You are on page 1of 33

Subject: Mathematics

Grade: First Third


Date of Lesson: 9-30-2014
Lesson Length: 30 minutes

Lesson Objective:
o Student will be able to add numbers less than 20 by anchoring to fives and tens.
Instruction:
o Tutor to Tutee ratio- 1:1
Activity:
o Part 1:
Explore the 10-frames with the student.
How many squares are there in each row?
What about the whole table/
Have you used one of these before? If so, what do you remember about it?
If not, what do you think you could do with it?
o Part 2:
Place 6 counters on the 10-frame.
Ask the student
How many counters are there?
How many more do you need to fill in the 10-frame?
Repeat with the following numbers.
4
9
3
7
o Part 3:
Ask the student to place 4 counters on the 10-frame. Write 4 on your paper.
Ask them to place 6 counters on the second 10-frame. Write +6 next to the 4
Ask the student: how would you add these two numbers without counting the
counters?
When they find the total write = 10 on the paper.
Ask them to explain what they did to find the answer.
Repeat with the following numbers. Ask them to explain their process after each one.
3 and 4
2 and 7

4 and 8
9 and 9
o Part 3:
Now ask the student to place 17 counters on the 10-frames. Write 17 on the paper
Write +10 next to the 17 and ask the student to put 10 counters on the third 10-frame.
How could you find the answer without counting the dots?
When he/she has found the answer, write in on the paper.
Ask them to explain how they found the answer.
Repeat with the following numbers. Ask them to explain their process after each one.
12 and 8
15 and 9
10 and 14

Materials:
o Ten frames sheet with three ten frames
o Counters or candies
o Sheet of paper for recording numbers
o Pencil

Subject: Mathematics
Grade: Six and Seven
Lesson Date: 9-29-2014
Lesson Time: 30 minutes

Lesson Objectives
o Students will be able to:
Construct the meaning of fractions by using words.
Instruction:
For this activity it is essential to not tell students that they are working with fractions.
It is about constructing the meaning of fractions, guided by the tutor, without using
numbers.
o Tutor to tutee ratio: 1:1
Part 1
1. Give student the cards and have him/her spread them out on the table.
2. Ask the student to arrange the cards into three groups.
3. The student assigns each group a name that corresponds to the item in the group. Write
the group names on the index cards and place the index card above the group.
Part 2
4. Ask the student: Could you combine any of the groups?
a. Prompt the students toward the idea that they can combine two of the groups if
they change the name:
i. Can you add apples and oranges? No because they dont have the same
name. What could you do to combine them? Change the name of the
group.
b. Rename the group by creating a new index card and placing it below the two
original group labels.
c. Ask appropriate follow-up questions to solidify the knowledge
5. Shuffle the cards and ask the students to form two new groups. Name the two new groups
on index cards.
a. One group will be a mixed group. Items in the mixed group must relate in some
way.
Part 3
6. Ask the student:
a. If we were going to change out the labels with numbers, what would we put for
the mixed group? Write the number on a new index card and place it over the
group name.
i. What would the name of the other group change to? Create index card like
above.

b. If we take away all of the one of the items in the mixed group (for example all of
the apples from a group with apples and candies),
c. What is the bottom number telling us?
d. What about the top number?
Part 3 is where Im stuck. I dont know how to word things so that it makes
sense and is helpful!!

Materials;
o 5 apple cards, 4 candy cards, and 6 orange cards.
o Index cards, 10.
o Marker or pen

Example for tutor: Groupings may be different after Part 2. The idea is to have them group items
that are the related (by color, red, or by item, fruit).
PART 1
1. Give cards to student.
Have them randomly lay
them on the table.

2. Ask the students to group


them in three groups.

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Apples

Oranges

Candies

3. Give the groups names


with index cards.

PART 2:
4. Ask the student:
Could you combine any of
the groups?
Prompt the student towards
the fact that he/she can

combine two of the groups


if the group is renamed.
Place an index card with the
new group name below the
two original names
5. Shuffle the cards and ask
the student to form two new
groups. Name the two new
groups on index cards.

Apples + Oranges = Fruits


Group 1 = Fruits

Group 2=Candies

Group 1= Red things

Group 2= Oranges

PART 3:
6. Ask student, how many total items are in the Red Things group? Fill in answer on the sheet as
a fraction.
7. How many are in the Oranges group? Record the answer
8. What if we take away the apples from the Red Things group how many candies do we have?
Record the answer
9. What is the bottom number telling us? What the total group is and how many are supposed to
be in the group.
10. What is the top number telling us? How many we have from the group.

Subject: Math
Grades: 1-2
Date of lesson: 10-7-2014
Lesson Length: 30 minutes

Lesson Objective
o Students will be able to anchor to 5 and 10 when counting
Instruction
o 1:1 ratio
Activity
o For this activity, each group of tutor and tutee will receive one game board (Watermelons
and Cherries or Uh Oh! Arrows
o Student will be playing against you so it is your job to model the correct way to move
your token by anchoring to the 5s and 10s spaces. Do not count each space.
o Part 1:
Explore the game board
What do you notice about the board?
How many jumps does it take to get from one corner to the next?
o They can count each jump this time as they move their token.
Where would we land if we only moved 5 jumps?
o Let them move their token
If we move six spaces starting at the corner, how could we know where wed end
up without counting each space?
o What about 8, 9, 15, 20?
Keep doing this until they get it.
o Part 2:
Play the game following the directions that accompany it.
Remember to model the proper way to jump and do not let them count each space.
Also remind them that the game has nothing to do with skill, its really about luck. So
if they lose, they shouldnt feel bad. Give them a sticker at the end!
Play for 30 minutes, the player with the highest score wins.
Model good sportsmanship!
Materials ( I will provide these)
o 1 Uh-Oh! Arrows Game
o 2 Watermelons and Cherries Games
o 6 die
o 6 tokens
o sticker sheets

Uh oh.
Arrows
Lose a
bullseye!

Subject: Math
Grades: Middle
Date of Lesson: 10-6-2014
Lesson Length: 30 minutes

Lesson Objective
o Students will be able to add and subtract proper and improper fractions with denominators: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,
8, 10
Instruction:
o Tutor to Tutee ratio: 3:3
Game is played as a group of three teams. 1:1
o Preparation:
For this lesson, we will only be using the add and subtract operation cards.
Activity
o Part 1
Explore the Fractionoply Game Board
How many jumps does it get from corner to corner?
What square is located at the half-way point on each side of the board.
If we move six spaces starting at GO, how could we know where wed end up without counting each
space?
what about 8, 9, 15, 20?
o Part 2
Explain the rules of the game using the directions.
Key reminder
o All students will solve each problem, even if it is not their turn. Tutors will support students
as they work through the problems. DO NOT SOLVE THE PROBLEM FOR THEM OR
MORE THEIR TOKEN.
It is important for the students to learn to move their token without counting each space.
Play the game for 30 minutes or until a team has reached $5,000. At the 30 minute mark, the team
with the most money wins.
Materials (I will provide these)
o 1 Fractionoply game board
including
directions
operation cards: subtract and add
fraction cards
2 dice
multi-colored counters
3 tokens
fake money or paper for adding and subtracting money (bank account)

Subject: Math
Grade 1
Date of Lesson: 10-14-2014
Lesson Length: 30 minutes

Lesson Objective:
o Student will be able to add numbers by counting-up
Instruction:
o 1:1
o Activity:
Part 1: I wish I had
Hold up 4 connecting cubes and say, I wish I had 6 cubes
o Write 4 + _ = 6
o If you want, you can pretend that the cubes are something else like cookies or books.
I wish I had 6 cookies
Student should give you the number of cubes that you are missing.
o Have them fill in the missing 2 in your equation
Ask if they know another way to write it
o 2 + 4 = 6 , 6 2 = 4 , etc.
o If they do not, model it for them and explain.
Repeat with a different number of cubes.
o Numbers should be less than 6.
Now hold up a number more than 6 and say I wish I had 6 cubes.
Student should remove the excess cubes.
o Remember to write out the subtraction sentence and ask for the addition sentences.
Repeat the same process with the number 15.
o Hold up numbers that are less than 15 and then hold up numbers greater than 15
Remember to write the subtraction/addition sentences and have them fill in the blank.
Part 2: Difference War
Deal out the dot cards. Do not look at your pile of cards.
o This is played like the regular card game WAR
On each play, the players turn their top card over.
The player with the greatest number of dots on their cards wins the round and gets as many
counters from the pile as the difference between the two cards.
Used cards are put aside.
The game is over when the cards run out (or whenever you want to call it as over)
Materials
o Connecting Cubes
o Counters
o Dot cards
Lesson modeled after those found in Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching
Developmentally

Subject: Math
Grades: 6 and 7
Date of Lesson: 10-13-2014
Lesson Length: 30 minutes

Lesson Objective:
o Student will be able to compare and order fractions by their nearness to 0, , and 1.
Instruction:
o Tutor to Tutee ratio: 1:1
o Activity;
Part 1
Give student a stack of fraction cards and ask them to sort the cards into three groups: those that
are closer to 1,closer to , and closer to 0.
Lay out the cards marked 0, 1, and .
o The student does not have to order them by size, only by how close they are to the
benchmarks.
For those closer to , help the student decide if the fraction is greater or less than .
Part 2: (optional: depending on how well they do with Part 1. If time is running out move on to Part
3)
o You will need the fraction models for this part.
Ask your student to name a fraction that is close to 1 but not more than 1.
Next have them name a fraction that is even closer to 1.
o Ask them to explain why they believe the fraction is closer to 1 than the previous fraction.
Allow student to use the fraction model to help with their thinking.
Ask for another fraction that is even closer with than the second fraction.
Repeat this for and 0.
o Three fractions for each one: closer, closer, closest.
Example: Close to 0
Close:
Closer: 1/8
Closest: 1/16
Part 3:
What are two fractions that add up to ?
o They can use the models for this portion as well.
Materials:
o Fraction Models
o 10 Fraction Cards
Lesson modeled after those found in Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching
Developmentally and Good Questions for Teaching Mathematics

2
10
1
5
6
99
1
8

10
12
8
9
85
100
9
10

4
10
21
50
5
8
12
22
1
2

Subject: Math
Grades: Middle
Date of Lesson: 10-20-2014
Lesson Length: 30 minutes

Lesson Objective
o Students will be able to add and subtract proper and improper fractions with denominators: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,
8, 10
Instruction:
o Tutor to Tutee ratio: 3:3
Game is played as a group of three teams. 1:1
o Preparation:
For this lesson, we will only be using the add and subtract operation cards.
Activity
o Part 1
Explore the Fractionoply Game Board
How many jumps does it get from corner to corner?
What square is located at the half-way point on each side of the board.
If we move six spaces starting at GO, how could we know where wed end up without counting each
space?
what about 8, 9, 15, 20?
o Part 2
Explain the rules of the game using the directions.
Key reminder
o All students will solve each problem, even if it is not their turn. Tutors will support students
as they work through the problems. DO NOT SOLVE THE PROBLEM FOR THEM OR
MORE THEIR TOKEN.
It is important for the students to learn to move their token without counting each space.
Play the game for 30 minutes or until a team has reached $5,000. At the 30 minute mark, the team
with the most money wins.
Materials (I will provide these)
o 1 Fractionoply game board
including
directions
operation cards: subtract and add
fraction cards
2 dice
multi-colored counters
3 tokens
fake money or paper for adding and subtracting money (bank account)

Grade 1
Lesson Date: 10-28-2014
Lesson Type: Stations

Objectives: Student will be able to add and subtract using a variety of different methods.
Activity: This lesson will be different from others because we will be doing three
different stations. You are only responsible for one station but be familiar with all of
them. Each lesson should only last 10/15 minutes.
o Station 1: Grouping and Grazing Game on Tablet ONLY IF THE CENTER HAS
WIFI!!
http://illuminations.nctm.org/Activity.aspx?id=3526
Select the addition option
o Model how to play the game
o Go through at least 3 addition rounds.

Station 2: Part/Part/Whole
Use counters to model. After modeling, have student write the numbers with a
dry erase marker.
Place 4 counters in the first PART and 3 counters in the second PART
o Write on a piece of paper 4 + 3 = _
o How many would go in the WHOLE section?
complete the number sentence
o Repeat with 5/7, 2/5, 1/10
Have the student write the number sentences for these.
Now, place 4 in the first PART and 7 in the WHOLE.
o Write the number sentences on a sheet of paper: 4 + _ = 7
o Ask the student what would go in the other PART section?
Now write 7 4 = _
o complete with 13/5, 7/2, 11/10

o Station 3: Cuisenaire Rod Part/Part/Whole


Lay out a purple rod with a yellow rod underneath.
Ask the student which c-rod could be added to the purple one to make it the
same length at the yellow rod.
o White
Repeat with dark green/orange (purple), red/purple (red), and white/blue
(brown)
Show the student the orange c-rod. Ask the student to give you two rods that
when added together equal the length of the orange rod.

When they show one, ask for another, and then another.
Repeat with the brown rod and the yellow rod.
Then ask students to create their own combinations

Materials
o c-rods
o tablet
o counters
o part/part/whole template
o dry erase markers
o paper

Part

Part

Whole

Grade 6
Lesson Date: 3 November 2014
Subject: Fractions

Objectives: Student will be able to create related fractions: 1, , 1/4, 1/8


Activity:
o Part 1:
Give each student a tub of playdoh, a dry erase board (to write down the fractions
as you go along), plastic knife, counters, and an expo marker
Now have the student create a rectangle. Ask the student to cut it in half.
How many pieces do you have?
What is each piece called? (fractions, )
Now have them cut each of those pieces in half.
How many pieces do you have?
What is each piece called?
How many 1/4s are in ?
Repeat with 8ths
How many pieces do you have?
What is each piece called? 1/8
How many 1/8 are in ? In ? In ?
o Part 2:
Ask the student to form a new rectangle, cut it in half, and then cut the halves into
halves to create 4/4.
Give the students 8 counters and ask them to divide them evenly across the 4ths,
placing an equal number of counters onto each pieces of playdoh.
How many counters are on ? 2
If there are 8 counters whole how many counters are in ? 2
Repeat with 12 counters, and 16 counters.
o Part 3:
Ask the student, which fraction is larger or ?
o What do these two fractions have in common?
Have the student make two rectangles and divide each into 4ths
o Let the student see that of one rectangle is larger than of other.
Point out that if two fractions have the same denominator than largest
numerator will be the largest fraction.
Ask the student, which fraction is larger, 2/8 or 2/4?
What do these fractions have in common?
Have the student make two rectangles and divide one into 4ths and the other
into 8ths.

o Let the student see that 2/8 is smaller than 2/4


Point out that if two fractions have the same numerator then the fraction with
the smallest denominator will be the largest fraction.

Materials
o Playdoh
o Plastic knives
o Dry erase board
o Expo markers
o counters

Grade Six
Lesson Date: 11-10-14

Objective: Student will be able to


o Explain that a fractions size is dependent on the size of the whole.
o Identify equivalent fractions.
Activity 1: Yarn fractions
o Give student a piece of yarn. Instruct the student to cut the piece of yarn into two equal
pieces.
How many pieces have we made?
What is each piece called?
o Ask the student to cut each piece into two pieces, creating 4 pieces of yarn of equal lengths.
How many pieces have we made?
What is each piece called?
o Keep one piece of yarn and remove all other pieces.
o Give the student another piece of yarn and repeat the above process.
o When now compare the two from the first yarn and the second yarn.
If they are both , how is one bigger than the other?
Activity 2: Pizza Problems
o Using the circle fractions show the student the circle, the circle, and the 1/8 circle.
Write each name on the dry erase board.
o Ask the student, which is bigger?
What do you notice about the numbers in the fraction?
The bigger the number, the smaller then piece.
o Knowing this, as the student to solve the following problem.
Brads mom ordered two pizzas from the pizzeria. She asked that 1 pizza be cut into
4 pieces and the other pizza be divided into 8 pieces. When the pizzas arrived, she
gave Brad 1 piece from the pizza that was divided into 4 pieces and Brads sister 1
piece from the pizza that was divided into 8 pieces. Who got the bigger piece of
pizza? How do you know?
o Write rule number one on a piece of paper.
If the numerators of the two fractions that we are comparing are the same, the
fraction with the smaller number in the denominator always represents the bigger
(greater) fraction.
o Now ask them to solve this problem:
Brads mom ordered one pizza from the pizzeria. She asked that the pizza be cut
into 4 pieces. When the pizzas arrived, she gave Brad 1 piece from the pizza that
was divided into 4 pieces and Brads sister 2 pieces from the pizza that was divided
into 4 pieces. Who got the bigger share the pizza? How do you know?
o Write rule number two on the piece of paper.
Rule #2 - If the denominators of the two fractions that we are comparing are the
same, the fraction with the larger number in the numerator always represents the
bigger (greater) fraction.

Now give the student the following problems. Based on the rule which would be the larger
fraction.
and
2/8 and 2/4
and 1/8
Materials
o Circle fractions
o 40 centimeter length of yarn
o 20 centimeter length of yarn
o Scissors
o Paper
o Marker
o Dry erase board
o Dry erase maker
o

Grade 6
Lesson 7
Date: 12-01-14
Objective: Student will be able to measure and estimate length using meters, decimeters,
centimeters, and millimeters.
Activity:

Part 1:
o Ask student what they know about metric measurement: meters, decimeters, centimeters,
and millimeters. Use meter stick as visual.
10 millimeters = 1 cm
10 cm = 1 dm: how many millimeters would be in 1 dm?
10 dm = 1 m: how many cm and mm would be in 1 m?
Part 2:
o Fill out the chart.
o What common items could you use to measure? Find at least 2 items for each unit.
Part 3: Measurement Olympics
o Set a starting line
o Discus Throw
With student at starting line, allow them to throw the paper plate like a Frisbee.
ONE TIME ONLY
Have the student first estimate how far the plate traveled. Use both the common items
and metric as units.
Record in the chart
o Javelin Throw
Repeat the same process as above with the paper straw.
o Shot-Put
Repeat the same process with the cotton ball.
Materials
o Meter Stick
o Paper Plate
o Paper Straw
o Cotton Ball
o Pencil

Unit

Millimeter

Centimeter

Decimeter

Meter

___ cm = 1 dm

___ dm = 1 m

Common
Item 1
Common
Item 2
___ mm = 1 cm

___ mm = 1 dm

___ cm = 1 m

___ mm = 1 m

Event

Discus Throw

Javelin Throw

Shot Put

Estimation
Common Item
Metric

Exact
Common Item

Metric

Grade 1
Lesson 7
Lesson Date: 12-02-14
Objective: Student will be able to: visually distinguish between a penny, nickel, and dime;
manipulate the values to equal an amount less than 30 cents.
Activity:

Part 1:
o Show student the piggy bank. Do you know what this is or what it is used for?
o Review monetary values: Show each of the three coins and ask:
What is this?
How do you know that?
How much is it worth?
o Also review the signs for dollars and cents.
Just use cent signs.
Part 2:
o Ask the student to show you 10 cents. Write ten cents on a piece of paper using the cent
sign.
Ask for another way to show the same amount.
Ask for one more.
o When the student has shown 3 ways to show 10 cents, they can drop the coins into the
piggy bank.
o Repeat with the values: 12 cents, 18 cents, 20 cents, 25 cents, 29 cents.

Materials:

Coins: pennies, nickels, and dimes


Paper and Marker
Piggy Bank