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Cailin Inman
Ms. Robillard
L.A 8 Hour 7
12 February 2015
Video Game Benefits
Violent video games do not cause gamers to act violent in real life. If anything, these
video games are beneficial to society. Video games are helping solve some of the worlds biggest
scientific issues, keeping potential criminals busy taking out their violence virtually and teaching
teenagers the value of teamwork and perseverance (through role playing video games).
The more popular violent video games become, the less violent society is. This is because
possible criminals are being kept busy by playing the violent video games. Research shows that
violent tendencies have actually decreased since technology and video games advanced, proving
that video games do not cause people to be violent, if anything it reduces violence. Potential
criminals arent committing as many crimes because they are spending so much time being
violent on their video games (Dashevsky). Violent video games are keeping criminals busy
virtually instead of having them be violent to real people in the real world.
Video games are not all bad, some games are actually designed to have the players work
on solving real-world issues that scientists cannot solve alone. A game was made where players
werent just playing a videogame, but they were solving a problem that involved an Aids-like
disease in monkeys. It took only three weeks for video gamers to solve the problem that experts
had been working on for 13 years. Another game was designed for gamers to help scientists
discover more about space. Forty planets that could potentially support life have been found by
the users of this game. Science needs more people (Mohammadi). With more and more people

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playing online games designed to solve sciences biggest problems, more people are contributing
to the world of science.
At many high schools in New York they play a game called Killer as an end of the year
ritual. This role playing video game is played by students who sign up and pay an entry fee of
$20, this money is put into the winners pile. Students get to pick their teams of no more than
four students, they have to work together as a team to eliminate all other players. The weapon is
a water gun, every participant receives one, if you are shot with water youre out. The final team
wins the game. The students have to work as a team to kill the others. This teaches teenagers
valuable lessons about relying on each other and helping contribute to the work. If a member of a
team doesnt do their part, the whole team suffers, just like in real life. At the end, the final team
wins the money, this encourages the kids hard work, teamwork and perseverance during the
tournament.
Some people might say that to some gamers, it can turn into more than just a game. This
is true, but these people are already violent and would have been violent before playing any
video game. Gamers who have violent tendencies would have been this way with or without
video games, some people are just violent. Video games could actually contribute to these violent
people getting their anger out on a video game instead of hurting real people.
All and all, violent video games are not the source of violent behavior in teens and young
adults. Video games do not teach people violence, some people are just violent by themselves, if
anything these violent games are keeping criminals off the streets and on their electronics. Video
games are helping scientists solve major problems, by designing games that trick the player
into solving real world issues. Role playing video games are just a fun and entertaining way for
kids and teens to compete in a non-violent way, and learn the value of working together as a

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team. Video games do not have a negative effect on society. Video games contribute to a safer,
more knowledgeable, better working world.

Works Cited
Dashevsky, Evan. "Violent Video Games May Stop Crime by Keeping Criminals Busy Playing
Violent Video Games." TechHive. IDG Consumer & SMB, 27 Nov. 2013. Web. 11 Feb.
2015.

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Mohammadi, Dara. "How Online Gamers Are Solving Science's Biggest Problems." The
Guardian. Guardian News and Media Limited, 25 Jan. 2014. Web. 3 Feb. 2015.