uses a few core techniques and articulations to help the phrases come to life. we’re going to look at the minor blues. 4th. 68 GuitarTechniques September 2014 . Don’t be intimidated by the look of the notation – it seems complicated due to the tempo and time signature. A minor. Many blues and rock guitarists change the controls from phrase to phrase and this adds variety and promotes natural pauses in the phrases. and contains the classic Marsden/ Coverdale compositions Here I Go Again and Fool For Your Lovin’. Dm7. The piece starts with some volume swells often referred to as ‘violining’. the chords are Am7. 2nd. Bernie never gets carried away with long phrases or lots of notes. In part one. and features guest appearances from Joe Bonamassa. will help you to unlock the neck and appreciate the nuts and bolts of the phrases. which are all used to taste and are standard blues fare.lesson: video VIDEO ON THE CD Bernie Marsden Part 1 Bernie Marsden demonstrates his style by soloing over two blues backing tracks. Cmaj7. there will be a new lick or phrase in here for you. Both of these performances have been transcribed and then analysed from a technique and music-theory point view. Bernie’s most recent solo release. A bit of reverb or delay can be added for that ‘pro’ touch. If we harmonise the scale in 3rds we get the following chords: Am7. light overdrive and be prepared to experiment with the controls to achieve the desired settings. try creating a solo of your own over the same backing track as Bernie used. b6th. Don Airey and many other fantastic musicians. Many of Bernie’s phrases have this scale at their core. String bending is a great way to add feel to lead guitar playing. The Natural Minor has the following intervallic structure: Root. just dial up a creamy. has some great guitar playing and tones. Shine. Once you’ve mastered some of the concepts in Bernie’s solo. he’s in ‘slow minor’ mode and Jon Bishop is your guide. Bernie’s rich. These patterns are the foundation of this solo and knowing them well. It’s well worth refreshing yourself with the five A Minor Pentatonic shapes (Examples 1-5). Bernie is probably best known for his work with Whitesnake.

Learning Zone BERNIE MARSDEN PART 1 Jon Bishops BERNIE MARSDEN Video Part 1 MINOR PENT BOXES GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 BERNIE MARSDEN’ S MINOR BLUES Ex 1 The A Minor Pentatonic Scale — Shape One 3 &4 œ 10 E B G D A E Ex 3 œ 12 E B G D A E 8 œ 5 œ œ 7 5 œ œ 7 5 œ œ 7 5 œ œ 8 5 œ 8 œ œ 10 8 œ œ 9 7 œ 10 œ 7 œ œ œ œ 10 7 10 8 œ œ 10 œ 13 œ 10 œ 12 œ 9 œ œ œ œ œ œ 12 10 12 10 12 10 The A Minor Pentatonic Scale — Shape Four & 34 15 E B G D A E Ex 5 5 œ The A Minor Pentatonic Scale — Shape Three & 34 Ex 4 œ The A Minor Pentatonic Scale — Shape Two & 34 œ œ 12 œ œ 15 13 œ œ 14 12 œ œ 14 12 œ œ 15 12 œ œ 17 15 œ œ 15 12 œ œ 17 15 The A Minor Pentatonic Scale — Shape Five & 34 E B G D A E œ 8 E B G D A E Ex 2 cd-rom 17 œ 15 œ œ 17 15 œ 17 œ 14 œ 17 œ 14 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 69 .

~~ ~~ ~~ œ œ œ œ . Neck pickup with light overdrive E B G D A E ~~ ~~ ~~ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ⋲ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Change to bridge pickup ~~~ ~~ Am7 5 7 5 7 5 6 5 3 5 ~~~ œ. Œ. œ~~ D m7 ~~ 13 œ~~ œ œ ~~ 15 13 12 . & œ œ œ œ œœ E B G D A E 3 BU Œ BU 10 (12 ) œ œ~~. and this helps harmonic added. ©. well worth memorising. These bars contain classic blues-rock vocabulary and are swells. the ideas come from shape 4 of the same scale. F 7 1 5 4 5 4 5 7 4 5 4 5 5 3 BU 5 7 (9) 5 œ œ œ œj œ~~ .lesson: video VIDEO ON THE CD CD-ROM BERNIE MARSDEN’ S MINOR BLUES cd-rom [Bars 1-4] Bernie’s solo starts out with some phrases that use volume control scale. œ œ j j œ œ œ œ 10 8 8 10 8 10 ~~ ~~ 5 3 5 7 5 10 BU œ ~~ 10 (12 ) 10 Œ. j ⋲œ œ ~~~ 3 5 6 5 3 5 ~~ œ ⋲ Jœ  j j j œ œœ œ œ œ 10 12 10 12 10 12 10 12 ~~ 15 5 D m7 ~~ ‰ ≠œ~~ 7 7 5 (√) ~~ œ . The turnaround lick in bar 12 has a slight hint of a picking Jon Bishops GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 judicious finger vibrato and string bending to selected notes. œ œ œ œ~~ œ œ ~~ œ œ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ & E B G D A E œ~~ .»¢º Am7 12 & 8 Ó. j œ œ œ 7 ≠œJ ≠ ≠ ≠ D m7 ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠≠ ~~ ~~ ~~ ~~ ~~ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠≠ 7 Am7 7 ~~ ~~. Bernie adds with some added notes. as notated in Ex 1. This sound can come from striking the string with the pick at an BERNIE MARSDEN Part 1 some of the flesh of the thumb to brush the string on the to bring the melody to life and provide a ‘vocal’ quality. Œ. ‰ ~~ 12 14 12 14 12 14 12 14 12 14 j œ œ~~. angle Video and then allowing MINOR BLUES [Bars 5-12] These phrases are constructed from shape 1 of the A Minor Pentatonic way through – of course. ~~ 12 14 . ≠~~ ~~ 8 ⋲ œJ Œ. & ⋲ E B G D A E ≠œj œ ≠œ ≠œJ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ~~ ~~ ~~ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠≠≠≠≠ Œ. œœ j œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ~~⋲ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & 3 E B G D A E 5 BU ~~ 5 8 8 (10 ) 3 5 8 5 BU 7 (9) 7 5 7 ~~ 5 7 7 (9) rake 5 5 5 8 5 5 7 8 3 3 5 3 E m7 √ œ œ œ œ œ œ . To achieve this effect. œ. 5 8 5 œ~~~ 8 ~~~ 3 ~~ ~~~ ˙. first hammer/tap the note with the fretting hand. J D m7 13 12 ~~ 15 13 10 70 GuitarTechniques September 2014 3 12 13 12 13 12 ~~ 14 Am7 ~~ œ œ. Billy F Gibbons made this a trademark. then swell the volume control simultaneously with the picking hand. ≠œj œJ 6 ~~ ~~ Œ. ‰ ‰ œ. In bar 10. œ œ œ œ .

Am7 ‰ ~~ BU ~~ BU 8 8 10 (12 ) 10 (12 ) 5 10 (12) 8 10 J ~~ ~~~ œ œ œ.. . œ. œ œ œ ~~ 10 10 ( 11) (10 ) 8 ~~ 10 12 ~~~ 15 12 15 13 14 18 (√) & œœœ Œ ~~ œ. ~~ . and well worth examining. Bar 14 and 15 feature some unison bends. œ. œ. ‰. only this time they are played up one octave from our original position rooted at the 5th fret – here. œ œ 3 ~~ j ~~~ œ ˙˙ . œ œ œ . & E B G D A E ~~ BU BU BD 12 14 12 20 17 20 17 20 17 19 17 ~~ 19 19 ' œ œ œ œ œ œ~~. œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ j . œ ~~~ ‰ ~~~ 7 12 ~~ D m7 E B G D A E ±± PH . . Even with a simple minor blues like this.Learning Zone BERNIE MARSDEN PART 1 BERNIE MARSDEN’ S MINOR BLUES cd-rom [Bars 13-24] The melody used at the end of bar 13 is a cracker. œ. œ œ œ œ~~ J 19 17 19 19 17 ~~ 19 20 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 71 . we’re 12 frets higher. and then bending note on the third string to the same pitch. . Œ E m7 1/4 ' ~~ 1/4 17 17 20 17 . Blues-guitar players often vary how soft or hard they play each phrase Am7 & E B G D A E E m7 . These are created by fretting the note indicated in the tab on the second string. Played . ~~~ 10 12 (14) 8 5 7 5 7 7 5 5 7 3 5 7 5 14 Dm7 lightly . . ⋲ œj œj œ œ . ‰ Œ. œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ. The middle of the phrase in bar 16 is played with a very light picking-hand touch. . BU BD 14 & œ j — b— œ œ ~~ 5 œ ~~~ 5 7 7 BU œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ ⋲ Jœ  ~~~ 10 10 5 5 8 7 5 5 4 7 ~~ 3 œ œ œ œ ⋲ œ œ œ . Bar 20 features some ideas played in shape 1 of A Minor Pentatonic. œ. Bar 16 features the use of great 2the xxxxxxxxxx dynamics. . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ~~ ‰ & 3 E B G D A E 5 8 5 8 8 5 8 5 7 5 5 7 8 5 7 7 (9 ) (7) 5 8 3 9 8 8 ~~ 10 5 8 (10 ) 8 8 5 8 5 7 5 ~~ 5 7 5 7 7 BU BD BU BD 10 ( 11 ) (10 ) 8 10 10 8 Am7 √ ~~ ~~~ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ. see how much variety Bernie is bringing to the solo. at the 17th. œ jAm7 œ œ œ BU j ~~ j ~~ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ~~ Œ j œ œ 7 ( 9) ( 7) 7 3 ( 9 ) (7) 5 BU BD 7 œ œœ œ œ œ ~~~ to add feeling and variety. œ ‰ œ œ œ œœœœ‰ Œ 3 E B G D A E 7 16 j j œ œ~~ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ~~ œ œ ‰ ‰ Œ.

œ œ œ œ œ~~. so be careful to keep the notes in tune. œ œ. ⋲ ‰ ⋲ œ ⋲ œ j œj œ ‰ œ œ œ BU BU ~~ BU(10) 8 ~~ ~~ ~~ (10 ) 8 5 10 8 10 8 7 5 7 ( 9) 7 5 5 7 5 3 5 7 22 E m7 Am7 ~~ ~~ ~~ ~~ jœ œ œ œ j œ. or over-bend the notes (good vibrato can help too. The phrase in bar 27 is a fast flourish. œ~~ œ œ œ ~~ œ œ. Bernie uses double-stops to great effect in songs like Ain’t No Love In The Heart Of The City. œ œ ‰ œœœœ Am7 E B G D A E 8 5 7 5 7 7 (9) 5 7 5 7 5 5 7 5 7 5 5 7 7 7 Dm7 ~~ 10 8 5 8 5 7 5 ~~ 5 5 7 5 7 3 5 24 A m7 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ b œ œ œj n œ œ œ œ j œ j œ œ œ œ œ ‰. œ j œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 E B G D A E BU 5 5 7 5 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 8 10 7 5 7 5 5 5 7 (9) 10 8 10 12 10 10 8 10 8 10 10 8 10 10 10 8 œ j œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ ⋲ BU 10 8 9 8 8 7 5 7 7 7 5 7 (9) 5 ⋲ ‰ 8 œ œ Œ 5 5 8 28 & j œ œ ~~ œ œ œ Dm7 BU E B G D A E 5 9 7 27 & E B G D A E 6 5 ~~ 8 (10) ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ. Œ. BU ( 9) 8 (10 ) . BU BD (9) j œ 8 (10 ) 5 #œ. Bars 33 and 34 feature some ideas ‘right up there’ œ œ . œ œ œ œ. œ œ ‰ œ œ. which goes from the root A to the 9th (B). BD j nœ œ. and you may need to have a couple of 3 listens to get this one down. and Bernie’s is among the best). 3 5 BU BD 8 29 72 GuitarTechniques September 2014 5 7 (9 ) (7) BU 5 7 5 7 (7 ) œ. œ œ . j œ 10 8 8 Dm7 j œ œ œ œ J & J E B G D A E BU BD 7 (9) (7) 10 8 10 5 8 in position 17. The solo finishes with a super-cool sounding string bend. D m7 j œ œ œ œ A m7~~ ~~ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œ œ ~~ œ. & œ J BU ~~ ~~ ~~ ~~ œ œ .lesson: video VIDEO ON THE CD CD-ROM BERNIE MARSDEN’ S MINOR BLUES cd-rom [Bars 25-37] This final chorus starts out with some double-stops. j œ œ. J œ. Good intonation can be achieved by ensuring you don’t press too hard.

œ. j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ Am7 & E B G D A E 5 8 ~~ œj œ œ ~~ œ œ ~~ œ œ œ œ œ ~~ œj œ œ œ ~~ œ œ œ œ œ œ ~~ j œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ & œ œj œ œ BU ~~ ~~ BU( ) ~~ ~~ BU BD ~~ BU( ) ~~ ( ) j œ j œ ¿ J ~~~ 7 5 X j œ 5 10 8 8 5 8 5 (7) (8) 7 8 5 10 8 5 7 8 5 5 7 5 5 8 8 5 3 30 Am7 √ ~~~ √ j œ œ / ~~~ .œj œ~~ œ .Learning Zone BERNIE MARSDEN PART 1 BERNIE MARSDEN’ S MINOR BLUES cd-rom 4 xxxxxxxxxx & 4 xxxxxxxxxx œ œ ~~ œ œ œ j œ BU E B G D A E 8 (10) 8 ~~ 5 8 10 8 5 5 8 8 30 ~~~ œ.œ œ . ⋲ œ. œ œ j œ œœ œ œ œ œ. œ. ‰ ‰ & E B G D A E œ 3 Am7 34 Am7 E B G D A E E B G D A E 1 BU 10 (12) (10 ) (12 ) 7 5 7 E m7 ~~ œ~~ œ ~~ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ b œ œ œ. œ . œ. & œ E B G D A E 20 19 17 20 17 19 17 & œ œ œ. œ 14 ~~~ 12 14 12 14 15 E 13 15 15 (16) 15 13 ' ~~~ 1/4 BU BU B 15 ( 17) G D A E 31 31 (√) jE m7 œ œ œ & E B G D A E 13 15 (17) 15 13 7 5 ~~~ BU X 14121214141212 14 BU BU 17 13 20 15(22 15 ) (16) 15 13 15 15 ( 17) 13 √) jE m7 j ( . œj œ. ~~ œ œ 36 5 7 20 (22) 19 ( 21) 19 17 19 17 ~~ œ. E m7 œ œ œj ~~ 7 5 7 9 19 17 17 BU 20 (22) 17 20 19 17 19 œ œ œ BU 19 20 7 ( 9) 17 5 5 20 8 19 ( 21) œ . œ. . œ œ œ œ. j . . œ œ . œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ⋲& œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ⋲ ‰ j œ 3 E B G D A E BU 20 (22) 17 BU 20 (22) 17 20 17 19 17 19 17 19 17 19 33 (√) Dm7 œ œ. œ . ~~ j ~~ . œ œ. œ & ‰ ¿ Œ ⋲ ‰ ⋲ œ Jœœœœ œ œ œ. œ œ . ~~~ œ œ œ. œ . œj œj œ œ œ œ j œ . . œ œ œ œ œ œ. j b œ. œ œ œ~~ œ œ œ œ œ.~~ BU ~~ 817(10 ) 19 17 5 8 19 5 17 7 19 Am7 ~~ ~~ 517 ‰ 17 19 34 œ œ Uœ & œ œ œ. . œ œ ~~ ~~ 8 10 7 ~~ ~~ 59 7 9 œ œ œ j œ BU 8 10 36 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 73 10 . Am7 j œ BU BD BU E B 10 G D A E BU 19 17 17 17 19 19 17 17 19 19 17 33 ~~ ~~ 7 BU BU Dm7 √) Dm7 ( . œ. ' œ œ j œ. . œ . .

our current series on neo-classical rock gives us a good opportunity to look at the various principles and protocols behind creating harmony parts to a given melody. Melodically. we would get two consecutive B notes. 1987). This form of repetition can start to sound particularly tedious when played in succession (such as when harmonising arpeggios in parallel 3rds). it will produce a D note each time one plays a B note (an interval of a minor 3rd). the second note won’t always be in the right key. and are not just rooted in some pompous aesthetic. such as Harmony by Walter Piston (W W Norton & Company Incorporated. ABILITY RATING Moderate/Advanced Info Will improve your Key: C (Am) Tempo: various CD: TRACKS 43-53 General rock harmony Voice motion knowledge Chord tone understanding As it is based mainly on simple chord forms and straightforward rhythms. although harmonious and correct within the key of C. as a guitarist. however. you can supplement and inform your listening with some essential reading. if we program the harmoniser to correspond to the C Major scale. For example. 5ths and 4ths tend to work best with non-intelligent harmonisers. two voices (pitches) may move in three ways in relation to each other. You should too. if one were to create a parallel harmony for a two-note melody comprising G to B by simultaneously playing B to D. even though the 6ths are of unequal size). Shaun Baxter looks at how harmony is approached in the world of modern rock guitar. but ensure an optimum blend by paying attention to the amount of distortion required. Our examples were recorded using a distorted tone. we don’t continue to live in such pedantic times. Thankfully. but then produce an E note when a C note is played (a distance of a major 3rd). the motion created by an intelligent harmoniser is still considered to be parallel (in other words. the traditional objections to certain forms of parallel harmony do have a practical basis. Track record One can’t really talk about this subject without mentioning JS Bach. 1) Contrary motion: moving in opposite directions 2) Similar motion: moving in the same direction 3) Oblique motion: one remains stationary while the other moves Similar motion is the one that is most commonly used in rock music. the second (harmony) note will always be three semi-tones higher than each note played. 74 GuitarTechniques September 2014 david lyttleton lesson: creative rock . 5ths and octaves) were systematically avoided in the 18th and 19th century. When harmonising a melody. The harmoniser will compensate in a similar manner for any other chosen interval/ harmony with any particular scale of your choosing. To counteract this. Although used heavily in rock and pop. your dynamic range. Bach composed an enormous amount of material. Intelligent harmonisers allow the user to pre-programme a particular scale (G Lydian. the techniques that you are using (so that they complement or mirror the other parts) and temper your vibrato so that it matches the other parts. The user programmes the harmoniser so that the second (harmony) note is a pre-set distance away. thus creating a harmony. I’m sure you’re aware that there are signal processors called harmonisers (into which instruments can be fed on their way to the amplifier) that simultaneously generate another note (or notes) a specific distance from the original note (above and/or below it). it will compensate. Basic (non-intelligent) harmonisers work by generating a second note in response to the first. Octaves. for example) and. For example. however. tracks 43-53 For example. and adjust their tone. technique and vibrato accordingly. all of it brimming with voice motion employed in a systematic but extremely creative way. Furthermore. This form of similar motion – where two intervals remain the same distance apart – is known as parallel motion. and ask it to generate 3rds. the limitations of parallel motion are quite easy to observe. The time lag between the first and second note is so small that the listener perceives both as being played simultaneously.ON THE CD Creating harmony parts PART 1 As an adjunct to Bridget’s feature on four-part harmony. if you programme the harmoniser to generate Minor 3rds above the original. unless you are using octaves (the identical note 12 semitones higehr or lower). however. your pickup selection. so Beethoven would probably be spinning in his grave to know that there are machines that exist in order to produce such musical ‘monstrosities’. certain modes of parallel motion (such as unisons. one could: Increase the distance (register) between the various NEXT MONTH: Shaun delves deeper into the topic of rock guitar harmony Get The Tone 7 6 6 7 4 Gain Bass Middle Treble Reverb Successful harmonies rely on blend. Backing vocalists are aware of this. rather than always generate a note that is a consistent distance away from the original. a minor 6th followed by a major 6th is still considered to be parallel 6ths.

if we do the same thing three scale-notes lower (as shown here). so that the listener gets a sense of harmony from notes as they are played consecutively. C Œ. this will be quicker and easier to see if you can put all of the parts in one stave). each of these types of program will allow you to hear the SHAUN'S CREATIVE GUITAR CREATING HARMONY PARTS SHAUN'S CREATIVE GUITAR CREATING HARMONY PARTS no audio NON-CHORD TONES: Let’s take the three notes of a simple melody like Three Blind Mice (here. Œ. œC . 3. this example – still a form of similar motion – works better. results as it ‘plays’ the score. Again. Logic or GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Example 1 NON-CHORD TONES Although used heavily in rock and pop music today. let’s do what most guitar players would do: that is. rather than simultaneously. 4 PARALLEL MOTION cd track 44-46 [Ex 2] Next. Parallel Ex 4 (similar motion . œ. certain modes of parallel motion were systematically avoided altogether in the 18th and 19th century. So far. Ex 2 (parallel motion 3 scale-notes above) œ. C & 68 Gtr 1 E B G D A E (3rd) 12 √ Cœ . Finale or Notion (initially. so that you can hear them all played back together. ©. We will touch on some alternative forms (contrary and oblique motion). but will concentrate mainly on ways of applying parallel and similar motion in an appropriate and effective manner. we are going to discuss some of the pros and cons of parallel motion. œ. get together with other musicians! In the following musical examples. play an equivalent melody or motion three scale-notes higher (C major scale).»§º œ & 686 & 8 (3rd) Ex 1 E B G E DB AG ED A1 E 1 œG . the resultant harmony doesn’t fit the underlying chords so well. C Œ. C Œ. C G G œ. 68 (3rd) 12 œ.»§º ©»ªº œC . C (5th) 10 (Root) 8 œ. the 5th of C). Loco 68 [Ex 3] However. 68 œ. G C (5th) (Root) (3rd) 12 (5th) 10 (Root) 8 12 10 8 Œ. in this instance. œ. ExampleS 2. œ. [Ex 4] Whereas. Avoid parallel motion by applying either contrary motion or oblique motion. you could try any of the following: Playing all of the voicings simultaneous on one instrument (depending on the difficulty of the line). G œ. Parallel (b7th) 13 (3rd) 12 Ex 3 (parallel motion 3 scale-notes below . Similar (Root) (3rd) (6th) (Root) (3rd) (5th) 13 12 10 13 12 8 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 75 . and should be played as normal NON-CHORD TONES: Ex 1 notes (Basicare Melody) Scale indicated by ( ). & 68 Gtr 2 E B G D A E (5th) 15 œ. Write the parts out using music-notation software such as Sibelius. 68 (3rd) 12 Œ. we have discussed how parallel motion often results in repeated notes when the melody moves in the same interval as the accompanying harmony line(s). played in the key of C). the technique works. œ. Omit certain notes. * * Scale notes are indicated by ( ).Learning Zone Creating harmony parts parts (such as moving one or more parts up or down an octave) so that none of the following notes duplicate any of the previous pitches. œ. C (5th) 10 (Root) 8 G C G œ. You could. (Root) 8 C œ.. Another inherent disadvantage is that parallel motion doesn’t always articulate (relate to) the underlying harmony (chords). because the final note is a chord tone (G.unsuitable) œ. Cubase.more suitable) œ. Programming each part via MIDI in a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) such as Pro Tools. Œ. and should be played as normal (Basic Melody) ©»ªº C ©. of course. G (5th) 10 œ. Regarding a method for establishing harmony parts. C Œ. Fortunately. generating the results via MIDI. Or create rhythmic counterpoint. because each note makes sense against the underlying chord. C œ. so that the harmony is implied.

(5th) 8 C œ. (3rd) 12 Similar (Root) (3rd) 13 Œ.50 by quarterly credit card. For example. with no duplications (the same note played in different parts). Your subscription will start with the next available issue.myfavourite magazines.uk Or call +44 1604 251 045 Terms and Conditions: This offer is for new North American subscribers only. Œ.lesson: creative rock ON THE CD tracks 43-53 ExampleS 5. 68 (Root) 8 (3rd) 12 C C œ. C Œ. (mixed motions & rhythmic counterpoint) œ. Note how the various chord tones in the original melody (Guitar 3) have been mirrored by a complementary chord in the other two parts.com/guitartechniques Or call TOLL FREE on: 1-800-428-3003 76 GuitarTechniques September 2014 save OVER 40% Overseas Orders Excluding North America Order online at: www. 7 making three-part harmony work cd track 47-49 [Ex 5] Here.imsnews.99)! l Struggle to find a copy of Guitar Techniques in stores? Then subscribe today and you’ll never miss another issue – delivered by Airmail. G (5th) 10 œ . œ . (3rd) (5th) 10 (Root) 8 ⋲ 13 (5th) C G (Root) * 13 ( 12 ) 13 (Root) (Root) œ. we have continued the process of applying similar motion. the 3rd of underlying C chord) is now underpinned by C (root of C) and G (the 5th of C). [Ex7] As well as harmonic counterpoint (combination of different voice motions) it is also possible to create interest and balance through rhythmic counterpoint (via a mixture of different rhythms). œ. but choosing harmony notes that relate to the underlying chord in order to produce a three-part harmony of the same basic melody. If you take each note of the original melody within this three-part harmony. C œ. Make sure that you take time to note how this same principle is applied throughout all of the following examples. similar & oblique motion) œ. Œ. Gœ . you will see that it is now underpinned with all of the other notes from the underlying chord. œ. [Ex 6] This next example shows how the original melody can be harmonised Ex 5 (parallel. C œ. Œ. If at any time during the first 60 days you are dissatisfied in any way please notify us in writing and we will refund you for all un-mailed issues. (mixture of motions) C (Root) 8 C Parallel Ex 6 C using a combination of voice motions. Similar with part 1 C (parallel with pt 2) œ. Oblique 68 œ œ œ 8 8 C G C C 68 œ . Œ. you can save over 40% off the store price and pay just $29. œ. Come and join the GT family! . direct to your home or workplace. Minimum subscription term is 12 months. l Get your copy up to three weeks before they hit the stores.07 per issue (usual price $15.co. The melodic embellishments from the two harmony parts are played in rhythmic counterpoint to Guitar 3 (in other words. 6. l That’s the equivalent of only $9. 68 Ex 7 C (5th) 10 Similar 8 Oblique Gtr 3 68 œ. they occupy holes left by the rhythm of the original melody line). the first note (E. Œ. & 68 C G E B G D A E (5th) (Root) 12 Œ. G C (5th) 12 œ. (3rd) 12 œ . Gœ . Order online: www. You will receive 13 issues per year. C & 68 Gtr 1 E B G D A E & 68 Gtr 2 E B G D A E (3rd) 12 œ. producing a more sophisticated affect. Contrary (5th) 9 10 (3rd) 9 œ. G œ œ œ (Root) 8 G œ œ œ (3rd) * (10 ) 12 œ œ * (Root) (3rd) (Root) (5th) (12 ) 10 9 10 12 Œ. œ. The chord tones in these other two parts have been embellished using scale notes. (Root) 68 œ (5th) 9 10 œ. (3rd) 9 North American Subscription Offer Subscribe to Guitar Techniques today and save over $89 off the store price – it’s madness! l Yes.

we need something more direct. C G œ. than Guitar 3 (the most commonly-used intervals when applying parallel harmony are 3rds. Guitars 2 and 1 are a 3rd and 6th higher respectively.more freedom in second part) œ. (2-part harmony . although okay for. Here. 6ths and octaves).Learning Zone Creating harmony parts Example 8 TWO-PART HARMONY – MORE FREEDOM IN SECOND PART Interestingly. the second part (Guitar 2) is able to dart around Ex 8 cd track 50 between the various chord tones not covered by the original melody (Guitar 1).parallel harmony a 3rd and 6th above) ¢ ©»¡£™ F 3 ¡ œ œ¡ ™ ™œ ™œ œ œ ™œ 4 œ ™œ ¢œ &4 œ œ ¡ Gtr 1 E B G D A E ¡ 8 ¢ 12 3 10 10 10 3 8 13 8 D7 10 10 12 9 ≤ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ¢≤ 3 ¡ œ ¡ ™œ 3 œ ¡ ™œ œ 4 œ &4 œ œ œ œ ¡ £œ œ ¢ 3 ¢ £ 3 E B G D A E D7 3 8 7 6 5 8 5 6 5 7 8 5 ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≤ F 3 ¡œ ¢œ ¡ œ 3 4 ™œ œ¡ ¡œ œ &4 ™ £œ œ œ£ œ œ 3 £ 3 £ Gtr 3 etc ≥ 0 1 3 3 2 1 1 5 1 1 2 3 D7 9 7 11 7 ¡ #œ œ œ œ ¢ £ 3 0 3 5 4 # ¢œ ¡ œ ¡ œ ™œ £œ £œ 3 3 ™ 3 ¡œ 3 œ œ # œ œ ¢ ™ ¡ ¡ 5 12 12 ¡œ 10 etc F Gtr 2 # ™œ £ 3 10 3 œ # ¡œ œ ¢ ≥ E B G D A E cd track 51 played as a three-part harmony. 2 # ™œ 10 ¡œ 14 ¢œ ™œ 3 3 ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≤ etc ¢ G E7 ¡œ # œ œ¡ ¡œ ¢ œ œ¡ ™ ¡ ™ œ ™œ ™ ¢ ¡ £ £œ # ™œ œ œ¡ ™œ £œ £ ¢ ™ ™œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ & ¡œ œ œ 10 11 12 12 œ¡ ™œ œ 3 ™ ™œ œ ¢ 3 3 7 10 5 10 5 7 7 7 9 3 # ¡œ ¢œ œ¡ ™œ œ œ œ ¡ £ 3 ¢ 2 5 2 3 2 4 5 ≥ 3 3 3 3 ¢œ ¡ ™œ ¡œ œ ™ £œ ™œ ¡ œ £ ¡ ¢ £œ œSeptember 2014œGuitarTechniques 77 Am œ œ 3 3 3 . say. (3rd) 10 8 7 Example 9 CHORD TONES ONLY – PARALLEL HARMONY A 3RD AND 6TH ABOVE The approach in Examples 7 and 8. would be too fiddly when attempting to harmonise powerful rock lines: basically. establishing a two-part harmony for a melodic line underpinned by three-note chords presents more options in terms of choice of motion. This example shows an arpeggio passage Ex 9 (chord tones only . C (3rd) 12 (5th) 10 (Root) 8 œ C & 68 Gtr 1 E B G D A E C & 68 œ Gtr 2 œ œ (Root) (5th) (Root) E B G D A E 10 10 G œ œ (3rd) œ œ œ 10 12 9 (3rd) 10 8 œ œ œ œ (Root) (3rd) (Root) 9 10 ˙. a ballad. In this example. œ (5th) 7 8 œ (5th) 7 10 œ. without the fear of crossing over or duplicating any notes from a third part second harmony.

and two1inversions higher G 2 2 are also is theD same as a 6th higher.£ again.¡ Gtr 2 E B G D A E 5 6 5 8 5 6 5 lesson:≥ creative ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ rock ≤ ≤ 3 7 8 ¢œ 7 8 5 ≤ ≤ ≤ etc 7 9 5 7 7 10 5 7 7 7 tracks 943-53 ON THE CD ¢œ D7 3 ¡ ¡œ 3 3 œ¡ ™œ ¡œ ¡œ ™œ # œ 4 ™œ œ¡ ¡ œ œ œ track &4 ™ œ £ œ A 3RD AND 6THœABOVE œ ONLY – PARALLEL HARMONY # œ . Finally. This triple iteration applies to most of the 0 the 5 5 notes of Guitar 1 throughout this entire example. playing a 6th be in a different octave).. 3 Playing a 3rd higher will produce the same notes 3 E as when 1 playing a 6th lower (only an octave apart). and again 4 4 in third note of Guitar 3. note that the repetition problem inherent 2 5 2 with parallel motion is increased with each added 3 3 voice..CONTINUED Example 9 CHORDœTONES ¡ cd œ £ £ œ £ series on neo-classical œ ¢will generate the 3same notes as a 3rd3 lower (although. For example.¢œ they52 3 £ are higher 3 If you have followed this rock. ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≤ ≤ etc ¢ G E7 ¡œ # œ œ¡ ¡œ ¢ œ œ¡ ™ ¡ ™ ™ ™ œ œ œ œ¡ ™œ £ £ ™ ¢ ¡ £ £œ # œ ¢ ™ ™œ œ œ œ œ œœ & ¡œ œ #œ œ ≥ 3 3 E B G D A E 10 14 12 G 3 & œ œ œ£ ¡ ¢ E B G D A E 9 5 10 12 5 5 12 12 14 11 14 E7 8 7 10 7 8 4 3 3 3 3 7 3 3 7 9 10 7 œ œ 4 5 ¢ 3 11 9 3 #œ œ¡ œ¢ £ ™ £ œ £ 5 2 12 16 12 ¡ ™ # ™œ œ E7 3 12 3 ¡ 3 7 14 13 œ œ # œ œ ™ œ 3 3 ¡ 2 10 15 10 3 7 6 9 ¢œ 12 13 14 14 12 15 7 12 œ 3 5 4 7 9 9 9 3 12 17 12 Am 3 œ œ¡ œ¢ ™ 11 7 12 10 3 œ¡ ™œ 3 œ œ ¡ £ œ 3 3 œ œ¡ œ¢ ¢ ¢ 7 4 5 4 6 7 3 7 7 10 9 & 3 œ¡ œ¡ ¡œ ¡œ E7 ¢œ ™œ œ ™œ £ 3 20 17 & ¡ 17 ¢ ≤œ 17 œ œ £œ ™œ ™ 3 E B G D A E & 14 17 19 16 ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≤ ¢œ 17 12 ¡œ ¢œ E7 13 14 13 18 19 12 13 18 ¡ 16 ¡ œ ™ œ # £œ ™œ œ 10 ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ 13 12 10 ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ œ¡ ™œ ¡ ™œ ¡ œ ¢Eœ7 œ¡ # ™œ £œ ™œ ¡œ œ 3 3 17 Am ¢œ 3 ™œ 12 ¡œ 13 ™œ 3 3 12 ¡œ 3 ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ 3 3 ¢œ 3 3 E B G D A E œ¡ 12 ¢œ Am 3 8 ¡œ 10 ¡œ œ £ ¡ ¢œ ¡œ ¡œ œ 5 5 14 œ ¡ 9 ¡œ 3 14 5 6 ≤ 8 10 9 10 8 10 ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ ≤ 78 GuitarTechniques September 2014 7 9 10 9 7 ≤ ≤ ≥ ≥ 8 5 5 5 ~~~ œ ¢ ¡ 15 12 3 œ ™ 10 œ ¢ 3 12 10 7 œ ¢ 12 œ ¢ 7 ˙ ~~~ ~~~ ¡˙ 12 8 œ¡ ¡œ 3 ~~~ 8 ¡ ¡œ œ¡ œ 3 5 5 5 5 5 ≤ ≤≥≥ Ó Ó ~~~ ~~~ 10 ≤ ≤ ≥≥ 7 ˙ 9 3 3 3 œ £ 13 3 Am # œ¡ 14 ≤ ≤ ≥≥ 8 12 8 ≤ œ¡ 13 3 ≤ Am 3 ¡ ¢ œ œ¡ ™œ ™œ ¡ œ ¡œ ™œ œ ¡œ 3 √¢œ E B G D A E 14 13 14 œ¡ ™œ £œ ™œ ¡ œ ≤ œ¡ ™œ ™œ ™ œ ¢œ 3 9 3 3 3 ¡ ¢œ ¡ ™œ # œ 4 œ œ 3 3 ¡ ¢œ œ¡ ™ ¡ ™œ œ œ œ¡ £ ¢ œ œ œ œ œ œ£ £ 3 & 12 ¡ ¢œ œ¡ ¡ ™ œ¡ œ œ G E B G D A2 E 12 3 3 3 ¢œ ™œ ¡œ £ ¡ ¢ £œ œ Am Ó . 3It is for this reason that 3rds and 6ths 3 A inversions of each0 other. Conversely. the 2 first note of Guitar 1 (F) is repeated by the second note2of Guitar 2. you will see that we will F 3 Gtr 3 merely playing different inversions of the same arpeggios simultaneously: E 1 5 1 one Binversion higher is the same as a 13rd higher.

2) Each scale note is mirrored by two other complementary scale notes (again. It’s important to start off by identifying the chord tones from within the original line (the strongest notes).parallel harmony a 3rd and 6th above) ©»¡º¢ ™Amœ œ (œ ) œ œ œ (œ ) œ ™G œ (œ ) œ œ œ ( œ) œ œ 4 &4 Gtr 1 E B G D A E 10 Am œ & 44 * 12 (10 ) 12 8 * 12 (10 ) 12 œ ( œ) œ œ œ ( œ) œ Gtr 2 14 G œ 7 * 10 (8 ) 10 * 17 (16 ) 17 14 17 (16 ) 17 12 Gtr 3 10 œ 5 * (7 ) 8 8 10 * * * 12 ( 9 ) 12 12 (9 ) 12 œ (œ) œ œ œ (œ ) œ G ¡ œ 7 3 * (5 ) 7 3 œ * 9 3 * 12 ( 9) 12 12 9 (10 ) 12 œ ( œ) œ œ œ ( œ ) œ œ œ œ œ ( ) œ œ (œ ) œ * * 10 ( 7 ) 10 7 10 10 ( 7 ) 10 * * 7 ( 5) 5 7 4 5 ( 7) 4 1 G œ ( œ) œ ¡œ ¡ ™ ¡ œ œ œ ( œ) œ œ œ œ œ (œ ) œ & œ() ¡ Am ¢œ F ¢ * 8 ( 7) 8 E B G D A E 5 5 * * 5 (4 ) 7 5 (2 ) 4 3 * 3 ( 5) 7 3 ~~~ œ œ œ¡ œ œ¡ œ¡ œ œ œ œ ˙ ¡ œ (œ ) œ œ (œ ) ¡ G Am ( ) * 5 ( 3) 5 1 1 * 2 (0) * 3 5 (2) 4 3 3 3 4 5 7 ≥ ≤ ≥≤ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥≥ ≤ ≥≥≤ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥≤ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥≥ ≤ ≥≥≤ ≤ ≤ ≥ G G Am œ (œ) œ œ ~~~ œ œ Fœ ( œ) œ œ (œ) œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œœ ˙ (œ) œ œ ( œ ) œ œ (œ ) œ œ (œ ) œ ~~~ * * * * * * * E B G D A E 14 (12 ) 14 14 10 12 ( 10 ) 12 10 Am ( 7 ) 10 9 12 ( 9 ) 12 12 G œ œ & ( œ) œ œ œ ( œ) œ œ œ œ œ (œ ) œ œ œ( ) * * * * 9 ( 7) 9 3 5 7 7 ( 5) 3 ≤ ≤ 2 (3) 5 5 4 ( 5) 7 ≥ ≥ 4 10 ( 7 ) 10 10 7 8 (5) 8 10 (7 ) 10 9 12 9 10 10 ≤ ≤ G Am ~~~ œ (œ ) œ œ œ œ œ ( œ ) œ œ (œ ) œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ~~~ * * * 2 3 3 ( 2) 0 ≤ ≤ 2 (3) 5 5 4 5 5 2 Ó 12 F 5 ( 4) 5 Ó ~~~ Am E B G D A E * 3 ( 5) œ (œ) œ œ œ œ œ() G * 14 (12 ) 14 10 14 (12 ) 14 œ 14 (12 ) 14 12 8 * * 16 (14 ) 16 12 16 (14 ) 16 * 9 * ( 7) œ ( œ ) œ œ œ ( œ) œ F 14 (12 ) 14 14 8 6 Am G 4 œ œ ( œ) œ œ œ (œ ) œ œ œ ( œ) œ œ œ ( œ) œ &4 E B G D A E œ ( œ ) œ œ œ ( œ) œ F ™œ œ ( œ ) œ œ œ ( œ) œ * * E B G D A E * 10 (8 ) 10 8 cd track 53 the chord tones) in an equivalent manner to the original (so that any motion is mirrored as closely as possible). you will see that: 1) Each chord tone is mirrored by two other complementary chord tones (in the other parts). and making sure that each of these is underpinned by other chord tones in the other two parts.Learning Zone Creating harmony parts Example 10 CHORD AND SCALE TONES – PARALLEL HARMONY A 3rd and 6th ABOVE Here. If you visually scroll up and down through the three guitar parts. in the other parts with no duplications). Then the object is to link the chord tones from each harmony part using scale notes (which act as passing notes between Ex 10 (chord and scale tones . we see how parallel motion can be applied to a melody (Guitar 3) composed from chord tones linked by scale notes. with no duplications (no two notes are the same pitch). Ó 3 ≥≥ ≤ ≤ September 2014 GuitarTechniques 79 .

too! Track record How could we talk about movie themes without mentioning the iconic 60s James Bond riff played by legendary UK session man Vic Flick. with its brilliantly evocative theme? Other fabulous cinema and TV guitar moments include the spooky Twilight Zone double-stop riff played by US session titan Tommy Tedesco.com where you can also check out a video of me playing my country guitar extravaganza. in this case. and indeed. I was always hearing different types of solo piano pieces. Again. Although the double-stop-style B section I’ve contrived an imaginary situation where a TV or movie theme has been written. funky single-note ‘popping’ intro. concertos and the like. . Some added wah-wah will help if you want to give it that real 70s treatment – and maybe a bit of phaser. This is mainly an improvised solo. Wes Montgomery-style. music that was listened to was predominantly classical (my brother is a classical pianist). a 10-bar secondary whether there’s a guitar element to them or theme (B section) and then a 16-bar solo over not. Growing up in a household where the ON THE CD tracks 54-55 the main theme (C section). producer and guitarist are one and the same!). to help give it a more authentic ‘jazzy’ feel. counter-melody part to the longer-note melody that you can hear the trumpet playing during this section. Finally. purposely keeping most of the phrases straightforward C Minor Pentatonic-based in order to make it catchy and familiar. and played it with my thumb. the composer. After a 70s-style. I’ve deliberately gone with the vibe of the tune. the solo (C section) isn’t designed to be flash. I feel confident in my belief that some of these amazing movie soundtracks must be placed ‘up there’ alongside some of the great classical pieces. regardless of main theme (A section). and a versatile guitarist is needed to realise the composer’s or the producer’s vision ABILITY RATING (fortunately in this case. The tune is in C minor. I’ve used fingerstyle/thumb for this.. but I’m a huge fan groove. and the original Batman TV show theme. as I wanted a spontaneous.. again played by Tedesco. It has an eight-bar intro. musical. I’m not classically trained myself. a 16-bar of film and TV soundtracks. and hopefully. and has a cool jazz feel with a funky bass and drum I don’t know about you. with the chordal element of the piece being played by the rhythm guitar using some nice jazz voicings. a fizzy drink and a tub of ice cream! Andy Saphir is going to the movies to bring you a jazzy tune inspired by the 70s silver screen. The 70s vibe is helped along by a consistent wah-wah ‘scratch’ guitar part that continues throughout. What The Cluck! NEXT MONTH: Andy begins a new technique series called Chops Shop! Get The Tone 5 5 4 6 4 Gain Bass Middle Treble Reverb Choice of guitar tone is purely dependent on the style and feel you’re going for. go to www. but above all. If you’d like to contact me. the melody (A section) is simple and singable (as a melody should be in a track such as this). ‘cool jazz’ or funky feel tune. but it’s a slightly different angle to the predominantly stylistic approach of previous lessons in this series. uncontrived feel.andysaphir. in that I’ve contrived an imaginary Vic Flick played session situation where a ‘Bond’ on this Clifford Essex TV or movie theme has been Paragon guitar written. a clean tone with perhaps the merest hint of early amp drive will sound great.Cool Jazz Movie Theme Grab some popcorn. Moderate What I’ve come up with is a mini retroInfo Will improve your style track which I’ve attempted to write to fit the movie or TV show for which I’ve Key: G minor Stylistic approach fictitiously been commissioned. And although I might not be greatly knowledgeable about the vastly varied amount of music under the umbrella of ‘classical’. It’s interesting that we have Wes’ song Sunny in this issue. as a retro. I’ve arranged it as a complementary. Now the purpose of this month’s lesson isn’t to teach you how to be a classical or movie-soundtrack composer (though it might hopefully inspire you!). and I’ve interpreted it by going for an ‘octaves’ approach to give it depth. cool. too. simple. and a guitarist is needed to realise the composer’s vision. I’m not a composer or arranger. so perhaps one will help you with the other. 80 GuitarTechniques September 2014 GETTY IMAGES lesson: SESSION Brought to you by. theme can be seen as a melody in its own right. Tempo: 123 bpm Phrasing and melody I’m pretending it’s a 70s-style LA-based cop CD: TRACKS 54-55 Jazz-chord vocabulary show or movie. with all due credit going to the composers and musicians whose incredible talent brings them into being. In this case.

# œ.. œj ⋲ œœj. œœ ⋲ œœ . ˙. œ nœ ... as this is the main melody. # œ. ˙˙ . the rhythm guitar plays these chords on the recording. J 8 6 8 8 8 7 7 8 8 6 7 6 7 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 7 Cm11 Cm11 Cm11 Cm11 ˙. 5 j œj ⋲ œjj.. ˙˙ . F maj9/C œœj ⋲ œœj. (Rhythm plays these chords) (Rhythm Guitar 8 plays these chords) (Rhythm Guitar 8 .THEME 3 X X j # œj œ #n œj œ #n œj œJ œ #n œ J n œ œJ œ nœ .. 3 B D E G A 1. Again. ˙. œ œœ. . which will help to ensure that the notes are played rhythmically. ˙. Be aware of the style as you play – it’s a jazz vibe. bœ Fm/C œœj œœj œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ 6 8 6 3 6 3 8 5 8 5 8 5 6 3 6 3 6 3 5 3 6 3 3 3 F maj9/C 8 8 A6b13 b13 Aœ b13 Aœ A bœ13 ˙. maybe with the thumb. # œ. 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 3 Cm11 b A b13 A b13 A b˙13 œ œœ œœ œœ œ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ 8 5 8 6 8 6 8 6 5 3 5 3 5 3 6 3 Fm/C œ œ œœ œœ œ ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ Fm/C Fm/C Fm/C 8 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 3 Fm/C ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ 6 8 5 8 5 8 5 6 3 6 3 6 3 5 3 œ œœ Jœœœ Jœ Jœ J ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œœ Jœœœ Jœ Jœ J 3 ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ 9 8 9 8 9 8 9 8 # G7 # 5 G7œ# 5 œ G7œ# 5 3 5 3 X X X 3 X X3 5 X 3 X X3 5 3 5 X X JAZZ JAZZ JAZZ JAZZ b wwbb wwb Cm B /C Cm Cm Cm B /C B /C B /C ww w . . ˙˙ . ˙. œ œ. # œ.. Cm11 j F maj9/C œj ⋲ œjj. ˙. œœj ⋲ œœj. so no crazy vibrato! [Bars 17-33] The octave melody again.. œœ ⋲ œœ . œ nœ . ¿ œ ¿ ¿ œ. b œ.Learning Zone Cool Jazz 70s Movie Theme Example COOL JAZZ 70s MOVIE THEME cd track 54 [Intro bars 1-4] Palm-mute this funky ‘popping’ line and play with a pick using 1/16th note ‘down-up-down-up’ for each beat.. 10 X 8 3 X X 8 8 10 X 3 X X 3 4 . ˙. ˙˙ . œ œ. 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 7 5 8 6 8 6 8 6 7 5 7 5 7 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 6 5 A 13 b A b13 A b13 A b˙13 3 œ. Thumb or fingerstyle approach would work here. ˙˙ . ˙. ww œ œ .. ˙. ˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ 3 3 X X X 3 X X 3 X 3 X X 3 3 X X 10 9 10 9 10 9 10 9 Cm11 Cm11 Cm11 Fm/C Fm/C Fm/C 3 X X Fm/C nF/C ww nF/C ww nnF/C w nn www n ww F maj9/C F maj9/C F maj9/C ¿ œœ ¿¿ ¿¿ œ. ˙. GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Andy Saphir's SESSION SOLOING Andy Saphir's SESSION SOLOING Andy Saphir's SESSION SOLOING Andy Saphir's Gm/C SESSION SOLOING GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 INTRO C5 (Dm/C INTRO C5on repeat) ©»¡ºº (Dm/C on repeat) INTRO C5 ©»¡ºº on repeat) INTRO j C5 b bb b 44 (Dm/C œ ¿ ¿ œj œ ©»¡ºº & œj œ on¿repeat) (Dm/C b œ ©»¡ºº b & b b b 4 œj œ ¿ œ ¿¿ ¿¿ œjj œ & b b b 4 œj œ ¿ œ ¿ ¿ œj œ & 4 œœ ¿ œ œ E B E G B D E G A B D E G A 1. [Bars 5-7] Strictly. ˙.. 6 8 6 3 6 3 6 3 8 5 8 5 8 5 6 3 6 3 6 3 7 8 7 8 6 8 6 7 5 8 6 7 5 7 5 7 5 6 5 7 5 7 5 5 3 5 3 ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ Fm/C Fm/C Fm/C ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ 6 Fmaj9/C Fmaj9/C Fmaj9/C Fmaj9/C ˙. ⋲ ⋲ b œ A bœ13 b13 œ Aœ A bœ13 œ ⋲ 10 11 10 11 10 11 10 11 # # œ# œœ# G7 5 G7 5 G7 5 œœ œœ œ 8 7 8 5 8 5 8 5 7 4 7 4 7 4 6 3 6 3 6 3 5 4 3 œ œ œ œ 8 10 8 11 8 10 8 11 8 10 8 11 8 10 8 11 G7 5 6 8 7 8 6 8 6 8 6 7 5 7 5 7 5 6 5 G7 5 # #5 œ œ œ œ G7 œ G7 œ œœ ⋲ œ œ G7œ## 55 œœ⋲œœ œ œ ⋲œœ œ ⋲ A 13 œ bœ œ ⋲ bœ œœ ⋲ bb œœ œœ ⋲ bb œœ œ ⋲ bœ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ j œj ⋲ œjj. . ww œ œœ œœ œœ œ 8 6 8 6 8 6 A Cm11 MAIN THEME 5 j A Cm11 MAIN THEME œj A Cm11 MAIN THEME ˙ ˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ Fm/C Fm/C Fm/C 6 œ œ. 8 8 8 10 X 3 X X 3 4 . 3 D E A 1. . b œ. ˙˙ . œ œœ. F maj9/C w œj ⋲ œœj.. ˙˙ . 8 6 8 6 8 6 5 3 5 3 5 3 6 3 G7 # 5 G7 # 5 œ G7 # 5 G7œ# 5 11 8 11 8 11 8 11 8 j œj œœj œœj œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ 6 8 6 3 6 3 6 3 8 5 8 5 8 5 3 5 nœ bœ œ nœ œ œ nœ ⋲ bœ œ nœ n œ ⋲ b œ œ n œ œ œœ œ nœ ⋲ bœ œ nœ œ œ œ 81 œ ⋲ September 2014 GuitarTechniques . . ˙˙ . Accurate timing is essential here. ˙. # œ. ˙˙ . ˙˙ . but watch for correct timing.. œ œ ⋲ œœ œ.. 8 6 8 6 8 6 7 5 7 5 7 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 6 5 Fmaj9/C 3 œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ 7 œ œ œœ œœ œ 7 œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ Fm/C j œj œœj œœj œœ œ 8 Fmaj9/C Fmaj9/C Fmaj9/C j œj œœj œœj œœ œ 5 ˙. www ww Guitar ¿ œ ¿ ¿ œ. but feel free to play them with a gentle approach.. ˙˙ . œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ 8 7 8 6 8 6 8 6 7 5 7 5 7 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 6 5 3 ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ 5 5 3 5 3 5 b œœ b ⋲ b b œœ ⋲ b bb œœœ ⋲b œ ⋲ G7 5 Œ Œ Œ Œ 3 4 4 4 COOL COOL COOL COOL ¿ œœ ¿¿ ¿¿ œjj œ ¿ œ ¿ ¿ œj œ ¿ œ ¿ ¿ œj œ ¿ œ œ œ œj œ œj œ œ œ 4 - ww ww ww 6 6 6 7 6 8 6 7 6 8 6 7 6 8 7 8 5 5 5 11 10 11 10 11 10 11 10 A 13 ˙. ¿ œ. ⋲ ⋲ ⋲ ⋲ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙˙ ˙ 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 3 œ œ œ œ b œ. 3 E 1. . # œ. [Bar 16] This a little ‘answer’ style fill. ¿ œœ ¿¿ ¿¿ œ. (Rhythm ww theseGuitar ¿ œ ¿ ¿ œ. œœj ⋲ œœj. 3 E B E G B D E G A B D E G A 7 B D E G A 7 D E A 7 E 7 b & bb b b & b b bb & bbb & 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 3 5 3 X X X 3 X X3 5 X 3 X X3 5 3 5 X X b & bb b b & b b bb & bbb & 5 6 5 6 7 5 5 6 7 5 5 6 7 5 7 b & bb b b & b b bb & bbb & E B E G B D E G A B D E G A 17 B D E G A 17 D E A 17 E 17 b & bb b b & b b bb & bbb & ˙.. ˙. plays 8 3 X X these chords) 8 3 4 . ˙˙ . [Bar 8] This is a ‘pick up’ lick into the main theme. œ nœ .. as this is a common jazz approach. ˙ . œ. try using your thumb. plays chords) ¿ œ. ˙˙ . Cm11 œ œ œœ œœ œ Cm11 Cm11 Cm11 8 5 ˙. ww œœ ⋲ œœ . ˙˙ . 8 3 4 10 X A MAIN ... Note how there are subtle changes to the previous time round.. œ œ. # œ. ˙˙ . œœj ⋲ œj. # œ. j œ n œ Fm/C œœ n n œœj Fm/C j œœ n n œœ Fm/C n n œœj œœ n œ œ F/C F maj9/C E B E G B D E G A B D E G A 11 B D E G A 11 D E A 11 E 11 E 3 3 X X (C5Gm/C on repeat) (C5Gm/C on repeat) (C5 on repeat) jGm/C œj on repeat) (C5 [A section (main theme) bars 9-15] This is the main theme played in octaves. ¿ œ ¿ ¿ œ.

B 8 6 [B section (secondary G 8 7 ‘3rds’ 5 5 melody) bars 25-33] These predominantly D 3 to the chords over which 5 double-stops act as a little harmonised melody Fm/C 7 6 Fmaj9/C ˙ b ˙.. œœ. œ œœ œ 54 ˙ .G D A E 5 3 11 8 5 6 3 lesson: SESSION œ Cm11 8 7 5 6 5 3 5 3 3 j j œ ‰ ⋲ œ .. œ. G 11 b & bbb & bbb &b b œœ œœ œœ 3 8 9 8 9 8 9 D maj7 b & bbb & bbb &b b E B E G B D A G E D E B A 32 G E D 32 A E 32 œœ œœ œœ b B b7 Bœ œb7 B 7 œ œ œ œ 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 Ó Ó Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ F maj9/C Fm/C F maj9/C œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ⋲ œ n œ œ œ œ œœ œ ⋲ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ ⋲ œ nœ 8 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 8 9 8 9 8 8 9 10 10 10 œ œ œ œ œ œ~~~ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ~~~ œ F maj9/C ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ~~~ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ~~~ Fm/C œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Fm/C œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œœ œœœ & b b b Fm7 œ . and requires the correct 16th-note based ‘down-up-down-up’ approach to sound right. œœ. it uses 8 the G Superlocrian 4 Bb 3 Cb (B) Db Eb F).. œ œ. œ3 3 3 œ. œœ. œ b b œ.. œ œ œ œ Ó Ó Ó œ œ œ œ Ó Ó Ó œ œ œ œ Œ Œ Œ 8 8 8 . Bear in mind that the rhythmic 16th-note octave phrase from bars 31-33 is played with the thumb. Ensure [Bar 24] Another ‘answer’ fill. œ œ ˙. œ œ œ œ œ G 11 C C . œ œ œ œ 15 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 A 7 5 8 9 8 9 8 9 15 15 œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ w ww œ.. ˙. œ b œ. œœ œœ. with the B note on the ‘2 and’ marking the major 3rd of the G7 chord. b œœ. 3 5 5 5 (G Ab notes from mode œ œ ˙. Played 8 over the 5 G chord.. œ œ. . œ. Fm/C E B G D A E 3 b 6 3 5 3 11 11 11 13 3 8 8 8 10 Cm11 œ bœ œ ⋲ œ ⋲ b œ œ œœ j ˙ . œœ. Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. THEME Fm7 œœ. œ. œ. œœ b E bmaj7 ww E bmaj7 w œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ. œ œ. œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ J J ON THE CD# A 13 17 b ˙ &b b ˙ 5 5 œ ˙ œ ˙ these are played accurately – good timing is vital. œœ. 13 11 b A 13 13 3 6 3 6 Fmaj9/C 6 tracks 54-55 G7 5 that the phrases sit ‘in the pocket’. G 11. œ œ . this time more jazzy and using the Ab whole tone scale (Ab Bb C D E Gb) start to the lick. 3 3 8 9 8 9 8 9 9 10 9 10 9 10 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ 3 4 6 4 6 4 6 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 10 9 10 9 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 œœ œœ œœ j n œœ j n œœ j n œœ œœ œœ œœ 4 6 4 6 4 6 7 8 7 8 7 8 8 9 8 9 8 9 6 5 6 5 6 5 œœ œœ œœ 3 3 œœ œœ œœ 3 7 8 7 8 7 8 b 8 10 8 10 8 10 œœ. œ.. A b7 b 5 œ.. A b7 b 5 œ . so they’re played. œœ b œœ. œ œ. œœ œœ. ˙. œœ œœ œœ 4 6 4 6 4 6 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 15 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 15 12 15 œ œ œ œ SOLO OVER MAIN THEME C SOLO OVER MAIN THEME C m11 œ œ œ œ C m11 bSOLO œOVERœ MAIN œ Ó œ œTHEME & b b b C m11 œ œ œ œ œ Ó b b & 82 GuitarTechniques b September œ œ œ2014œ œ Ó &b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. œ B SECONDARY œ b œ. it then moves into a descending C E Aeolian (C D Eb F G Ab Bb) line. cd track œ œ.. b b & œ THEME ˙ Example COOL JAZZ ˙ . œœ. 70s MOVIE A E 8 11 œ nœ 13 # bœ œ nœ œ œ œ ⋲ G7 5 12 11 13 12 10 13 12 22 2 xxxxxxxxxx 2 xxxxxxxxxx œœ.. 10 12 10 12 10 12 Dm7 5 œœ œœ œœ Dm7 5 Dm7 5 3 3 œœ œœ œœ 3 8 9 8 9 8 9 4 6 4 6 4 6 6 5 6 5 6 5 E maj7 10 11 10 11 10 11 6 8 6 8 6 8 œœ. 8 7 6 6 8 [Bar 34] This is the pick-up lick into the solo. & b b b œ œœ3 œœ 3 &b b B SECONDARY THEME 2 xxxxxxxxxx Fm7 THEME B SECONDARY 11 13 11 13 11 13 E B E G B D A G E D E B 25 A G E D 25 A E 25 E B E G B D A G E D E B A 29 G E D 29 A E 29 b D bmaj7 œœ D bmaj7 œ . Œ . œœ..

œœ œ œœ œ JJœ ‰ ‰ œ ⋲ œ œ ⋲ œ œ œ ‰ JJœ. This solo was practically all so8 12 12 I wouldn’t play exactly the same thing if I did it again. J J œ œ œ œ . œ. bb œ . √ bb .. √ œœ œ œœ œ œœ Fm/C œœ œœ œœ œ œ Fmaj9/Cœ œ œ bœ. œ œ 3 J œ b Œ ⋲ Œ ‰ ‰ ‰ Œ ⋲rallJ 3 b & C m11 C m11 10 10 8 8 10 10 12 12 ~~ 11 11 88 6 6 Cm11 Fmaj9/C Fmaj9/C 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 8 œœG 7œœ## 5œ œœ œ Cm11 œ œ G7 5 Cm11 œ œ œ œ œ.œ . œ G G 11 11 œ. œ œœ œœœ œœœ œœ ‰ œ œ œ nn œœ ‰ ⋲ œ n œ nœ A 13 A 13 œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ Fm/C Fmaj9/C b œ œ .. œj œ œ GG 77œ 55 Cm11 œ. ⋲⋲ J. 10 10 although the general 8 8 9 9 feel of the note placement would be similar. 8 8 10 10 8 8 10 10 8 8 10 10 8 8 10 10 8 8 œ œ œ œ œ~~~ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ F F maj9/C maj9/C 8 12 8 10 10 12 8 8 10 10 10 10 11 11 12 12 10 10 8 8 ~~~ 8 8 35 35 b œ œœ œ œ bœ nœ A A 13 13 b &b b ⋲ E 3 E B 3 B G G D D 3 A A E E cd track 54 15 15 Fm/C Fm/C b œ œ œ œ œ Ó &b b œ œ œ œ œ Learning Zone 8 9 8 improvised.. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. Œ œ œ ⋲ œ œ œ Œ ‰ JœJ œ œ œ ‰ œ œJ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b & œ. ⋲⋲ œœJ ‰‰  ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ JJœ. œ œ œœ. The important C 8 8 10 10 8 8 10 10 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ . b œ n œ œ œ œ œ œ.. œ œ œ œ b œ œ . though feel G 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 G 12 with 12 12 12 12 if12 12wish. . Œ ⋲ Œ ‰ œ‰ œ œ Jœ ‰‰ ŒŒ œ. . œ œ œ œ œ œj œ~~ J ‰ Œ F F m/C m/C 11 11 13 13 11 11 b b A b‰13 7 7 # Fm/C Fm/C G7 5 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 11 10 8 11 10 8 0 0 11 10 8 0 11 8 11 8 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 8 9 9 8 9 9 9 9 8 8 8 10 8 10 8 8 10 8 8 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 11 8 8 11 8 11 8 11 11 8 11 8 10 10 11 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 Fm/C Fm/C Fmaj9/C b b A b13 # # G7 # 5 G7 5 G7 5 ‰‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰‰ Jœœ.. œ ‰ œœ œœ œœ ‰‰ ⋲⋲ œœ nn œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œœ . œ œ & & b b bb œ.. œ 3 Example COOL JAZZ 70s MOVIE THEME E 15 15 15 15 15 15 E 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 B B [C section (solo) Bars 35-51] I played this solo with the pick. 9 8 8 8 thing here is the phrasing. . E E with 32 32 the licks being quite straightforward and uncomplicated. œ 13 13 13 13 15 15 Fmaj9/C Fmaj9/C œœ œœ œ œ~~ bb Fmaj9/C b œœ œ~~œœ œœ ŒŒ bb œ & b & b œ œ œ œ~~œ œ œ Œ &b b ~~ ~~ 8 ~~ 8 8 10 8 10 38 38 E E B B G G D E A D B A E G 41 E D 41 A E 41 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 11 11 13 13 œ œ œ. ⋲ JœJ ‰  8 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 10 8 10 10 8 10 8 10 8 b A 13 3 E E B B G D G E D A B A E G 47 E D 47 A E 47 10 10 10 11 13 11 13 11 13 11 11 13 11 11 11 11 13 11 13 11 11 11 13 11 13 13 13 11 13 13 13 13 13 11 11 13 13 11 13 œœ œœ œœ 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 10 A 13 A 13 Fmaj9/C A b13 œ . 12 With 12 12 12 12 free to continue the fingerstyle approach you a few brief D D A A exceptions. √ œ œ ..13 œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ C m11 Aœ œ œ b . œ œ ⋲ ⋲ ‰ J &b b J ‰ ‰ E B E B G D G E D A B A E G 44 E D 44 A E 44 8 8 8 8 18 16 15 18 16 15 18 16 15 rall 10 10 10 10 C m9 C m9 U U ww U w C m9 rall 18 16 15 18 16 15 13 13 18 13 16 15 10 10 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 83 . œ. œ œ b œ œ ‰ ‰ ⋲ ⋲ ‰ œ b & & b b b œ œœ œ œœ œ . Experimenting with phrasing and note placement can really add a new dimension to your playing. SOLO SOLO OVER OVER MAIN MAIN THEME THEME C C m11 m11 E E B B G G D D A A E E ÓCool Jazz 70s Ó Movie⋲Theme œ nœ 11 11 12 12 11 11 13 13 ⋲ 11 11 13 13 11 11 # Cm11 œ. œ. the notes used are from C Minor Pentatonic scale (C Eb F G Bb).

including sitar. mellotron. most people didn’t even have TV. bohemian image. Keith is playing an Epiphone Casino ABILITY RATING Easy/Moderate Info Will improve your Key: Various Tempo: Various CD: TRACKS 56-67 Authentic R&B grooves Slide licks in standard tuning Transposing riffs in a 12-bar Famed for their longevity. harmonica). Track record The early Stones were steeped in sounds from across the Atlantic. and Route 66 (an R&B standard). audiences must’ve gaped in awe! Brian’s influences. Richards was using open-G tuning almost exclusively. Keith was also enamoured by Chicago bluesmen such as Muddy Waters. to the birth of British R&B. always complementing whatever Keith played. he and Keith were the guitar dream team.and 12-string electric. During the early years. Brian with his Gretsch Double Anniversary. harmonica.ON THE CD The Rolling Stones This month. Jones was a gifted multi-instrumentalist who could pick up anything and play it. The Rolling Stones’ roots go back over half a century. Phil Capone looks at the twin-guitar stylings of Brian Jones and Keith Richards. too. was the ‘Stones sound’ fully realised. Keith has often cited that this was the period when ‘the ancient art of weaving’ (ie two interlocking rhythm guitar parts) began. None of these amps had master-volume controls. in the decades that followed. His hard-riffing style was authoritative and grooving. recorder. the original line-up featured Mick Jagger (vocals. Stewart was soon ‘sacked’ by manager Andrew Loog Oldham because he didn’t fit the band’s young. they experimented with other styles including Motown (listen to Keith playing backbeat ‘chips’ on Out Of Time) and psychedelic rock (2000 Light Years From Home). tracks 56-67 learnt the importance of riffs and groove. incredible back catalogue. During their early years. Their early milestone singles wear their influences on their sleeve: listen to I Wanna Be Your Man (1963). Until Jones’ own untimely demise in 1969. Howlin’ Wolf. such as Come On (Chuck Berry). slide guitar (often in open tunings). Charlie Watts (drums). By the mid-60s they'd switched to Fender Twins and Dual Showmans with more power and volume to cope with bigger venues. His raw and bluesy style was pivotal in defining British R&B. and forged their telepathic. He is reputed to have been the first on the British scene to play slide. It’s All Over Now (1964). This is evident by the wealth of instruments he used on Stones records. he ignored changing musical fashions. Keith played in standard tuning. The Stones performed and recorded covers of their favourite R&B artists. he and Richards were the guitar dream team. Little Red Rooster (1964). So when Brian first appeared in London clubs wielding his bottleneck. but he remained as the group’s road manager and continued performing and recording with The Stones until his death in 1985. Route 66 (1965) and. and. and that double-stop style remains part of his sound to this day. Bill Wyman (bass). Brian played six. In the mid-60s. Brian and Keith used Vox AC30 amps. and the British R&B legends’ evolution was complete. saxophone. and Keith Richards’ ability to confound medical science. the cutting edge of the new and exciting R&B sound. Brian Jones (guitar. So select your bridge pickup (or both together) and turn your amp’s treble up all the way. Not Fade Away (1964). and from these he Until Brian Jones’ untimely demise in 1969. three-dimensional sound can be achieved. Willie Dixon and Bo Diddley. Keith Richards (guitar). 84 GuitarTechniques September 2014 BILL ORCHARD / REX lesson: BRITISH R&B . By this time. Little Red Rooster (Willie Dixon). NEXT MONTH: Phil looks at Denny Laine of The Moody Blues Get The Tone 2 5 5 9 2 Gain Bass Middle Treble Reverb In the early years. most importantly. they were simply cranked up loud with lots of top end. were drawn from American R&B. acoustic. Formed in 1962. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction (1965). of course. and Ian Stewart (piano). When the power-amp tubes are driven hard in this way a big. the cutting edge of the new and exciting R&B sound. his experiments with open tunings did not begin until 1967. trumpet. with songs like Honky Tonk Women and Street Fighting Man. But only when they returned to their R&B roots at the end of the decade. Back in 62. refining his style into what would ultimately become one of the most instantly recognisable in rock ’n’ roll. interweaving skills jamming along to them. and autoharp. from the most infamous rock ’n’ roll band of all time. harpsichord. Richards’ primary soloing influence was Chuck Berry. harmonica). marimba.

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PMœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . > ©»¡¡º fl PM PM E A E E Aj E PM # ## # # Richards: Ex 1 Keith Rhythm œœ00 œœ00 œœ02 œœ00 . œ. it’s important Phil Capone . ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ### 4 Ó œ ‰ 557 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 10 10 9 9 7 7 5 5 & 4 A7 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 12 12 10 10 8 8 5 5 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 10 10 9 9 7 7 E 7 12 7 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 12 12 10 10 A 6 8 8 5 5 j nœ j j # # # œœ n œ œœ œœ œœj b œœ œœ RPn n œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥≥12 12≥ ≥12n œ 12≥ 12≥ 12≥ ≥12 12≥≥ 10 10œ n9œ 9 w 7 7 5 5 & 5 7 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 12 12 10 10 8 8 5 5 A7 E7 A6 j A7 E7 A6 j œ œ BU jœ œ ## # ## œœœj nn nn œœœ8 œœœ7 œœ5 œœœjj b œœ œœ ≥n n œœ ≥ ≥ ≥ œBU 8 7 œ5 œ b œ88 œ77 n n œ55 œ n œ œj≥(œ9) ≥œ5 œœ≥j (œ9 ) ≥ œ5 œœ7 nn œœ5 œ n œ w & # œ7 n œ5 œ7 n œ5 Aw76 & E7 j nAœ7 j œ œ BU j # # # œœ n œ œœ œœ œœj b œœ œœ n n œœ œBU œBUœ œ œ n œ BU 8 7 5 œ œ nœ w & nœ 7 5 8 7 5 5 5 Ex 3 Brian Jones: R 8& B Groove ( ) ( ) 9 9 8 7 5 7 5 8 7 5 5 5 ( 9) (9 ) 7 5 7 5 7 8 7 5 7 5 ©»ªº 7 5 7 5 7 Double time feel A5 A BU BU U # # # 4 .. & ©»ªº# 44 .œ. too.. œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ7 .œ75.œ. œ œ. 2. œœ02j œœ00 ## 4 . Keith Richards: Bo Diddley Rhythm 4 ©»¡¡º 1. 3 GUITAR TECHNIQUES ©»¡¡º 4E 1. œœ20 œœ20 œœ20 œœ20 œ0j Eœœ20. œ.STONES4 œœœStyle œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œ 1. inhibit the Style movement of your strumming hand. 88 77 55 8 7 5 5 5 .STONES Because TECHNIQUES this riff is based on2open to palm-mute youR do&this. feel to things Keef would heartily approve. Chuck Ex 2 Keith Richards: œ22 track Example 2 KEITH. Use with your picking hand throughout.THE ROLLING STONES Example 1 KEITH RICHARDS: BO DIDDLEY RHYTHM Learning Zone cd track 56 GUITAR 3 4 chord shapes. œ. 0 0 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 85 . RICHARDS: CHUCK BERRY œ 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 2 2 0 2.œ75. E GUITAR TECHNIQUES 234 GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 3 4 E B G D A E E B E G B D G A D E A E E B G D A E E B G D A E 1 E B E G B D G A D E A E 1 E 1 B G D A E E 1 B G D A E 4 E B E G B D G A D E A E 4 E 4 B G D A E 4 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 E B G D A E E B E G B D G A D E A E E B G D A E . œ.Ó 1from your 4changing throughout. w & Double time feel A5 A œ75.BRITISH R & B .œ. double-stops >E02œ7shape fl 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 2 a minor0 2 3rd 2 œ (beats 21 and 2 œ second 2œ 0 2 string. .œ95.BRITISH B or. need . . œ .œœ122E3 ⋲ œœ122 ⋲ œœ122 œœ122 ⋲ œœ122 œœ122 œœ122 E A œœ0 œœ0 œœ0 œœ0 œœ0 >œœ0 œœ0 œœ20 œœ20 œœ20 œœ20 œœ20 œ0A Eœœ20.. œ . œ9-5. OnlyAthe staccato notes should be fully Double time was feel recorded PM Doublegreat feel A5 A sounds on six-string. 7 7 9 9 7 7 9 9 7 7 9 9 7 7 9 7 . but pressure of your palm on every offbeat. 2.STONES Style # # # 4 . Bo Diddley ⋲ ⋲ ⋲ ⋲ ⋲ ⋲ ⋲ ‰ ⋲ œ .A5 -on a . & # 44 .. œ7-5. 2 2 2 . 3 A 1E A Phil Capone . ( ) ( ) 9 9 8 7 5 7 5 . # fl PM PM # # 4 ≥ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥>œ ≥œ PM œ œ. A E..œ.E3 A E.. PMœœ ⋲ œœ ⋲ œœ œœ ⋲ œœ œœœ00 flœœœ00 PMœœ ⋲ œœ ⋲ œœ œœ ⋲ œœ œœœ020 œœœ00 . Ex 3 &Brian Jones: 4 RR œ&& BB Groove œ GROOVE œ œ œ œ œ7 5œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 7 5 7 œœ r&B ExExample 3 Brian 4 Jones: Groove cd track 60 BRIAN JONES œ œ œ..STONESEStyle jE Phil Capone .. U ## # ##time 4 Ex 3 Brian Jones: R & B Groove U . œœ121 œœ121 œœ121 œœ121 cd œœ1021 58 ... driving groove. œ.BRITISH R & B ..≥ 0 string0 0 or 0 œ 0 œ like 0œ these 0your first 0 finger 0 ≥ 0on the first 0 third fingers.you Pt 1will . 2œ 0 remaining 2 œ 2 2 are played 2 0 2 by barring 0 2with your In the third ©»¡§∞ bar. œ. PMœœ ⋲ œœ ⋲ œœ œœ ‰ œœœ020 œœœ00 œ1021 DOUBLE-STOPS œœ121 Berry œœ121 Double œœ121 œœ121 Stops œœ121 œœ1021style œœ121 œœ121 œœ121 œœ121 œœ121 œ22 œœ1021 .œ95. œ7 œ9 7 9 w0 # U PM # œ . œ.. ≤Use 0œ .. œ.œ. œ. & # 4 .. To achieve the pulsating rhythm...œ. 2.œ95. Don’t apply too much pressure when Ex 1 alternate 16th-note picking as indicated.. œ7-5. œ7 Stops 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 12 12 10 10 n œ8 œ8 œ5 œ5 ÓÓ Chuck Berry ‰ Double Ex 2 Keith Richards: & 4 # ‰ & 4 E7 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ D7œœ œœ œ œ œ œ ©»¡§∞ RP . 5 PM 7 5 7 5 5 7 5 7 5 5 9 5 9 5 5 9 5 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 5 7 5 7 5 5 9 5 9 5 5 9 5 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 5 7 5 7 5 5 9 5 9 5 5 9 5 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 7 7 7 9 9 9 7 7 9 9 7 . Chuck 2 2 2 2 Stops2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 .Ptœœ 1 œœœ. 0 .œ. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & 4 œ œ œ œ œ # œœ12 ⋲ œœ12 ⋲ œœ12 œœ12 ⋲ œœ12 œœ22 œœ12 . Use downstrokes throughout to achieve a strong. 4 œœ12 ⋲ œœ12 ⋲ œœ12 œœ12 ‰ œœœ22 œœœ12 &©»¡¡º 4 1. ## # ## ©»¡§∞ 12 4 . w .. you’llPM to 0 move from 2)0 the PM PM œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 0 4). relax the damped... œ œ œ n œ œ œœ œœ RP . œ7-5. D7 ..BRITISH œœœ œœœ Rœœœ & B œœœ.. œ. œ9-5. Boœœ Diddley œ Ex 1 Richards: Rhythm œ œœ œœ 2 3œœœ4 œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœPhilœœœ Caponeœœœ ..Rickenbacker ©»ªº This example 12-string for authenticity. œ œ 7 .œ75.Pt 1 .œ.Pt .œ. œ ⋲ œ ⋲ œ œ ‰ œœœ œœœ &Keith# Richards: 4 .

resting it gently across all six strings. play the double-stop licks by barring Blue Mini Fuzz Face). you’ll find a GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 4 Capone R & -. Œœ Œ Œ C œœœ. 7 7 . œ Œ Œ œœ.. 3. œ Em œœ. F/Gn œœ. To achieve an authentic sound in the final riff.BRITISH dedicated theStyle best results (we used Dunlop’s excellent GUITAR TECHNIQUES 23 3 4 hitting unwantedPhil Phil Capone BRITISH Rfuzz &B Bpedal STONES Style In the second section (bar 9 onwards). 13 13 ©»¡§º A7 A7 # # # ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ n œœ & . -. E E B B G G D D A A E E 7 7 8 8 7 7 7 7 8 8 7 7 5 5 6 6 5 5 5 5 6 6 5 5 1. the first section.. 3. G œ Œ œ Œ œ . but for simplicity. 5. DD œœœ. not behind them as you would when fretting œ B G D A E 7 7 7 7 7 7 4 5 7 9 5 5 5 7 7 6 5 5 6 7 5 5 ( 8) ( 7) (8) (7 ) 7 7 5 5 7 BU BD 5 5 ( 8) ( 7) (8) (7 ) 7 7 5 5 7 Uœ ˙ D A œ œ˙ œ. 7 7 8 8 9 9 8 8 8 8 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11 ww w ww w G G ### Play Play 4X 4X . . as this example illustrates. œ. Œ œ Œ F/G G œœ. 1. 7 7 8 8 7 7 7 7 8 8 7 7 7 7 8 8 9 9 8 8 8 8 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11 9. aim your pick onto the first and second strings only. C œœ. When playing the ‘chips’ in 42. Dœœ Aœ ˙ U œœ œœœ ˙˙˙ rit œ. ŒœŒ œœ. Keep unwanted strings muted by resting your unused F #7 Many slide players mute using theBfirst finger picking hand fingers on them. Keith Richards: Rock 'n Roll riff through changes ©»¡•º E 7 œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ Ex 4 Keith Richards: Rock 'n Roll riff # n œthrough a œchanges ## 4 Œ Œ Ó ©»¡•º &Shuffle 4 E 7 œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ nœ aœ # # 4 Œ Ó & # 4 Œ 2 A7 12 12 E B G D A E E 14 12 14 12 13 12 12 12 5 5 12 ©»¡§º œ œ nœ œ œ # # # Jones: œ (normal œ œ n œtuning) Ex 5 Brian # # 4 Slide J ‰ ‰ J Œ & ©»¡§º 4 B7 j # # # # 4 œ œ œ n œ œ ‰ Jœ ‰ œ n œ œ œ Œ J # 4 & 5 7 9 5 Brian frequently played slide in open tuning. 7 7 8 8 7 7 17 17 Chuck Berry Berry style style soloing soloing Chuck E E B B G G D D A A E E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 7 5 5 5 5 D7 D7 œœ œ n œœ ‰ œœ Œ J 7 7 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 7 œ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œœ n œœ A A7 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 7 5 5 5 5 œ j œ œ œœ n œ # œœ Ó 6 6 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 7 5 5 6 6 5 5 19 19 86 GuitarTechniques September 2014 # # D7 D7 œœ œœ œœ œœ n œœ n œj # œœ œœ œœ n œœ A A7 7 œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ j œ .. Vibrato has only been featured in bars 31 and by a count or fill to make the transition easier. of their slide hand. . j with fingers.-. we’ve kept B7 Always position your bottleneck directly this example in regular tuning. . 9.lesson: BRITISH R&B ON THE CD tracks 56-67 Example 4 KEITH RICHARDS: RoCK 'N' ROLL RIFF THROUGH CHANGES 2 often transposed riffs and licks by simply moving them along the Keith fretboard. . . The ‘hammered 3rd’ (last note in bars 1 and 3) is played with your second finger (keeping the first finger barre in position). Ex Ex 6 6 Stones Stones Jam Jam Motown Motown "chips" "chips" G G ©»¡™º œ. j œ œ œnœ œ Œ œ œ œnœ œ Œ 7 4 7 7 5 5 B 12 14 12 12 G 14 12 13 D A Example 5 BRIAN JONES: SLIDE (NORMAL TUNING) Ex 5 Brian Jones: Slide (normal tuning) E E B G D A E E A œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œj b n œœ œœ n œ œ nœ aœ ‰ œ J n œ œ nœ Œ A7 œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œj b n œœ œ n œ œ n œ a œ ‰ œ BU BDœ n œ œ Œ J nœ Shuffle 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 7 5 j #œ œ F #7 j #œ œ 7 1 2 1 2 œ œ jœ œ œ jœ œ œ œ 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 w B ~~~~~ jU w œ w n œ ~~~~~ œ œ œj œ œ œ œj œ œ 2 2 Uw ~~~~~ n œœ 2 2 Example 6 STONES Jam 2 2 4 4 2 2 4 4 ~~~~~ cd track 66 Although the tempo changes are quite dramatic. each section is preceded the strings with one finger. This use it sparingly. Fret the double-stops by barring with Ex 4 cd track 62 your first or third finger. œ 5 7 5 A 7 7 rit 7 5 6 5 7 5 7 6 7 7 cd track 64 5 avoid sounding flat. œœ. E m œœœ. œ # & 44 . to above the frets.achieves STONES produces a tighter sound and also avoids open strings. as this has never been a big feature of Keith’s playing style. 5. however. . Œ œœ. .

E D A . September 2014 GuitarTechniques 87 . œ œ œ nœ & D7 A7 D7 œœ œœ .. œ œ œ. .œ & E B G D A E 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 7 5 5 J 5 5 7 5 5 7 7 5 5 5 5 7 5 5 THE5 ROLLING STONES 7 5 6 7 7 5 Learning Zone 6 5 19 Example 6 STONES Jam & E B G D A E ### D7 ‰ œœ ‰ 10 10 œœ œœ œœ n œœ j œ nœ #œ 10 10 10 10 œœ œ œ œ œ ‰ n œJ Œ 12 10 12 10 11 12 10 11 A7 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ n œœ œ œ œ n œ # œœ Ó 5 5 12 12 5 5 5 5 7 7 5 5 5 5 6 7 7 5 6 5 23 & ### D7 E7 A7 œ nœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ ‰ œJ b œ œJ œ œJ b œ œ œ œ n n œœ œ n œ w BU E B G D A E cd track 66 BU 7 ( 8) 7 ( 8) (8 ) ( 8) 7 7 BU BU ( 8) ( 8) 7 7 7 (8 ) 7 7 ( 8) 7 5 5 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ Œ Œ œ 2 2 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 27 œ. . œ œ œ œœœ œœ œœœ (rpt to fade) 0 0 4 2 4 5 5 5 4 4 2 . œœ œœ n œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ # # # œœ œœ n œœ œœ œœ n œ b œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ.. œ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ 1/4 3 E B G D A E 2 BU 1/4 7 7 7 7 5 7 5 5 7 5 7 BU 5 7 (9 ) 5 5 7 ( 9) 7 8 7 5 ~~~~ 5 5 7 7 7 7 5 5 7 5 5 5 7 7 7 8 8 8 7 7 5 5 7 7 7 7 7 œœ œ œœ œœ œœ n n œœ œœ œœ E7 5 5 7 7 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 5 5 7 5 5 5 7 7 8 7 8 7 j œœ œ œœ œœ œœ n n œœ œœ œœ D7 5 5 7 5 5 8 8 7 7 7 7 5 5 37 ~~~~ # # # # # œœ œœ n œœ œœ & nœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ ˙ # # E B G D A E 8 7 32 A7 j ~~~~ œ n n œœ œ œ # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # œ nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ nœ œ E B G D A E 7 5 5 5 5 7 5 7 7 41 0 5 5 5 5 ~~~~ 7 5 7 5 7 7 Fuzz pedal riff ∑ ©»¡¢º . ∑ . j n œ .

3am. underpinning it all is that bedrock of solo guitar accompaniment that defined his early days. as The Sound Of Silence from their debut album began to get radio play and. blues and gospel thanks to his ear for unique chord voicings and unexpected progressions. A recipient of no less than 12 Grammy Awards. Any good acoustic large or small will be fine for this type of work – I used a Froggy Bottom model M for this month’s recording. . Although he has worked with a host of well-known sidemen Paul Simon is a product of the American folk style that counts Woody Guthrie and Dave Van Ronk among its founding fathers. Tracks like The Boxer display Simon’s ABILITY RATING controlled. though. but his highly developed sound also features elements of jazz. Success in the US a highly skilled acoustic fingerpicker. Hey Schoolgirl. and no record collection should be without a copy of Graceland! His most recent album. Simon is a product of the American folk style of fingerpicking that counts such luminaries as Woody Guthrie and Dave Van Ronk as its founding fathers. more refined version of the folk fingerpickers who preceded him. Stuart Ryan explores the refined and tasteful style of multiple-Grammy-winning fingerpicker. and his albums always feature beautifully layered guitar work. It was as Simon & Garfunkel that they found mainstream fame. 1964’s Wednesday Key: G Picking-hand timing Morning. beckoned. as Tom And Jerry. Paul Simon is also hallmark of his career. So Beautiful Or So What. Track record Short of recommending The Best Of Simon & Garfunkel. uptempo approach to fingerstyle playing. This not only broadened ALTHOUGH REVERED AS a legendary his musical horizons. but you’ll still find him using plenty of unusual and interesting chords down there to sustain your interest. Simon’s sound has evolved over the years. because you need to perfect your picking-hand technique to emulate him properly. He makes great study material for this reason. Info Will improve your Incredibly though. Although you’ll often see him with Martin guitars. re-united with Art Garfunkel. though. Simon & Garfunkel’s first album release. Much of the time his fretting hand lives in the open position. in their mid-teens scored their first chart hit. and from 1964 until Paul Simon: here they split up in 1970. is also great. They were writing songs together just over a year later and. NEXT ISSUE: Stuart looks at the timeless playing of James Taylor Get The Tone 2 7 6 6 2 Gain Bass Middle Treble Reverb Paul Simon has been seen with dreadnought and OM style guitars in addition to a plethora of electrics. they playing his Martin signature model crafted a string of hits that have become iconic classics. but gave him the taste singer and songwriter thanks to his many for solo performance that would become a hits with Art Garfunkel. was not a success – with the Tempo: 95bpm Open-position chords result that Simon moved to the UK. The interesting chord stuff is on albums like Still Crazy After All These Years. 88 GuitarTechniques September 2014 SIPA PRESS / REX Transcribing and recording his fingerstyle arrangement of Davey Graham’s Anji for GT made me realise how adept a picker he actually is. astonishingly. from the darker approach of his solo albums like Still Crazy After All These Years to the upbeat African-inspired joy of Graceland. Simon met Art Garfunkel in 1952 when they were just 11. he has also been a long time Yamaha user. His guitar style is very much in the classic arpeggiated chord and alternating bass fingerpicking style. the duo went on to garner the rave reviews for which we know them now. Simon’s style is in many ways a cleaner.lesson: acoustic ON THE CD tracks 68-69 Paul Simon In his ongoing appreciation of the world’s superstar acoustic guitarists. Paul Simon. while Mrs Robinson showcases his Moderate strumming rhythm work in action. where he CD: TRACKS 68-69 Picking-hand speed became a fixture on the folk club and coffee-shop circuit. you can’t go wrong with any of their releases from Wednesday Morning 3am to Bridge Over Troubled Water.

Check out 50 Ways To Leave Your Lover for a really clever and GUITAR TECHNIQUES 2 3 4picking-hand sequences Stuart's Acoustic this bar – either use the thumb (p) followed by the thumb. and an aspect that makes him so interesting [Bar 5] You can try two different at the start of to listen to. Looping this first four-bar sequence will be great [Bar 13] Harmonic twists and turns are one of the really fun aspects of practice if you are new to fingerstyle playing. Either’s fine: it’s more a question of sure you are comfortable with getting it to speed and keeping it well timed preference and what feels comfortable. or if your picking needs work. Paul Simon’s guitar playing. second we wouldn’t normally expect in this type of track.Learning Zone PAUL SIMON Example PAUL SIMON style cd track 68 [Bar 1] This picking-hand pattern will form the basis of this study. or start with the thumb then use the first. This next sequence features some chords that PAUL SIMON STYLE fingers to pluck the chord. ©»ª∞ # 4 & 4 E B G D A E 4 # œ œœ œ œ œœœ 0 3 œ œ 1 0 2 2 œœœ 1 1 0 2 2 3 1 0 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 3 C C/G C C /G 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 C 0 0 0 0 3 Csus2/B 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 2 3 3 1 0 2 œ 1 0 2 3 3 C /G 3 Am œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ 1 0 1 0 2 2 3 œ œ œ œ 1 0 0 2 3 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 3 0 0 2 0 3 3 0 2 3 # 0 3 3 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 1 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2 0 3 0 3 0 0 3 G C G œœ œœ œœ œœœ ˙˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 Em œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ b œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ 0 0 0 œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Cm(maj7) 0 0 2 0 G 1 2 2 0 2 2 œœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 Cmaj7 D 7/F C/G 1 0 3 # 2 Am/E G œœ œ 3 0 2 0 0 œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 3 0 0 3 D6/F 1 0 3 3 13 3 œœ œ 1 0 3 # 3 1 0 2 0 G 1 0 2 10 0 0 C /G 3 # 0 0 0 0 3 7 & E B G D A E # 0 0 1 0 2 & E B G D A E œ G œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ 3 1 & E B G D A E C/G 0 0 0 & E B G D A E G 0 3 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 3 œ 0 œœœ œ 0 0 2 1 0 œœœ 0 0 œ 0 œœœ œ 0 0 2 2 0 œœœ 0 0 2 0 September 2014 GuitarTechniques 89 . so make and third fingers to pluck the chord. first and second sophisticated progression. before progressing.

[Bar 25] There are several different picking-hand approaches you can take 2 Acoustic to sound the chords on beat two – you could pluck both with the thumb. and the thumb. second and first strings. the first finger plucks the third string and so on. 1 0 2 0 3 1 2 3 1 0 2 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 ww w 2 2 . [Bar 27] And again. first and second fingers to pick the third. This type of sound also reflects the jazz influence within Simon’s playing.lesson: acoustic ON THE CD tracks 68-69 Example PAUL SIMON style cd track 68 [Bar 19] The inner-voice movement on this A minor chord is another example of how the great songwriters get more mileage out of one chord. or use the thumb to pick the fourth string. first and second fingers. or conversely you could lightly brush down then up & E B G D A E œ # # œ 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 2 3 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 3 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 3 D7/F # Am7 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 1 1 2 1 1 2 0 0 G 1 1 2 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 2 0 C/G 2 2 # 1 0 2 G 2 C/E G œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœœ ˙˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 G 0 3 D œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ 1 0 2 1 0 2 3 C /E G 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 3 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 C C/G C C /G D7 œœ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2 3 2 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 3 0 2 2 0 2 1 2 1 0 2 2 0 C C/G C C /G G 2 1 2 1 0 G/D C /E G œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœœ ˙˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 1 0 2 0 1 2 3 90 GuitarTechniques September 2014 3 1 0 2 0 3 1 2 3 0 0 0 3 3 26 0 1 œœ œ œ œœ œ œ # œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ 3 0 0 29 œœ œ œ œœ œ œ b œœœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 0 0 2 2 C m(maj7) Am(maj7) 3 # œ 0 0 0 0 0 23 œœœ Am 0 & E B G D A E œœœ 0 19 & E B G D A E œœœ 0 16 & E B G D A E œ Cmaj7 0 0 2 & E B G D A E # Em the strings with the picking hand first fingernail. there are several methods to pluck the D chords here – either use a traditional ‘pima’ approach where the thumb takes care of the fourth string. Paul McCartney style.

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The stem can either be placed to the right and pointing up. which is a black dot with a vertical stem attached to one side. The note-head can be positioned either directly on top of the line. or ‘accidentals’ to the mix. and step three is to translate the information to the guitar. We focused on the latter two and learnt how to find specific notes on the guitar. Mnemonics are usually an effective way of quickly remembering seemingly unrelated information. those five letters are not as unrelated as they seem when you place the four ‘space’ letters in between. learning it like this. which are placed from left to right on five horizontal lines called a stave. the lower Amalgamating all these letters. Mnemonics are effective for quickly memorising information. and there’s no tab – so you can test out your newly acquired skills. and start with some exercises in translating the information and playing those notes on the guitar. or to the left and pointing down. in chunks. The first three examples use three consecutive letters at a time: ‘A-B-C’. . will soon have you breaking down those walls and enjoying it! And even if you never become a fluent sight reader. On the treble clef. or quarter-note. just like the letters d and p. the lower the pitch and vice versa. although you could cover the tab up if you’re feeling brave. produces the sequence: E F G A B C D E F (low to high). The following exercises are designed to help you learn the notes on the stave in manageable chunks. NEXT MONTH: Charlie introduces sharps and flats. how much more employable you will become – say. which is a helpfully obvious word. Guitar music is usually written on a treble clef. symbol. we set out the three steps of reading music: Step one is to use your eyes to recognise the notes on the stave. or in the spaces between the lines. and how much more rounded and developed a musician you will be.. There are different types of dots that each represent different note lengths – we’ll look at this in more depth in a later lesson. Imagine being able to look at a page of music and read the notes by sight! ABILITY RATING Easy Info Key: Various Tempo: 60 bpm CD: TRACKS 70-79 Will improve your Notation reading Fretboard knowledge Employability! Last month. the position. The spaces on the stave spell F A C E from low to high. ‘Every Guitarist Buffs Dirty Frets’ might help jog your memory. the five lines represent the notes E-G-B-D-F. This month. step two is to process that information in your mind. We have provided tab for these so you can make sure you’re applying the notes to the guitar correctly. Even if the thought of reading music has previously seemed scary. we will use the ‘crotchet’. think how much easier learning the parts to new songs will be. which you can recognise by the ornate squiggle at the beginning of the staff. Follow this comprehensive 14-part series from Charlie Griffiths to demystify the art of reading music. in shows or when depping for other guitarists (potentially very lucrative).lesson: rockschool ON THE CD track 70-79 Reading Music Part 2 Notes on the stave Brought to you by. we’ll learn how notes are written on the stave.. The pitch of the note is determined by the vertical placement of the dot (or ‘note head’) on the stave. which is also sometimes called a staff. from low to high. The quarter-note is the most basic measurement of time and means: ‘play one note per beat’. 92 GuitarTechniques September 2014 Music is written with dots. For now. and seriously improve your employability. so Every Guitarist Buffs Dirty Frets might help jog your memory! In fact. ‘D-E-F’ and ‘E-F-G’. Examples 4 and 5 are split into ‘spaces’ and ‘lines’.

E and F can be played on the second string on the G 3rd. Saying the names of the letters out loud as you encounter them is a very effective way of imprinting the stave in your mind. third and fourth fingers to those respective frets to minimise hand movement. 4th and 5th frets. 5th and 2 6th frets 4 with the 5 same 4fingering as 2 used in5 Ex. Using 4 specific 5 D B 2nd String Notes: D E F A E E B G D A E œ œ œ2 E B G D A E ©»§º œ œ œ & 44 ©»§º œ D E œF 4 œ3 Notes: B 2nd 5 6 & 4 String ©»§º œ œ œ 4 &4 cd track 70 all on the third string on the 2nd. Use whatever fingering feels the most E Lines ©»§º 4 & 4©»§ºœ & 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ cd track 76 on the guitar.Learning Zone NOTES ON THE STAVE GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Charlie Griffiths Example 1 thiRD STRING NOTES ‘A B C’ READING Part This exercise focuses in on the centre of the stave. the middle line is B. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ September 2014 GuitarTechniques 93 . the first two. with your first finger at the 7th fret. and the2 spaces below and above it are A and C. in a ‘line-spaceE E B line’ configuration. œ 3 œ 5 œ 3 œ œ œ2 œ œ œ 5 œ 3 œ œ œ2 œ œ œ 3 2 3 5 3 5 3 2 2 3 5 3 2 5 3 2 3 2 3 5 3 5 3 2 2 3 5 3 2 5 3 2 3 GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Charlie Griffiths Example 4 SPACES F A C E GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Charlie READING Part 2 This example only uses the notes in the spaces: ‘FACE’. ©»§º 4 &4 œ œ œ œ œ 5œ 3œ 5œ ©»§º This trio of notes is found in the bottom third of the stave. 3rd and 5th frets with first. The tab for this example. you should be able to find these four notes READING Part 2 D Spaces ©»§º Spaces 44 & ©»§º œ 4 &4 œ D œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Example 5 LINES E G B D F œ œ œ œ œ œ E Lines This example uses only the notes on the lines ‘EGBDF’. If you haveGriffiths practised the first three examples enough. is only a suggestion. and as you play each note. and can be played on the4 fourth string on the 2nd. D. You can play the three notes A B and C A 3rd String Notes: A B C ©»§º 44 œ œ œ œ & GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 A 3rd String Notes: A B C ©»§º A 3rd œ A B œC œ œ2 Notes: & 44 String ©»§º 4 5 4 & 44 œ œ œ œ GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 3 4 Charlie Griffiths œREADING œ 2 œ œ Part œ Charlie Griffiths READING Part 2 E B G D A E E B G D A E œ œ œ œ œ œ 5 œ 4 œ œ œ œ œ2 œ 4 œ 5 œ 4 œ 4 œ œ œ2 œ œ œ2 œ œ œ œ 4 2 4 2 5 4 5 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 5 œ 6 œ 5 œ 5 œ 5 œ 6 œ 5 5 œ3 œ 5 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ œ 5 3 5 5 6 5 3 5 3 5 6 œ 6 œ 3 œ 5 œ 5 œ 6 E B C 3 5 5 6 3rd String Notes: E F6G G D A E E B 3 5 6 5 6 G D C 3rd String Notes: E F G A Example 3 fourTH STRING NOTES ‘E F G’ E E B G D A E œ 5 E B B 2nd String Notes: D E F G 4 STRING 5 4 5 4 5 Example 22 secoND NOTES ‘D E2F’ D A These three notes are found in the top third of the stave. second and third C 3rd String Notes: E F G &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ©»§º2 3 5 3 5 3 2 2 4 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 5 œ 2 cd track 72 fingerings when reading is a big help.1. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ cd track 78 comfortable. practise looking ahead to the next one as soon as possible to minimise any hesitation. allocate your first. and requires you to jump from string to string. you can also try them one string string lower. as it means you can ‘feel’ where you are on the guitar and find the notes without having to take your eye away from 4 the page 2 and look 4 at the 2 fretboard. 5 4 5 2 œ 5 5 œ 3 6 œ cd track 74 fingers.

rock. improve your classical and jazz technique – plus a complete transcription of G N’ R classic. and Vivaldi’s Winter. Play like Dream Theater. accurately and musically. learn Grieg’s Peer Gynt and check out the video masterclass with Thomas Leeb. Leslie West and Jonny Lang.myfavouritemagazines. Welcome To The Jungle. Learn extreme guitar techniques. Master the styles of Frank Marino. riff like The Kinks and The Faces. learn Joe Walsh’s guitar parts with our transcription of Funk 49. Steven Wilson. Francis Dunnery and more! Don’t miss our ultimate guide to making sure you’re prepared for any big rock gig. and a superb guitar transcription of Freddie King’s blues classic. And master the guitar styles of Fleet Foxes.50 n Europe: £6. Allman Brothers. Plus. Brent Mason and many more! Unlock the true potential of the pentatonic in blues. George Benson and acoustic nylon-string ballad guitar! Master timing with our in-depth lesson – it’s crucial to playing more fluently. Plus a full transcription of the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Parallel Universe! JUNE GT 231 JUly GT 232 AUGUST GT 233 Learn SRV’s awesome rendition of the blues classic The Sky Is Crying. We regret that we cannot photocopy transcriptions from back issues Each back issue costs (including postage and packing) n UK: £5. jazz and country music.N e ve r miss another issue 49 Turn to page to subscribe! Back issues missed it? grab it now! Your copy of Guitar Techniques gone walkabout? Quick.50 n Rest of the world: £7.uk Please do not call or email the magazine directly as we cannot deal with subscriptions or back issues. George Benson. Play like Nashville’s Top 10 session men. get one now while stocks last! APRIL GT 228 SPRING GT 229 MAY GT 230 Measure your ability at every guitar skill with our special Rockschool Test. Chuck Wayne.50 94 GuitarTechniques September 2014 . Learn how to arrange a tune for guitar.co. Joe Louis Walker. HOW GOOD ARE YOU? STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN COMPLETE WORKOUT PERFECT YOUR TIMING PENTATONIC POWER! string bends TO ORDER BACK ISSUES: Call 0844 848 2852 or visit www. Chris Stein. Learn 20 amazing string-bending licks to ignite your solos! Master the acoustic style of Jimmy Page. Takin’ Care Of Business. Plus Ted Nugent. Play the Stray Cats’ rockabilly classic Rock This Town.

it’s Bernie’s blues-rock roots for which he’s best known. the first three Led Zeppelin albums have been given the once-over. including Album Of The Month… Album of the month Bernie Marsden Shine Mascot Label Group HHHHH Although he’s been involved in a wide variety of musical projects over the years. Howe’s guitar work seems a little cautious. Light Of The Ages and Subway Walls which takes us through a musical journey like earlier Yes material. all expertly recorded and produced by Jeff Lang in Melbourne. additional second disc. This is the latest. as expertly executed as it all is. From there on. his style oozes atmosphere. finds the time to release an album. And he’s undoubtedly one of the UK’s tastiest players in this field. so for the duration of the album nothing else in the world seems to matter. This is not for the faint-hearted. Davison’s vocals are uncannily like Jon Anderson’s at times. and here it is! Far from a ‘difficult’ second album. and Squire’s bass only starts getting raunchy on the final track. guitarist Eric Gales and drummer Thomas Pridgen. We gather the bells and whistles in this respect have been reserved for the deluxe packages which contain an extra DVD and 60page booklet. and comes highly recommended. Yes Heaven & Earth Frontiers Records HHHH This all-new album from Yes is the first to include vocalist Jon Davison (who has had a hand in the writing as well) and it provides a good cross-section of classy material and ideas. It’s a fantastic achievement! Various formats are available. the Roy Thomas Baker production is definitely American and consequently sounds a little safe. Dragonfly is beautifully played and lovingly produced. The DVD and Blu-Ray packages are short on extras – just a brief film outlining the stage show’s creation. single CD. The songs are great. outtakes and backing tracks plus alternative mixes and versions as selected by Jimmy Page. this video sees Gabriel revisit his So album in its entirety in order to mark its 25th anniversary. songwriter and acoustic guitarist who now resides in Australia. the performances were shot in super high definition. Initially. from the eves during The Tower That Ate People. The album offers a good mixture of instrumentals and vocals and occasionally calls on additional players. Good variety of styles here. many of which have not been heard before. but his own style also emerges and his delivery is excellent throughout. double CD and vinyl plus a deluxe box set – and this is only the start. a really lovely album. a few guests were enlisted and his teaming with vocalist David Coverdale on Trouble works brilliantly. and happily they are. Technology continues to improve. The fast-paced title track features Joe Bonamassa. blues and rock together and produce a fantastic album? Obviously.Music Reviews What our Ratings Mean: ★★★★★ Buy it ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Average ★ Bin it! New Albums A selection of new and reissued guitar releases. even when viewed in ordinary DVD format. We love Walk Away. The sheer instrumental power is almost frightening. The sleeve notes include explanations behind some of the songs. Geoff Downes sounds more like Wakeman than ever on some tracks. great arrangement and a soaring solo that’s unmistakably Marsden. This includes live versions from the right eras. yet the vocals still soar out over the mayhem. it’s more like prog albums of the past. thus making it a comfortable addition to the vast catalogue of Yes material. In keeping with Gabriel’s cutting-edge sensibilities. this is a musical assault that focuses the ears and the mind. too: there’s great slide work from Justin on Gatekeeper while the country-flavoured Ram’s Eye is uptempo and brings a smile to the face. For variety. and somehow Bernie resists a solo. showing what a great team they still make. We particularly like Bernie’s Breakdown which involves Ben Franz on double bass. it’s still a very worthwhile project. all the same!   Peter Gabriel REVIEWS BY ROGER NEWELL AND DAVID MEAD Back To Front – Live In London Eagle Rock HHHH Filmed over two nights in autumn 2013 at London’s O2 Arena. and it’s a corker! He has always written quality songs and this is packed with them. good vocal here. British-born Justin is a talented singer. But the sound they produce is unmistakably their own. so we naturally expected these to be better than the earlier digital attempts. the moody Ladyfriend really draws you in. but it’s the instrumentals that allow Justin to shine. but it definitely is a remarkably musical and finely conceived album. and excellent Dobro and mandolin work from Pete Fidler. which shows just what a tasty player he is. We’re all familiar with the material. however. but with greater instrument separation. Jeff Lang on harmonium. too. But it does lack danger. so expect their other studio albums to receive similar treatment before long. On the downside. Bernie still gigs extensively and every now and again. This is a fine album that improves as you listen. there is a hidden depth here that is only fully revealed on subsequent plays. And although the additional material will appeal far more to the hardened fan than to a new recruit. with its strong melody. As you would expect from the track records of bassist Dug Pinnick. Winter Pick shows an honest and personal approach to his songs. and expanded with an September 2014 GuitarTechniques 95 . The concert begins with an acoustic set with the houselights up and the stage bathed in white light before the dramatic transformation to computer-driven lighting effects midway through the song Family Snapshot. just check out Sirmione. Stunning. There’s fantastic variety and great songs throughout this album – it’s Bernie at his best. likewise. there’s new life and energy here that will appeal to everyone. the standout tracks include To Ascend. right through to the climactic encore which sees Gabriel enveloped in a tower that descends Justin Bernasconi Winter Pick Fuse Group HHHH There’s something appealing when music is stripped back to its barest essentials. you return to the studio and make another one. Led Zeppelin Led Zeppelin 1. 2 & 3 Atlantic HHHHH In line with the trend of remastering analogue recordings. helping you to focus on the ‘message’ within the lyrics. and particularly when it’s as well executed as this. All in all. Hats off to Page! Pinnick Gales Pridgen PGP 2 Magna Carta HHHH What do you do when you put three giants of prog. this is a magical masterpiece that delights the ears from the first bars of the opening track. it’s a visual and sonic treat. and the resulting footage is sharp as a pin. so in that respect. too. They draw inspiration from many great rock and blues acts over the years. and it’s a real guitar fest. so there’s a comfortable element here.

C (C major). Easy-Moderate Easy Read music GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE USER GUIDE Each transcription is broken down Guitar Technique Examples . & œ @ œ @ œ bœ @ @ @ @ 5 @ 4 @ 7 8 n Each of the four notes are to Palm Muting be alternate picked (down. We’ll also let you know what aspect of your playing will benefit by attempting a lesson.Picking shows part of the scale being played onTechnique the fourth string with first. & ¿ ¿¿ rake & 8 7 6 7 0 0 E B G D A E œœ010 œœ23 œ & E B G D A E 0 1 0 2 3 X X X 0 0 8 7 6 7 0 0 E B G D A E ≤ œ 4th string Open @ 0 0 0 2 2 0 5 @œ @ 4 7 D7 #212œœ @0œœ @ œœ œœ @ œœ & nœ # œœœ & ¿¿ 2 1 2 0 n œœ œœ @œ œ A m7 œœ œ 0 1 @20œœ 80 0 1 0 2 0 ¿ w rake E B G D A E 5 X X X Appeggiate chord Arpeggiate Chord w E B G D A E X & gg ˙ ggg # ¿˙ g gg 00 ggg 22 ggg X2 &œœ 0 0 2 2 0 œ œ 5 X 4th string Open 0 5 3rd string 2nd fret Palm0 Muting PM n Drag the pick across the Arpeggiate Chord strings shown with a single sweep.. Em (E n œœ 4 notes andPick4 Rake minor).Picking 3rd fret Chord example Chord example (with capo) The diagram represents the G chord in the photo... œœ D7 (D dominant 7) and Am7 (A minor 7). Guitar Technique Examples . (T) Picking hand: p (thumb).Picking Up and down picking 5 Tremolo picking Tremolo Picking Down & Up Picking & 7 œ & œ œ @ @ 5 @ 4 @ 7 8 Palm muting Palm Muting œ bœ @ @ œ @ @ & nœ # œœœ œ œ œ 7 E B G D A E 5 ≥ ≤ n The first note is to be downTremolo Picking picked and the last note is to be up-picked. a (third). m (second). and a circled number is a fretting finger. Here are the abbreviations used for each finger: Fretting hand: 1. ≤ Above shows a Cmaj9 (no 3rd) with harmonics at the 12th fret. as seen in the accompanying photo. etc. The blue line represents a capo – for this A chord. Often used to augment a ˙˙˙ ggg # ˙˙˙ rake’s lastgg note. The six lines represent the six D 6 6 A 7 7 strings on a guitar – the numbers on the E 0 0 0 0 0strings are fret numbers. 5 X ¿ ¿¿ ≥ œ rake E B G D A E PM Arpeggiate Chord Pick Rake 0 0 Pick Rake Pick rake PM E B G D A E 8 7 6 7 œ œ 7 8 œ stave. E B G D A E 7 1st fret œœ 1E 2B 3G 4D 5A 6E 4 The left box shows an A minor pentatonic scale with added 5 tapped notes signifiedPalm by Muting ‘T’s. 3. œœ & # œœ œ œ œ œ œ PM E B G D A E @ Palm Muting @ 4 @ E B G D A E @ 96 GuitarTechniques September 2014 5 7 8 E B G D A E œ œ œ 8 7 6 7 0 0 0 8 7 6 7 0 n œœ œœ 0 œ œ PM 8 7 6 7 0 0 n Palm mute by resting the edge Rake ofPick picking-hand’s palm on the strings near the w bridge.Picking œ3 1E 7 A E & œ 2B 3 1 MUSICAL STAVE The five horizontal lines for 3G 2 C Em Picking D7 A m7 Tremolo 4D 0 5A music notation show note pitches and rhythms 6E # œ œ œ œ œœ and & are divided by œœbar lines.. The photo GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE Guitar Examples . Intervals are shown below. fret 7 now fret 5.GT USER GUIDE You can get more from GT by understanding our easy-to-follow musical terms and signs. œ œ Tabœ isœ an aid TABBing @ @ Under thetomusical PM to show you where put your fingersPMon the E B 8 8 G horizontal 7 7 fretboard. The two stave and tab examples show chords. The ‘O’ symbol is an open string. 2.Treble Clef And MAGAZINE Tablature GUITAR TECHNIQUES into two parts.œ & the original fret 5 now becomes fret 3.Picking œ œ Tablature œ & Technique Examplesœ .Treble Clef And Guitar Down & Up Picking GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE USER GUIDE GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2nd string Guitar Technique Examples . nœ œ 1 E B G D A E 2nd string C œ bœ @ @ œ @ 5 Tapping & harmonics @ ≥ & œ R œ Tremolo Picking Down & Up Picking & œ 2nd string 3rd fret 5 Tremolo Picking GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE Guitar Technique Examples .. œ ≤ 9 5 7 œ @ E B G D A E 7 œ @ œ @ & œ bœ @ @ # œœœ E B G D A E 1E 2B 3G 4D 5A 6E Picking variations and ≥ alternatives ≤ GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE Guitar Technique Examples . .& up-picked) n œœ very rapidly n œœ and continuously. place it at fret 2. c (fourth). Relating tab to your fretboard 3 2 Every transcription or lesson in GT is graded according to its level of difficulty. 4. Down & Up Picking œ xD 8 ≥ & Down & Up Picking & Scale example E B G D A E The diagram shows the fret-hand fingering for the A major scale (root notes in black). i (first finger).. œ œœ œ b œœ E B G x A major scale 1E 2B 3G 4D 5A 6E & 2nd string 1st fret ggg # # ˙˙ gg ˙ gggg 454 ggg 44 g 5 ˙ & gggg ˙˙˙ ggg # ¿˙ g ggg ggg gg 0 0 2 2 X 2 ggg # ˙˙˙ ggg # # ˙˙ gg ˙ ggg gg ggg 4 5 4 4 4 5 n Play the notes of the chord by strumming across the relevant strings in the direction of the arrow head. from Easy to Advanced. @ PM E B G D A E 3rd string 2nd fret 2 Em Guitar Techniques: How they appear in written music. This is for ease of visualising a fretboard scale or chord quickly. third and fourth fingers. Capos change the fret number ordering – here. m i 1 Our rating system a c 4 T p Advanced Moderate-Advanced nut & fretboard hand Labelling Moderate The fretbox diagram above represents the fretboard exactly.

œ œ ≠œ œ ≠ ≠ œ ≠ ≠ ≠ harmonics E B G D A E P P 5 7 0 P 5 7 0 Natural harmonics Fret Hand Muting & & n œ ¿ ¿ ‚ ¿ œ# ‚‚ ¿ ¿ ‚# œœœ ‚¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ œœœ ‚ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ · · · ·· 8 X X X 7 X X 12X 6 12 X X X 12 7 X X X X X X X n Pick the note while lightly touching ‚ the‚string‚ directly over & the fret indicated. The last example uses the vibrato ‚ ‚ bar. Sometimes referred to as a blues — curl. then lightly — place the — index — finger & over ‘x’ fret (AH ‘x’) and pick (with a pick. E B G D A E Tapped harmonics & œœ œœ PH 7 5 ¿¿ ¿¿ · · · ·· Vibrato 4 AH19 7 ¿¿ ¿¿ NH AH16 5 n Pick the note and then bend up a quarter tone (a very small amount). &off for E B G D A E & E B G D A E 2 9 n Note sustained. TCH E B G D A E 2 9 capo Gargle Capo Notation · TCH TH17 n Scoop . n Tap (hammer-on) with a finger of the picking hand onto the fret marked with a circle. then pick it and release to 5th fret ‚ note. E B G D A E ··· 5 7 & E B G D A E E B G D A E & 4 7 0 nœ # œœœ ¿¿ ¿¿ ‚ ‚ ¿¿ ¿¿ X X X X X X X X P 5 ¿¿ ¿¿ œœ ¿¿ œœ ¿¿ ‚ # ‚‚‚ X X X X X X X X 8 7 6 7 12 ¿¿ ¿¿ 5 & 4 E B G D A E 7 ··· TH17 E B G D A E TH19 5 7 4 ‚ 2 · 7 ··· TH17 E B G D A E 5 TH19 7 Dive bomb & œ AH17 4 & #‚ 8 X X ‚X 8 ‚ X ‚ ‚ 767 ‚XXX XXX XXX 767 XXX E B G D A E ‚ & — ± ±± E B G D A E ‚ 5 & ‚ ‚ TH19 7 ‚ ¿¿ ¿¿ X X X X ‚ ‚ ··· AH17 5 AH19 7 — — — ± ±± ‚ ··· TH17 TH19 5 7 TH17 4 Touch harmonics & œ TH17 ‚ · TCH E B G D A E 4 n Fret the note as shown. E B G D A E 7 7 7 ··· AH16 E B G D A E — — 7 ‚ P 5 n œœ # œœ & Quarter-tone bend 12 & 7 0 & PH 7 — · · · ·· 12 P P E B G D A E # ‚‚ ‚ 12 AH19 n Fret the note as shown. — & ¿¿ ¿¿ · 2 9 n A previously sounded note is touched above the fret marked TCH (eg TCH 9) to sound harmonic. Square bracket used if a long-held note has new articulation applied. n Fingerpicking requirements are shown at the bottom of the tab notation. Then pick 3rd note and ˙ (œ 4th œ) b˙ pull note. Scoop‚ & doop ‚ ‚ & 5 E B G D A E 7 ‚ ‚ ‚ ≠ ≠ ≠ 5 NH E B G D A E PH 7 5 AH17 Pinched harmonics AH19 7 ··· AH16 & X X X X 7 7 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ 7 ≠œ œ ≠œ œ œ ≠œ 6 Fret-Hand Muting Fret Hand Muting 6 n Sound the notes marked with a square by hammering on/tapping with the frettinghand fingers. PH E B G D A E ≠ ≠ ≠ Pre bend ‚ ··· AH17 4 E B G D A E 7 ≠ œ E B G D A E ‚ NH AH19 Vibrato — arm bends — & ≠œ œ ≠ E B G ED BA GE D A E & ± ±± vibrato arm (aka whammy bar) AH16 E B G D A E 7 n Bend12up from the 5th fret to the pitch of the 7th fret note. The last two 6 notes show a slide with the œ last &note beingœ re-picked. Called ‘violining’. n Sound the note and ‘flick’ the tremolo bar with picking hand so it ‘quivers’. Results in a ‘gargling’ sound! n A capo creates a new nut. n Turn volume control off. but dig‚into ‚the string ‚ with the &side of the thumb as you sound it with the pick. 9 ‚ Other techniques œ & scrape Pick · Violining Finger numbering Pima directions Right-hand tapping TCH E B G D A E 2 9 n The edge of the pick is dragged down or up along the lower strings to produce a scraped sound.Fretting Hand E B G D A E Hammer-on & Pull-off Hammer On & Pull Off & œ œ œ œ 5 7 7 5 E B G D A E tr E B G D A E 5 8 ~~~~~ tr ~~~~~ 7 5 & E B G D A E œ œ œ & ≠œ œ ≠œ œ œ ≠œ E B G D A E S 5 7 5 5 n Fret the start note (here. but ‚ rightsound it with a quick hand tap at the fret shown œ & (TH17) for a harmonic. œ œ 5 ~~~~~ 5 Slides (Glissando) (7 5) 5 E B G D A E 7 5 tr ˙ (œ œ) E B G D A E ~~~~~ ( ) Note Trills Note Trills & n Pick 1st note and hammer Trills fretting hand for 2nd onNotewith tr ~~~~~ note. sound note(s) and then turn vol up for a smooth fade in.depress the bar just œ & striking before the note and release. note. ‚ ‚ AH16 X 8 7 7 X 6 7 X 7 7 X 7 0 5 & n Bend up to the pitch shown Hand Muting inFret the brackets. Usually with ‘i’ or ‘m’. September 2014 GuitarTechniques 97 . E B G D A E ± ±± 5 ‚ 7 0 n X markings represent notes muted by the fretting 12 7 hand 12 7 12 7 when struck by the picking hand. 7 0 · · · ·· 8 7 NH 6 7 12 PH — P P 5 & n Fret the note as shown. so the above example has the guitar’s ‘literal’ 5th fret now as the 3rd fret. TH17 4 7 ··· TH17 E B G D A E ‚ ¿¿ ¿¿ 7 5 vibrates n The fretting hand 7 the note by small bend ups and releases.lower the bar TCH slightly after picking note. ¿¿ ¿¿¿ & note bent NH E EB BG GD DA AE E P P 5 5 7 Fret Hand Muting 6 ≠ ≠ ≠ œ E E B G D A E 5 œ n Pick 1st note and slide to Left Hand Tapping the 2nd note. ··· P 5 7 0 4 AH17 5 · · · ·· 8 7 6 7 12 X X X X 12 X X X X X X X 12X X 8 7 X 6 X 7 7 X 7 7 X X X X Artificial harmonics & E B G D A E ‚ ‚ ± ±± 7 5 7 ‚ ‚ is‚ picked. then the vib is depressed to slack.& œ œ œ œ 5 7 7 5 ~~~~~ ˙ (œ œ) b ˙ tr & tr Fretting hand GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE Guitar Technique Examples . n The numbers after the notes are the fingers required to play the fret numbers in the tab below. p or a). then re-pick the noten while œ ¿ ¿¿ holding ¿ œœ# ‚ ¿¿ the ¿ # œœœ at‚¿¿¿ the ¿¿ ‚ ¿¿¿new œœ ‚‚ pitch. œ Re-pick bend Left Hand Tapping œ 5 ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ ≠ Left Hand Tapping E E B G D A E 8 S Slides (Glissando) E B G D A E 8 & œ œ œ b˙ BENDING and vibrato bend up/down (7 5) Slides (Glissando) n Rapidly alternate between Slides (Glissando) the two notes indicated in brackets with hammer-ons œ œ and &pull-offs. Doop . Left Hand Tapping the 5th fret) and bend up to 6 the pitch of the bracketed œ & before releasing. A harmonic results. then the n The note & whammy bar is raised and TH17 TH19 pitches TH17 lowered to the shown in brackets.

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