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Lynchburg College

Curriculum Unit: Magic Magnets


Second Grade, Science

Emily Britt
Education 424: Science Instruction
19 February 2015

Curriculum Unit: Magic Magnets


Rationale
Science is a complicated subject. It is essential for all students to grasp the main concepts
and as a teacher, it is my duty to make this knowledge accessible. Many students react poorly to
boring lecture therefore it is important to deliver scientific content in a way that makes it
interesting as well as sparks the imagination of my students. Students need to be inquisitive in
order motivate themselves to learn.
Major goals and objectives:
At the end of the unit, the students will be able to:
Identify the north and south magnetic poles
Determine the everyday uses of magnets
Classify objects into two groups: magnetic and nonmagnetic
Identify objects that contain iron
Define magnetic field
Identify the difference in repulsion and attraction field lines
Describe the differences between a natural magnet, artificial magnet, and electromagnets
Conduct an experiment using magnets
Collect and organize data in a chart and bar graph
Draw a conclusion about data collected
Communicate results with their peers
Explain the earths natural magnetic field
Use a compass to find magnetic north
Virginia Standards of Learning
2.1
The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the
nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.

observations and predictions are made and questions are formed;


observations are differentiated from personal interpretation;
observations are repeated to ensure accuracy;
two or more characteristics or properties are used to classify items;
conditions that influence a change are identified and inferences are made;
data are collected and recorded, and bar graphs are constructed using numbered axes;
data are analyzed, and unexpected or unusual quantitative data are recognized;
conclusions are drawn;
observations and data are communicated;
simple physical models are designed and constructed to clarify explanations and show
relationships; and
k. current applications are used to reinforce science concepts.

2.2The student will investigate and understand that natural and artificial magnets have certain
characteristics and attract specific types of metals. Key concepts include
a. magnetism, iron, magnetic/nonmagnetic, poles, attract/repel; and
b. important applications of magnetism.

b. important applications of magnetism.

2.2
The student will investigate and understand that natural and artificial magnets have certain
characteristics and attract specific types of metals. Key concepts include
a. magnetism, iron, magnetic/nonmagnetic, poles, attract/repel; and

l. simple physical models are designed and constructed to clarify explanations and show
relationships; and
m. current applications are used to reinforce science concepts.

k. observations and data are communicated;

j. conclusions are drawn;

i. data are analyzed, and unexpected or unusual quantitative data are recognized;

h. data are collected and recorded, and bar graphs are constructed using numbered axes;

g. conditions that influence a change are identified and inferences are made;

d. two or more characteristics or properties are used to classify items;

c. observations are repeated to ensure accuracy;

b. observations are differentiated from personal interpretation;

2.1
The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of
science by planning and conducting investigations in which
a. observations and predictions are made and questions are formed;

Standards of Learning Objectives

Curriculum Unit: Magic Magnets

Lesson
1

Lesson
2

Lesson
3

Lesson
4

Lesson
5

Lesson
6

Curriculum Unit: Magic Magnets


Overview of Content

Magnet: a piece of iron or steel that attracts certain metals


Poles
Poles are either end of a magnet
North Pole and South Pole
Like poles repel and opposite poles attract
Magnetic Force is stronger at the poles and gets weaker as you move farther away
from the poles.
If you cut a bar magnet in half, you get two new, smaller magnets, each with its
own north and south pole.
Magnetic field: the invisible push and pull from a magnet
A magnet creates an invisible area of magnetism all around it
Magnets affect some metal items that are inside of its magnetic field.
Items must contain iron, cobalt, nickel, or steel in order to be affected.
Earths Magnetic Field
The north end of a magnetic compass always points roughly toward Earth's North
Pole and the south end of the compass needle always points toward Earths South
Pole. That is because Earth itself contains magnetic materials and behaves like a
gigantic magnet.
Types of Magnets
Natural Magnets: Natural magnets are composed of a mineral called magnetite or
lodestone. This mineral is special because the domains are naturally facing the same
direction.
Artificial Magnets: Artificial magnets are composed of special minerals or metals.
The domains of these materials have been turned the same way using a magnet or
electricity.
Electromagnet: An electromagnet is created with electricity is run through a coil.
This creates a magnetic field around the coil.
Magnetic Domains: areas inside of an material where the magnetic charges are all facing
the same direction.
Magnets have important applications and uses in everyday life.

Curriculum Unit: Magic Magnets


List of Materials

Lesson 1
o Plastic Cup
o Paper clip
o Cotton balls
o String
o 2 by 2 inch sheets of
Glass
Plastic
Aluminum foil
Copper
Iron
Paper (a sticky notes pad works well)
A stick notes pad with a small sheet of iron in between the pages
o A strong magnet (rare earth magnet)
o Handout: Magic Magnets: What is a Magnet?
o Flipchart
o Marker
o 1 bar magnets for each student with defined poles
o Preferably by color (blue and red) and with a letter (N and S)
o ELMO or other document projector
o SmartBoard

Lesson 2
o Brown paper bag filled with 10 objects
At least 2 different objects made of iron
Wooden toothpick
Penny
Rubber bands
Tin can
Crayon
Bobby pin
Small rock
Piece of plastic (like a counter)
Glass marble
A dime
Steel wool
Thread
Aluminum foil
o Two bar or horseshoe magnets
o Handout: Magic Magnets: Attract or Not Attract?

Lesson 3

o
o
o
o
o
o

Two bar magnets per group


One cut-able bar magnet per group
Iron shavings in shakers
Wax paper
Manila folder or light colored construction paper.
Handout: Magic Magnets: Magnetic Field

Lesson 4
o artificial magnet and natural magnet
o ELMO or other document projector
o Handout: Magic Magnets: Types of Magnets
o Iron Nail
o 4 yards of insulated wire
o 1 volt dry cell battery
o 2 duct tape strips per group (1inch by 2 inch)
o Paper clips, bolts, washers, etc.
o Bar magnet

Lesson 5
o Natural Magnet, Man-made Magnet
o Spring Clothespin
o 1 inch masking tape
o Scissors
o Large Plastic Cup
o Paper Clips
o Handout: Magic Magnets: The Strongest Magnet Investigation
o Handout: The Strongest Magnet Graph
o Completed Strongest Magnet Graph for example

Lesson 6
o Paper clip
o Natural Magnet
o Foam Packing Peanuts (non-biodegradable)
o Bowl
o Water
o Compass
o 4 sentences strips: North, South, East, and West
o Handout: Magic Magnets: Compass and Earth
o ELMO or other document projector

Curriculum Unit: Magic Magnets


Special Safety Concerns
Magnets should not be swallowed or inserted into any orifice of the body.
Lesson 4 involves a small electrical current. It is not enough to harm anyone but students should
be monitored closely and anyone not adhering to the rules will not be involved in the
construction.

Curriculum Unit: Magic Magnets


Extension activities
Extension activities are for students that require a little extra challenge outside of the six planned
lessons or finish work more quickly.

Magnet Inventor:
o Activity:
Design a new product that uses magnets
Draw your invention
Answer the following questions:
How does this invention use magnets?
What does your invention do?
How does it make life easier?
Who would use your product?
Magnet Centers: When students complete their work during science, they can go to one
of 2 magnet centers.
o Center 1:
Materials:
Computer
Brainpopjr.com
Activity:
Watch the BrianPop Jr video on magnets.
Play the games that go along with the video
o Center 2: (Adapted from Teaching Science to Children (2005)
Materials
Ring Magnets
Peg that fits into the center of the ring magnets
Activity:
Drop the rings onto the peg so that the rings float.
If the rings stick together, try flipping the top ring over and placing
it on the peg.
Answer the question: What causes the rings to float?

For meeting the ends of diverse learners:

Students with special needs:


o Students with special needs will receive direct instruction from the teacher or
from an aide.
o All instructions will be delivered orally.
o Rather than writing, students can answer questions from handouts orally to the
teacher or to an aide.
English as a second language learners
o Rather than writing answers students can have conversations that the teacher will
listen in to.

Curriculum Unit: Magic Magnets


Sources of information
AAAS. "How Strong Is Your Magnet?" Science NetLinks. American Association for the
Advancement of Science, n.d. Web. 18 Feb. 2015.
Fisk, Judy. "How to Make a Paper Clip Compass for Kids." EHow. Demand Media, 02 Aug.
2011. Web.
Friedl, Alfred E., and Trish Y. Koontz. Teaching Science to Children: An Inquiry Approach. 6th
ed. New York City: McGraw-HIll, 2005. Print.
Pflugfelder, Bob. "Make an Electromagnet." Make an Electromagnet - Science Bob. Science
Bob, n.d. Web.

Lesson 1: Introduction to Magnets

Objectives:
o Student will be able to
Identify the north and south magnetic poles.
Determine the everyday uses of magnets.

Essential Questions:
o What is a magnet?
o How are magnets used?
o Where is a magnet the strongest?
o What is a magnetic pole?
o Which ends of the magnet repel and which ends attract?

Content Outline
o Magnet: a piece of iron or steel that attracts certain metals
The Parts of a magnet:
Poles are either end of a magnet
North Pole and South Pole
Like poles repel and opposite poles attract
o Magnetic Force is stronger at the poles and gets weaker as you move farther away
from the poles.

Part 1: Discrepant Event


o Adapted from Teaching Science to Children (2005)
o Group: Whole Class
o Materials:
Plastic Cup
Paper clip
Cotton balls
String
2 by 2 inch sheets of
Glass
Plastic
Aluminum foil
Copper
Iron
Paper (a sticky notes pad works well)

Figure 1

A stick notes pad with a small sheet of iron in between the pages
A strong magnet (rare earth magnet)

o Preparation:
Place the magnet in the plastic cup and cover with the cotton balls covering it.
Set up the event in a similar way to Figure 1 before students come to class or on a
desk away from student activity.
o Procedure:
1 Ask students to gather around the set-up
2 Ask students what they believe is holding the clip up.
3 Next ask students to predict which sheets will make the paperclip fall.
Record predictions on a flipchart
4 Carefully insert each sheet between the paperclip and the cup
Check the predictions that were correct and X the predictions that were
incorrect.
5 Guide students to a generalization of the relationship between the sheets that
caused the clip to fall and those that did not.

Part 2:
o Group: Whole Class
o Strategy: teacher lead discussion
o Materials:
Handout: Magic Magnets: What is a Magnet?: 1 copy per student
Flipchart
Marker
o Preparation:
Draw a KWL chart on the flipchart.
o Procedure
1 Give each student a copy of Magic Magnets: What is a Magnet?.
2 Start first by asking students what they know about magnets
Write responses on the KWL chart.
3 Next ask student what they would like to know about magnets.
Write responses on the KWL chart.
4 Flip to the next blank page on the flipchart. Ask students where they see magnets
Prompt for other locations beside just refrigerator magnets

Tell students to write eight of the locations listed in their Magic Magnet Notes:
What is a Magnet?

Part 3:
o Group: Heterogeneous Pairs
o Strategy: Inquiry
o Materials:
1 bar magnets for each student with defined poles
Preferably by color (blue and red) and with a letter (N and S)
ELMO or other document projector
SmartBoard
o Procedure:
1 Group students into pairs
2 Give each student a bar magnet
3 Give each pair a handful of paperclips.
4 Ask the pairs to investigate the magnets but to keep in mind these questions (write
them on the board):
How can we get our magnets to stick together?
Where is the magnet to strongest?
5 Allow time for students to explore. Walk around and answer any questions or to
guide pairings to knowledge.
6 After students have finished, come back together as a class and ask each pair to
tell something that they found out.
7 Complete the Magic Magnets: What are Magnets? Handout together as a class.
Project blank copy onto SmartBoard using ELMO. Ask for student input on
completing the Handout.
8 Students should glue completed Handout into their science notebook.

Part 4:
o Start Unit Vocabulary Sheet
1 Flip to next page of flipchart
2 Ask students to turn to the next blank page in their Science Notebooks.
3 They should write Magnet Vocabulary at the top of the page.
4 Write the definition on the poster paper as students write along.
Magnet: a piece of iron or steel that attracts certain metals.
Attract: to pull
Repel: to push
5 Tear the paper from the flipchart and use a magnet to pin it to a blank spot on the
white/chalk board.

Write terms on sentence strips and ask students were they should go on the Word
Wall.
Add Magnet, Repel, and Attract to the word wall.

Assessment:
o Completion of Magic Magnets: What are Magnets?: (See Completion Rubric)

Lesson 2: What materials are attracted to magnets?

Objectives:
o The student will be able to
Classify objects into two groups: magnetic and nonmagnetic
Identify objects that contain iron.

Essential Questions:
o What materials are attracted to magnets?
o What do these items contain that makes them magnetic?

Activity:
o Adapted from Teaching Science to Children (2005)
o Group: Heterogeneous Groups
o Strategy: Guided Investigation
o Materials:
Brown paper bag filled with 10 objects
At least 2 different objects made of iron
Wooden toothpick
Penny
Rubber bands
Tin can
Crayon
Bobby pin
Small rock
Piece of plastic (like a counter)
Glass marble
A dime
Steel wool
Thread
Aluminum foil
Two bar or horseshoe magnets
Handout: Magic Magnets: Attract or Not Attract?

Procedure:
1 Divide students into pairs. Give each pair a paper bag fill with 10 objects from the
above list
2 Ask the students to empty out the contents of the bag onto the table and
investigate what is inside.
Identify any objects that they do not recognize.

Ask students to classify or group the objects into two groups based on what they
know about the materials
Size, shape, material, weight, etc.
4 Give each pair the opportunity to share how they classified their objects.
5 Next give each student one bar magnet and a copy of the Handout: Magic
Magnets Attract or Not Attract?
6 Ask the class how the magnet could be used to classify the objects.
7 Instruct the students to make new groups using the magnet. First they should
record their predictions on the Handout.
8 As they test each object, they should record their results on the Handout.
9 As pairs finish, they should answer the questions on the Handout.
10 As a class, go over the objects that were magnetic and those that were not
magnetic.
11 Students should glue their Handouts into their science notebook.

Assessment
o Attract or Not Attract Handouts are graded using Completion Rubric

Lesson 3: Magnetic Fields

Objectives:
o The student will be able to
Define magnetic field
Identify the difference in repulsion and attraction field lines

Essential Questions:
o What is a magnetic field?
o How can we see a magnetic field?
o How is the magnetic field between two unlike poles different to that of two like
poles?

Content Outline
o Magnetic field: the invisible push and pull from a magnet

Activity
o Group: Heterogeneous Pairs
o Strategy:
o Materials:
Two bar magnets per group
One cut-able bar magnet per group
Iron shavings in shakers
Wax paper
Manila folder or light colored construction paper.
Handout: Magic Magnets: Magnetic Field

Procedure:
1 Give each pair two bar magnets, a manila folder, wax paper, and a saltshaker of iron
shavings.
2 Have students place a manila file folder on their desk or table, then place two bar
magnets on the manila folder with opposite ends together.
3 Place a piece of wax paper on top of the magnet.
4 Have students sprinkle iron filings all around the bar magnet. They may need to
gently tap the wax paper with their finger to get the best view of the magnetic field
lines.
5 Have students draw what they see in their Handout
6 Ask students the following questions:
Are your lines of force greater at the ends or in the middle of the bar magnet?
(Answer: at the ends)

7
8

9
10

11
12
13
14
15

16
17
18

What assumption can you make about the strength of the magnetic field at that
location? (Answer: The magnetic field is strongest at the ends or at the poles. This
is where the lines are concentrated and closer together.)
Have the students place the used iron filings back in the saltshaker after you model
the best and cleanest way.
Have the students now place two bar magnets onto the manila file folder so that North
poles are facing each other and are about an inch apart. Place the wax paper on top of
the magnets.
Have students sprinkle iron filings around the north poles of the magnets
Have students draw what they see.
Ask the students if the magnets are attracting or repelling? (Answer: Repelling)
How do you know? (Answer: The magnetic field lines are bending away from
each other.)
Have the students place the used iron filings back in the saltshaker.
Now ask the students what they think will happen when they cut a bar magnet in half.
Tell each group to carefully cut the bar magnet in half at an angle .
Have students place the cut bar magnet onto the manila folder so that one flat end is
close to one angled end.
Have students sprinkle iron filings around the area between the two magnets.
Ask the students what they see happening? (Answer: the magnetic fields are
bending away from each other)
What can they infer about the two magnets? (That the diagonal end of one magnet
is now the north pole or south pole)
Have the students clean up per your directions.
Add the following terms to the Vocabulary Sheet and Word Wall
Magnetic field: the invisible push and pull from a magnet
Students should glue their Handout into their science notebooks.

Assessment:
o Handouts are graded using Completion Rubric

Lesson 4: Types of magnetics

Objective:
o Student will be able to:
Describe the differences between a natural magnet, artificial magnet, and
electromagnets.

Essential Questions:
o Where do natural magnets come from?
o How do we get artificial magnets?
o What is an electromagnet?
o What is a magnetic domain?

Content Outline:
o Natural Magnets: Natural magnets are composed of a mineral called magnetite or
lodestone. This mineral is special because the domains are naturally facing the same
direction.
o Artificial Magnets: Artificial magnets are composed of special minerals or metals.
The domains of these materials have been turned the same way using a magnet or
electricity.
o Electromagnet: An electromagnet is created with electricity is run through a coil. This
creates a magnetic field around the coil.

Part 1: Magnetic Domains and types of magnets


o Group: Whole Class
o Strategy: Direct Instruction
o Materials:
artificial magnet and natural magnet
ELMO or other document projector
Handout: Magic Magnets: Types of Magnets
o Procedure:
1 Give each student a copy of Magic Magnets: Types of Magnets
2 Project a copy onto the SmartBoard or other projection screen
3 Have students complete the handout as you explain the concepts and complete the
one that is projected.

Part 2: Make an Electromagnet


o Adapted from http://www.sciencebob.com/experiments/electromagnet.php
o Group: heterogeneous pairs

o Strategy: Teacher guided group


o Materials (multiplied by 10)
Iron Nail
4 yards of insulated wire
1 volt dry cell battery
2 duct tape strips per group (1inch by 2 inch)
Paper clips, bolts, washers, etc.
Bar magnet
o Preparation
Strip one inch of insulation off each end of the wire.
o Procedure
1 Group students into pairs
2 Give each student a nail, wire, a battery, metal materials, and two strips of duct
tape.
3 Remind students that they will be working with a small electric current and that
they need to pay close attention and be careful.
4 Instruct students to wrap the insulated wire in the same direction around the nail
50 times.
Model this step on your own nail.
5 Check that the nails are wrapped properly.
6 Have the students use the tape to attach one end of the battery to one of the
exposed ends of the wire.
Model this step
7 Have students carefully attach the other end of the batter to the other end of the
wire.
Model this step
8 Tell students to test the strength of the magnet by picking up paper clips, bolts,
and washers.
9 Use another piece to carefully attach the other end of the battery to the other end
of the wire.
10 Test the strength of the magnet by picking up paper clips, bolts, and washers.
11 Give the pairs each a bar magnet.
12 Ask the students to compare the strength of the electromagnet to that of the bar
magnet.
Is one stronger?
13 Have students take apart their electromagnets and put the materials in the space
you designate.
14 Add the following terms to the Vocabulary List and the Word Wall

Magnetic domains: The areas inside of a material where the magnetic charges
are all facing the same direction.
Natural Magnet: A magnet that is found in the ground that is made of
Lodestone.
Artificial Magnet: A magnet that is made by people out of special metals like
iron, cobalt, and nickel.
Electromagnet: A powerful magnet that is made by people that uses electricity
to create a magnetic field.
15 Students should glue the Handout into their science notebooks.
o Assessment:
Handout graded using Completion Rubric

Lesson 5: Strength of Magnets

Objectives:
o Student will be able to
Conduct an experiment using magnets
Collect and organize data in a chart and bar graph.
Draw conclusion about data collected

Essential Questions:
o Which is stronger: a natural magnet or an artificial magnet?

Activity: Test Magnet Strength


o Adapted from http://sciencenetlinks.com/student-teacher-sheets/how-strong-yourmagnet/
o Group: Heterogeneous Pairs
o Materials:
Natural Magnet, Man-made Magnet
Spring Clothespin
1 inch masking tape
Scissors
Large Plastic Cup
Paper Clips
Handout: Magic Magnets: The Strongest Magnet Investigation
Handout: The Strongest Magnet Graph
Completed Strongest Magnet Graph for example

Procedure
1 Group students in pairs
2 Hand out the Magic Magnet: The Strongest Magnet Investigation Handout
3 Read aloud the Magic Magnet: The Strongest Magnet Investigation.
4 Ask students to make a hypothesis with their partner on which magnet will be the
strongest. They should write their hypothesis on their Handout in a complete
sentence.
5 Demonstrate the following
Flip cup so that it is upside down on the desk
Tape bottom leg of clothespin to the bottom of the overturned cup.
Beginning with the natural magnet, clip the magnet into the clothespin.
Open paper clip to form a hook. Touch the hook to the magnet.
6 Tell students to repeat what was just shown to them on their own desks. Walk around
as students assemble their apparatus.

7
8
9

10
11
12
13

14
15
16

17
18

Repeat the instructions for the procedure.


Instruct students to take turns carefully adding paper clips to the hook, one at a time.
Students should count the number of paper clips that they can hang onto the hook
before the paper clips fall.
They should record the number of paperclips onto the data sheet on the line Trial
One under Natural Magnet
Repeat the procedure 3 times with the same magnet
Next, exchange the natural magnet for the man-made magnet.
Repeat Steps 5 through 7
Students should form a conclusion and answer the three questions listed on the
handout.
As groups finish their trials, instruct each pair on making their graph and show them
the sample graph that you have completed (attached)
Give each group 1 graph. See Magnet Strength Graph attached. (completed and
uncompleted)
When they have finished all trials tell students to fill in the graph with their data.
Encourage students to use colored crayons to make their graphs more appealing.
Allow each group to share their results and graphs with the class.
Ask these following questions:
Did we all have the same results?
Why might we have gotten different results?
What can we conclude as a class about which magnet is stronger?
Hang each graph on the unit bulletin board or in a prominent place around the
classroom.
Students should glue their Handout into their science notebooks.

Assessment
o Handout is graded for completion using Completion Rubric
o Graph is graded for organization and accuracy (See Graph Rubric)

Lesson 6: Compass

Objectives:
o Student will be able to
Explain the earths natural magnetic field.
Use a compass to find magnetic north.

Essential Questions
o What is a compass?
o How does a compass use magnets?
o How does a compass work?
o Why does it always point north?

Content Outline:
o A compass is a navigation tool that uses the earths natural magnetic field to show
North, South, East, and West.
o The north end of a magnetic compass always points roughly toward Earth's North
Pole and the south end of the compass needle always points toward Earths South
Pole. That is because Earth itself contains magnetic materials and behaves like a
gigantic magnet.
o The compass needle is magnetized to be attracted to the magnetic field of the earth.

Activity: Make your own compass


o (Lesson adapted from http://www.ehow.com/how_10023611_make-paper-clipcompass-kids.html)
o Groups: Heterogeneous pairs
o Strategy:
o Materials
Paper clip
Natural Magnet
Foam Packing Peanuts (non-biodegradable)
Bowl
Water
Compass
4 sentences strips: North, South, East, and West
Magic Magnets: Compass and Earth Handout
ELMO or other document projector

Procedure
1 Group students into pairs. Give each pair 1 paperclip, 1 natural magnet, 1 packing
peanut, and a bowl.

Tell the students that one student from each pair needs to careful fill the cup all the
way up to the top.
3 Now instruct students to unfold the paperclip as straight and long as possible.
Model this to the students.
4 Have students grasp the magnet and rub it across the straightest part of the paperclip.
Rub for 3 minutes
Model this to the students
5 Next, tell students to take the packing peanut and carefully poke the straight end into
the peanut (long-ways). Make sure the paperclip is centered in the peanut.
Model this to the students
6 Have the students place the peanut gently on the surface of the water. Wait a moment
as the paperclip align itself with earths magnetic fields.
7 Once the paperclip stops moving, instruct students to blow gently on one end of the
paper to push it out of alignment. If the compass is working the needle should
return to the same position.
8 Allow the pairs to use the compass to check their compass
9 As a class, determine which part of the room is North, South, East, and West.
Place the sentence strips on the walls in those areas.
10 Instruct students to clean up.
11 Add the following term to the word wall and to the Vocabulary List
Compass: a navigation tool that uses the earths natural magnetic field to show
North, South, East, and West.
12 Students should respond to the following questions in the next blank page of their
science notebooks.
What were the steps you used to create your compass?
How could knowing how to make a compass help you in the real world?
Wrap-up:
1 Give each student a Compass and Earth Handout.
2 Project a blank copy onto the Smartboard using the ELMO
3 Complete the Handout as a class. Ask for student input for completing.
4 Students should glue the Handout into their science notebooks.

Assessment
o Response in notebooks are collected and graded using Response Rubric.

Magic Magnets:

What is a Magnet?

Name:_______________________

What is a magnet?

Where do we see magnets?

1.
2.
3.
4.

5.
6.
7.
8.

Draw a magnet. Color with green crayon where the


magnetic force is the strongest.

Color the North squares red and the


South squares blue. Place an X where
the two poles will repeal and a where
the two poles will attract.

Magic Magnets:

Name:

Attract or Not Attract?

Directions:
1. List all of the objects found in your bag under the heading Objects.
2. Next make a prediction. Put a check in the YES box if you think the
object will be attracted to the magnet and No, if it wont.
3. After testing, record your results

Object

Prediction
Yes

No

Result

Yes

No

Object

What do the magnetic objects have in common?

What does an object need to have in order to be magnetic?

Prediction
Yes

No

Results
Yes

No

Magic Magnets: Magnetic Fields

Name: _____________________________

What is a magnetic field?

What happened when you cut the magnet in half?

Draw what you see during the Magnetic Field Activity

Remember to color the north pole of your magnet red and the south pole, blue.

Two of the Same Poles Close Together

Two Opposite Poles Close Together

Magic Magnets: Types of Magnets

Name: _________________________

Draw the domains.


Un-magnetized Rock

Where do natural magnets come from?

How do we make artificial magnets?

What is an electromagnet?

vs

Magnets

Magic Magnets:

Name:____________________________________________

The Strongest Magnet Investigation


Directions: Put on your scientist hat and explore which magnet is stronger: an artificial magnet or
a man-made magnet. Read the procedure very carefully!
Hypothesis: Which magnet do you think will be the strongest? Write in a complete sentence:

Procedure:

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Set up the cup and clothespin by following Mrs. Britt.


Clip the NATURAL magnet in the clothespin first.
Take turns with your partner, carefully adding clips to the hook, one by one.
Count the total number of clips before the hook falls. Write this number under Trial 1.
Repeat steps 3 and 4 two more times and fill in Trial 2 and 3.
Take the natural magnet out of the clothespin and place the ARTIFICIAL magnet in the clothespin.
Repeat steps 3 and 4 until you complete all three trials for the artificial magnet.
7. Circle the winner of each trial.

Data Chart:

Trial 1

Trial 2

Trial 3

Natural Magnet
Artificial Magnet
Conclusion: Which magnet was the strongest? Which magnet won most of the trials? Was your hypothesis correct? Write in three
complete sentences.

Magic Magnets:

Compass and the Earth

Name:____________________________

What is a compass?

When would you use a compass?

How does a compass work?

Draw a compass

Color Earths Magnetic Field

Graph Title: ______________________________________

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5
4
3
2
1
Trial 1

Trial 2
Trial 3
Natural Magnet

Trial 1

Trial 2
Trial 3
Artificial Magnet

Number of Paperclips

Graph Title: Which Magnet is the Strongest?

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1
Trial 1

Trial 2
Trial 3
Trial 1
Trial 2
Trial 3
Natural Magnet
Artificial Magnet
Type of Magnet

Magic Magnets Unit Assessment

Name: _______________________

Directions: Read each answer and terms carefully. Write the letter to the

answer in the blank next to the term. Use answers only once. Not all answers
will be used.
(2 points each)

1. Magnet
2. Repel

A.

an instrument used for finding north,


south, east, and west.

B.

the magnetic pull of the earth

C. a piece of iron or steel that attracts


certain metals

3. Magnetic Field
4. Attract
5. Compass

D.

to push

E.

the invisible push and pull from a


magnet

F.

to pull

Directions: Write YES in the blank next to the objects that WILL be attracted
to a magnet.

6.
7.
8.
9.

(1 point each)

Paperclip
Rubber band
Sheet of paper
Iron nail

Directions: Write ATTRACT between the two magnets that would be

attracted to each other and REPEL between the two magnets that would
repel.
(3 points each)

9.

10.

______

______

Mrs. Britts Second Grade

Student Name:

Handout Completion Rubric


Not Completed
0 points

____________________
Grade ______/6

Mostly Completed
1 point

Completed
2 points

Assignment
Completion

The assignment
was not
completed

The assignment
was mostly
completed.
There were few
blanks.

The assignment
was
completed.

Neatness

The assignment
was very sloppy
and hard to
read.

The assignment
was neat but it
could use so
improvement.

The assignment
was very neat.

Complete
Sentences and
Punctuation

The assignment
did not have
complete
sentences or
punctuation
were needed.

The assignment
had a few
incomplete
sentences and
missing
punctuation.

The assignment
had complete
sentences and
proper
punctuation
were needed.

Comments from Mrs. Britt

Mrs. Britts Second Grade

Response Rubric

Student Name:

Not Completed
0 points

____________________
Grade ______/6

Mostly Completed
1 point

Completed
2 points

Content

The questions
were not
answered.

The questions
were not
answered
completely

The questions
were
answered fully
and in detail.

Neatness

The assignment
was very sloppy
and hard to
read.

The assignment
was neat but it
could use so
improvement.

The assignment
was very neat.

Complete
Sentences and
Punctuation

The assignment
did not have
complete
sentences or
punctuation
were needed.

The assignment
had a few
incomplete
sentences and
missing
punctuation.

The assignment
had complete
sentences and
proper
punctuation
were needed.

Comments from Mrs. Britt

Mrs. Britts Second Grade

Graph Rubric

Student Name:

Not Completed
0 points

____________________
Grade ______/6

Mostly Completed
1 point

Completed
2 points

Organization

The data did


not match the
data chart or
the wrong
graph was used
to the show the
data.

Some of the
data did not
match the data
chart or the
wrong graph
was used to
show the data.

The correct
graph was
used to show
the data. The
data was
shown
correctly.

Neatness

The graph was


filled in sloppily.
This made the
graph hard to
read.

The graph was


neat but could
use
improvement.

The assignment
was very neat.
The graph was
filled in nicely.

Graph

The graph did


The graph was
not have proper missing some
titles for the
titles.
graph or the xand y-axis.

The graph had


a title, the x
and y-axis had
titles.

Comments from Mrs. Britt