You are on page 1of 5

Mandi Seaton 

Muscle System Lab Report 
Mrs. Lafferty  
A whole skeletal muscle is considered an organ of the muscular system. Each muscle 
consists of skeletal muscle tissue, connective tissue, nerve tissue, and blood or vascular 
tissue. An individual muscle cell is called a muscle fiber. Muscle fibers are enclosed by a 
plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is known as sarcolemma. The cytoplasm inside 
the muscle fiber is called sarcoplasm. Within the sarcoplasm, (T) tubules transport 
substances throughout the fiber.  The  (T) tubules  are close  in proximity to the sarcoplasmic 
reticulum that stores calcium. One research done on the muscular system was over muscle 
recovery. Growth factors, including  basic fibroblast growth factor, insulin­like growth factor, 
and nerve growth factor, can improve muscle regeneration, but the post­injury healing 
process remains incomplete (Huard, J., Li, Y., & Fu, F. H., 2002). An other sources say that 
even though people are dedicated to better understanding skeletal muscle regeneration, there 
has been relatively little impact on clinical approaches to treating skeletal muscle injuries 
(Ambrosio, F., Kadi, F., Lexell, J., Fitzgerald, G. K., Boninger, M. L., & Huard, J, 2009) .There 
is also research supporting dysfunction of the mitochondria in the human skeletal muscle in 
type 2 diabetes (Kelley, D. E., He, J., Menshikova, E. V., & Ritov, V. B., 2002).  

 

 

Figure 1 
Figure 1 (drawn by Mandi Seaton)​
 is the structure of the skeletal muscle. The drawing starts 
with a skeletal muscle. It then continues breaking down the muscle into cells until we reach 
the small strands of myosin and actin. The image can be found labeled by Mandi Seaton on 
thinglink. ​
http://www.thinglink.com/scene/609229820198387712 
 
 
When a neuron stimulates a muscle cell it sends a wave of action potential over the 
plasma membrane. The action potential releases internally storage calcium which then cause 
a muscle contraction. The structure of the muscle fiber allows for quick distribution of calcium 
ions throughout the cytosol. (T) Tubules criss­cross the cell. When the cell is stimulated, a 

Mandi Seaton 
Muscle System Lab Report 
Mrs. Lafferty  
wave of depolarization spreads over the plasma membrane. the wave then moves deep in the 
cells via the tubules. Here there are voltage sensitive proteins that control a calcium release 
channel. It is adjacent to the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The sarcoplasmic reticulum is the major 
calcium storage in muscle cells. The waves cause the channel to open and release the 
calcium  throughout cytosol of the cells. Within a bundle of a muscle cell, called a myofibril, 
the calcium reacts with protein filaments to cause a contraction. In each sarcomere, or 
contraction unit, thin actin and thick myosin are opposed ,but cannot react in the absence of 
calcium. This is because where myosin binds to the actin filaments are covered in rod shaped 
proteins called tropomyosin. Calcium sensitive complex, called troponin is attached to the end 
of every tropomyosin. When calcium floods the cel, troponin binds to it moving tropomyosin 
off of the binding sites. Opening the myosin binding site on the actin filament allows myosin to 
crawl along the actin. This results in a contraction of the muscle fiber. Calcium is then quickly 
return to the sarcoplasmic reticulum by a calcium pump. Without calcium, the myosin release 
the actin. They then slide back to their original position. 
(Received from ​
http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcontent/animations/content/muscle.html​

 

 
Figure 2 
In ​
Figure 2 (drawn by Mandi Seaton), ​
it shows the actin and myosin before and after 
contraction.  
 

    

 

 
Figure 3

Figure 4 

Mandi Seaton 
Muscle System Lab Report 
Mrs. Lafferty  
Fi​
gure 3​
 ​
(taken by Pedro and Mandi​
) a relaxed rabbit muscle fiber before ATP was applied. 
Figure 4 (taken by Rachel and Mandi)​
 is rabbit muscle that has contracted after ATP solution 
was added.​
 ​
This represents Both picture where taken at magnification x100. 

 

 

                                  Figure 5
Figure 6 
Figure 5 and 6 ​
show the lengths and diameters of 5 different trial including rabbit muscle 
fibers. In ​
figure 5​
, the length in each trial got smaller when the fiber contract. While in ​
figure 6​

it can be seen that the diameter stretched after the contraction occurred. 
 
 
Before ATP is added, the muscle fibers are relaxed. When relaxed, the cells edges are 
smooth. An example can be seen of this in ​
figure 3.​
 After ATP is added, the muscle fiber 
contracts. When contracted, the cells edges become rough and rigid. An example of this can 
be seen in ​
figure 4​
. The data received from measuring the fibers before and after contraction 
shows that the diameter increases, while the length decreases. You can get some variations 
in data for different reasons. Measurements can affect the data depending on the rulers, 
microscope, etc. Also, the temperature of the light the microscope is emitting is a factor. The 
length and numbers of muscle fibers in the bundle can change the measurements data. The 
amount of ATP added and the time spent on the muscle fiber may be a factor in the degree of 
change. 
 

Mandi Seaton 
Muscle System Lab Report 
Mrs. Lafferty  

 

 
Figure 8 

Figure 7
 

Figure 7 ​
is a table showing data for continuous grip. Figure 8 is a table showing data 
for repetitive grip. The data from both tables were collected by Rhiannon Trevino, Guadalupe 
Valverde, and Mandi Seaton. The data values were taken from my grip strength.  

 
 
Works Cited 
 

Mandi Seaton 
Muscle System Lab Report 
Mrs. Lafferty  
Alberts, et al., ​
Molecular Biology of the Cell,​
 Fifth Edition, ​
Garland Science Publishing 
© 2008 Garland Science Publishing and Sumanas, Inc. 
Lieber, R. (2002). Skeletal Muscle Structure. ​
Function, and Plasticity, 2nd Edn 
Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins​

Huard, J., Li, Y., & Fu, F. H. (2002). Muscle injuries and repair: current trends in 
research. ​
The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery​
, ​
84​
(5), 822­832. 
Kelley, D. E., He, J., Menshikova, E. V., & Ritov, V. B. (2002). Dysfunction of 
mitochondria in human skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes. ​
Diabetes​
, ​
51​
(10), 2944­2950. 
Ambrosio, F., Kadi, F., Lexell, J., Fitzgerald, G. K., Boninger, M. L., & Huard, J. (2009). 
The effect of muscle loading on skeletal muscle regenerative potential: an update of current 
research findings relating to aging and neuromuscular pathology. ​
American Journal of 
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation​
, ​
88​
(2), 145­155.