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SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

Lesson Plan Template Abridged


(May be adapted based on instructors needs)

Pre-Planning
TOPIC
Name
Subject
Grade Level
Date/Duration
Standards/
anchors/
competencies
PA/Common
Core/Standards
(Plus any others
as may be
required)

Formative
AND/OR
Summative
Assessment
Evidence

Phonics
Michaela Plute
English Language Arts
25 First grade students
1 or 2 classes
CC.1.1.1.D: Know and apply grade level phonics and word
analysis skills in decoding words.
Identify common consonant diagraphs, final-e, and
common vowel teams.
Decode one and two-syllable words with common
patterns.
Read grade level words with inflectional endings.
Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
CC.1.1.1.C: Demonstrate understanding of spoken words,
syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken
single-syllable words.
Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in
spoken and written words.
Orally produce single-syllable words, including
consonant blends and digraphs.
Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final
sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words.
Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes)
in one-syllable words to make new words.
Formal Evaluation
The 1st grade students will be given a worksheet for
independent practice on rimes and onsets and I will
grade my students on being able to achieving my
objective of 80% accuracy on the assessment. The
worksheet will have flower petals with onsets on them,
and the students will have to match the onsets to make
words with the rimes: -at and -ig. This will be a partner
assessment.
For ELLs: The students will be given a worksheet on
rimes and onsets from the lesson, and will be required
to match them with 80% accuracy just like their fellow
classmates. The worksheet will have the same onsets
and rimes, the only differences are, the worksheet for
the ELLs will have a picture of the word they are trying
to create and the word will be written in the childs
native language on the sheet.
Informal Evaluation
During the independent/ group practice, the students
will work on different parts of the word (onset and rime)

CK

Objectives
A-B-C-D
Bloom's Taxonomy
Webb's Depth of
Knowledge (DOK)

with games. This type of an assessment would be an


observation. I would like to see my students complete
the games with 80% accuracy based on the skills they
learned in class. I will also be assessing for
participation and team player skills. I would have
puzzles for CVC words that deal with onsets and rimes
and matching the word to the picture (which would be a
good sight and touch sense for the children to use. I
would also have a word family game, which has sheets
with words on them. The children roll the onset and
rime dice and have to cover up the word they roll and
recite it. The Rime House is another activity I would
have for more advanced groups. There are more
challenging rimes that students have to figure out
words for.
Also during our lesson, we will be going over what
onsets, rimes, and syllables are and common/unknown
sight words. The students will identify the onsets,
rimes, and how many syllables the word has with 70%
accuracy.
Speaking: listen for correct pronunciation of words as students parrot
teacher and other students say words in English. The student and
partner will record their voice and listen to their partners as they
identify a list of words from the book that have onsets and rimes.
Writing: View their written work from the lists they make of words
that have onsets and rimes from the book and the t-chart they have
made words that are real vs words that are made up. Finally,
observe the written work that the student demonstrates by writing the
letters on the phonics worksheet.
Reading: Check for understanding by having ELL point to pictures of
words and repeat the words with their buddy. Observe as they work
with a partner and repeat the terms after the class.
Listening: observe as students follow directions and complete the
assignments in class as they are written for them and modeled
appropriately by the teacher.
Family what rhyming books that use rime/onset words have you and
your family read in your native language? Provide an example during
class for our discussion.
Culture what rhyming books do they have in your country that you
have read? I will also provide the students assignments and important
words in concepts in English and their native language.
All students will be able to identify the rime and onset
of each of the words with 80% accuracy.
Students will be able to identify grade level sight words
accurately and fluently 70% of the time.
Students will be able to complete the Phonics
worksheet with 80% accuracy.

Step-by-Step Procedures

RATIONALE for the


CK
Learning Plan
DETAILS
Introduction
Activating Prior Knowledge
I will ask the students if they are able to identify what
onsets, rimes, and syllables are. I will give them
examples of words so they are able to practice the skill
they are learning. I will clap out the syllables of the
words with the students and produce the onset and rime
within each word. I will give more examples and ask the
students shout out the answers together, in unison. I
will ask all my students to think of more examples of
words with onsets and rimes from books they have read.
I will ask them, What books do you read with your
family that has onsets and rimes?
For ELLs: I will give the ELLs visuals of the words we are
learning and practicing and while they will identify the
onset and rime with their peers in English (parroting with
a peer after the class says it), they can tell us the letter
of the onset or letters of the rime in their native
language and number of syllables. I would ask my ELLs if
they have read any books in their native language with
their family. The child can either provide me with an
example of their own, or parrot with a buddy as we read
through the list of words their fellow classmates have
provided.
Hook/Lead-In/Anticipatory Set
I will read a book to my students on rimes and onsets. I
would read a book called, The Sneetches and other
stories by Dr. Seuss. After I have read the story, I will
have my students work in pairs to write a list of
onset/rime words they found in the story and the words
that rhymed together. After they have made that list, I
would have my students take it one step further and
make a T-chart of words that are real and words that are
made up. We would then come back together as a class
(after 20 minutes) and go over our lists. I would write all
the words my students have come up with, we would
review what onsets, rimes, and syllables were in each
word, and then make a T-chart on the board. I would ask
each paired group to tell me their list of words (if they
had most of the same words we already wrote, I would
just have them give me the words they had that were
not said.
For ELLs: I would have my ELLs work with a student who
was a native English speaker. I would allow these paired
groups to have iPads. The native speaker would record
themselves saying word for word the list of words they had
come up with, and after every word, the ELL would parrot
the native speaker. The ELL student would be able to hear
his/her self speak the words. The chart and words on the

Explicit
Instructions
Big Ideas
Essential
Questions

Lesson Procedure
Must include
adaptations &
accommodations
for students with
special needs
Accommodations,

board would provide a visual for all the students.


Big Idea Statement
There are different parts of all words called syllables that
help you to pronounce them and understand them by
breaking them apart.
Some words have onset and rime parts that make them
similar but separate from other words.
For ELLs: When native speakers can refer to the board
for what they are learning and the big ideas, I will
provide ELL students with their own personal copy of the
statements. The statements will be written in English
and their native language. The big idea statements will
be found in their in class folder for every lesson.
Essential Questions
What is an onset part of a word?
What is a rime part of a word?
Are you able to identify sight words?
How many syllables does this word have?
For ELLs: When native speakers can refer to the board for
what they are learning and the questions they should be
able to answer by the end of the lesson, I will provide ELL
students with their own personal copy of the questions.
The questions will be written in English and their native
language. The questions will be found in their in class
folder for every lesson along with the big idea statements
and any new vocabulary.
Key Vocabulary
Onset
Rime
Phonics
Sight words
Syllable
Students will look at the word wall for the lessons
vocabulary.
For ELLs: The student will go into their in class folder and find
pictures of their vocabulary in there. The pictures will also
have the words in the childs native language on them. A
buddy in the class who had the same native language as the
early staged ELL students, will help the student recite the
vocab in their native language after the child parrots the
classmates in reading the vocabulary in English first.
Pre-Assessment of Students
I will ask the students if they are able to identify what
onsets, rimes, and syllables are. I will give them
examples of words so they are able to practice the skill
they are learning. I will clap out the syllables of the
words with the students and produce the onset and rime
within each word. I will give more examples and ask the
students shout out the answers together, in unison. I

Modifications

will ask all my students to think of more examples of


words with onsets and rimes from books they have read.
I will ask them, What books do you read with your
family that has onsets and rimes?
For ELLs: I will give the ELLs visuals of the words we are
learning and practicing and while they will identify the
onset and rime with their peers in English (parroting with
a peer after the class says it), they can tell us the letter
of the onset or letters of the rime in their native
language and number of syllables. I would ask my ELLs if
they have read any books in their native language with
their family. The child can either provide me with an
example of their own, or parrot with a buddy as we read
through the list of words their fellow classmates have
provided.
Modeling of the Concept
I will talk to the students about what syllables, onsets,
and rime parts of the word are. I will do some examples
with the students and then I will have the students
provide the answers in unison.
I will introduce a book called, The Sneetches and other
stories by Dr. Seuss to talk about onsets and rimes.
The students will split into pairs to write down all the
words they can remember from the story that were
onset/rime words and provide the word that it rhymed
with.
Students will then take the words they came up with and
make a t-chart of words that are real and words that are
made up.
We will come back together as a group and talk about all
the words and make a t-chart as a class.
I will then have a group of flash cards for seven easy and
3 challenging sight words that will both encourage and
challenge the students.
I will ask the students to point out how many syllables
there are in the words, if the word has an onset or a rime
as well. I will help the students with this if they need
more instruction on the topic.
Based on how well the students do with this I will
provide them with more instruction or introduce the
onset/rime game.
We will do an example first, so the students understand
the concept. I will have an ar rime card and a pile of
possible onsets that can go with it. (Each group will be
provided with the pile of onsets to use with their
activity). One student from each group will tell me one
word they can make with the possible onsets and the
rime I have.
The students will then work in groups but also

individually to match onsets with the rimes (from the


onsets and rimes I provide to them) under the
categories of rimes (at, et, ot, ut, it), in 5 groups of 5 so
each student will have a rime group of their own.
Since I will only provide enough onsets for the entire
group, the students must take turns making their words.
I will have a pile of onsets that can be matched to rimes
to make new words so that the children can understand
the differences between onset and rime.
The children will then find the words that they make with
the onset and rime in the pile they have. I will have
words that correspond with the rimes. Whether it be at,
-et, -it, -ot, -ut, I will not tell them if the word they made
was correct. It will be self-check.
After the children have finished and have 5 cards under
their initial rime card, they will tell their fellow students
in their group and I what words they have made.
I will ask the students to tell the class what word they
made from the list of onsets and rimes. (I will hear from
one student from each group, each group with have a
at, -it, ot-, et-, and ut person each person will give me
one word). A buddy in the ELLs groups can read the
words the ELL student has created and she/he can
repeat after them.
I will give the students positive praise for correct
answers and encouragement and help for parts that
they have problems with.
We will review onsets, rimes, and syllables once more to
make sure the students have a thorough understanding
before we do the phonics worksheet and games on
rimes and onsets.
The groups that we had for the whole class game will be
the groups for the rime/onset games we play for our
formative assessment. I will use this to judge if my
students have really understood the material.
The onset/rime worksheet will be given for homework.
Transition
I will transition from syllables, onsets, and rimes as a
way of breaking down words to understand and
pronounce them. To have them practice this skill I will
give the students sight words based on the Drill
Sandwich Activity where there are 3 words that are
unknown to the child and 7 words that the child does
know well (maybe from the word wall) . We will play the
game to help with the parts of a word and a worksheet
on rimes and onsets as well.
Guiding the Practice
I will have the students play the game I have about
onsets and rimes to identify different parts of a word.
The students will be split into 5 groups of 5. They will

Materials
(reading,
technology,
equipment,
supplies, etc.)

Closure

receive one rime group per student in the group and a


pile of onsets for the group to share. We will make 5
words for each rime and a pile of words will be given to
the children to self-check their work of their particular
rime after the activity has been completed period.
I will provide an example to the students using the ar
rime and I will walk around when children are working to
provide additional assistance and guidance.
Providing the Independent Practice
The children will work in their groups to practice onset,
rime, and syllables by using the games I have provided.
There will be 5 games for 5 groups and the children will
periodically switch to have experience in all of the
games (each game will be 15 minutes). I will provide
supports to ELL students, as the specific game requires
me to. An example of a support I could provide would
be to translate the words in the games into the ELLs
native languages, and have a sheet for them to refer to.
The worksheet on rime and onset can be done with any
additional time in the class, or for homework.
Adaptations/Accommodations for Students with Special Needs
ELL student adaptations stated within the lesson
sequence.
Phonics worksheet
Sight words list
Sight words flash cards
Onset and Rime cards
Adapted worksheet for ELLs
The 5 onset/rime games my students will play
The Sneetches and other stories book
a t-chart for the book activity
Big ideas, essential questions, and vocabulary
adaptations for ELL students.
Ipad for recording purposes
Summary & Review of the Learning
I will ask the students if they are able to tell me what the
onset, rime, and syllable of a word are. I will also ask
my essential questions to figure out if my students got
what I wanted them to out of the lesson.
Homework/Assignments
The rime/onset worksheet if it does not get completed in
class.