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Published on AASL Learning4Life Lesson Plan Database

Rock Star Road Trip


Created by: Cathy Davis
Title/Role: School Librarian, Technology Integration Specialist
Organization/School Name: East Fairmont Junior High School
Location: West Virginia
Grade Level: 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
Type of Lesson: Stand-alone lesson
Type of Schedule: Flexible
Collaboration Continuum: Limited
Content Area:
The Arts
Educational technology
Mathematics
Social studies
Content Topic: Music - Genre; Social Studies - Geography; Educational Technology - Internet Navigation

Standards for the 21st-Century Learner


Skills Indicator(s):
1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness
for needs, importance, and social and cultural context.
2.1.3 Use strategies to draw conclusions from information and apply knowledge to curricular areas, realworld situations, and further investigations.
4.1.5 Connect ideas to own interests and previous knowledge and experience.
Dispositions Indicator(s):
1.2.2 Demonstrate confidence and self-direction by making independent choices in the selection of
resources and information.
2.2.1 Demonstrate flexibility in the use of resources by adapting information strategies to each specific
resource and by seeking additional resources when clear conclusions cannot be drawn.
3.2.1 Demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both formal and informal
situations.
Responsibilities Indicator(s):
1.3.5 Use information technology responsibly.
2.3.1 Connect understanding to the real world.
4.3.4 Practice safe and ethical behaviors in personal electronic communication and interaction.
Self-Assessment Strategies Indicator(s):
1.4.2 Use interaction with and feedback from teachers and peers to guide own inquiry process.
2.4.2 Reflect on systematic process, and assess for completeness of investigation.
4.4.1 Identify own areas of interest.
Scenario: Everyone has a favorite musical artist or group. This is your students' opportunity to go "on the
road" with the band through a virtual tour. They will complete a short biography about a favorite artist/group
and identify two cities in which they will perform. They will "attend" concerts in those cities choosing two

educational and two entertainment activities per each location, and obtain a song that they will play for the
class (emphasize school appropriateness). Use Mapquest, Google Maps or Yahoo Maps to determine a
driving route, mileage and driving time required for each city visited. Using the current cost of gasoline,
calculate how much the trip will cost round-trip. Also, calculate the cost of concert tickets and those of the
activities you have chosen.
Overview: Just what is there to do and see in this country anyway? We don't often ask students what
their interests are. Through personal choice in music, this activity encourages students to visit other cities,
apply real-world tools, and discover just what there is to do in other places. May be conducted
collaboratively with music (genre), social studies (geography), and Math (economics)or may be taught in
isolation.
Final Product: Oral and/or multimedia presentation of biography, cities in which to attend concerts,
educational and entertaining sites, mileage/distance/expenses, legally-obtained school-appropriate version
of one song by your artist or group.
Library Lesson: Students will become information literate by accessing information efficiently and
effectively; practice ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology; recognize
intellectual property rights; define/examine genre as it exists in music; develop note-taking and oral and/or
technology presentation skills.
Estimated Lesson Time: 120 minutes

Assessment
Product: Librarian and collaborating teacher will develop a rubric for the final product with input from
students.
Process: Librarian and collaborating teacher will monitor progress as students select artists and
conduct online searching, assisting as needed in locating official websites and tour schedules. Additional
assistance may be needed for mapping sites and downloading audio.
Student self-questioning: What interests me about this idea or topic? What are all the sources that
might be used? What organizational patterns will help me make sense of my information? How have I
shown responsibility in finding and using information in an ethical way? Why am I interested in this idea?
How does it connect to what's important to me personally? Why does this genre appeal to me? What
other genres have I tried? How can I share this experience with others?

Instructional Plan
Resources students will use:
Interactive Resource (i.e. webpages, multimedia learning objects, chat services)
Sound (i.e. music playback file, audio compact disc, recorded speech or sounds)
Text (books, letters, poems, newspapers, etc.)
Interactive Resource URL: none specifically
Resources instructor will use:
Projector
Laptop
White board
Other

Other instructor resources: CD player, MP3, cell phone

Instruction/Activities
Direct instruction: Explanation of assignment including instruction in effective internet searching,
Boolean language, internet short-cuts, and recognition of credible sites. Music teacher will discuss
genre, Social Studies teacher will explore U.S. geography, Math teacher will discuss economics, and
Librarian will tie in all areas as well as teach intellectual property rights, internet navigation and
downloading media to external devices.
Modeling and guided practice: Show activity previously completed by teacher or student. Use
Intelliboard to interact with internet sites presented. Explain that music sample must be legally obtained
and presented.
Independent practice: The student uses independent time to search for sources.
Sharing and reflecting: As work progresses, the student, SLMS, and core subject teachers review the
rubric to ensure all pieces are included.
Have you taught this lesson before: Yes
Strategies for differentiation: For struggling learners: 1. Reduce project to one city. 2. Complete
biography and identify some tour dates only. For advanced learners: 1. Calculate lodging and meal costs.
2. Use a travel reservations site (Expedia, Travelocity, etc.) to plan virtual trips to cities farther away.

AASL/Common Core State Standards Crosswalk


Mathematics:
7.NS.3 Mathematics The Number System Apply and extend previous understandings of operations
with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. 3. Solve real-world and
mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers. (7)
Mathematics High School - Functions Linear, Quadratic, and Exponential Models Construct and
compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve problems (9,10,11,12)
8.NS.1 Mathematics The Number System Know that there are numbers that are not rational, and
approximate them by rational numbers. 1. Know that numbers that are not rational are called irrational.
Understand informally that every number has a decimal expansion; for rational numbers show that the
decimal expansion repeats eventually, and convert a decimal expansion which repeats eventually into a
rational number. (8)
7.SP.8.b Mathematics Statistics and Probability Investigate chance processes and develop, use,
and evaluate probability models. 8. Find probabilities of compound events using organized lists, tables,
tree diagrams, and simulation. b. Represent sample spaces for compound events using methods such
as organized lists, tables and tree diagrams. For an event described in everyday language (e.g., "rolling
double sixes"), identify the outcomes in the sample space which compose the event. (7)

7.RP.1 Mathematics Ratios and Proportional Relationships Analyze proportional relationships and
use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. 1. Compute unit rates associated with ratios
of fractions, including ratios of lengths, areas and other quantities measured in like or different units. (7)
S-IC.6 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Making Inferences and Justifying
Conclusions Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and
observational studies 6. Evaluate reports based on data. (9,10,11,12)
8.SP.2 Mathematics Statistics and Probability Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data.
2. Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables.
For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and informally assess the
model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line. (8)
8.F.3 Mathematics Functions Define, evaluate, and compare functions. 3. Interpret the equation y
= mx + b as defining a linear function, whose graph is a straight line; give examples of functions that are
not linear. (8)
8.F.2 Mathematics Functions Define, evaluate, and compare functions. 2. Compare properties of
two functions each represented in a different way (algebraically, graphically, numerically in tables, or by
verbal descriptions). (8)
7.RP.3 Mathematics Ratios and Proportional Relationships Analyze proportional relationships and
use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems. 3. Use proportional relationships to solve
multistep ratio and percent problems. (7)
S-MD.6 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Using Probability to Make Decisions
Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions 6. (+) Use probabilities to make fair decisions
(e.g., drawing by lots, using a random number generator). (9,10,11,12)
S-MD.5.b Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Using Probability to Make
Decisions Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions 5. (+) Weigh the possible outcomes of a
decision by assigning probabilities to payoff values and finding expected values.|b. Evaluate and
compare strategies on the basis of expected values. (9,10,11,12)
S-CP.9 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Conditional Probability and the Rules
of Probability Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform
probability model 9. (+) Use permutations and combinations to compute probabilities of compound
events and solve problems. (9,10,11,12)
S-CP.8 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Conditional Probability and the Rules
of Probability Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform
probability model 8. (+) Apply the general Multiplication Rule in a uniform probability model, P(A and B)

= P(A)P(B|A) = P(B)P(A|B), and interpret the answer in terms of the model. (9,10,11,12)
S-CP.7 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Conditional Probability and the Rules
of Probability Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform
probability model 7. Apply the Addition Rule, P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B) - P(A and B), and interpret the
answer in terms of the model. (9,10,11,12)
S-CP.8 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Conditional Probability and the Rules
of Probability Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform
probability model 6. Find the conditional probability of A given B as the fraction of B's outcomes that
also belong to A, and interpret the answer in terms of the model. (9,10,11,12)
S-CP.3 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Conditional Probability and the Rules
of Probability Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data 3.
Understand the conditional probability of A given B as P(A and B)/P(B), and interpret independence of A
and B as saying that the conditional probability of A given B is the same as the probability of A, and the
conditional probability of B given A is the same as the probability of B. (9,10,11,12)
S-CP.2 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Conditional Probability and the Rules
of Probability Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data 2.
Understand that two events A and B are independent if the probability of A and B occurring together is
the product of their probabilities, and use this characterization to determine if they are independent.
(9,10,11,12)
Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Conditional Probability and the Rules of
Probability Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data
(9,10,11,12)
S-IC.5 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Making Inferences and Justifying
Conclusions Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and
observational studies 5. Use data from a randomized experiment to compare two treatments; use
simulations to decide if differences between parameters are significant. (9,10,11,12)
S-IC.4 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Making Inferences and Justifying
Conclusions Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and
observational studies 4. Use data from a sample survey to estimate a population mean or proportion;
develop a margin of error through the use of simulation models for random sampling. (9,10,11,12)
S-IC.2 Mathematics High School - Statistics and Probability Making Inferences and Justifying
Conclusions Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments 2.
Decide if a specified model is consistent with results from a given data-generating process, e.g., using
simulation. (9,10,11,12)

G-MG.2 Mathematics High School - Geometry Modeling with Geometry Apply geometric
concepts in modeling situations 2. Apply concepts of density based on area and volume in modeling
situations (e.g., persons per square mile, BTUs per cubic foot). (9,10,11,12)
G-MG.1 Mathematics High School - Geometry Modeling with Geometry Apply geometric
concepts in modeling situations 1. Use geometric shapes, their measures, and their properties to
describe objects (e.g., modeling a tree trunk or a human torso as a cylinder). (9,10,11,12)
Mathematics High School - Number and Quantity Quantities Reason quantitatively and use units to
solve problems. (9,10,11,12)
7.NS.1.c Mathematics The Number System Apply and extend previous understandings of
operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. 1. Apply and extend
previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent
addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram. c. Understand subtraction of
rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p - q = p + (-q). Show that the distance between two
rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in
real-world contexts. (7)
7.NS.1.b Mathematics The Number System Apply and extend previous understandings of
operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. 1. Apply and extend
previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent
addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram. b. Understand p + q as the
number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is
positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses).
Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts. (7)
8.EE.4 Mathematics Expressions and Equations Work with radicals and integer exponents. 4.
Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both
decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for
measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters per year for seafloor
spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology. (8)
7.EE.4.b Mathematics Expressions and Equations Solve real-life and mathematical problems using
numerical and algebraic expressions and equations. 4. Use variables to represent quantities in a realworld or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by
reasoning about the quantities. b. Solve word problems leading to inequalities of the form px + q > r or
px + q < r, where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Graph the solution set of the inequality and
interpret it in the context of the problem. (7)
7.EE.4.a Mathematics Expressions and Equations Solve real-life and mathematical problems using
numerical and algebraic expressions and equations. 4. Use variables to represent quantities in a realworld or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by

reasoning about the quantities. a. Solve word problems leading to equations of the form px + q = r and
p(x + q) = r, where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Solve equations of these forms fluently.
Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the sequence of the operations used
in each approach. (7)
7.EE.2 Mathematics Expressions and Equations Use properties of operations to generate
equivalent expressions. 2. Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem
context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related. (7)
8.EE.8.c Mathematics Expressions and Equations Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of
simultaneous linear equations. 8. Analyze and solve pairs of simultaneous linear equations. c. Solve
real-world and mathematical problems leading to two linear equations in two variables. (8)
8.EE.8.b Mathematics Expressions and Equations Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of
simultaneous linear equations. 8. Analyze and solve pairs of simultaneous linear equations. b. Solve
systems of two linear equations in two variables algebraically, and estimate solutions by graphing the
equations. Solve simple cases by inspection. (8)
8.EE.8.a Mathematics Expressions and Equations Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of
simultaneous linear equations. 8. Analyze and solve pairs of simultaneous linear equations. a.
Understand that solutions to a system of two linear equations in two variables correspond to points of
intersection of their graphs, because points of intersection satisfy both equations simultaneously. (8)
7.SP.6 Mathematics Statistics and Probability Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and
evaluate probability models. 6. Approximate the probability of a chance event by collecting data on the
chance process that produces it and observing its long-run relative frequency, and predict the
approximate relative frequency given the probability. (7)

This lesson plan is subject to copyright by the American Library Association and may be used for the noncommercial purpose of scientific
or educational advancement granted by Sections 107 and 108 of the Copyright Revision Act of 1976. Address usage requests to the ALA
Office of Rights and Permissions.

Rubric for Oral Report

Attribute

1 - Not Acceptable

2 - Below
Expectations

3 - Meets
Expectations

4 - Exceeds
Expectations

Effective use of Visual/Audio Aids


School-appropriate V/A aids

Inappropriate

appropriate

Appropriate amount of information per V/A aids

so much or so little too much information appropriate level of


information per VA to per VA, missing
information per slide
make VA useless
information such as
labels on axis

Effective use of technology to prepare V/A


aids

sloppy, format for


graphs not followed

poor, some format


errors

appropriate, all
formats followed

superior clarity, all


formats followed

Logical order of topics

totally disjointed, no
organization

some items
presented out of
order

organization as per
guidelines

superior organization
enhances
communication

Appropriate use of time: Not too long /short

far too long or far too somewhat too long


short
or too short

Methodology or approach: coverage appropriate


(if applicable)

methodology not
explained

Required information

required information missing more than


not presented
one element

missing one element presentation superior


or beyond
expectations

Conclusions/Recommendations: Significance
explained

inadequate
present, but not
conclusions or
logical, significance
recommendations, or not explained
conclusion and
recommendations
not based on facts
presented

present, logical,
significance clearly
explained

Presentation organization

appropriate length

methodology unclear methodology clear

theoretical
development
methodology so
clear as not to
require questioning

present, logical,
superior
explanations of
significance and
relevance

Score

Group Presentation (if applicable)


Even division of effort

one person clearly


apparent uneven
dominates or did not distribution of effort
contribute

even division of
effort

each member made


a significant
contribution

Interaction between team members

it is clear that
solution did not
result from good
team interaction

good teamwork

clearly team
functioned well,
product clearly
exceeds sum of
parts

All members of group understand solution

clearly at least one unclear that all


member unaware of members
understand solution
solution/strategy
and methodology

all members
understand complete
solution and
methodology

all members
understand solution,
what they did, and
what team members
did

Voice volume, enunciation, speed

unintelligible or had
to

voice hard to hear,


words slurred or
voice trails off, spoke
too slow or too fast,
monotone with little
emphasis

voice clearly heard,


words clearly
enunciated, did not
speak too slowly or
too rapidly

voice projected very


well, clear
enunciation, did not
speak too slowly or
rapidly

Hesitations, other voice habits

presentation full of
hesitations, ums,
ahs, etc.

some hesitations,
ums, ahs, etc.

clear, continuous
presentation,
perhaps a few ums,
ahs, etc.

superior
presentation, free of
ums, ahs, etc.

Distracting mannerisms

presentation full of
some distracting
distracting
mannerisms
mannerisms such as
giggling

no distracting
mannerisms

superior presentation

Maintaining eye contact

no eye contact at all poor eye contact;


looking down or at
screen significant
portion of time

maintained eye
contact other than
quick glances at
screen

maintained eye
contact with all
segments of the
audience

Poise

clearly unsure,
nervous, confused

composed at all
times

exudes/convey
confidence

poor interaction
between team
members apparent

Presentation Mechanics

at times appears
unsure, nervous,
confused

Body language

immobile, hands in
pockets, or blocked
screen

didn't always
indicate how material
on VA was related to
presentation

consistently used
gestures to
coordinate oral and
visual presentation

excellent use
gestures to provide
emphasis

Direct / evasive

non-responsive

evasive or
inaccurate

clear and direct

very clear and


complete

Complete

nonexistent

incomplete

complete

complete and
enhancing result and
communication

not all members


participate
appropriately

all members
participate
appropriately

all members can


answer questions on
all aspects of
presentation

Response to Questions

Appropriate participation (for groups/if applicable) clearly at least one


member unable to
respond