You are on page 1of 5

Early Man 

Notebook 
 
Go to the ​
Social Studies section​
 on our class 
website and complete each of the following 
lessons.  Make sure you watch the videos 
carefully.  You may pause or re­watch them as 
many times as needed.  Make sure you go back 
and take the quiz at the end of each lesson, or you will not receive credit for 
completing the lesson. 
 
 
 
 

Early Man Lesson One 

Please define each word in the table below. 
 

WORD 

DEFINITION FROM VIDEO 

archaeology 

 

archaeologist 

 

fossil 

 

artifact 

 

hominid 

 

 

Go to ​
Early Man Lesson One​
, complete the form, and click “SUBMIT.” 
 
 
 
 
 

Early Man Lesson Two 

Please define each word in the table below. 

 

WORD 

DEFINITION FROM VIDEO 

hunter­gatherer 

 

migration 

 

land bridge 

 

 

Now, Please read the following text carefully and ​
selectively highlight 
important facts​
. Then, answer the questions below. 
 
Introduction: 
With each move, people had to adapt ­ which means to change their way of life ­ to suit their 
new environment.  They had to find out which plants could be eaten.  They had to learn to 
hunt different animals and to find new materials for tools and shelters.  
 
A Changing Climate: 
People also had to adapt to changes in Earth’s climate.  Over the past two million years ­ 
including most of the Stone Age ­ Earth experienced four long ice ages.  The last great Ice 
Age began soon after modern humans appeared. During this period, thick sheets of ice, 
called glaciers, spread across large regions of Earth.  Glaciers covered the northern parts of 
Europe, Asia, and North America.  Part of the Southern Hemisphere were also under ice. 
With so much of Earth’s water frozen in the glaciers, rainfall decreased.  Areas that had once 
been well­watered grasslands became deserts.  Sea levels dropped, exposing “land bridges” 
where ocean waters had once been.  With these changes, many animals had to migrate to 
find food.  The people who depended on these animals for food had little choice but to follow.   
 
Staying Warm: 
Ice Age hunter­gatherers adapted to climate change in many ways.  As winters grew longer, 
people learned to use whatever materials they could find to build warm shelters.  For 
example, in Eastern Europe, people built huts out of mammoth bones.  Mammoths were huge 
furry elephants that lived during the Ice Age.  These huts were covered with animal skins to 
keep out the winter wind and snow.  People also found other ways to stay warm.  Using bone 
needles, they sewed snug clothing from animal skins and furs.  They kept fires burning day 
and night.  
 
Forming Larger Communities: 
Some groups adapted to change by forming larger communities.  In larger groups, hunters 
could work together to kill animals such as mammoths.  They could also better defend their 
communities from attack.  In time, communities began to trade with one another for special 
stones or shells.  They likely also traded information about finding food during hard times.  

 

Please answer the questions in the table below. ​
Use complete 
sentences. 
 
QUESTION 

ANSWER 

What does it mean to adapt?    
How did the Ice Age make 
life difficult for early 
humans? 

 

Write two complete 
 
sentences using your own 
words to ​
explain two ways​
 in 
which early man adapted to 
his environment.  
Describe​
 the Ice Age, using 
complete sentences and 
your own words.  

 

 
Go to ​
Early Man Lesson Two​
, complete the form, and click “SUBMIT.” 
 
 
 
 

Early Man Lesson Three 

Now, Please read the following text carefully and ​
selectively highlight 
important facts​
. Then, answer the questions below. 
 
Introduction: 
Most people lived as hunter­gatherers and moved to follow their food supply. After the last Ice 
Age ended, people had to adapt to a changing environment in order to survive.   
 
The Agricultural Revolution:  
When the last Ice Age ended, about 12,000 year ago, a long period of global warming began. 
Temperatures rose around the world, and rainfall patterns changed.  Glaciers that had 
covered so much of Earth began to shrink, and ocean levels rose.  Most plants and animals 
adapted to these changes, but some large Ice Age animals did not adapt to a warmer world 

and many died out.  People who had hunted some of these animals for food had to find 
something else to eat.  
 
Modifying the Environment: 
Some people adapted to these changes by searching for new sources of food.  They found 
smaller animals to hunt.  People living near rivers and lakes began to depend more on fish for 
food.  Over time, people began to domesticate the plants and animals that they used for food. 
To domesticate means to change the behavior of animals or plants in ways that are useful for 
humans.  Examples of domestication include training an ox or horse to carry heavy burdens, 
keeping chickens to lay eggs for your family to eat, and planting an entire field full of wheat to 
grow food. At first, there was little difference between wild and domesticated plants and 
animals.  Year after year, people selected the seeds of the plants that produced the best 
crops to plant again.  As a result, domesticated plants began to produce more and more food 
of higher quality.  A wild tomato, for example, is the size of a cherry, but a domesticated 
tomato is the size of an orange.  
 
 

Please answer the questions in the table below. ​
Use complete 
sentences. 
 
QUESTION 

ANSWER 

What does it mean to 
domesticate animals or 
plants? 

 

Give ​
two examples​
 of how 
domesticated animals can 
be useful to humans. Your 
examples can be from the 
text or from your own 
experience.  

 

Explain why domesticated 
plants benefitted humans.  

 

 

Log on to ​
BrainPop​
 and search for the video called ​
“Agricultural 
Revolution.”​
  (Remember, ​
both the username and the password​
 for 
BrainPop is ​
jwms.)   
 
Watch the video, then define each word in the table below.  

 

WORD 

 

DEFINITION FROM VIDEO 

agriculture 

 

domestication 

 

food surplus 

 

specialization