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Unit 1: Discrimination: Past & Present

Theme: Discrimination
Topic: Holocaust
Grade: 6

th

Subjects: Social Studies, English/Language


Arts, Reading, Math, and Science
Duration: 12 Days

No one is born hating another person because of the color of


his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to
hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for
love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.
Nelson Mandela

Monday & Tuesday: The Rise of the Superior


Race
Wednesday & Thursday: Anti-Semitism
Friday & Monday: Deportation of Jews and
their arrival to Camps
Tuesday & Wednesday: Concentration Camps
and Death Camps
Thursday & Friday: The Death of 11 Million
Monday: Interactive Concentration Camp
Tuesday: Summative Assessment Day

Ryan and Annas Lighthouse School


Schedule
7:45-8:45: Homeroom & Advisory
8:50-10:05: 1 Period
st

10:10-11:25: 2 Period
nd

11:30-12:45: 3 Period
rd

12:50-1:15: Lunch
1:20-2:35: 5 Period
th

2:40-3:45: Connections/Planning
3:45: Dismissal

Topic Statement and Rationale


As educators of the middle level we have an obligation to provide a curriculum that not
only provides clear, complete, and objective information, but also actively assists young
adolescents in formulating positive moral principles. We believe that it is imperative to educate
young adolescents on the issue of discrimination and how it affects individuals and society as a
whole. According to This We Believe, young adolescents are developing moral reasoning that
focuses on what's in it for me to consideration of the feeling and rights of others. The
Holocaust provides one of the most effective subjects for examining basic moral issues. As
students gain insight into the many historical, social, religious, political, and economic factors
that cumulatively resulted in the Holocaust, they gain awareness of the complexity of the subject
and a perspective on the inconsistencies between values exhibited by adults and the conditions
they see in society. Students come to understand that it is the responsibility of citizens in any
society to learn to identify discriminatory acts and to know when to surpass the role of bystander.
Young adolescents demonstrate a high level of interest in studying this subject in history
precisely because the event raises questions of fairness, justice, individual identity, peer pressure,
conformity, indifference, and obedienceissues that adolescents confront in their daily lives.
They are especially socially vulnerable, because as they develop their beliefs, attitudes, and
values, the discriminatory acts emphasized in society may negatively influence their ideals and
values, or encourage them to compromise their beliefs. Students are also challenged to
comprehend the magnitude of the Holocaust as they are moving from acceptance of adult moral
judgments to a development of their own personal values. (United States Holocaust Memorial
Museum).
To democratically determine a curriculum designed around the students wants and needs we
surveyed a mixture of forty-five sixth and seventh graders about what they wanted to know about
themselves and what they wanted to know about the world. After examining the survey results (see
survey results) we found that most students wanted to know why discrimination and prejudice exists
within todays society. Taking into consideration the questions the students had about discrimination
we formed a second survey to allow students to inform us on what they wanted to learn more about
or what they were interested in regarding the subject of World War II. Thirty out of forty-five
students mentioned they wanted to learn more about the holocaust. By comparing the two survey
results we was decided to create an overarching theme of discrimination and integrate the historical
event of the holocaust into all aspects of the curriculum.
Through an integrated curriculum designed around the theme of discrimination and a
focus on the historical event of the Holocaust we will be able to encompass the cognitive, social,
and moral needs and wants of the young adolescent. In social studies they will learn about the
events and issues surrounding the Holocaust and how they affected society as a whole. In math
the students will solve real world problems using ratios, area, exponents, and independent and
dependent variables in relation to the discriminatory issues involved during the Holocaust.
Through the subject of science students will examine the scientific explanation and reasoning
behind Adolf Hitlers superior race. Students will also conduct an experiment comparing the
moth and the butterfly, noting the differences the two have and relating the findings to the theme
of discrimination. In English/ Language arts, students will read, The Diary of Anne Frank, a
novel about a young Jewish girl hiding from societies discriminatory acts during the Holocaust.
Students will also learn how to effectively write a narrative story using real-world events of
discriminatory acts and the Holocaust.

Survey Results
What questions do you have about yourself?
1. When will I die?
2. When will the world end?
3. Will I die young?
4. Will I pass this year?
5. Will I go to jail?
6. Why does my foot grow so fast?
7. Is there Jamaican in my family?
8. Why am I not well liked?
9. Why cant I change my attitude?
10. Will I ever be able to change my horrible ways, and be a better person?
11. Who will I have as my children?
12. Am I lucky with the life I have?
13. Will I have a good life?
14. Will my husband be good?
15. Am I going to pass the CRCT?
16. Do I have good grades in my classes?
17. Will I go to college?
18. Will I pass 8th grade?
19. Will I pass all grades?
20. Who will I marry?
21. What will I be when I grow up?
22. Will I make a lot of money?
23. WIll I have kids?
24. Why do I like music?
25. How come I can understand music better than others?
26. Why do I have certain interests that others dont?
27. What time was I born?
28. How come I get along with boys better than with girls?
29. What do I look like in other peoples eyes?
30. Why cant I be like other girls (acceptable)?
31. What do people think about me?
32. Why am I short?
33. Why do I have small foot?
34. Why am I athletic?
35. Why do I get mad easily?
36. Why do I eat so much, but stay so skinny?
37. Why do I talk a lot?
38. Why do I get hyper easily?
39. Am I going to eat more tomorrow?
40. What do others think about me/
41. Why is it hard for me to be social?
42. Why do I stay quiet and mostly never talk?
43. Why do I always have to cross my legs every time I sit down?
44. Why do I have to constantly move my leg or tap my finger?
45. Why am I so tall?
46. Why do I like to sing?
47. What will I be like in the future?
48. Why do I enjoy playing sports?
49. Is there a family history of playing different sports?
50. Where does my last name come from?
51. Why am I a girl?

52. Why am I unorganized?


53. Why do I get bored so easily?
54. Why do I get up in the mornings to go to school?
What questions do you have about the world?
1. Is there still segregation?
2. Why is there kings and queens?
3. When will land grow?
4. Will land shrink?
5. Whats at the center of the Earth?
6. Why does the world have to end?
7. Does the world end in 2015?
8. Why is it difficult?
9. Why is there bad people?
10. Who is the best person?
11.Why is there so much hate in the world?
12. If we are all equal, why do some African Americans and Caucasians dont like each other?
13. Why are there murders?
14. Why do some fortunate (rich) people laugh at people who live on the street?
15. Why do people do drugs, why were they ever created, and why are they being sold?
16. Why are people different?
17. Why do people pick on people?
18. Will people ever quit being mean to people?
19. Will there ever be another war?
20. Why is earth round?
21. Why do people kill others?
22. Why do people rob others?
23. Why are there bullies?
24. Why are there girls and boys?
25. Why are there so many cruel people?
26. Why do people eat so much?
27. Why do people litter?
28. Why do people hurt other people by bullying?
29. Why are there wars?
30. Why does so much violence occur?
31. Why do people judge each other?
32. What do people feel when they are depressed?
33. Why did the world change from what it used to be?
34. Why do we use non-renewable resources?
35. Why do we abuse animals?
36. Why do we bully people?
37. Why do people judge other people so harshly?
38. Why do we pollute the world?
39. Why do animals grow up faster than humans?
40. Why did people take other people as slaves?
41. Why is there racism in many countries?
42. When will society accept people for who they are and not their appearance?
43. Why is it all about money?
44. Why do people get criticized so much?
45. How come people always say the world is going to end every year?
46. When will the world be at peace?
47. Can we be a lot nicer?
48. When will the world start to be a better place?
49. Why do we have discrimination?
50. Will racism every stop?
51. Will world hunger ever end?

Surveyed: 45
What do you already know about World War II?
1. About the people in it and stuff
2. Hitler died, Jews were saved, camps were shut down
3. It was a war that involved a lot of countries
4. Its about Hitler
5. It happened because Germans felt that it was unfair to put all the blame on Germany
6. The Holocaust killed 6 million Jews
7. After the war, European countries came together and they were trying to rebuild each other
8. Pearl Harbor caused it
9. It was caused by the Treaty of Versailles
10. American won
11. They had nuclear bombs and weapons
12.It was horrific
13. The allies won
14. Japan was bombed
15. Hitler committed suicide
16. It has a big affect on society today
17. It began in 1945
18. Germany was one of the main instigators
What do you want to learn about World War II?
1. More about the Holocaust
2. Nothing
3. All of the conflicts
4. Holocaust
5. I want to learn more about the people involved in World War II
6. Why did Adolf Hitler kill himself?
5. How did Germany recover from Nazi rule?
6. What was the final solution?
7. Was it a big economic downfall?
8. I want to learn more about the timeline of the war
9. Did it have any affect on the electronics or vehicles that are made today?
10. Everything
11. How did they win?
12. The important people that died
13. Who was in it?
14. What happened during and after the war?
15. Why did it start?
Surveyed: 45
Wanted to know more about the Holocaust: 30

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results


Established Goals Discrimination: Past & Present
To engage the intellectual curiosity of students in order to inspire critical thought and personal
growth
To enable students to reflect on their feelings, beliefs, and understanding of discrimination.
To engage students in critical analysis of discrimination that links economic, social, cultural,
political, and historic issues.
To help students understand that solutions to discrimination need to go beyond individual acts
to address systemic change.
To provide opportunities for students to make meaningful, positive actions to combat
discrimination.
Gain awareness of the complexity of the Holocaust and a perspective on how a convergence of
factors can contribute to the disintegration of democratic values
Gain an understanding of different types of discrimination and its relevance in todays society
Acquire knowledge and understanding of past discrimination and its effects on society
Locate, analyze, and synthesize information related to the Holocaust and the act of
discrimination and apply this information to solve problems/make decisions.
Question claims based on vague attributions or on statements made by people outside the area
of their particular expertise.
Determine how the change in the plot of a story affects the characters response.
Write a narrative based on real-world or imaginable events.
Solve real world and mathematical problems
Students will be able to conduct and experiments and record the findings using the scientific
method.
Enduring Understandings (Key Understandings)
Students will understand
The Holocaust was not an accident in
history. It occurred because individuals,
organizations, and governments made
choices that not only legalized
discrimination but also encouraged
prejudice, hatred, and ultimately mass
murder to occur.
The roots and ramifications of prejudice,
racism, and stereotyping in any society
That discrimination is not just the result
of individual actions, but rather a system
of exclusion that affects economic, social,
political, and cultural institutions.
The many historical, social, religious,
political, and economic factors that

Essential Questions
- What provocative questions will foster
inquiry, understanding, and transfer of
learning?

How was it possible for a modern society


to carry out the systematic murder of a
people for no reason other than that they
were Jews?
What events led to the rise of Adolf Hitler
and the Nazi Party?
What is discrimination? How have we
seen it in the past and how do we see it in
present day society?
What was life like in the
ghettos/internment camps? How did Jews
go from the ghettos to concentration
camps?

cumulatively resulted in the Holocaust


It is the responsibility of citizens in any
society to learn to identify danger signals
of discrimination and to know when to
react
The personal and universal consequences
of indifference to the preservation of
human rights.
There may be more than one way to
interpret a given set of findings.
Students will be able to understand how a
storys changing plot as well as a
characters response moves towards a
storys resolution.
That writing a narrative involves the use
of effective technique, specific details, and
well-formatted order in which particular
events happen.
Math can be applied to real world
situations and is used to solve real world
problems
Students will understand the importance
of recording the scientific method while
gaining a new perspective on diversity
and how discrimination has factored into
the world currently, and historically.
Students will understand that
discrimination is not limited to just race
or gender.
Students will understand that
discrimination is an act that has occurred
for many years

Is discrimination subject to only race?


How can we identify acts of
discrimination? What are ways in which
we can prevent or stop it?
What was the final solution and how did it
lead to the concentration camps/death
camps?
How does discrimination affect society as
a whole?
What makes some people resist and
others obey authority?
How did the Nazis determine there was a
superior race and what were the effects of
their claims?
What does the term plot mean when
associated to a story or drama? Can the
plot change throughout a story, and
(how/does) this affect the characters in the
story?
How has reading The Diary of Anne
Frank improve my knowledge and
understanding of the Holocaust, and how
can I use my knowledge and
understanding to assist in my writing
skills and techniques?
Why did Adolf Hitler believe in a superior
race? What evidence did he have to
support his claims? Was this evidence
enough to eliminate an entire population?
How can mathematical ratios be used to
solve real world problems?
What are the proprieties of translations,
reflections, and rotations?
How do two variables, dependent and
independent, change in relationship to one
another? How is the concept of distance
and time related?
How do you find area? How can you use
area to solve real world problems?
What does an exponent do to a whole
number? How do you go from a
exponential notation to a whole number
and vice versa?

Students will know.


What key knowledge and skills will students acquire
as a result of this unit?
- The dangers of remaining silent, apathetic,
and indifferent to the oppression of others
- Silence and indifference to the suffering of
others or to the infringement of civil rights
in any society can perpetuate these problems
- The range of behaviors and actions
necessary to carry out the Holocaust; help
ranged from active participation to passive
complicity.
- Some groups of people can be treated
unfairly because of their physical
characteristics, religious beliefs, sex, race,
etc.
- People sometimes look the other way when
they see an act of discrimination because
they do not know how to stop it.
- The laws and policies in the years following
the rise of Nazism that lead to the Holocaust
- The origins, establishments, conditions, and
operations of the Nazi concentration camps
and death camps.
- The effects of the living conditions in the
ghettos, concentration camps, and death
camps on the victims
- The scientific explanation and rationale
made by Nazi scientists and doctors for the
Superior Race
- Students will know that a story has a
beginning, middle, and end.
- Students will know how the characters
within the novel, The Diary of Anne Frank
change as the story progresses.

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How is writing used differently for


scientific purposes rather than literary
purposes?
How do I analyze the results of a scientific
experiment?
What connections can I make with the
butterfly and moth experiment to the unit
theme discrimination?
What is being done to address racial
discrimination? What can I do?

Students will be able to..


- What should they eventually be able to do as
a result of such knowledge?

Develop an awareness of the value of


pluralism and an acceptance of diversity
Think about the use and abuse of power as
well as the roles and responsibilities of
individuals, organizations, and nations when
confronted with civil rights violations and/or
policies of genocide
Understand what is meant by discrimination
Be able to identify negative discriminatory
behavior
Provide examples of positive actions to
combat racial discrimination at the
individual, community, and international
levels
Identify peaceful ways to respond to acts of
discrimination when presented with realworld examples.
Characterize Nazism and identify the
consequences of its rise to power
Identify various issues that caused the
Holocaust
Give examples of the discrimination
displayed to Holocaust victims
Describe examples of courageous action
taken by those who rescued victims during
the Holocaust
Connect their prior experiences to that of the
Holocaust
Express their ideas, orally and in written
form, about the issues raised by the
Holocaust

How The Diary of Anne Frank represents


a historical event from the Holocaust and
how Anne and her family were exposed to
discriminatory acts
How to mathematically convert ratios and
how to determine relevance
write an equation to express one quantity,
thought of as the dependent variable, in
terms of the other quantity, thought of as the
independent variable.
How to find area of a polygon by composing
into rectangles or other shapes
The proprieties of translations, reflections,
and rotations
Write numerical expressions involving
whole-number exponents
The process and procedures of conducting a
scientific experiment
The correlation of the butterfly with the
Holocaust
How to format the scientific method
How to analyze the results of the
experiment, noting the similarities and
differences of the butterfly and moth

Determine how the event of the Holocaust is


in direct relation to discrimination today
Question scientific claims and arguments
effectively
Describe how the plot in The Diary of Anne
Frank unfold.
Identify ways in which the characters are
affected by the changing of the storys plot.
Write a narrative (fiction or non-fiction) on
the events in sub sequential order.
Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real
world and mathematical problems
Use variables to represent two quantities in a
real world problem that change in
relationship to one another
Apply the technique of computing area to
real world mathematical problems
Use translations, reflections, and rotations
experimentally
evaluate numerical expressions involving
wholenumber exponents.
Follow the step-by-step process of an
experiment.
Conduct a scientific experiment comparing
the butterfly to the moth.
Analyze the results of the experiment
Recognize the correlation the experiment has
with discrimination

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning


Performance Tasks: Performance Indicators:
Projects, Unit Tests, Academic Prompts etc..
- Through what authentic performance
tasks will students demonstrate the
desired understandings?
- By what criteria will performances of
understanding be judged?
- Summative Assessments:
o Narrative
o Compare/contrast piece
o Tests
o Project
o Scientific Notebook

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Other Evidence: Formative Assessment


- Through what other evidence (quizzes, tests)
will students demonstrate achievement of the
desired results?
- How will students reflect upon and self-assess
their own learning?

Literature Circles
Life-size timeline
Four-corners
Ticket out the door
Scientific Method Matching Game
Interactive Concentration Camp

o Portfolios
Formative Assessments
o Diary/ Journal Entries
o Quizzes
o Web/concept Map
o Experiments
o K-W-L chart

***Throughout the unit, students will be


asked to stick their names on the traffic light.
What does this mean?
-Each teacher on the team will have four
different traffic lights (poster) hanging in their
rooms. Before the students leave the
classroom, they have to stick their names on
the traffic light to inform the teacher where
they think they are. Each color of the light
will represent different levels of
understanding.
Red: Stop. I do not understand.
Yellow: Slow down. I almost
understand.
Green: Lets move along. I understand.

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan


Learning Activities:
What learning experiences and instruction will enable students to achieve the desired results?
How will the design.
W= help the students know WHERE the unit is going and WHAT is expected? Help the teacher
know WHERE the students are coming from (prior knowledge, interests)?
H= HOOK all students and HOLD their interest
E= EQUIP students, help them EXPERIENCE the key ideas and EXPLORE the issues
R=Provide opportunities to RETHINK and REVISE their understandings and work
E=Allow students to EVALUATE their work and its implications
T=Be TAILORED (personalized) to the different needs, interests, and abilities of learners
O= Be ORGANIZED to maximize initial and sustained engagement as well as effective learning

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Advisory Lessons
Lesson Title: Introduction to Discrimination
Content: Advisory
Grade: 6th
Duration: 1 Day
Standards:
Goals:

Teacher: Trull/Etheredge
Date: Monday April, 21st

Gain an understanding of different types of discrimination and its


relevance in todays society
To enable students to reflect on their feelings, beliefs, and
understanding of discrimination

Understandings
Students will understand
Students will understand that discrimination is not limited to just race or gender.
Essential Questions:

What is discrimination?
How have we seen it in the past and how do we see it in present day society?

Students will know.

Objectives
Students will be able to.

Some groups of people can be


treated unfairly because of their
physical characteristics, religious
beliefs, sex, race, etc.

The dangers of remaining silent,


apathetic, and indifferent to the
oppression of others

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Understand what is meant by


discrimination
Develop an awareness of the
value of pluralism and an
acceptance
Be able to identify negative
discriminatory behavior of
diversity

Formative/ Informal/ Performance Tasks:

Assessment
Summative/Formal/Other:

Resources:

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Learning Experience
Hook:
Hook:
During this activity, preferential treatment will be provided to a particular group of students. For
example, tall students with brown eyes must stand at the back, and all others can be seated.
Teacher will explain that it is a new Government seating strategy and this will aim to provoke a
reaction. Ask students how does it feel to be treated in this way? Was this fair treatment?
Students are praised and seated. Show images of discrimination and ask students what they think
they are going to learn about. (15 minutes)
Learning Experience: Group students into pairs. Have students list as many acts of
discrimination as they can. Come back together as a whole group and have students share what
they came up with as a class (30 minutes)
Have students define what they think discrimination is and then give them the following
definition: the practice of unfairly treating a person or group of people differently from other
people or groups of people (10 minutes)
Closure: Introduce unit by showing homemade movie trailer about what the we will be doing the
next few weeks. Include the following: holocaust, discrimination, genocide, Hitler, butterflies,
Anne Frank, Nazis, etc. ( 5 minutes)
Differentiation:
Use of visual representations and auditory discussion
Allow students to work in groups to foster collaboration

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Lesson Title: Outline of Advisory Sessions


Content: Advisory
Grade: 6th

Teacher: Trull/Etheredge
Date: Date: Tuesday April 22nd - Friday May
2nd

Duration: 9 Days
Standards:
Goals:

To enable students to reflect on their feelings, beliefs, and understanding of


discrimination.

To engage students in critical analysis of discrimination that links


economic, social, cultural, political, and historic issues.
To help students understand that solutions to discrimination need
to go beyond individual acts to address systemic change.
To provide opportunities for students to make meaningful, positive
actions to combat discrimination.

Understandings
Students will understand

The roots and ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping in any


society
It is the responsibility of citizens in any society to learn to identify danger
signals of discrimination and to know when to react
Students will understand that discrimination is not limited to just race or
gender.

Essential Questions:

What is discrimination? How have we seen it in the past and how do we see it in present
day society?
Is discrimination subject to only race?
How can we identify acts of discrimination? What are ways in which we can prevent or
stop it?
How does discrimination affect society as a whole?
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What is being done to address racial discrimination? What can I do?

Students will know.

Objectives
Students will be able to.

Some groups of people can be


treated unfairly because of their
physical characteristics, religious
beliefs, sex, race, etc.

People sometimes look the other way


when they see an act of discrimination
because they do not know how to stop
it.

Develop an awareness of the value of


pluralism and an acceptance of diversity
Understand what is meant by
discrimination
Be able to identify negative
discriminatory behavior
provide examples of positive actions to
combat racial discrimination at the
individual, community, and
international levels
Identify peaceful ways to respond to acts
of discrimination when presented with
real-world examples.

Assessment
Formative/ Informal/ Performance Tasks:
Summative/Formal/Other:

Resources:
Large cardboard cut-outs of puzzle pieces.
Paint
Paint brushes
Ted Talk video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0OV92Yyl20
Marker board
Dry erase markers
Marker board eraser
Eggs
Chart paper
Pink and blue construction paper
Posters
Markers/crayons/colored pencils

Cartoon image, There are Many Types of Families

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Learning Experience
Tuesday April, 22nd: Students are given a puzzle piece and instructed to decorate the puzzle
piece in a way that illustrates who they think they are. When students are done, they will put
each of their puzzle pieces together to see that each of them are one piece of a puzzle. The idea
that we are all different in many ways, but come together to be one is also demonstrated.
Students will be working together to figure out where they fit in the larger puzzle.

Wednesday April, 25th: Watch Ted Talk on discrimination and how bullying is a form of
discrimination and have students record their thoughts and questions during the video. After
video form small groups and give students the following prompts:
Have you ever been bullied? How did it make you feel?
Is bullying a type of discrimination? How and why?
How can we stop and or prevent bullying in our school and community?
Come together as a whole group and have students share what they talked about in their small
groups.
Thursday April, 24th:
Fill the main marker board with mean words and write the question, How do you want to be
remembered?

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Next, give the students time to read what some of the words say. Allow students to form groups
(3-4 students/group) to share experiences theyve had with people saying some of those mean
words to them, or perhaps times when theyve said mean words to others. Once students have
had a chance to share, allow them the erase a mean word from the board and replace it with a
word they would rather be remembered by.

Last, allow the students to form their small groups again, and reflect on the days activity. Share
what they learned and how the activity will help them now and in the future. Be sure that the
students note the difference in the board with the changes they made by erasing meanness.

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Friday April, 25th:


Divide students into groups of 3 or 4 students. Within the groups, instruct students to come up
with a definition for family. Encourage them to be creative by including pictures and drawings.
Once students have formed a definition for family, show them the image below. Ask students to
discuss in their groups whether or not they noticed that these films had such diverse families.
Instruct students to discuss whether or not the image changes their definition for family. Does the
image change your views on the film or the characters within the film? Allow students time to
revise their definition of family (if needed) keeping the definition they created to begin with.
Then, have students share with the whole group.

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Monday April, 28th:


Break students into groups of three or four. Give each group a white egg and a brown egg. Have
students record how each egg is different and how they are similar. Then allow students to break
open each egg into a separate container. Then have students record how the inside of each egg is
different or similar. Have students reflect in their small groups about how this activity helps them
to understand discrimination and how even though we all may appear different on the outside, on
the inside we are the same.

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Tuesday April, 29th:


Explore how the phrase that's so gay could be hurtful to some people. Put chart paper around
the room with the following questions:
What do you think of when you hear the word gay?

In what ways have you heard the word gay used?

Why do you think people sometimes use the phrase thats so gay?

How would you feel if someone said thats so gay about something you were
doing or about something you liked?

Give students markers and create a chalk talk using the above strategy. Give the students
ample time to respond to each question. Come together as a class and discuss the questions
and answers you wrote and read. For the last portion of the class, explain to students that the
next day they will be visiting the students in the special education classes, but before then,
give them information about what would happen to children with disabilities before there
were laws for their rights. Show students images of the institutions where the children with
disabilities were kept.
Wednesday April, 30th:
Continue
the previous days discussion on discrimination of people with disabilities by taking the class
to visit with other students with severe disabilities. During this time, other the students will
engage in an art activity where the students without disabilities will aid the students with
disabilities with finger painting a butterfly. These butterflies will be hung up around the

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school. When the students return to class, allow them to reflect on the activity.

Thursday May, 1st


In this lesson, students will think about characteristics they ascribe to either boys or girls.
They will learn about the idea of stereotypes and will consider whether gender stereotypes
are fair or unfair. They will also discuss how it feels to not conform to socially defined
gender norms.
When students first walk in give the boys a pink sheet of paper and the girls a blue sheet of
paper. If there are comments about why the boys received pink and the girls received blue ask
students to consider the following question:
What makes blue a boy color and what makes pink a girl color
Show photos of typical stereotypes against gender and have students respond if they think they
are accurate or not and why?
Discuss as a whole group how this is seen as discrimination and in what other ways do we
discriminate against gender.
Friday May, 2nd:
As a whole group reflect on the different types of discrimination discussed the past two weeks
and how we could go about stopping and preventing this discrimination from occurring.
With a partner or small group, create a poster that illustrates one of the ideas the class came up
with for standing up against discrimination. Hang your posters around school to encourage
schoolmates to take action against discrimination.
Differentiation:
Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic, Linguistic.
Through the series of Advisory lessons, students will participate in multiple learning
23

experiences.

Lesson Title: Interactive Session


Content: Advisory
Grade: 6th
Duration: 1 FULL Day

Teacher: Etheredge/Trull
Date: Monday May, 5th

Standards:
NCSS: IV. Individual Development & Identity: Social studies programs should include
experiences that provide for the study of individual development and identity.
V. Individuals, Groups, & Institutions: Social studies programs should include experiences
that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions.
Goals:
-To help students understand that solutions to discrimination need to go beyond individual acts
to address systemic change.
- To provide opportunities for students to make meaningful, positive actions to combat
discrimination.
-Gain awareness of the complexity of the Holocaust and a perspective on how a convergence
of factors can contribute to the disintegration of democratic values
-Acquire knowledge and understanding of past discrimination and its effects on society
Understandings
Students will understand
- The roots and ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping in any society
- The personal and universal consequences of indifference to the preservation of human
rights.
Essential Questions:
- What are some of the ways discrimination was shown through the Holocaust?
- How does silence or an indifference towards discrimination affect individuals and society?
- What are the ramifications of discrimination and how does it affect individuals and society?
- In what ways can you connect your experiences to that of the discrimination shown throughout
history?
24

Objectives
Students will know.
Students will be able to.
Think about the use and abuse of
power as well as the roles and
The dangers of remaining silent,
responsibilities of individuals,
apathetic, and indifferent to the
organizations, and nations when
oppression of others
confronted with civil rights
violations and/or policies of
Silence and indifference to the
genocide
suffering of others or to the

Give examples of the discrimination


infringement of civil rights in any
displayed to Holocaust victims
society can perpetuate these

Describe examples of courageous


problems
action taken by those who rescued
victims during the Holocaust
The range of behaviors and actions
necessary to carry out the
Connect their prior experiences to
Holocaust; help ranged from active
that of the Holocaust
participation to passive complicity.

Some groups of people can be


treated unfairly because of their
physical characteristics, religious
beliefs, sex, race, etc.

People sometimes look the other


way when they see an act of
discrimination because they do not
know how to stop it.

Assessment
Informal/ Performance Tasks:
Formative/Summative/Formal/Other:
Journal Reflections: students will be able to
Whole group discussion at end of interactive
reflect on the following:
session: students can comment on what they
How they felt
thought about the whole experience and how
What they noticed
they felt throughout the process. Did they
Any questions or concerns
understand anything differently or better when
Further interests/ inquiries
participating in the interactive session rather
than just discussing it in class? This will allow
What they learned
the teacher to determine if interactive session
was effective and what changes may need to be

25

made to the experience.


Resources:
Identity Cards
The Gym
Student desks
Fake money
Bread and Potatoes
Parent Volunteers
Pizza for lunch
Costumes & Props
Barbed wire fences
Train fronts
Yellow stars of David and Swastikas
Books that students can stack in place of bricks
Audio features (train, marching, etc)
Baby dolls
Examination materials: popsicle sticks, combs, labcoats, etc

Gas chambers

Learning Experience
From 7:45-12:45, the students within the entire team will participate in an interactive activity in
the schools gym. During this time, students will reenact the events within the Holocaust. Students
will be given an identity card the Friday before the event. Students are expected to take on the
role completely by using costumes and props. Students will be notified on Monday to report to
the gym before the school bell rings.
Hook: When the school bell rings at 7:45 teachers will take on their roles as Nazi leaders and
students will be expected to take on their roles as well.
All Nazi leaders/ members will wear a swastika arm badge while all Jews will be required to
wear the yellow star of David. During this time, Jews will go through the process of losing their
businesses and homes and will be forced to move to the ghetto. Some students sell food such as
bread and potatoes. Jews will have to find where those people are in order to feed their families.
Sellers have to determine whether or not they will sell food to Jews (if they are German). In
order to get food, students must have the money. This will require students to figure how much
money they have and how much they can spend on food.
Students will also have to pay fines. For example, a Jewish woman may have to pay a fine due to
her infant crying while at the bank. A German man may have to pay a fine for allowing a Jewish
man in his barber shop. ( 90 minutes )
*At any time during the day, if Jewish students lose their star of David or its taken from by a
Nazi, they will be killed. Students will be forced to sit on the bleachers of the gym and watch
how the Jew to German ratio changes over the day.

26

Engaging Learning Experience:


Deportation of the Jews: Students will be forced to march in the streets. During this time students
will march all over the school and outside the school. Then, students will be forced to load the
trains (upside down desk) where they will be forced to stand in. (90 MINUTES)
Arrival at Concentration Camp: Students will experience what its like be separated from their
family by force. Nazi soldiers/leaders will direct the Jews (Men to the left, women and children
to the right.).
Students will go through the process of examinations to some extent. For example, teachers or
students acting as students will tell Jews to open their mouths and say, Ah, check their heads
for lice, and look at their identity card for any reported illness. Some students may be sent to the
gas chambers immediately based on their health status. (60 MINUTES)
Life in the Concentration Camps: Students will undergo harsh/unfair treatment such as doing
pointless tasks
stacking books
marching around the gym
serving meals (snacks) to Nazi members and not being allowed to have anything
cleaning
(60 MINUTES)
Closure: Students will go back to their fourth period teacher and will reflect on the days
activities through whole group discussion while eating lunch in the classroom. Pizza will be
provided.

Differentiation:
Involves kinesthetic learning while also involving visual, auditory, social, and linguistic
Having students physically participate in their learning will foster better comprehension and
understanding.

Identity Card
Name: Anne Frank
Religion: Jewish
Occupation: Child
Health Status: Well
Income: No source of income
Number of Family Members: 3
From: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Age: 13 years old

27

Identity Card
Name: Adolf Hitler
Religion: Catholic
Occupation: Chancellor of Germany
Health Status: Well
Income: Unknown
Number of Family Members: 4
From: Munich, Germany
Age: 48 years old

Lesson Title: The Rise of the Superior Race


Content: Social Studies
Teacher: Anna Trull
Grade: 6th
Date: Monday 4/21 & Tuesday 4/22
Duration: 2 Days
Standards: SS6H7: The student will explain conflict and change in Europe up to the 21 st
Century
1. Describe major developments following World War I: the Russian Revolution, the Treaty
of Versailles, worldwide depression, and the rise of Nazism.
2. Explain the impact of WWII in terms of the Holocaust, the origins of the Cold War,
and the rise of Superpowers.
NCSS VI: Power, Authority, & Governance: Social studies programs should include
experiences that provide for the study of how people create and change structures of power,
authority, and governance.
Goals:
Gain awareness of the complexity of the Holocaust and a perspective on how a convergence of
factors can contribute to the disintegration of democratic values
Locate, analyze, and synthesize information related to the Holocaust and the act of
discrimination and apply this information to solve problems and make decisions
Understandings
Students will understand
The Holocaust was not an accident in history. It occurred because individuals, organizations, and
governments made choices that not only legalized discrimination but also encouraged prejudice,
hatred, and ultimately mass murder to occur.
The many historical, social, religious, political, and economic factors that cumulatively resulted

28

in the Holocaust
Essential Questions:
What events led to the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party?
What makes some people resist and others obey authority?
Objectives
Students will know.
Students will be able to.
The many historical, social, religious, political, Develop an awareness of the value of pluralism
and economic factors that cumulatively
and an acceptance of diversity
resulted in the Holocaust
Think about the use and abuse of power as well
The laws and policies in the years following
as the roles and responsibilities of individuals,
the rise of Nazism that lead to the Holocaust
organizations, and nations when confronted
with civil rights violations and/or policies of
The range of behaviors and actions necessary
genocide
to carry out the Holocaust; help ranged from
active participation to passive complicity.
Identify various issues that caused the
Holocaust
Characterize Nazism and identify the
consequences of its rise to power
Express their ideas, orally and in written form,
about the issues raised by the Holocaust
Informal/ Performance Tasks:

Assessment
Summative/Formal/ Formative /Other:

K-W-L chart- assess what the


students already know about the
Holocaust and helps teacher
structure curriculum around what
students want to learn.
Class discussion during power
point and while answering
essential questions
Traffic Light: Students will put
their name on green (for yes, I
understand, lets move on), yellow
(Im kind of getting it, but slow
down) , and red (no, Im not
getting it, we need to stop).

29

Journal entries on video about


Master Race- Formative

Resources:
http://cc.assets.ushmm.org.s3.amazonaws.com/resources/deconstructing-the-familiar-images.pdf
(Photos for activity)
http://cc.assets.ushmm.org.s3.amazonaws.com/resources/deconstructing-the-familiarworksheet.pdf
(Photo Activity Worksheet)
http://cc.assets.ushmm.org.s3.amazonaws.com/resources/deconstructing-the-familiar-chart.pdf
(Photo Activity Chart)
Learning Experience
Hook Activity: Create a K-W-L chart on chart paper and hang it in the front of the classroom.
Guide students through the K-W-L chart asking students what they already know about the
holocaust. Second ask students what they want to learn about the Holocaust. Leave the L column
blank and have students fill in what they have learned throughout the unit in this column.

Make sure to actively involve all students in class discussion of K-W-L


After they are finished, ask them what are some ways we can go about
learning the items in the W column?. (15 MINUTES)

Engaging Learning Experience: A photo-activity that will have students examine photographs
from the Holocaust which may or may not be familiar to them. By examining the photographs,
first without a caption and then with a caption, students see the behaviors of ordinary individuals
and think about the pressures and motives that might have shaped the behaviors. The pictures,
when shown together, offer students a unique understanding of how and why the Holocaust
occurred. (45 MINUTES)
1. Divide the students into groups of two or three.
2. Each group receives a worksheet and one photograph without a caption. (Note, there
are seven different photographs. Several of the groups, depending on class size, will be
examining the same photograph).
3. Students examine the photograph (without the caption) and answer the questions in
Section 1 on the worksheet.
4. When finished, hand out the same photograph to each group but this time with the
caption and have the students read the caption and answer the questions in Section 2 on
the reverse side of the worksheet.
5. Bring the students back together as one large group. Distribute the photo activity chart
to each student.
6. Have each of the groups report out on their photograph with particular emphasis to
sharing their answers to the questions in Section 2. As they do, each student should fill in
the corresponding boxes on the chart for that particular photograph.
Lecture: Teach students about the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party. Use power point to

30

teach the following: (40 MINUTES)

Hitlers early life


Hitler in WWI
Early politics: National Socialist German Workers
Hitler imprisonment
Mein Kampf
Hitlers rise to power: chancellor of Germany
The Enabling Act
Third Riech
Why people voted for Hitler
The Nazi Party
Gestapo
Hitler youth
Fear

Students will take notes using the guided note-taking handout. Students will know the following
terms:

National Socialist German Workers: the political party, led by Adolf Hitler that
ruled Germany from 1933 to 1945. Its members were called Nazis. It was
founded as the German Workers' party in 1918, and "National Socialist" was
added to the name in 1920. The swastika, an ancient art motif, was adopted
as the official party symbol.
Chancellor: the head of government of Germany
Reichstag: German parliament
The Enabling Act: was a 1933 amendment to the Weimar Constitution that
gave the German Cabinet in effect, Chancellor Adolf Hitler the power to
enact laws without the involvement of the Reichstag.
Third Reich: Name for Germany during the period from 1933 to 1945, when
its government was controlled by Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party
SA (Brown shirts): Hitlers private army
SS (Black shirts): Replaced the SA.
Gestapo: The secret police of Nazi Germany
Hitler youth: Organization set up by Adolf Hitler in 1933 for educating and
training male youths aged 1318 in Nazi principles.
Aryan: a person of pure German heritage and blood, which Hitler considered
the superior race. Typically blond and blue-eyed.
Fascism: A political system promoted by Hitler and his ally, Italian dictator
Mussolini, that called for citizens to be unquestioningly loyal to the nation and
obedient of its leader. The needs of the state outweighed the needs, beliefs,
or freedoms of the individual. Emphasis was on national pride, traditions, and
racial purity. There was no freedom of speech. Foreigners those who were
simply minority ethnic or religious groups included were hated and
persecuted.
The Fuhrer- the German word for leader. Hitlers title.

Rise of the Superior Race: Watch PBS: Master Race https://www.youtube.com/watch?


v=YXci6fcG2Yc (20 MINUTES)
31

Watch from ( - )
1. After watching video, have students write journal entries to reflect on their emotional response
to the program. Ask students to include the events or speakers in the program that affected them
the most and to explain why. Then ask them to imagine what they would say if they met one of
the speakers. What questions would they ask? (20 MINUTES)
Closure: Answer essential question ; discuss as whole group (10 MINUTES). Remind students to
put name on traffic light
Differentiation:
Use of visual, auditory, and kinetic teaching styles
Students collaborate in pairs and small groups whose membership changes as needed. Learning
in groups enables students to engage in meaningful discussions and to observe and learn from
one another.

The Rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party


Adolf Hitlers Early Life
Hitler was born on April 20th, 1889 in ________________. He had a poor relationship with his
father and was very close to his mother. He was an aspiring _______________, and was twice
rejected by the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. It was at this time, in 1908, that Hitler began a
movement based on the beliefs that ________________ were the ____________
____________.
Hitler in WWI
Hitler pleaded to be in the _____________ (a state in Germany) Army and was granted his
request. He served as a messenger in a regiment that exposed him to enemy fire. He was shot in
the leg and suffered from a poison gas attack. He was awarded the ________ _________- the
highest military honor in Germany.
Hitler and Early Politics
Hitler helped form the __________ __________ __________ ____________ ___________
(Nazi) in 1919 and assumed leadership in 1921. _________ _____ ______ (pooch) in 1923
was an attempt by Hitler to seize power and overthrow the Bavarian government for signing the
_______ __ ____________. The attempt failed and Hitler was ____________ for five years for
high __________.
Mein Kampf

32

Hitler wrote Mein Kampf (____ __________) in 1925 while he was in prison. This became the
_______ ideologyand it attacked _______, ___________, democracy, and the Treaty of
Versailles. Hitler wrote that Germany needed to destroy the _____ ______ and conquer Russia,
among other things. The book sold 10 million copies.
Hitlers Rise to Power
By ______, the Nazi Party was the biggest political party and held 230 seats. Hitler demanded to
be appointed _________- he was initially refused, but then given the position. Just before the
1933 election, the ___________ (parliament) was burned to the ground. The president of
Germany granted the Nazi Party the power to squash any political opposition, and they
intimidate and arrested __________ and ____________ party members.
The Enabling Act
After the 1933 election, Hitler proposed the _________ ____, which would essentially give him
a _________- and it passed. The Enabling Act ______ all political parties, declared Germany a
___ party state, said _____ were not allowed to be in civil service positions, and made all local
and state governments staffed with Nazi members.
Hitler Secures Absolute Power
When the president of Germany died in 1934, Hitlers cabinet passed a law proclaiming the
___________ to him (rather than holding elections). The military swore an oath to _______, not
the state. Hitler had now obtained ______ power, and Germany became known as the ______
_______.
Why vote for Hitler?
____ ____________: These people shared the same ideology as Hitler and believed he was their
savior, from the depression, the Jews, and the Communists.
___________: People did not consider Hitler to be a real threat.
_____ _____ ____ ________: The depression and hyperinflation highlighted the need for new
political leadership.
The Nazi Party
The SA (______ _________). This was Hitlers private _______. They bullied opponents into
obeying the Nazi Party. However, once Hitler rose to power, he had the SA replaced by a new
organization- the SS.
The SS (______ _______). The SS were Hitlers private bodyguards and were lead by Heinrich
Himmler. They arrested and __________ anyone who challenged Hitler. The SS took over law
enforcement in Germany and implemented the _______ __________.
The __________ was the secret police of Nazi Germany. They investigated treason, espionage,
and sabotage causes against the Nazi Party. They also set up and administered the
______________ camps.
The ________ Youth was an organization under the Nazi party that had over five million
members. They were indoctrinate in ___________ and even drafted into the military ranks.
It was by using ___________ that Hitler had stopped freedom of speech and expression
everyone had to obey Nazi policy, or face the consequences!

33

Rating

Content of work/
Personal reflection
responses to questions
My response is thorough.
My reflections are thoughtful
I make meaningful connections and complete.
to important ideas from the
I reveal personal feelings about
lesson.
the topic.
I draw upon previous knowledge I reflect on personal experiences
and/or connect my response to related to the topic.
larger issues.
I use humor, questioning, and
I support my responses with
other techniques that probe for
relevant details and accurate
deeper meaning.
facts.

34

Self-assessment

I describe how my understanding


has changed using specific,
meaningful examples.
I make comparisons between what
I understood before and what I
understand now.
I raise important questions for
further exploration, or describe new
topics I'd like to learn.

My response is adequate but


could be more thorough.
I make some connections to
ideas from the lesson.
I support my responses with
some details and facts, but they
are not completely accurate.

My reflections are adequate, but


could be more thoughtful.
I reveal some personal feelings
about the topic.
I mention personal experiences
but don't reflect on them.
I use some humor or questioning
in my writing.

I describe how my understanding


has changed and give some
examples.
I make comparisons between what
I understood before and what I
understand now.
I briefly mention new questions or
topics for exploration.

My responses is incomplete.The
connections I make to other
ideas or information are weak. I
provide only weak or
incomplete supporting evidence.

My reflections are brief.


I reveal very little about my
personal feelings or experiences.
There is little reflection or
questioning; it sounds as if I'm
not really interested in the topic.

I provide some information about


how my understanding has
changed.
I don't include any examples.
I provide only limited comparison
between what I understood before
and what I understand now.

My response is random or
unrelated to the question.
My writing is disorganized and
unconnected to any important
ideas.

My reflection is limited or
superficial.
I don't reveal any personal
feelings or ideas.

I don't reveal anything about how


my understanding of the issue has
changed.

Your
score/
notes:

Lesson Title: Anti-Semitism


Content: Social Studies
Teacher: Anna Trull
th
Grade: 6
Date: Wednesday 4/23 & Thursday 4/24
Duration: 2 Days
Standards: SS6H7: The student will explain conflict and change in Europe up to the 21 st
Century
1. Describe major developments following World War I: the Russian Revolution, the Treaty
of Versailles, worldwide depression, and the rise of Nazism.
2. Explain the impact of WWII in terms of the Holocaust, the origins of the Cold War,
and the rise of Superpowers.
NCSS: I. Culture: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the

35

study of culture and cultural diversity.


NCSS III: People, Places, & Environments: Social studies programs should include
experiences that provide for the study of people, places, and environments.
NCSS IV: Individual Development & Identity: Social studies programs should include
experiences that provide for the study of individual development and identity.

Goals:

To enable students to reflect on their feelings, beliefs, and understanding of


discrimination.
To engage students in critical analysis of discrimination that links economic,
social, cultural, political, and historic issues.
Gain awareness of the complexity of the Holocaust and a perspective on
how a convergence of factors can contribute to the disintegration of
democratic values
Gain an understanding of different types of discrimination and its relevance
in todays society
Acquire knowledge and understanding of past discrimination and its effects
on society
Locate, analyze, and synthesize information related to the Holocaust and the
act of discrimination and apply this information to solve problems/make
decisions.

Understandings
Students will understand

The Holocaust was not an accident in history. It occurred because


individuals, organizations, and governments made choices that not only
legalized discrimination but also encouraged prejudice, hatred, and
ultimately mass murder to occur.
The roots and ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping in any
society
That discrimination is not just the result of individual actions, but rather a
system of exclusion that affects economic, social, political, and cultural
institutions.
The many historical, social, religious, political, and economic factors that
cumulatively resulted in the Holocaust

Essential Questions:

How was it possible for a modern society to carry out the systematic murder of a people
for no reason other than that they were Jews?

36

How does discrimination affect society as a whole?

Students will know.

Objectives
Students will be able to.

The range of behaviors and


actions necessary to carry out
the Holocaust; help ranged from
active participation to passive
complicity.
Some groups of people can be
treated unfairly because of their
physical characteristics, religious
beliefs, sex, race, etc.
People sometimes look the other
way when they see an act of
discrimination because they do
not know how to stop it.

Think about the use and abuse of


power as well as the roles and
responsibilities of individuals,
organizations, and nations when
confronted with civil rights
violations and/or policies of
genocide

Identify various issues that


caused the Holocaust
Give examples of the
discrimination displayed to
Holocaust victims

The laws and policies in the years


following the rise of Nazism that
lead to the Holocaust

Assessment
Informal/ Performance Tasks:
Summative/Formal/Other:
Ticket out the Door: This will assess what the
Chart Paper Activity: Questions about Antistudents took away from the lesson
Semitism : will help students to think about
Discussion among groups: will provide
Anti-Semitism and for the teacher to know
understanding for the teacher as to where the
what they understand and what they dont
students comprehension level is at
Traffic Light: Students will put their name on
green (for yes, I understand, lets move on),
yellow (Im kind of getting it, but slow down) ,
and red (no, Im not getting it, we need to
stop).
Resources:
Video: http://www.ushmm.org/confront-antisemitism/european-antisemitism-from-its-origins-tothe-holocaust
Chart paper
Ghetto Testimonies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnkKBb6C_yQ

37

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXC1k1yhO2w

Learning Experience
Hook: When students enter the room allow the blonde headed students to sit at their original
desks and make the rest of the students sit on the floor next to their desk. After this has been
done, write the following question on the board:
- How does the treatment you just experienced make you feel? Do you think it is right to judge
someone based on his or her physical appearance?
Have students record their responses in their social studies journals. (15 MINUTES)
Introduce Anti-Semitism (5 MINUTES)
Define Anti-Semitismprejudice against or hatred of Jewsdid not end with the Holocaust. It
remains a global problem today, continuing among ordinary citizens, people of influence, and
even under state sponsorship. It often echoes the same falsehoods used by the Nazis. Efforts to
distort or deny the Holocaust are among the ways that Anti-Semitism is currently expressed.
Engaging Learning Experience:
Have students watch the video on European Anti-Semitism and its Origins to the Holocaust. As
they are watching the video have them record their noticings, their thoughts and feelings, and
their questions. (15 MINUTES)
When video is finished break students into groups of 3 or 4. Give each group one of the
following questions:
Why watch this film?
How have Jews been affected by antisemitism? What impact does antisemitism have on others?
What is the meaning of scapegoat? What do people gain from scapegoating?
What is the effect of hateful images and speech? Do images and words reflect existing attitudes
or create them?
How has antisemitism changed throughout history? What are some differences among religious,
political, and racial antisemitism?
Why would political or religious leaders espouse antisemitic ideas?
How is antisemitism similar to or different from other forms of group hatred?
Have students record their answers on chart paper within their groups making sure to cite

38

evidence from the video (25 MINUTES)


Come back together as a whole group and talk about the answers each group came up with and
the questions that arose within the group (10 MINUTES)
Closure: Ask the question: How does this Anti-Semitism view affect the rest of society during
this period? What does it lead up to? (5 MINUTES)
Define Anti-Semitism in own words as ticket out the door.
Remind students to put name on traffic light
Hook: Have this picture displayed on smart board/ projector: (10 MINUTES)

Have this prompt on the board: What do you think this picture is trying to depict? How does it
have to do with Anti-Semitism? Be detailed in your answer.
Students will record this in their social studies notebooks
Discuss how Nazis used propaganda to spread Anti-Semitism.
Define propaganda: information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote or
publicize a particular political cause or point of view.
Show a few more examples of Anti-Semitism propaganda and also some current day propaganda
(25 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Experience:
Write the word ghetto on the board. Have students share what they know about the word and
record their responses in their social studies notebooks. (5 MINUTES)
Have students to listen in the testimonies for examples of how ghettos during the Holocaust were
different from their understanding of what is referred to as a ghetto today. (15 MINUTES)
Have students think about the following questions throughout the videos:

In their testimonies, Ellis Lewin and Joseph Morton share some of their early feelings
and experiences in the ghetto. What kinds of things does Ellis talk about? What kinds of

39

things does Joseph share?

Based on the testimonies you just heard, how were ghettos during the Holocaust different
from your understanding of what a ghetto is today?

What visual picture has begun to emerge for you about ghetto life after listening to these
two testimonies?

How do you think Ellis and Joseph felt sharing these memories? How did you feel
listening to them?

Talk about the above questions as a whole group (15 MINUTES)


Closing:
Remind students to put name on traffic light
Differentiation:
Audio learning
Small group that will foster discussion and collaboration among peers
Visual learning
Whole group discussion that will allow teacher to scaffold instruction

40

Lesson Title: Deportation of Jews and their Arrival to Camps


Content: Social Studies
Teacher: Anna Trull
th
Grade: 6
Date: Friday 4/25 & Monday 4/28
Duration: 2 Days
Standards: Standards: SS6H7: The student will explain conflict and change in Europe up to
the 21st Century
1. Describe major developments following World War I: the Russian Revolution, the Treaty
of Versailles, worldwide depression, and the rise of Nazism.
2. Explain the impact of WWII in terms of the Holocaust, the origins of the Cold War,
and the rise of Superpowers.
NCSS V: Individuals, Groups, & Institutions: Social studies programs should include
experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups, and
institutions
NCSS VI: Power, Authority, & Governance: Social studies programs should include
experiences that provide for the study of how people create and change structures of power,
authority, and governance.
Goals:

To enable students to reflect on their feelings, beliefs, and understanding of


discrimination.

To engage students in critical analysis of discrimination that links economic,


social, cultural, political, and historic issues.
To help students understand that solutions to discrimination need to go
beyond individual acts to address systemic change.
Gain awareness of the complexity of the Holocaust and a perspective on
how a convergence of factors can contribute to the disintegration of
democratic values
Acquire knowledge and understanding of past discrimination and its effects
on society

Understandings
Students will understand

That discrimination is not just the result of individual actions, but rather a
system of exclusion that affects economic, social, political, and cultural
institutions.
The many historical, social, religious, political, and economic factors that
cumulatively resulted in the Holocaust

41

Essential Questions:
What was the final solution and how did it lead to the concentration camps/death camps?
What was life like in the ghettos/internment camps? How did Jews go from the ghettos to
concentration camps?
Students will know.

Objectives
Students will be able to.

The range of behaviors and actions


necessary to carry out the Holocaust;
help ranged from active participation
to passive complicity.

The origins, establishments,


conditions, and operations of the
Nazi concentration camps and
death camps.

Think about the use and abuse of


power as well as the roles and
responsibilities of individuals,
organizations, and nations when
confronted with civil rights violations
and/or policies of genocide

Identify various issues that caused the


Holocaust

Give examples of the discrimination


displayed to Holocaust victims

Connect their prior experiences to that


of the Holocaust

Express their ideas, orally and in


written form, about the issues raised by
the Holocaust

Assessment
Informal/ Performance Tasks:
Formative/Summative/Formal/Other:
Suitcase Activity
I Never Saw Another Butterfly narrative:
Google Earth Virtual Field Trip: Will help
Formative
students access their knowledge about the
This will allow the teacher to see what the
Holocaust and apply it to real life situations.
student understands about the holocaust and
Traffic Light: Students will put their name on
what he or she doesnt. This will help the
green (for yes, I understand, lets move on),
students to personalize with the subject.
yellow (Im kind of getting it, but slow down) ,
and red (no, Im not getting it, we need to
stop).
42

Resources:
Google Earth Virtual Field Trip: http://www.ushmm.org/learn/mapping-initiatives/mapping-theholocaust-google-earth (holocaust encyclopedia layer)
The book I Never Saw Another Butterfly
Suitcase
Suitcase worksheet
Powerpoint

Learning Experience
Hook: Suitcase Activity: Bring in a suitcase and have it open in front of the class. Have each
student take a worksheet out of the suitcase and fill out ten things they would take with him or
her to the concentration camps. It must be realistic and cannot be any cell phones or other items.
They can draw their items and then write a brief rationale of why they would take that item.
Afterwards, lead discussion and allow students to comment on what they are going to bring with
them and why. Also have students comment on how they felt when told they could only bring ten
things. Do you think you could live with those ten things for the rest of your life? (25
MINUTES)
Lecture: Write Final Solution on the board. Ask students what the definition of a final solution
is? Ask the class what they think this means and how it pertains to the Holocaust? Students will
write this in their social studies notebooks (8 MINUTES)
Define Final Solution: the Nazi policy of exterminating ALL European Jews
PowerPoint on the Deportation and transit of Jews to ghettos and concentration camps and what
happened to them once they arrived at their destination. Students will take notes during this time
and will be involved in class discussions when emotional and moral issues are brought up.
Students are encouraged to ask questions and to relate this situation to their own life experiences.
(30 MINUTES)
I Never Saw Another Butterfly: Each student will receive a (different) copy of a poem or piece of
artwork from the book. They will use this to write a short narrative from the perspective of the
artist: reflection of the life and thoughts that occupied the artists/writers minds. (30 MINUTES)
Prompts that might be followed:
Who am I?
Where am I?
How am I feeling?
What has happened to my family?
Why am I here?
Make sure to explain to students that these are pieces of art-work and writing from children in

43

the ghettos.
Engaging Learning Experience: Google Earth Virtual Field Trip of the Holocaust (30
MINUTES)
Students will engage in virtual field trip of Jewish Ghettos, deportation/transit stations, and some
concentration/ internment camps. In this field trip the students will see what it looked like at the
time and what it looks like today. They will get to experience it as if they were actually there.
This will allow students to take ownership in their learning and become active and engaged.
While on virtual field trip have students prepare by getting together necessary items: pen,
notebook, and camera. As they are traveling they will take notes on what they see and will also
be able to take pictures on their phones (as if they were on a real field trip).
Places Included:

Warsaw Ghetto
Amsterdam
Babi Yar
Budapest, Hungary
Berlin, Germany
Chelmno, Poland
Drancy Camp in France (deportations)
Kiev, South Ukraine
Kovno, Lithuania
Lodz, Poland
Mechelen Transit Camp
Stutthof Internment Camp
Tarnow, Poland
Terezin, Czechoslovakia

Closing: Answer essential questions: (5 MINUTES)


Remind students to put name on traffic light
Introduce Project. The project will be a summative assessment that will be due at the end of the
Unit. The students will choose a topic that deals with the history of the Holocaust or the
Holocaust itself and they will make sure to tie in the theme of discrimination. Student will need
to provide the who, what, when, where, and why of his or her topic in a creative form.
Parameters are endless. They will receive a copy of the rubric ahead of time and will be required
to put forth great effort. This will be due on Tuesday, May 6th and presentations will take place
in class. (20 MINUTES)
Possible topics to chose from:
Adolf Hitler
Anne Frank
Warsaw Ghetto
Auschwitz

44

Terezin
Final Solution
Superior Race
Anti-Semitism
Nazi Propaganda
Babi Yar
Dachau
The Jewish religion
Mein Kampf
Nuremberg Laws
Kristallnachat
ETC.

Differentiation:
Visual and hands on activity
Lecture
A lot of visuals used
Writing used to uncover thoughts and ideas
Interactive session to help students become involved in their learning

45

46

Holocaust Project Visual Repersenation Rubric


CATEGORY
ContentAccuracy

All content
throughout the
presentation is
accurate. There are
no factual errors.

Most of the content


is accurate but there
is one piece of
information that
might be inaccurate.

Content is typically
confusing or
contains more than
one factual error.

Originality

Presentation shows
considerable
originality and
inventiveness. The
content and ideas are
presented in a
unique and
interesting way.
The theme is
accurately tied in to
the topic of the
project. Real world
examples are used.
Font formats (e.g.,
color, bold, italic)
have been carefully
planned to enhance
readability and
content.
Information is
organized in a clear,
logical way. It is
easy to anticipate the
type of material that
might be on the next
card.
All graphics are
attractive (size and
colors) and support
the theme/content of
the presentation.

Presentation shows
some originality and
inventiveness. The
content and ideas are
presented in an
interesting way.

The content is
generally accurate,
but one piece of
information is
clearly flawed or
inaccurate.
Presentation shows
an attempt at
originality and
inventiveness on 1-2
cards.

The theme ties in


with topic but is not
mentioned in
presentation

Theme does not tie


in with topic, but is
referred to

No evidence of
theme

Font formats have


been carefully
planned to enhance
readability.

Font formatting has


been carefully
planned to
complement the
content. It may be a
little hard to read.
Some information is
logically sequenced.
An occasional card
or item of
information seems
out of place.

Font formatting
makes it very
difficult to read the
material.

Several graphics are


unattractive AND
detract from the
content of the
presentation.

Project includes all


material needed for
understanding of the
topic.

Project includes
most material
needed for
understanding of the
topic but lacks one
or two key elements.

All graphics are


attractive but a few
do not seem to
support the
theme/content of the
presentation.
Project is missing
more than two key
elements

Theme
Text-Font
Choice &
Formatting
Sequencing of
Information

Use of
Graphics

Effectiveness

Most information is
organized in a clear
logical way. One
card or item of
information seems
out of place.
A few graphics are
not attractive but all
support the
theme/content of the
presentation.

Presentation is a
mere reworking of
other peoples ideas
and/or graphics and
shows little attempt
at original thought.

There is no clear
plan for the
organization of
information.

Project is lacking
several key
elements,

Holocaust Project Oral Presentation Rubric


Preparedness

Students are
completely prepared
and have obviously
rehearsed

Students seem
prepared but might
have needed a few
more rehearsals.

Content

Shows a full

Shows a good

47

Students are
somewhat prepared,
but it is clear that
rehearsal was
lacking.
Shows a good

Students do not seem


at all prepared to
present.
Does not seem to

understanding of the
topic. Strong
evidence of
documentation and
research.

understanding of the
topic. Good
evidence of research
and documentation.

Comprehensio
n

Students are able to


accurately answer
almost all questions
posed by classmates
about the topic.

Students are able to


accurately answer
most questions
posed by classmates
about the topic.

Enthusiasm

Facial expressions
and body language
generate a strong
interest and
enthusiasm about the
topic in others.
Students use visual
aides that show
considerable
work/creativity and
that enhance and
support the
presentation.

Facial expressions
and body language
sometimes generate
a strong interest and
enthusiasm about the
topic in others.
Students use visual
aide(s) that shows
some work/creativity
and that makes the
presentation better.

Visual Aide

48

understanding of
parts of the topic.
Some evidence of
research;
documentation is
weak or missing.
Students are able to
accurately answer a
few questions posed
by classmates about
the topic.

understand the topic


very well. Very little
or no evidence of
research and/or
documentation.

Facial expressions
and body language
are used to try to
generate enthusiasm,
but do not seem
genuine.
Student uses a visual
aide that somewhat
makes the
presentation better.

Very little use of


facial expressions or
body language. Did
not generate much
interest in topic
being presented.
The student uses no
visual aide OR the
visual aide chosen
detracts from the
presentation.

Students are unable


to accurately answer
questions posed by
classmates about the
topic.

Lesson Title: Concentration Camps and Death Camps


Content: Social Studies
Teacher: Anna Trull
th
Grade: 6
Date: Tuesday 4/29 & Wednesday 4/30
Duration: 2 Days
Standards: Standards: Standards: SS6H7: The student will explain conflict and change in
Europe up to the 21st Century
1. Describe major developments following World War I: the Russian Revolution, the Treaty
of Versailles, worldwide depression, and the rise of Nazism.
2. Explain the impact of WWII in terms of the Holocaust, the origins of the Cold War,
and the rise of Superpowers.
NCSS VI: Power, Authority, & Governance: Social studies programs should include
experiences that provide for the study of how people create and change structures of power,
authority, and governance.
NCSS X: Civic Ideals & Practices: Social studies programs should include experiences that
provide for the study of ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic
republic.

Goals:

To enable students to reflect on their feelings, beliefs, and understanding of


discrimination.
Gain awareness of the complexity of the Holocaust and a perspective on how
a convergence of factors can contribute to the disintegration of democratic
values
Acquire knowledge and understanding of past discrimination and its effects
on society
Locate, analyze, and synthesize information related to the Holocaust and the
act of discrimination and apply this information to solve problems/make
decisions.

Understandings
Students will understand that

The Holocaust was not an accident in history. It occurred because


individuals, organizations, and governments made choices that not only
legalized discrimination but also encouraged prejudice, hatred, and
ultimately mass murder to occur.
The roots and ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping in any
society
That discrimination is not just the result of individual actions, but rather a
system of exclusion that affects economic, social, political, and cultural

49

institutions.
The many historical, social, religious, political, and economic factors that
cumulatively resulted in the Holocaust

Essential Questions:

How was it possible for a modern society to carry out the systematic murder
of a people for no reason other than that they were Jews?
Is discrimination subject to only race?
How does discrimination affect society as a whole?

Students will know.

Objectives
Students will be able to.

The dangers of remaining silent,


apathetic, and indifferent to the
oppression of others

Silence and indifference to the


suffering of others or to the
infringement of civil rights in any
society can perpetuate these problems

The range of behaviors and actions


necessary to carry out the Holocaust;
help ranged from active participation
to passive complicity.

The origins, establishments,


conditions, and operations of the Nazi
concentration camps and death camps.

The effects of the living conditions in


the ghettos, concentration camps, and
death camps on the victims

Think about the use and abuse of


power as well as the roles and
responsibilities of individuals,
organizations, and nations when
confronted with civil rights violations
and/or policies of genocide

Give examples of the discrimination


displayed to Holocaust victims

Assessment
Formative/Summative/Formal/Other:
Traffic Light: Students will put
Auschwitz Tour question sheet: Formative:
their name on green (for yes, I
Will help students to guide their thinking

Informal/ Performance Tasks:

50

understand, lets move on), yellow


(Im kind of getting it, but slow
down) , and red (no, Im not
getting it, we need to stop).
KWL chart: Will help teacher to
know what the students already
know and understand and what
they dont

Holocaust Survivor Letter: Formative: Will


help students to pull in their thoughts about
everything they learned that day. Will help
teacher to understand what the student
comprehends or doesnt comprehend.

Resources:
Identity cards
Gallery walk photos, models, captions, graphs, letters, etc.
Chart paper
PowerPoint
Auschwitz Virtual Tour: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gonvxBXAgNI
Solomon Radsky: http://www.holocaustsurvivors.org/data.show.php?
di=home&da=survivors&ke=7

Learning Experience
Hook: Students will craft their identity cards (for interactive session). They will be given all the
information to put on their card and then they will draw a picture of themselves based on the
descriptions given to them. (15 MINUTES)
Will relate this to the days lesson by helping them to gain an identity throughout the learning of
the holocaust and to try and put themselves in the shoes of the holocaust victims.
Gallery Walk: Items (mostly pictures) will be displayed around the room. The students will
silently take their notebooks and walk around the room looking at the images, charts, models, etc
and will read the caption that goes with each item. They will then make a KWL chart in their
notebooks and while they are walking around they will record what they already know about that
they see and what they want to know more about. (30 minutes)
Some of the items that might be included in the gallery walk (with captions):
Gas chambers
Pictures of the camps
Picture of victims
Ovens
Barbed wire
Mass graves
Food rations
Examination picture
Art
Letters
51

ETC.
Come together as a whole class and make a class size KWL on the gallery walk. Students will
contribute to the KNOW column and will teach the class what they know about that particular
item. After we have compiled a KNOW list, we will then compile a list of things we want to
know about and as we are filling out the chart the teacher will explain each item and give further
explanation of its uses/characteristics/etc. (15 MINUTES)
Lecture: PowerPoint: Life in the Concentration Camps. Have students take notes and participate
in class discussion (25 MINUTES)
Power point on Auschwitz (25 MINUTES). Students will receive notes for this discussion. See
attachment.
Virtual Tour of Auschwitz (25 MINUTES)
Students will work on questions sheet to go along with tour while watching
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

How were the various classes of prisoners distinguished?


What were the dark cells?
Auschwitz was the ______________ Nazi German concentration camp
How many people were at Auschwitz?
List some of the items piled up from the victims.
What was the execution wall?
How many Jews died in a gas chamber at one time?

Personal accounts of Holocaust Survivors:


Listen to an audio recording of Solomon Radaskys personal account of experiencing the Warsaw
Ghetto and the Concentration Camps. (8 MINUTES)
Closure: Write a letter as if you were a holocaust survivor and you have survived living in Nazi
Germany, the ghettos, and the concentration camp. Describe your experiences there. What made
it difficult? What gave you hope? How did you survive? What would you tell someone who is
reading your letter? (20 MINUTES)
Differentiation:
Gallery Walk provides movement / kinetic learning within lesson
Visual aids used
Virtual tour to involve students in their learning
Power point to aide the students who are visual and auditory
Personal accounts used to make the situation/event more real for the student

52

AuschwitzNotes
AuschwitzwasthelargestcampestablishedbytheGermans.Itwasacomplexof
camps,includingaconcentration,extermination,andforcedlaborcamp.Itwas
locatednearCracow(Krakow),Poland.Threelargecampsconstitutedthe
Auschwitzcampcomplex:AuschwitzI,AuschwitzII(Birkenau),andAuschwitz
III(Monowitz).MorethanonemillionpeoplelosttheirlivesatAuschwitz,nine
outoftenofthemJewish.Thefourlargestgaschamberscouldeachhold2,000
peopleatonetime.
AsignovertheentrancetothecampreadARBEITMACHTFREI,whichmeans
"workmakesonefree."Inactuality,theoppositewastrue.Laborbecameanother
formofgenocidethattheNaziscalled"exterminationthroughwork."
Victimswhoweresparedimmediatedeathbybeingselectedforlaborwere
systematicallystrippedoftheirindividualidentities.Theyhadtheirhairshavedoff
andaregistrationnumbertattooedontheirleftforearm.Menwereforcedtowear
ragged,stripedpantsandjackets,andwomenworeworkdresses.Bothwereissued
illfittingworkshoes,sometimesclogs.Theyhadnochangeofclothingandslept
inthesameclothestheyworkedin.
Eachdaywasastruggleforsurvivalunderunbearableconditions.Prisonerswere
53

housedinprimitivebarracksthathadnowindowsandwerenotinsulatedfromthe
heatorcold.Therewasnobathroom,onlyabucket.Eachbarrackheldabout36
woodenbunkbeds,andinmatesweresqueezedinfiveorsixacrossonthewooden
plank.Asmanyas500inmateslodgedinasinglebarrack.Inmateswerealways
hungry.Foodconsistedofwaterysoupmadewithrottenvegetablesandmeat,a
fewouncesofbread,abitofmargarine,tea,orabitterdrinkresemblingcoffee.
Diarrheawascommon.Peopleweakenedbydehydrationandhungerfelleasy
victimtothecontagiousdiseasesthatspreadthroughthecamp.
Someinmatesworkedasforcedlaborersinsidethecamp,inthekitchenoras
barbers,forexample.Womenoftensortedthepilesofshoes,clothes,andother
prisonerbelongings,whichwouldbeshippedbacktoGermanyforusethere.The
storagewarehousesatAuschwitzBirkenau,locatedneartwoofthecrematoria,
werecalled"Canada,"becausethePolesregardedthatcountryasaplaceofgreat
riches.AtAuschwitz,asathundredsofothercampsintheReichandoccupied
EuropewheretheGermansusedforcedlaborers,prisonerswerealsoemployed
outsidethecamps,incoalminesandrockquarries,andonconstructionprojects,
diggingtunnelsandcanals.Underarmedguard,theyshoveledsnowoffroadsand
clearedrubblefromroadsandtownshitduringairraids.Alargenumberofforced
laborerseventuallywereusedinfactoriesthatproducedweaponsandothergoods
thatsupportedtheGermanwareffort.Manyprivatecompanies,suchasI.G.
FarbenandBavarianMotorWorks(BMW),whichproducedautomobileand
airplaneengines,eagerlysoughttheuseofprisonersasasourceofcheaplabor.
EscapefromAuschwitzwasalmostimpossible.Electricallychargedbarbedwire
fencessurroundedboththeconcentrationcampandthekillingcenter.Guards,
equippedwithmachinegunsandautomaticrifles,stoodinthemanywatchtowers.
Thelivesoftheprisonerswerecompletelycontrolledbytheirguards,whoona
whimcouldinflictcruelpunishmentonthem.Prisonerswerealsomistreatedby
fellowinmateswhowerechosentosupervisetheothersinreturnforspecialfavors
bytheguards.
Cruel"medicalexperiments"wereconductedatAuschwitz.Men,women,and
childrenwereusedassubjects.SSphysicianDr.JosefMengelecarriedoutpainful
andtraumaticexperimentsondwarfsandtwins,includingyoungchildren.Theaim
ofsomeexperimentswastofindbettermedicaltreatmentsforGermansoldiersand
54

airmen.Otherexperimentswereaimedatimprovingmethodsofsterilizingpeople
theNazisconsideredinferior.Manypeoplediedduringtheexperiments.Others
werekilledafterthe"research"wascompletedandtheirorgansremovedfor
furtherstudy.
MostprisonersatAuschwitzsurvivedonlyafewweeksormonths.Thosewho
weretooillortooweaktoworkwerecondemnedtodeathinthegaschambers.
Somecommittedsuicidebythrowingthemselvesagainsttheelectricwires.Others
resembledwalkingcorpses,brokeninbodyandspirit.Yetotherinmateswere
determinedtostayalive.

KEYDATES
MAY20,1940AUSCHWITZICAMPOPENSAuschwitzI,themaincampin
theAuschwitzcampcomplex,isthefirstcampestablishednearOswiecim.
ConstructionbeganinMay1940intheZasolesuburbofOswiecim,inartillery
barracksformerlyusedbythePolisharmy.Thecampiscontinuouslyexpanded
throughtheuseofforcedlabor.AlthoughAuschwitzIisprimarilyaconcentration
camp,servingapenalfunction,italsohasagaschamberandcrematorium.An
improvisedgaschamberislocatedinthebasementoftheprison(Block11).Later,
agaschamberisconstructedinthecrematorium.
OCTOBER8,1941CONSTRUCTIONOFAUSCHWITZII(BIRKENAU)
BEGINSConstructionofAuschwitzII,orAuschwitzBirkenau,beginsin
Brzezinka.OfthethreecampsestablishednearOswiecimaspartoftheAuschwitz
campcomplex,AuschwitzBirkenauhasthelargestprisonerpopulation.Itis
dividedintoninesectionsseparatedbyelectrifiedbarbedwirefencesandpatrolled
bySSguardsanddogs.Thecampincludessectionsforwomen,men,Roma
(Gypsies),andfamiliesdeportedfromtheTheresienstadtghetto.Auschwitz
BirkenauplaysacentralroleintheGermanplantoexterminatetheJewsof
Europe.FourlargecrematoriabuildingsareconstructedbetweenMarchandJune
1943.Eachhasthreecomponents:adisrobingarea,alargegaschamber,and
crematoriumovens.GassingoperationscontinueuntilNovember1944.
OCTOBER1942AUSCHWITZIIICAMPOPENSTheGermansestablish

55

AuschwitzIII,alsocalledBunaorMonowitz,inMonowicetoprovideforced
laborersfortheBunasyntheticrubberworks(partoftheGermanconglomerate
I.G.Farben).I.G.Farbeninvestedmorethan700millionReichsmarks(about1.4
millionUSdollarsin1942)inAuschwitzIII.Prisonersselectedforforcedlabor
areregisteredandtattooedwithidentificationnumbersontheirleftarmsin
AuschwitzI.TheyarethenassignedtoforcedlaborinAuschwitzorinoneofthe
manysubcampsattachedtoAuschwitzIII.
JANUARY27,1945SOVIETARMYLIBERATESAUSCHWITZCAMP
COMPLEXTheSovietarmyentersAuschwitzandliberatestheremaining
prisoners.Onlyafewthousandprisonersremaininthecamp.Almost60,000
prisoners,mostlyJews,wereforcedonadeathmarchfromthecampshortlybefore
itsliberation.DuringtheforcedevacuationofAuschwitz,prisonerswerebrutally
mistreatedandmanywerekilled.SSguardsshotanyonewhofellbehind.During
itsbriefexistence,nearly1millionJewswerekilledinAuschwitz.Othervictims
includedbetween70,000and74,000Poles,21,000Roma(Gypsies),andabout
15,000Sovietprisonersofwar.

Lesson Title: The Death of 11 Million


Content: Social Studies
Teacher: Anna Trull
th
Grade: 6
Date: Thursday 5/1 and Friday 5/2
Duration: 2 Days
Standards: Standards: Standards: Standards: SS6H7: The student will explain conflict and
change in Europe up to the 21st Century
1. Describe major developments following World War I: the Russian Revolution, the Treaty
of Versailles, worldwide depression, and the rise of Nazism.
2. Explain the impact of WWII in terms of the Holocaust, the origins of the Cold War,
and the rise of Superpowers.
Goals:

To enable students to reflect on their feelings, beliefs, and


understanding of discrimination.
Gain awareness of the complexity of the Holocaust and a
perspective on how a convergence of factors can contribute to the
disintegration of democratic values
Locate, analyze, and synthesize information related to the
Holocaust and the act of discrimination and apply this information

56

to solve problems/make decisions.

Understandings
Students will understand that

The roots and ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping


in any society
The personal and universal consequences of indifference to the
preservation of human rights.

Essential Questions:

How was it possible for a modern society to carry out the systematic murder of a
people for no reason other than that they were Jews?
How does discrimination affect society as a whole?

Objectives
Students will know.
Students will be able to.
- The dangers of remaining silent,
Be able to identify negative
apathetic, and indifferent to the
discriminatory behavior
oppression of others
Describe examples of courageous
- Silence and indifference to the
action taken by those who rescued
suffering of others or to the
victims during the Holocaust
infringement of civil rights in any
Connect their prior experiences to that
society can perpetuate these problems
of the Holocaust
- The effects of the living conditions in
the ghettos, concentration camps, and
death camps on the victims

Assessment
Informal/ Performance Tasks:
Formative/Summative/Formal/Other:
Traffic Light: Students will put
Courage to Care Worksheet: Formative: will
their name on green (for yes, I
allow teacher to know if student understands
understand, lets move on), yellow the heros of the holocaust and what they did.
(Im kind of getting it, but slow
Will allow students to bring together their
down) , and red (no, Im not
thinking
57

getting it, we need to stop).


Life-size timeline: will help teacher
to know if student understands
time and place of events. Will
allow students to see where
events took place in a more
realistic situation.
Unit Debrief: Will allow students to
bring together their knowledge
and learning and will help teacher
to know what students retained

Resources:
Paper clips video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzBF1GI222g
End of Holocaust Power point
Cardboard puzzle pieces
Paint, markers, glue, scissors
Courage to Care Documentary
Courage to Care Worksheet

Learning Experience
Hook: Think about 6 Million. How many is that? What could we use to represent six million?
Record your answers in your social studies notebooks (5 MINUTES)
Show them the 6 million paper clips video and bring up the idea: if that is six million paper clips
can you imagine six million people? (8 MINUTES)
Lecture: Power point on the ending of the Holocaust and United States intervention. Have
students take notes (25 MINUTES)
Life-size Timeline Activity: Put important dates and events on cards that students will pull out of
a hat. Each student will receive an event/date and will also receive a cardboard cut out of a
puzzle piece. They will represent this event on the puzzle piece however they best see fit.
Whether it is a picture, words, numbers, etc. (30 MINUTES)
Students will then come to the front of the room and line themselves up in chronological order of
events that happened within the Holocaust. They will then make a class timeline on either a
wall in the classroom or a wall in the hall. (15 MINUTES)

58

Holocaust Heros: Begin by informing students that they are going to be hearing from people
who helped others during the Holocaust. Also tell them that they will be hearing from some of
the rescued as well. (25 MINUTES)
Pass out the worksheet. Students are to jot down responses in the chart during the film, but
should answer the rest of the questions afterward.
Show the video. Give students time to answer the questions after the video.
The questions beneath the chart are designed to encourage discussion. They are to be used in a
small group session. (10 MINUTES)
Complete the activity by sharing responses with the full class. (10 MINUTES)

Closing: UNIT DEBRIEF (35 MINUTES): As a whole group we will reflect on the past two
weeks. What we learned, what we enjoyed, what we have questions about, what concerned us,
what we could change for next time, and what would we like to know more about.
Remind students to put name on traffic light; that test and presentations are going to be on
Tuesday
Differentiation: Whole class discussion which allows teacher to scaffold instruction and facilitate
discussion
Movement within their learning
Art
Audio and visual learning styles used

59

Name: ________________________________________ Date: ________ Period: ______

Courage to Care Worksheet and Discussion Questions


Directions: After viewing the video and reading the handout, answer the following questions. If you need more
space, use the back of this sheet.

During the film, write down every reason someone gives for helping in the left-hand column. Write down every
danger, problem, fear, or dilemma that they mention in the right-hand column.

60

Reasons for Helping

Dangers, Problems, Fears, Dilemmas

Can you think of anything else (not mentioned in the video) that you would add to either column?

1. The film is entitled Courage to Care. This implies that in order to be a rescuer, you
needed both courage and caring. Which do you think is most important? Why?

2. Sometimes rescuers had to do things to help the Nazis victims that they would not
normally have done (i.e.- lie, steal, kill, etc.). Do you think this was wrong? Explain.

3. Rescuers generally say that they were not heroes, but they were. They acted with great
courage in dangerous times. How can you be a hero and not even know it?

4. Most rescuers didnt plan in advance to become rescuers, but acted when the opportunity
arose. How can you prepare now to be ready to do the right thing in a time of crisis?

61

62

TUESDAY MAY 6TH


Presentation Day: Students will present their summative projects (presentations may need to feed
into the next day)
Test: Students will be given multiple choice and short answer test
75 MINUTES

63

Lesson Title: The Rise of the Superior Race


Content: ELA
Teacher: Etheredge
th
Grade: 6
Duration: 2 Days
Date: Monday 4/21 & Tuesday 4/22
Standards: ELACC6RL3: Describe how a particular storys or dramas plot unfolds in a
series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves
towards a resolution.
Goals: Determine how the change in the plot of a story affects the characters response.
Understandings
Students will understand that the plot unfolds how a storys changing plot and a
characters response moves towards a storys resolution.
Essential Questions:
What does the term plot mean when associated to a story or drama? Can the plot change
throughout a story, and (how/does) this affect the characters in the story?
Objectives
Students will know.
Students will be able to.
-That a story has a beginning, middle, and -Describe how the plot in the The Diary of
end.
Anne Frank unfolds.
-to identify ways in which the characters are
affected by the changing of storys plot.
-how the characters within the novel,
The Diary of Anne Frank change as
the story progresses.

Assessment
Formative/ Informal/ Performance Tasks: Summative/Formal/Other:
-Literature Circles (Informal) assess what
the students
-Diary/Journal Entries (Formative) assess
students comprehend what they are
reading, forming connections, and
progressing in their writing abilities.
-Whole group discussions over the novel
and how it ties into out unit over
discrimination.
-Traffic Light (Informal). Students will
self-assess their understanding about the
lesson that day by placing their name on
red, yellow, or green (according to their
level of understanding) See Overview for
64

more information.
Resources:
Anne Frank: The diary of a young girl
WebQuest
Diaries (notebooks)
Learning Experience
Hook: Introduce the theme for the new unit, discrimination. Ask students to share what
they think discrimination is. Explain to the students that we will be discussing The Rise
of the Superior Race for the next two days. Ask students to explain what they think that
means.
Introduce the novel, The Diary of Anne Frank to the students. Give each student their
own copy to borrow for the remainder of the unit. Ask students to determine why we
would select this particular novel to read. Leave the students with this question to think
about. (15 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Experience: Students will spend the remainder of the period
searching the internet via teacher-created (Etheredge) WebQuest. The WebQuest will link
the students to various websites allowing them to read informative passages about the
Holocaust, as well as interactive websites that allow students to apply their learning.
Students will work on the WebQuest independently. (45 MINUTES)
Closure: Announce when the students have 5 minutes left before the whole class regroups
for closure on the days lesson. Students should take this time to find a good place to stop
in their WebQuest.
Announce to students that they can access the WebQuest anywhere they have access to
internet if they would like to do continue where they left off on their own time.
Revisit the question from the hook at the beginning of the lesson. Ask students to share
their answers. Announce to students that the lesson will be continued the following day.
(10 MINUTES)
Remind students to stick their names on the traffic light.
Tuesday:
Hook: Remind students that they will begin reading, Anne Frank: The diary of a young
girl. Pass out an anticipation guide explaining the purpose and directions to the students.
Inform the students to quietly and individually complete the anticipation guide using their
personal opinions. (10 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Experience: Once the students have completed the anticipation guide,
explain to the whole group that they will form groups (3-4 students/group) to discuss
their answers for the anticipation guide. Encourage students to ask the people within their
groups to walk them through their thought process in answering some of the questions to
the anticipation guide. The teacher should walk around the room and listen to the student
conversation, joining in the prompt thoughtful questions as needed. (25 MINUTES)
Regain student attention. Ask students for a spokesperson from each group to share
their favorite question they discussed in the group. (15 MINUTES) *Collect anticipation
guides from students.
65

Pass out the novel Anne Frank: The diary of a young girl and Diaries (notebooks) to
the class. Give students a moment to analyze the book by encouraging them to flip
through the book, notice the book cover, etc. Read (teacher) the first 32 pages of the book
to the students, stopping throughout the text to ask students thought provoking questions
and asking the students to make connections to the theme of discrimination.
Closure: Instruct students to write a their feelings on what theyve read (listened to) so far
in the text. Remind the students that they will be reading to novel for the remainder of the
unit and inform the students to bring their novels to class the following day. (5
MINUTES)
Differentiation:
Students will work in groups to discuss the anticipation guides and the novel will be read
to the students by the teacher in a whole group setting.

Lesson Title: Anti-Semitism


Content: ELA
Teacher: Etheredge
th
Grade: 6
Date: Wednesday 4/23 & Thursday 4/24
Standards: ELACC6W3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events

66

using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or
characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
Goals: Write a narrative based on real-world or imaginable events.
Understandings
Students will understand that a well-written narrative involves the organization of the sequence
in which particular events occur.

Essential Questions:
Why is it important to know the sequence in which events occur in a story and how can this help
me in writing a narrative?
Objectives
Students will know.
Students will be able to.
Well-written narratives include organization of Organize the sequence of events of short
sequence of events and the characters.
stories as well as the characters.
How to organize the sequence of events
Explain the importance of the sequence of
events in which they occur.
Know the sequence of events in which they
occur.
Assessment
Formative/ Informal/ Performance Tasks:
Summative/Formal/Other:
In-class discussion/Popcorn Discussion
Literature Circles

Resources:
Anne Frank: The diary of a young girl
Diaries (notebooks)
Short story worksheet
T-chart
Interactive Museum
http://www.annefrank.org/en/Subsites/Home/
Learning Experience
Wednesday
Hook: Refer to the essential questions with students. Remind students that they will continue
reading The Diary of Anne Frank. Remind the students that for the past two days they had been

67

studying discrimination and the superior race and ask students to share what theyve learned
from those two days, and explain how that ties into language arts. Ask students to share what
they think Anti-Semitism is. Inform students that the next two days will involve the discussion of
Anti-Semitism. (10 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Activity: Explain to students that they will be going to stations, so they will
need to listen carefully to their directions.
Divide the class in half.
Half One: Students will work on the computers in the classroom to visit the Interactive Online
Museum in pairs. Inform students that they museum allows students to see what it was like in
attic Anne Frank had to hide in. Tell students to refer back to p. 27 of the text to determine if the
museum provides an accurate depiction. In their journals, students write to the following
prompts: How do you feel when you view the images and artifacts in the museum? How does
this help you to understand the text better? How does this help you visualize what you are
reading? If students have extra time before its time to switch they should revisit the WebQuest
from Monday.
Half Two: Student will form small literature circles where they will take turns reading the next
32 pages of the text. The teacher should walk around the room, asking the groups to share what
whats happening in the story thus far.
Students will switch after the first session. (30 MINUTES/SESSION)
Closure: Ask students to share what they think about the text thus far with a show of hands. Have
students reflect back to the essential question and explain that they will be revisiting the essential
question and the topic of Anti-Semitism the following day.
Thursday:
Hook: Give students a worksheet with a short story. Instruct students read the story to quietly and
individually. Then, have them recall what they read by ordering the events in the sequence in
which they occurred in the story. (10 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Experience:
Have students reflect to the past two days. Remind them that they have been writing in their
diaries. The teacher should ask the students to answer why they would be instructed to write in
diaries while reading the novel.
Explain that writing is used for various reasons. Have students name the various reasons people
write. Use to T-Chart to organize the students responses. (15 MINUTES)
Read the novel to the students in a whole group setting. (32 pages). Discuss major events from
the reading. (35 MINUTES)
Instruct students to summarize what they just read in their journals independently. Have them put
the event in order of which theyve occurred thus far to the best of their ability. (The post reading
discussion will be a scaffold for writing their responses.) (10 MINUTES)
Closure:
Have a popcorn discussion where you name the first thing that happened in the text, and call
on a student to name the next thing. That student will call on another student, and the process

68

will repeat. (5 MINUTES)


Differentiation:
Students will be provided with a visual representation of Anne Franks hiding place. Students
will also have the opportunity to discuss the reading and the practice sequencing the events of a
story with a simple story.

Task Description:

(Diary Entries)

69

Retelling of
Experience

Reflections/
Personal
Response
Relevance to
Classroom
Concepts or
Personal
Experience

weight

Criteria

20%

20%

20%

Analysis of
Experience

20%

Effort on
Assignment

20%

Exemplary
Yes

Accomplished
Yes, but

Developing
No, but

Detailed explanation of
Clear explanation of
experience
experience
Specific descriptors of
Objective observation of
observations during
experience
experience
Organization is clear and
Writing is highly organized
easy to follow
with logical sequence

Somewhat clear explanation


of experience
Somewhat objective

observation of experience
Minimal organization

Reflects well on own work


Provides many examples

Some reflection on own


work
Provides few examples

Student listens well in


Student listens in class;
different contexts; relates
relates some observations
observations to classroom
to classroom concepts
concepts and/or personal
and/or personal
experiences
experiences

Makes minimal reference


to what is heard in class
or to personal experience

Makes many inferences


Comprehends deeper
meanings
High level of critical
thinking expressed

Makes inferences most of


the time
Usually comprehends
deeper meanings
Some critical thinking
expressed

Some inferences are made


Comprehends surface level

meaning
Minimal critical thinking
expressed

Obvious, detailed effort on


assignment
Neat, legible handwriting

Acceptable effort on all


parts of the assignment
Legible handwriting

Some effort on assignment


Readable handwriting

70

Reflects on own work


Provides examples

The Diary of Anne Frank


Anticipation Guide
Read each statement below. Then mark whether you think the statement is True or False. There
are no right answers.
1. No person is naturally better than any other person. True False
2. I treat all groups of people the same way. True False
3. I don't hate anyone. True False
4. I would risk my life for my family. True False
5. I would risk my life for my friends. True False
6. I would risk my life for a stranger. True False
7. Some people deserve to be treated differently because they are "different." True False

71

8. I get angry when I am not treated fairly. True False


9. Being accepted by people makes me feel better about myself. True False
10. If it hadn't been for Hitler, the Holocaust would never have happened. True False
Now, give your opinion on the following questions. Answer each with a paragraph or so.
11. You have just been awakened in the middle of the night to be taken away to a concentration
camp. You are allowed to take only one small suitcase with you. Explain what you would pack
and why you selected each item.
12. You and your family have had to go into hiding in order to survive and avoid
being separated from each other. Write a diary entry expressing how you feel about leaving your
home and friends.
13. Your very survival is dependent on the goodness and charity of others. Would you be willing
to risk your life for someone you hardly know, understanding that if you are caught, you will be
put to death? Explain your answer.

Rating

Content of work/
responses to questions

Personal reflection

72

Self-assessment

My response is thorough.
My reflections are thoughtful
I make meaningful connections and complete.
to important ideas from the
I reveal personal feelings about
lesson.
the topic.
I draw upon previous knowledge I reflect on personal experiences
and/or connect my response to related to the topic.
larger issues.
I use humor, questioning, and
I support my responses with
other techniques that probe for
relevant details and accurate
deeper meaning.
facts.

I describe how my understanding


has changed using specific,
meaningful examples.
I make comparisons between what
I understood before and what I
understand now.
I raise important questions for
further exploration, or describe new
topics I'd like to learn.

My response is adequate but


could be more thorough.
I make some connections to
ideas from the lesson.
I support my responses with
some details and facts, but they
are not completely accurate.

My reflections are adequate, but


could be more thoughtful.
I reveal some personal feelings
about the topic.
I mention personal experiences
but don't reflect on them.
I use some humor or questioning
in my writing.

I describe how my understanding


has changed and give some
examples.
I make comparisons between what
I understood before and what I
understand now.
I briefly mention new questions or
topics for exploration.

My responses is incomplete.The
connections I make to other
ideas or information are weak. I
provide only weak or
incomplete supporting evidence.

My reflections are brief.


I reveal very little about my
personal feelings or experiences.
There is little reflection or
questioning; it sounds as if I'm
not really interested in the topic.

I provide some information about


how my understanding has
changed.
I don't include any examples.
I provide only limited comparison
between what I understood before
and what I understand now.

My response is random or
unrelated to the question.
My writing is disorganized and
unconnected to any important
ideas.

My reflection is limited or
superficial.
I don't reveal any personal
feelings or ideas.

I don't reveal anything about how


my understanding of the issue has
changed.

Your
score/
notes:

Short Story: Ordering Events in a Story

73

Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Goldilocks. She lived at
the edge of the forest with her family. One morning, while she was
picking flowers, Goldilocks wandered into the forest and lost her way.
She was very frightened, but then she saw a friendly little cottage in
the distance.
The friendly little cottage belonged to three bears. One was a great big
Papa Bear, one was a middle-sized Mama Bear, and one was a tiny
little Baby Bear. That morning, the three bears decided to take a walk
while their porridge which tastes like oatmeal was cooling. It was
too hot to eat!
Right as they left through the back door, Goldilocks came in through
the front door very quietly. The first thing she saw and smelled was
the sweet, steamy porridge. I sure am hungry, Goldilocks said. Ill
just have one bite.
First, she tried a spoonful from Papa Bears great big bowl. OW! she
yelled, TOO HOT!
Next, she tried a spoonful from Mama Bears medium-sized bowl.
Brrrrr! TOO COLD! she complained.
Finally, Goldilocks tried a spoonful from Baby Bears tiny little bowl.
YUMMY! she cried. THIS IS JUST RIGHT! Goldilocks ate the entire
bowlful.
After running around the forest all day, Goldilocks feet were sore. I
need to sit down for a little while to rest my sore feet! she thought.
First, she sat in Papa Bears great big armchair. TOO HARD! she
screamed. Goldilocks stomped to the next chair.
Next she sat in Mama Bears medium-sized chair. It was so soft that
she sunk in! TOO SOFT! she complained, as she pulled herself out of
the cushions.
Finally, she sat in Baby Bears tiny little rocking chair. JUST RIGHT!
She laughed, and rocked until the chair broke.
With nowhere to sit, Goldilocks climbed up the stairs to find
74

somewhere to sleep. She was still very tired.


First, she tried Papa Bears great big bed. TOO HIGH! she yelled.
Then, she tried Mama Bears medium-sized bed. TOO LOW! she
screamed.
Finally, she tried Baby Bears tiny little bed. JUST RIGHT! she sighed.
Then Goldilocks fell asleep and dreamed dreams of flowers and warm
cookies.
Just then, the three bears returned home from their walk. They saw
spoons in their porridge, and were very surprised. Whos been eating
my porridge? asked Papa Bear.
Whos been eating my porridge? asked Mama Bear.
Whos been eating my porridge and eaten it all up? cried Baby Bear.
Then, the three bears saw that their chairs had been used. Whos
been sitting in my chair? Papa Bear howled.
Whos been sitting in my chair? wondered Mama Bear.
Whos been sitting in my chair and BROKEN it? squeaked Baby Bear.
The three Bears ran upstairs to check their bedrooms. Whos been
sleeping in my bed? Papa Bear roared.
Whos been sleeping in my bed? growled Mama Bear. She was a little
angry and a little worried.
Whos been sleeping in my bed and is STILL HERE? Baby Bear
screamed. He said it so loudly that he woke Goldilocks up.
She was so frightened that she jumped out of bed, ran out the front
door, and raced through the forest until she heard her mothers voice.
Lesson Title: Deportation of Jews and Their Arrival to Camps
Content: ELA
Teacher: Etheredge
75

Grade: 6th

Date: Friday, April 25 and Monday, April


28
Standards: ELACC6W3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or
events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event
sequences.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop
experiences, events, and/or characters.
Goals: Write a narrative based on real-world or imaginable events.
Understandings
Students will understand that a well-written narrative involves the organization of the
sequence in which particular events occur.
Essential Questions:
Why is it important to know the sequence in which events occur in a story and how can
this help me in writing a narrative?
Objectives
Students will know.
Students will be able to.
Well-written narratives include
Organize the sequence of events of short
organization of sequence of events and the stories as well as the characters.
characters.
Explain the importance of the sequence of
How to organize the sequence of events
events in which they occur.
Know the sequence of events in which they
occur.
Assessment
Formative/ Informal/ Performance Tasks: Summative/Formal/Other:
Chalk Talk
Journal
In class discussion
Resources:
Slide show
Audio Version
Chalk
Diary
Novel
Learning Experience
Friday
Hook: Before the students walk into the classroom, have their diaries on their desk. As
the students enter the classroom, have a slide show of images (the deportation of the

76

Jews/arriving at concentration camps) with music, and the lights dim to set the tone of the
Holocaust. There should be a large note of directions on the board for students to view
and follow. (Directions: Chose an image the is the most compelling to you and write a
narrative including dialogue between characters. Be sure that your story is relevant to the
Holocaust and the deportation of Jews.) The work should be done quietly and
independently. (15 MINUTES) (Students will not be able to finish they narratives, but
will revisit it activity the following class day.)
Engaging Learning Experience
Students will listen to the next 40 pages of the novel via the audio version of the novel.
The teacher will stop throughout the reading to ask thought provoking questions and
question the order in which events have happened. (45 MINUTES)
Closure:
Students will participate in a Chalk Talk where they will add to the sequence of events.
(15 MINUTES)
Monday
Hook: Hook: Before the students walk into the classroom, have their diaries on their
desk. As the students enter the classroom, have a slide show of images (the deportation of
the Jews/arriving at concentration camps) with music, and the lights dim to set the tone of
the Holocaust. There should be a large note of directions on the board for students to
view and follow. (Directions: Chose an image the is the most compelling to you and write
a narrative including dialogue between characters. Be sure that your story is relevant to
the Holocaust and the deportation of Jews.) The work should be done quietly and
independently. (15 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Experience
Students will listen to the next 40 pages of the novel via the audio version of the novel.
The teacher will stop throughout the reading to ask thought provoking questions and
question the order in which events have happened. (45 MINUTES)
Closure:
Students will get into their literature circles where they will discuss the novel and share
how they feel when they read the novel. Can they make any predictions of what they
think will happen next? (15 MINUTES)
Differentiation:
The teacher will scaffold the student into writing the narrative by discussing the elements
of a story.

Lesson Title: Concentration Camps and Death Camps

77

Content: ELA
Grade: 6th

Teacher: Etheredge
Date: Tuesday, April 29 and Wednesday April
30
Standards: ELACC6W3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events
using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts
from one time frame or setting to another.

Goals: Write a narrative based on real-world or imaginable events.


Understandings
Students will understand that a well-written narrative involves the organization of the sequence
in which particular events occur.
Essential Questions:
Why is it important to know the sequence in which events occur in a story and how can this help
me in writing a narrative?
Objectives
Students will know.
Students will be able to.
Well-written narratives include organization of Organize the sequence of events of short
sequence of events and the characters.
stories as well as the characters.
How to organize the sequence of events
Explain the importance of the sequence of
events in which they occur.
Know the sequence of events in which they
occur.

Formative/ Informal/ Performance Tasks:


Literature Circle
Journals
In-class discussion

Assessment
Summative/Formal/Other:

Resources:

Novel
Diary
Learning Experience

Tuesday
Hook: Explain to students that the next two days they will be talking about they concentration
78

camps and death camps. Ask them to connect this topic to where they are in the novel. Ask
students to share what they know about the concentration camps. (5 Minutes)
Engaging Learning Experience:
Divide the class in half.
Group One: Students will work in pairs to read and edit the narratives they have been working on
throughout the unit. Students may work on their revisions after their partner has edited their
paper.
Group Two: Students will read the next 32 pages of the text within their literature groups. They
will discuss how Anne Frank has changed thus far in the novel.
Students will switch at the completion of activity. (30 MINUTES/GROUP)
Closure: Whole-group, students will fill in the plot chart up to the portion that they are at in the
novel thus far. (15 MINUTES) *This will be completed in class Wednesday.
Wednesday
Hook:
Students will complete the plot chart that they ended with on Tuesday. They will also discuss
how the character, Anne Frank has changed throughout the text. Can they predict what will
happen to Anne Frank? (10 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Experience:
Students will begin by reading the novel silently (15 page). (20 MINUTES) *If students finish
early they may add to their narrative.
Students will discuss what they read in a whole-group setting. Teacher will ask specific questions
to students about the reading. (30 MINUTES)
Closure: Students will continue to read their novel silently (10 pages) and then summarize what
they read in their journals. (15 MINUTES)
Differentiation:
Teachers will scaffold the students in reading silently and will give students a chance to discuss
what they read before continuing to read silently.

79

Lesson Title: The Death of 11 Million


Content: ELA
Teacher: Etheredge
th
Grade: 6
Date: Thursday, May 1 and Friday, May 2
Standards: d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language
to convey experiences and events.
Goals: Write a narrative based on real-world or imaginable events.
Understandings
Students will understand that a well-written narrative involves the organization of the sequence
in which particular events occur.
Essential Questions:
Why is it important to know the sequence in which events occur in a story and how can this help
me in writing a narrative?
Objectives
Students will know.
Students will be able to.
Well-written narratives include organization of Organize the sequence of events of short
sequence of events and the characters.
stories as well as the characters.
How to organize the sequence of events
Explain the importance of the sequence of
events in which they occur.
Know the sequence of events in which they
occur.

Formative/ Informal/ Performance Tasks:


Literature Circle
Diary

Assessment
Summative/Formal/Other:
Narrative

Resources:
Novel
Diary
Movie
Learning Experience
Thursday
Hook:
Students will view images from the Holocaust, the aftermath of the Holocaust-death. Students
will write a short reflection of what they notice and how they feel when they view the images.
(10 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Experience:
Students will read the next 25 pages of the text within their literature circles. (30 MINUTES)
80

When they complete this task, the class regroup (whole-group). During this time, the class will
discuss what they read. (10 MINUTES)
Students will watch the first (20 MINUTES) of the movie, The Diary of Anne Frank
Closure: Students will write in their diaries the difference they noticed in the movie from the
novel. (5 MINUTES)
Friday:
Hook:
Explain to students that they will be turning in the narrative theyve been working on for a major
grade. Ask if any students have questions. Inform the students that they will be given the day to
complete the reading and work on their narratives in class. (5 MINUTES)
Engaging Learning Experience:
Divide Class in Half
Group One: Students will listen read the last 25 pages of the text with a partner and quietly
reflect on the novel when done.
Group Two: Students will finish writing their narratives, asking the teacher for help with any
questions of for editing, etc.
(30 MINUTES/GROUP) Switch.
Closure: Student will discuss whole group what they thought of the novel, what shocked them,
what they wish Anne Frank talked about in greater detail, etc. (10 MINUTES)
Differentiation:
Students will be given the opportunity to work on their narratives in class rather than outside of
class solely. Students are also able to come to visit the teacher for any questions.

Monday: Interactive Day! (Students may come by the classroom at the end of the day if they
have questions about their narrative.)
Tuesday: Students will turn in the narrative and any other assignments. Finish the movie, The
Diary of Anne Frank.

81

Lesson Title: Outline of Science Lessons


Content: Science

Teacher: Etheredge

Grade: 6th

Date: April 21st- May 2nd;


May 4th

Duration: 11 Days
Standards:
S6CS7. Students will question scientific claims and
arguments effectively.
a. Question claims based on vague attributions (such as
Leading doctors say...) or on statements made by
people outside the area of their particular expertise.b.
Recognize that there may be more than one way to
interpret a given set of findings.
S6CS6. Students will communicate scientific ideas and
activities clearly.
a. Write clear, step-by-step instructions for conducting
scientific investigations, operating a piece of equipment,
or following a procedure.
b. Understand and describe how writing for scientific
purposes is different than writing for literary purposes.
c. Organize scientific information using appropriate
tables, charts, and graphs, and identify relationships they
reveal.

Goals:
-Question claims based on vague attributions or on
statements made by people outside the area of their
particular expertise.
-Students will be able to conduct and experiments and
record the findings using the scientific method.
Understandings
Students will understand the importance of recording the
scientific method while gaining a new perspective on
diversity and how discrimination has factored into the
world currently, and historically.
Essential Questions:
How did the Nazis determine there was a superior race
and what were the effects of their claims?

82

Why did Adolf Hitler believe in a superior race? What


evidence did he have to support his claims? Was this
evidence enough to eliminate an entire population?
How is writing used differently for scientific purposes
rather than literary purposes?
How do I analyze the results of a scientific experiment?
What connections can I make with the butterfly and
moth experiment to the unit theme discrimination?
Objectives
Students will know.

The scientific explanation and rationale made


by Nazi scientists and doctors for the Superior
Race

The process and procedures of conducting a


scientific experiment
The correlation of the butterfly with the
Holocaust
How to format the scientific method
How to analyze the results of the experiment,
noting the similarities and differences of the
butterfly and moth

Students will be able to.


Question scientific
claims and arguments
effectively
Conduct a scientific
experiment
comparing the
butterfly to the moth.
Analyze the results of
the experiment
Recognize the
correlation the
experiment has with
discrimination

Assessment
Formative/ Informal/ Performance Tasks:
Scientific Method matching game
Scientific claims handout
KWL chart
Investigation

Summative/Formal/Other:
Science Portfolio
o Moth and
Butterfly
Experiment

Resources:
Science lab
Dissection equipment
Safety materials (goggles)
Moths and Butterflies
Scientific method flash cards
Scientific method worksheets
Portfolios

83

Handouts
o Claims
o Scientific Method
o Holocaust Experiments
o Investigation
Computer Lab

Learning Experience
Monday, April 21st and Tuesday, April 22nd:
Teacher will facilitate in a discussion over what a claim is and why people make a claim.
Students will look at various scientific claims made throughout history and identify if
those claims remain true today based on the information we know. Students will begin in
whole groups for the initial discussion and then move into small groups (3-4 students) for
the activity. Students will write about the discussion in class and any questions they still
have and add it to their portfolio.
Wednesday, April 23rd and Thursday, April 24th:
Teacher will facilitate a discussion over what evidence is and how we obtain evidence.
Encourage students to think about why evidence is important for a scientist? Is evidence
only used for scientific purposes?
Divide students into small groups of 3-4 student/ group. Provide each group with a
different set of data from the Holocaust (example: number of elderly deaths within six
months at a particular concentration camp). Have students analyze the data and discuss
what they notice within their groups. Then, have the students practice making scientific
claims using the T-chart handout provided below. The handout requires students to write
5 claims based on the data and provide sufficient evidence for each claim made. This will
show students the importance evidence has on making a claim about something. (Finish
on Thursday and share claims with the class.) Students will add all work to their
portfolios.
Friday, April 25th and Monday, April 28th:
Students will be introduced to the scientific method where they will discuss whole group
what it is, when its used, and how its used. Break the students into pairs where they will
challenge each other in a game of match. Each pair will be given a different experiment,
which will be cut into flashcard sizes. Students will match the portion of the scientific
method with the information that goes under that portion. For example, if the student
picks up a card labeled Hypothesis the or she would try to find the hypothesis in the
deck of cards before the students partner finds it. Once the students finish an experiment,
they will raise their hands and the teacher will come by the check their matches. If
students match correctly, they will pass their experiment to the next pair of students, and
begin matching a new experiment.
Tuesday, April 29th and Wednesday, April 30th:
Students will compare other forms of writing to that in science. In small groups of 3-4
students/group, students will discuss the importance of writing in science and talk about
how they are also writing in language arts drawing connections. Discuss how Anne Frank

84

wrote a diary about her experience in the Holocaust, but how a scientist may write about
the diseases within the concentration camps during the Holocaust. Provide students with
science experiments from the Holocaust to analyze. (Recordings should be added to
student portfolio.)
Have students practice writing an experiment using the scientific method be first
engaging in an investigation activity. Students will use the school as a resource for
finding the materials needed in their investigation. (See handout below.)
(Recordings should be added to student portfolio.)
Thursday, May 1st and Friday, May 2nd:
Working in pairs, students will engage in an experiment comparing moths and butterflies.
Students will be expected to follow the correct procedures in conducting the experience
and in the correct order. Students will be dissecting the moth and the butterfly, therefore
the teacher should assist the students in should stress the importance of safety in the lab.
Students will complete the lab on Thursday and must have all of their data recorded so
they can continue to work on their experiment on Friday.
On Friday, students will work in the computer lab where they will type their findings in
the experiment and draw a conclusion. (All work will be added to the students portfolio,
therefore each student within the pair must have a copy of all work recorded during the
experiement.)
Monday, May 5th: Interactive Day
Tuesday, May 6th:
Test Day! Students will show what they know by turning in their portfolios which will
contain all work from the unit, as well as a K-W-L chart where students will fill out what
they Know, what they Want to know, and what theyve Learned now that the unit is
completed.
Differentiation:
Students will engage in multiple learning activities that
incorporate multiple learning strategies and foster
students of all learning abilities.

85

Lesson Title: Outline of Math Lessons


Content: Math
Teacher: Trull
th
Grade: 6
Date: April 21st- May 2nd; May 6th
Duration: 11 Days
Standards:
MCC6.RP.3 Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve realworld and mathematical problems,
e.g., by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line
diagrams, or equations.
MCC6.EE.9 Use variables to represent two quantities in a realworld problem that change
in relationship to one another; write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the
dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable.
Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs
and tables, and relate these to the equation. For example, in a problem involving motion at
constant speed, list and graph ordered pairs of distances and times, and write the equation
d = 65t to represent the relationship between distance and time.
MCC6.G.1 Find area of right triangles, other triangles, special quadrilaterals, and
polygons by composing into rectangles or decomposing into triangles and other shapes;
apply these techniques in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems.
MCC6.EE.1 Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving wholenumber exponents.
MCC8.G.1 Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations.

Goals: Locate, analyze, and synthesize information related to the Holocaust and the act of
discrimination and apply this information to solve problems/make decisions.
Solve realworld and mathematical problems
Understandings
Students will understand that
- Math can be applied to real world situations and is used to solve real world problems
Essential Questions:
How can mathematical ratios be used to solve real world problems?
How do two variables, dependent and independent, change in relationship to one another? How
is the concept of distance and time related?
How do you find area? How can you use area to solve real world problems?
86

What does an exponent do to a whole number? How do you go from an exponential notation to
a whole number and vice versa?
What are the proprieties of translations, reflections, and rotations?
Students will know.

Objectives
Students will be able to.

How to mathematically convert ratios


and how to determine relevance

Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve


realworld and mathematical problems

Write an equation to express one


quantity, thought of as the dependent
variable, in terms of the other
quantity, thought of as the
independent variable.

Use variables to represent two


quantities in a realworld problem that
change in relationship to one another

How to find area of a polygon by


composing into rectangles or other
shapes

Apply the technique of computing


area to real world mathematical
problems

Write numerical expressions involving


whole-number exponents

Evaluate numerical expressions


involving wholenumber exponents.

Use translations, reflections, and


rotations experimentally

The proprieties of translations,


reflections, and rotations

Informal/ Performance Tasks:


Observations made by teacher
Ticket out the door

Assessment
Formal/Other:

Resources:

87

Test- Summative
Attic experiment- Formative
Train experiment- Formative
Star of David reflection, rotation,
and translation activity- Formative
Measure my Head ActivityFormative
Map Activity- Formative
Exponent Worksheet- Formative

Measuring tape
Measure my Head Worksheet
Graph paper
Shoe box
Glue and scissors
Doll house
Exponent worksheet
Holocaust Facts and Figures worksheet
Map of Europe

Learning Experience
Monday April 21 and Tuesday April, 22nd:
Measure my Head Activity
Student will read about the Superior Race and how Hitler believed the size of ones head
determined superiority.
Students will use perimeter and area to measure the heads of their classmates and will record
their findings in their notebooks- making sure to show all work and equations
st

Students will use the Star of David to explore rotations, reflections, and translations on their own
graph paper
Wednesday April 23rd and Thursday April, 24th:
Have the students create cattle cars/ train cars by measuring desks and putting them together to
make the size of a cattle car that would have been during the deportation of the Jews to
concentration camps. Find the area and the perimeter of the individual desks and then of the
entire car. Afterwards tell students that 100 people were put into that small space. Students will
have worksheet they will be filling out as they work- the students must show their work to get
credit.
Give each student a location on the map (where Anne Frank lives) and have him or her calculate
how many miles it is from there to Auschwitz. Then, tell each student that his or her trip took
four days, by railroad. Assuming that the train did not stop, how fast would the trains be
traveling? Then, tell them that most trains of this time period traveled at about 50 miles per hour.
Ask them how long they think the trip would take, if it did not stop. Record answers and work in
notebook.
Friday April, 25th and Monday April, 28th:
Bring in a dollhouse and show how much space is usually contained in an attic. Help students
realize what a limited space this is. Have them find the square feet available in the dollhouse and
use ratios to convert it to the size of a regular house. Have students work in pairs to make their
own attic out of a shoebox. Students will use their knowledge of ratios and rate reasoning to
make an accurate representation of the attic in which Anne Frank and her family were confined
to.

88

Record equations, work, and answers in notebook.


Tuesday April, 29th and Wednesday April, 30th:
Power point and worksheet on exponents
For homework have students research how exponents are used to solve real world problems.
Have students bring in an example problem for the class the following day.
Students will work on solving the real world exponent problems brought in by their classmates in
groups of three or four- record work and answers in notebook.
Thursday May, 1st and Friday May, 2nd:
Read the book How Much is A Million and discuss with students the concept of one thousand,
one million, and one billion. Have the students calculate if 6 million Jewish people were killed
during the Holocaust, and that was 2/3 of the pre-war European Jewish population, then how
many Jewish people used to live in Europe? Also have students use exponents to represent one
million and six million.
Have students work on Holocaust Facts and Figures worksheet in groups of two or three
Tuesday May, 6th:
Test Day
Differentiation:
Small and whole groups are used to foster collaboration and critical thinking
Hands on activities are implemented
Application of real world math problems
Written work is implemented
Performance and written based assessments are used

89

EXPONENT WORKSHEET
FIND THE VALUE OF EACH EXPRESSION:
5
1) 5

11
2) 2

3
3) 6

5
6) 6

7
7) 10

4
10) 12

2
11) 16

3
4) 9

2
5) 100

5
8) 3

8
9) 4

1
12) 27

SIMPLIFY EACH PRODUCT:


12
35
13) 10 10

7
12
14) a a

3
8
15) c c

7
9
16) d d

2e
8e
17) x x

103
1030
18) w w

90

6
5
19) a b

a
b
20) 10 10

12
19
11
21) g g g

Measure My Head - Holocaust Activity


Directions:TheNazisbelievedtheAryanracewassuperiorandthattrueAryanshadspecific
headmeasurements.Therefore,teacherswereinstructedtomeasuretheheadsoftheirstudents.
Thosewithsmallerheadswereconsideredinferior.
Anthropologists,biologists,andotherscientiststhroughouttheworldagreethattherearesome
obviousphysicaldifferencesamongracescolor,bodytype,hairtype,eyeshape,etc.However,
thesescientistsarevirtuallyunanimousindeclaringthatnosingleraceissuperiortoanyother.
Allraceshavememberswhoexcelatoneaspectoranotherofhumanaccomplishment,andall
havememberswhodonotexcel.
Overthecenturies,somecultureshaveestablishedrecordsofgreataccomplishmentincertain
areasartistic,intellectual,scientific,orgovernmental,forexample.Othershavecreatedfor
themselvesamazingadaptationstotheirenvironments,learningtolivesuccessfullyand
harmoniouslyclosetonaturewithlittleornotechnologicaladvancement.Menandwomenfrom
socalledadvancedsocieties,forexample,wouldbehardputtosurviveforevenafewdays
withouthelpintheharshenvironmentsoftheequatorialrainforest,thesandsoftheKalahari,or
thearcticzones.Greathumanaccomplishmentisevidentinallracesandculturesandthat
accomplishmentshowsitselfindifferentways,indifferentplaces,andatdifferenttimesorages.
Fromtimetotimeinthepast,someindividuals(andgroups)haveattemptedtodemonstratethat
oneracialgrouporanotherismorally,physically,and/orintellectuallybetterorsuperiorto
others.Nosuchattempts,however,havesurvivedscientificexaminationorcarefulthought.
Thereexistsnoproofthatanyoneraceisbetterorinferiortoanother.Andalthoughthere
aredifferencesamongus,therearefarmoresimilaritiesbindingustogetherasonehuman
family.

91

Holocaust Facts and Figures


Directions:SolvethefollowingproblemsbyusingfactsandfiguresprovidedfromHolocaust
books,atlases,encyclopedias,andothersources.
1. IfAdolfHitlerbecameChancellorofGermanyin1933andisbelievedtohave
committedsuicidein1945,howmanyyearswasheinpower?
____________________________________________
2. HowmanyyearswastheU.S.involvedinWorldWarII?
_________________________________
3. AnneFrankwasborninFrankfurtamMain,Germany,in1929.Shethenmovedto
Amsterdam,theNetherlands,in1934.HowlongdidsheliveinGermany?
_____________________________
4. Usingamileagelegendonamap,estimatethenumberofmilesAnneFrankwouldhave
traveledwhenshemovedfromFrankfurtamMain,Germany,toAmsterdaminthe
Netherlands.
________________________________________________________________________
_______
5. AnneFrankwasmovedbytheGermansfromAmsterdamtoWesterbork,from
WesterborktoAuschwitzBirkenau,andthentoBergenBelsenwhereshedied.Estimate
thenumberofmilesAnnewouldhavetraveledwhileshewasaprisoneroftheGermans.
________________________
6. HowmanyEuropeancountrieshadtheNazisoccupiedby1940?
___________________________
7. HowmanyyearsdidAnneFrankwriteinherdiary?
_____________________________________
8. MillionsofJewishpeoplewerekilledinasmanyas22differentEuropeancountries
duringWorldWarII.Afterresearchingforthefacts,createagraphshowingthenumber
ofJewishpeoplekilledineachofthefollowingcountries:Austria,Greece,Germany,

92

Poland,Latvia,Netherlands,France,Lithuania,Hungary,Czechoslovakia,Romania,the
SovietUnion,Yugoslavia.Asamplegraphformatthatmaybeusedappearsbelow.

Countries

Jewish Holocaust Deaths

Austria

Greece

Germany

Poland

Latvia

Netherlands

France

Lithuania

Hungary

Czechoslovakia

Romania

93

Soviet Union

Yugoslavia

Each mark on the graph represents 100,000 human beings.

9. InwhichEuropeancountrywerethemostJewskilled?___________Howmany?
___________
InwhichEuropeancountryweretheleastJewskilled?___________Howmany?
___________HowmanytotalJewswerekilledbytheendofthewarinallEuropean
countries?___________
10. ListtheothergroupsofpeoplebesidestheJewswhowerekilledduringtheHolocaust
periodandestimatethenumberkilledineachofthegroups.
Groupskilled_______________________________________________________
Numberkilled_______________________________________________________
11. Morethan17millionofthosewhoservedintheAlliedandAxisarmedforceslosttheir
livesinthewar.Thechartbelowliststhenumberofmilitarydeathsandmissinginaction
forsomeofthecountriesinvolved.Usetheinformationtoanswerthequestionsthat
follow.
Math
Allies Countries

Deaths

Australia

29,400

Belgium

8,000

Canada

39,000

94

China

1,400,000

France

122,000

Great Britain

305,000

Greece

1,830

Soviet Union

11,000,000

United States

405,400

Total

Axis Countries

Deaths

Bulgaria

32,000

Finland

89,000

Germany

3,250,000

Hungary

136,000

Italy

226,900

95

Japan

1,740,000

Romania

300,000

Total
1. WhichgrouphadthegreaternumberofdeathsAlliesorAxis?
___________________________
2. WhatisthedifferencebetweenthenumberofdeathsforAlliesandAxis?
____________________
3. WhichAlliedcountrysufferedthemostcasualties?
______________________________________
4. WhichAxiscountrysufferedthemostcasualties?
_______________________________________
5. HowmanymoredeathsdidGreatBritainsufferthanItaly?
_______________________________
6. HowmanymoredeathsdidtheSovietUnionsufferthanGermany?
_________________________
7. HowmanyfewerdeathsdidFrancesufferthanRomania?
_________________________________
8. HowmanyfewerdeathsdidHungarysufferthantheUnitedStates?
________________________
9. ListtheAlliedcountrieswithfewerthan400,000deaths.
_________________________________
10. ListtheAxiscountrieswithfewerthan150,000deaths.
__________________________________

96

Self-Evaluation
Name: Anna Trull

A. Overarching understanding and rationale:


1. Is the over arching understanding clearly stated? Yes
2. Has it been translated into one to three essential questions? Yes
3. Is the grade/age level indicated? Yes
4. Does it makes use of student input and is appropriate for the
community? Yes
5. Does your rationale statement make sense, and will it address
the personal and social issues of students at the age you teach?
Yes
B. Concepts and Essential Questions
1. Have you chosen a workable number of concepts and essential
questions to address? Yes
2. Do you seem to be central to your purpose? Yes
3. Have you defined the concepts in a way that children will
understand? Yes
C. Objectives
1. Do the objects include knowledge, skills, and attitudes? Yes
2. Are they elated to the national standards of a learned society
and the GPS? Yes
3. Do they make use of student input and are appropriate for the
community? Yes
4. Do they describe actions students will take to demonstrate their
learning? Yes
5. Do they include conditions under which students will
demonstrate learning and the criteria for judging whether
learning has occurred? Yes
D. Resource Bank: Are there a variety of resources, and do they support
your objectives and essential questions? Yes
1. Are resources organized so they are useful to you? Yes
2. Have you been creative and broad in your choices? Yes
E. Lesson plans
1. Are they well-organized? Yes
2. Do they include a variety of activities? Yes
3. Does the sequencing make sense, given your objectives and
essential questions? Yes
4. Have your tried to attend to the needs of your diverse students?
Yes
5. Have you been creative in some way? Yes
6. Are the content and skills important enough to be taught? Yes
7. Is there an introduction and content closure? Yes
8. Do they include questions for students, estimates of time, and
procedural closures or transitions? Yes
F. Evaluation

97

1. Is the evaluation well-organized and aligned with your


objectives? Yes
2. Are both formal and informal evaluations included, and are
assessments detailed enough to get important data about
student learning? Yes
3. Have you included copies of al assessments instruments and a
description of the criteria you will use to evaluate student work?
Yes
G. Group Evaluation
1. Ryan: 5

98

Self-Evaluation
Name: Ryan Etheredge
A. Overarching understanding and rationale:
1. Is the over arching understanding clearly stated? Yes
2. Has it been translated into one to three essential questions? Yes
3. Is the grade/age level indicated? Yes
4. Does it makes use of student input and is appropriate for the
community? Yes
5. Does your rationale statement make sense, and will it address
the personal and social issues of students at the age you teach?
Yes
B. Concepts and Essential Questions
1. Have you chosen a workable number of concepts and essential
questions to address? Yes
2. Do you seem to be central to your purpose? Yes
3. Have you defined the concepts in a way that children will
understand? Yes
C. Objectives
1. Do the objects include knowledge, skills, and attitudes? Yes
2. Are they elated to the national standards of a learned society
and the GPS? Yes
3. Do they make use of student input and are appropriate for the
community? Yes
4. Do they describe actions students will take to demonstrate their
learning? Yes
5. Do they include conditions under which students will
demonstrate learning and the criteria for judging whether
learning has occurred? Yes
D. Resource Bank: Are there a variety of resources, and do they support
your objectives and essential questions? Yes
1. Are resources organized so they are useful to you? Yes
2. Have you been creative and broad in your choices? Yes
E. Lesson plans
1. Are they well-organized? Yes
2. Do they include a variety of activities? Yes
3. Does the sequencing make sense, given your objectives and
essential questions? Yes
4. Have your tried to attend to the needs of your diverse students?
Yes
5. Have you been creative in some way? Yes
6. Are the content and skills important enough to be taught? Yes
7. Is there an introduction and content closure? Yes
8. Do they include questions for students, estimates of time, and
procedural closures or transitions? Yes
F. Evaluation
1. Is the evaluation well-organized and aligned with your
objectives? Yes

99

2. Are both formal and informal evaluations included, and are


assessments detailed enough to get important data about
student learning? Yes
3. Have you included copies of al assessments instruments and a
description of the criteria you will use to evaluate student work?
Yes
G. Group Evaluation
1. Anna: 5

Member of : Ryan and Anna: Each group member did a significant amount of work for the
Integrated Curriculum Unit, and the work load was evenly divided. We made a timeline of what
needed to be done by what date and what time. This time line was referred to daily and would be
the bases of forming daily "to-do" list. Each group member followed through at the scheduled
meeting times and was prepared to work with each other at those times. The members within the
group listened to one another's thoughts and suggestions thoroughly and was attentive. At the rise
of a problem, we worked together to form a solution, and attended to the solution adequately.

100