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Carolina Home Inspections of NC LLC

401 Cricketfield Lane


Cary, NC 27518
Office: 919-851-7960 Fax: 866-362-1599 E-mail: inspector@jjeffzehnder.com

Name: Vanitha Vijayakumar


Address: 316 Matilda Pl
Cary NC 27513
Telephone Number: 919-415-0935
E-mail Address: Vanitha <vanit1075@yahoo.co.in>
Inspection Ordered by: Client
Property Address: Same
Year Built/Structure Age*: 2013 - less than 1 Square Footage*:
Date Performed: 11/19-20/14
Weather
Reason for the Inspection: Special - one year, warranty

4149 sq ft
Sunny 45

I inspected the above property address on the date listed.

_______________________________________________
J Jeff Zehnder
North Carolina License 1626

*Age and square footage information as provided by client or client representative

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Summary Pages for: 316 Matilda Pl


This summary is not the entire report. The full report will include additional information of interest or
concern to the client. It is strongly recommended that the client promptly read the complete
report, for ease of use the summary is presented first followed by the body of the report. For
information regarding the negotiability of any item in this report under a real estate purchase contract,
contact your North Carolina real estate agent or an attorney.
The summary lists items that do not function as intended or adversely affects the habitability of the dwelling as
well as items that appear to warrant further investigation by a specialist or subsequent observation. A complete
report from the inspector, Carolina Home Inspections of NC LLC (hereinafter Inspector), consists of this
summary and a nine part detailed home inspection checklist. The checklist portion contains individual
component and system information, evaluation and testing conditions, and preventative maintenance comments.
If certain materials or items are found present in the structure, a listing of Items for Further Investigation may
be included in the list of Items Considered to be Unsatisfactory. These items will be specifically labled and
offer information regarding these documented home material issues and further investigation by a specialist or
subsequent observation may be required.
This property was not inspected by Inspector for the presence or absence of health-related molds, mildew, or
fungi. Inspector is not qualified, authorized, nor licensed to inspect for health-related molds, mildew, or fungi.
If information about these issues is desired, it would be prudent to have the entire structure inspected by an
industrial hygienist before closing proceedings.
It is strongly recommended that all evaluation and repair of all unsatisfactory items be performed by qualified
and licensed professionals.
General Home Inspections are not a building code-compliance inspection, but a visual inspection for safety and
system defects. The Inspection Report may comment on and identify as problems systems, components and/or
conditions which may violate building codes, but although safety defects and building code violations may
coincide at the time of the inspection, confirmation of compliance with any building code or identification of any
building code violation is not the goal of this Inspection Report and lies beyond the scope of the General Home
Inspection.
If you wish to ascertain the degree to which the home complies with any applicable building codes, you should
schedule a building code-compliance inspection.
The Inspection and report are performed and prepared for the sole and exclusive use and possession of the Client.
No other person or entity may rely on the report issued pursuant to the Agreement. In the event that any person,
not a party to this Agreement, makes any claim against Inspector, its employees or agents, arising out of the
services performed by Inspector under this Agreement, the Client agrees to indemnify, defend and hold harmless
Inspector from any and all damages, expenses, costs and attorney fees arising from such a claim.

Please note that all orientations are taken from the front of the home facing the home; an example = the
rear left bedroom far left window is taken from the view of the home from the front facing the home.
Items considered to be unsatisfactory follow on pages 3 through 33.
Repairs and corrective actions needed should be performed by the builder and their
subcontractors at the builders direction. If there are any doubts or conflicts, a licensed general
contractor should be used to repair all items reported in the summary section needing repair
unless otherwise noted.
Any items that the builder elects to not correct or disagrees with in this report should be
documented in writing for future reference.
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Foundation
1
Grade at Foundation on the right side near the rear of the home and the exterior condensing unit is too
high from mulch and dirt. This will allow easy access for pests and needs corrective actions.

3
Retaining Walls at rear of home leave no safe access to approximately 20% of the rear yard, or no way to
maintain the upper areas. Also, areas slope exceeds industry norms and the system need corrective actions.

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No access to upper areas and slop on terrace is greater than 3 to 1 with visible signs of erosion

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Exterior
Siding Condition Stone veneer has been installed on this home. An inspection of the visible
components revealed that the stone veneer has not been installed in compliance with the guidelines
provided by the Masonry Veneer Manufacturers Association (MVMA). Guidelines are available at
http://www.masonaryveneer.org/pdf.mvma030303.pdf. In absence of specific manufacturers
specifications the MVMA is the standard. If the owner/builder can provide proper specifications those
standards may be applied and the application may be acceptable.
A lack of proper detailing and flashing may result in water penetration behind the siding, resulting in
damage to the structure. Please note that because the water resistive barrier, lath and base coats are
concealed behind the stone veneer they cannot be evaluated by a visual evaluation.
18

The stone above the front bay window and door arch lack any provision for drainage, no visible weeps!

The weep holes in the brick cladding above the far right garage door are approximately 3 feet above the door
lintel and cracks are already forming in the area and cladding below.

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No weeps above the openings

Weeps in stone at base of wood framed area - ok.

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Area above bay with no weep and mortar impeding drainage above flashing.

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Area under brick sills has voids in mortar

Mortar above lintel has cracked and is now displaced and the brick above has settled and cracked.

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Weeps above right garage are 3 feet up and cracks have formed.

Cracks

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19

Cracks (Masonry) see last item.

22

Doors All exterior doors require sealant at the joint between the jambs and the sills, this was

never done on this home; deterioration of the jambs from moisture will continue to occur to the jambs
over time and all areas need repair.
Front door needs sealant

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Rear door needs sealant

23
Trim work the front right trim is not uniform and has a large gap that will allow pests access to the wall
system and home, corrective action is needed.

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24
Paint & Caulk along the garage trim is already separating from the surrounding area and needs corrective
action to prevent moisture and air penetration.

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30
Railings along the deck have warped and are no longer performing as intended and deflect easily,
corrective action is needed.

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Plumbing - A licensed plumbing contractor should be used to repair all items reported in
this section needing repair unless otherwise noted.
58
Bathroom Plumbing Fixtures the master suite tub drips and does not completely shut off, corrective
actions are needed.

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Electrical - A licensed electrical contractor should be used to perform any electrical repair,
replacement, evaluation or consultation of all items reported in this section needing repair or evaluation
unless otherwise noted.
76
Receptacles, Switches, & Fixtures some of the homes safety covers are loose or lacks fasteners
and need corrective actions for safety.
Master bedroom cover

81
Wiring to other Major Electrical Equipment the dryer plug is not installed in compliance with
manufacturers specifications and guidelines and is not safe, corrective actions are needed.

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Central Heating System - A licensed Mechanical contractor should perform any HVAC or
ventilation repair, replacement, evaluation or consultation for all items reported in this section needing
attention unless otherwise noted.
97

Supply/ Return Plenums the return grill shown is not secure and needs corrective actions.

100
Fireplaces hearth is not secure and cracks and pops under hand pressure, corrective action is needed or it
can easily be damaged.

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Interior
While fit and finish item are not normally part of formal home inspections there are too many issues to
not list some of them and the underlying conditions and issues. The interior doors, cabinets and trim as
a group need corrective actions and have not been installed with the amount of professional
craftsmanship expected. The nail pops and cracks in the drywall also need some actions.
Walls, Ceilings, Floor & Trim - Fit and Finish - Defects there are numerous fit
and finish defects in the finished drywall and trim that need corrective actions. To facilitate repairs the
homeowner will mark them with colored tape or labels, some were marked during this inspection but not
all. Some finish defects are listed below that needs corrective actions.
110, 111, 112 & 119

Master bath door and rear deck door drywall both have a straight line crack above, this type of crack is
not a result of settlement but is indicative of workmanship and should be repaired .

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Diagonal cracks are indicative of settlement and while they can/should be repaired they should also be
monitored moving forward to ensure movement does not worsen and necessitate further actions.

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111

Ceiling in the utility room has a large hole that needs repair.

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112
Floors the carpeted doorways have areas where the pad was cut too short and the hardwood floors have
areas that show visible expansion space, all areas need corrective actions
Pad short

Floor short

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117

Windows - spring balance is not functioning as intended in the master bedroom, needs corrective aciton.

118

Doors numerous interior doors do not function as intended and need corrective actions, specifics follow.
1st floor guest bedroom and closet doors do not function as intended.

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1st floor guest bedroom and closet doors do not function as intended.

Master closet door does not function as intended.

Please note, that while many of the other interior doors operate they also have issues, in some cases the latch just
catches by a very small margin and in some cases the doors are hinge bound, all doors should be reviewed and
repairs completed.
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119
Trim work - numerous areas of the homes trim are damaged, not secure, have gaps or poorly fit joints and
need corrective actions. Some but not all examples follow.
Gap and not secure

Gap

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Poorly finished

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121
Kitchen & Bath Cabinets the cabinets under the cooktop are not level and the countertop is not level,
this has left a inch gap with shims that is very excessive and needs corrective actions to prevent cracks in the
countertop.

121
Kitchen & Bath Cabinets the dinette areas supports are very poorly finished, not secure and not plumb
corrective actions are needed.

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Lack of craftsmanship & not secure

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121
Kitchen & Bath Cabinets areas of the trim are poorly done, not secure and have gaps, corrective actions
are needed.
Gap and loose

Gap and loose

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Gap and loose

121

Kitchen & Bath Cabinets - drawer front is loose and not secure to the drawer and needs corrective actions.

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122
Kitchen & Bath Counter Tops have cracked at the wall to countertop joint; grout used in these locations is
not the proper material for this use and cannot work for long. Flexible sealants are needed between these systems,
corrective actions are needed.

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Appliances
128

Fan/Hood outlet is damaged and does not fully close, corrective actions are needed
Bent and does not close

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133
Dryer Vent flex hose is too long; every foot of flexible duct materials has the same restriction as
5 feet of rigid metal duct and will impeded proper airflow. The length used should be shortened to least
amount needed to make the connection.

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I. Foundation, Basement and Structure


Foundation Type:

Block and Brick: Crawlspace closed and conditioned

Thickness: 8 inches
Column or Pier Type: Block and Brick
Floor Structure Type: Wood; Joists
Wall Structure Type: 2x4
Method used to observe under floor crawlspaces: Crawled into crawlspace
Equipment used for inspection of structure:

Battery operated stream light flashlight

Moisture Meter Model: Delmhorst BD-2100


8" Probe for exterior areas around plumbing, deck attachments, and exterior doors
S = Satisfactory

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

U = Unsatisfactory

Checkpoint
Grade at Foundation
Walks/Driveway
Retaining Walls
Foundation Walls
Sill Plate
Footing Drain Pipe
Floor Joists or Girder
Sub-flooring
Column or Pier Conditions
Insulation
Cracks
Ventilation
Prior Water Infiltration
Vapor Barrier
Sump Pump
Chimney Foundation
Dist. 1st Wood to Ground

Rating
U
S
U
S
NV
NV
S
S
S
S
NV
NA
No
S
NA
NA
S

O = Operating

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Comments
See Summary Page
See Summary Page

See Comment Below

Comments and Notes:

Footing drain should always drain to daylight and be protected from unwanted pests. Outlet should be
visible and have some sort of cover that allows water to move easily thru but not permit unwanted pests
easy access.

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Crawlspace views

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II. Exterior: Siding, Windows, Doors, and Other Elements


Wall Structure Type: Frame; wood
Wall Cover Material: Stone and Cement Fiber and brick
S = Satisfactory

18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35

U = Unsatisfactory

Checkpoint
Siding Condition
Cracks (Masonry)
Vegetation
Windows
Doors
Trim work
Paint & Caulk
Storm Doors & Windows
Porch
Decks
Steps
Balconies
Railings
Attached Shed
Carport
Garage
Garage Door Reverse
Mechanism
Garage Door

O = Operating

Rating
U
U
S
S
U
U
U
NA
S
S
S
NA
U
NA
NA
S
S
S

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Comments
See Summary Page
See Summary Page
See Comment Below
See Summary Page
See Summary Page
See Summary Page

See Summary Page

Tested on:
Electric

Force

Eyes

Both

Manual

Comments and Notes:

Vegetation: all vegetation should be kept away from the homes exterior, a minimum of 12 inches free
air space is required to ensure the life of the home and its exterior surfaces. Also trees hanging over the
drip line of the roof should be kept clear of the roof plane for 8-12 feet.

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III. Roof
Type of Roof:

Gable with modifed hips

Roof Structure:

Trusses

Sheathing Material: OSB

Method used to observe Roof Surface:


Materials:

Fiberglass

Layers:

One layer

Rain Gutters:

Aluminum

Visual with drone

Attic Access Method: Pull-down stairs


Attic Ventilation: Soffit and Ridge Vents
S = Satisfactory

36
37

38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49

U = Unsatisfactory

Checkpoint
Shingle Condition
Flashing & Joints

Eaves, Soffits & Fascias


Skylights
Vent Pipes
Chimney
Gutters & Downspouts
Attic Ventilation
Attic Ventilation Fan &
Thermostat
Attic Water Infiltration
Attic Insulation
Joists & Rafters
Sheathing
Trusses

O = Operating

Rating
S
S

S
NA
S
NA
S
NA
NA
No
S
S
S
S

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Comments
Flashings are generaly not visable due to construction
methods as well as aplications of covering materials,
inspection process is only able to include those portions
that are visable.

See Comment Below

limited visability
limited visability
limited visability
limited visability

Comments and Notes:

Pipe Boots roof pipe boots do not last as long as the roofing shingles and should be monitored over
time. Expected life is approximately 8-15 years; recommend replacement when they show signs of
deterioration to prevent leaks before they develop.
Downspouts must always be routed away from the homes foundation; the more effectively this is done
the better the home will perform over time. Moisture near and around a home contributes to foundation
issues, may contribute to organic (mold) growth in the home and is a draw for pests.

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General Roof Views

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IV. Plumbing System


Water Supply:

Municipal

Supply Piping: PEX

Distribution Piping: PEX with metal


Waste Disposal:

Municipal

Waste Piping: PVC

Waste Ventilation: PVC


Water Heater:
Manufacturer:

Electric and Solar


SolarEarth

Water Heater Location: Garage


S = Satisfactory

50
51
52
53
54
55

56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70

Gallon Capacity:

Model Number: SU120U-1


Water Shut Off Valve Location: Hall Closet

U = Unsatisfactory

O = Operating

Checkpoint
Condition of bathroom and laundry venting
Water Pressure (Functional Flow)
Functional Drainage
Condition of water piping
Fixture Connections including Faucets & Traps
Interior Drain, Sewer and Vent Piping

Water Heaters
Water Heaters Norma & Automatic Safety Controls
Bathroom Plumbing Fixtures
Bathroom Tile, Grout, & Caulk
Shower Pans
Whirlpool Tub
Laundry Tubs & Plumbing
Bar Sinks
Exposed Water Storage Tanks
Septic System and Well System
Condensate Pump
Drainage Ejector Pump
Kitchen Plumbing
Kitchen Sinks
Miscellaneous

Comments and Notes:

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119.9

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Rating
S
S
S
S
S
S
S

S
U
S
S
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
S
S
S

Comments

home is equipted with a Solar water


and electric system that should have
anuual maintenance by a profesional
familar with these systems
See Summary Page

See Comment Below

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Drain assembly is not installed to best practice and direct the flow from one side directly into the other just
below the sink connection with a T.

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V. Electrical System
Main Service Capacity: 400 Amps

110 Volts

Service Entry Conductor Type: Aluminum

110/220 Volts
Size: 4.0 2 200 AMP panels

Location of Main Panel: Garage

Overhead

Underground

Seal Intact

Weatherproofing of service entrance: Satisfactory


Main Panel Box Type:

Breakers

Additional Spaces Available: Yes

Number of Disconnects to cut all power: 2 (6 maximum)


House Wiring: Copper
Other: Receptacles:

Grounded

Polarity: Satisfactory

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI):

Yes

Operating: Yes

Location of Distribution & Sub Panels:


Distribution of Receptacles: Adequate
S = Satisfactory

U = Unsatisfactory

O = Operating

71
72
73
74
75
76
77

Checkpoint
Service Ground and Bonding Wires
Main Service Cable Attached to House
Service Panel Box
Breaker/Fuse Condition
Interior House Wiring
Receptacles, Switches, & Fixtures
Fire Alarms/Smoke Detector

Rating
S
NA
S
S
S
U

78
79
80
81
82

Ceiling Fans
Exhaust Fans
Wiring to Central Heat/AC Systems
Wiring to other Major Electrical Equipment
Outside Receptacles and Fixtures

Comments and Notes:

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S
S
S
S
U
S

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Comments

See Summary Page


Tested Manually
Security System

See Summary Page

Integrated

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VI. Central Heating System


Type: Forced Air Heat Pump

Power Source: Electric

Brand: Carrier

Model: FX4DNF049

Tested System: Yes


Condition: Satisfactory
Type of Ducts or Piping: Flex
Size of Filters:
S = Satisfactory

83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101

U = Unsatisfactory

Checkpoint
Flue Pipes & Chimneys
Slope & Joints
Automatic Safety Controls
Oil Tank & Oil Tank Vent
Installed Heat Source in each
room
Draft Device
Heat Exchanger
Furnace
Carbon Monoxide Detector
Thermostat
Heat Pump
Emergency/Aux. Heat Strips
Air Handler Unit
Supply Air Ducts
Supply/ Return Plenums
Registers
Inside Fan
Fireplaces
Gas Piping / Connection

Comments and Notes:

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O = Operating

Rating
NA
NA
S
NA

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Comments

S
NA
NA
NA
Yes
S
S
S
S
S
U
S
S
U
S

See Summary Page

See Summary Page

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VII Air Conditioning System


Type: Central Air Conditioner

Power Source: Electric

Brand: Carrier

Model:

Tested System: Yes


Condition: System not evaluated
Type of Ducts or Piping: Flex
S = Satisfactory

102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109

U = Unsatisfactory

Checkpoint
Filters
Normal Operating Controls
Evaporator Coil
Installed Cooling Source in each
room
Condensation Drain
Refrigerant Lines
Outside Condenser Unit
Temperature Drop Test
15 - 25 Degrees=normal cooling
temperature

O = Operating

Rating
S
S
NV

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Comments
See Comment Below
Sealed in unit.

S
S
S
S
U

See Comment Below


See Comment Below
Outside air temperature too cold to test system.

Comments and Notes:

Filters the filters can affect the operation and long term function of the HVAC system and should be
replaced on a regular basis.
Pleated filters vs. fibrous filters
Pleated filters generally should be replaced every 90 days
Fibrous filters are more temporary and should be generally replaced every 30 days.

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Condensate Drains: Exterior condensate drains should be directed away from the homes foundation,
splash blocks or other drainage system are recommended to keep the homes feet dry and to prevent
damage to the structure over time or provide pests a food source. Condensation Drains should always
drain to daylight and not be obstructed or the system may back up and damage may occur, needs repair.

Refrigerant lines must be protected from the elements or energy loss and poor system performance will
occur, a proper wrap or paint will help prevent deterioration of the exterior pipe insulation and should be
part of home maintenance or regular replacement of the insulation will be needed.

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VIII. Interior: Walls, Ceilings, Floors, Windows, & Doors


Ceiling Structure: Trusses
Observed sign of water penetration into the building: No
Observed signs of condensation on building components: No
S = Satisfactory

110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123

U = Unsatisfactory

Checkpoint
Walls
Ceilings
Floors
Stairways
Steps
Closets
Railings
Windows
Doors
Trim work
Insulation
Kitchen & Bath Cabinets
Kitchen & Bath Counter
Tops
Locks

Comments and Notes:

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Rating
U
U
U
S
S
S
S
U
U
U
NV
U
U
S

O = Operating

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Comments
See Summary Page
See Summary Page
See Summary Page

See Summary Page


See Summary Page
See Summary Page
See Summary Page
See Summary Page

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IX. Kitchen Appliances


S = Satisfactory

124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134

Checkpoint
Dishwasher
Range
Oven
Microwave
Fan/Hood
Garbage Disposal
Trash Compactor
Central Vacuum
System

Utility Room
Dryer Vent
Washer Pan

U = Unsatisfactory

Rating
S
S
S
S
U
S
NA

O = Operating

NA = Not Applicable NV = Not Visible

Comments
Electric
Electric
Vent:

Gas
Gas

Interior

Exterior

See Summary Page

NA
S
U
S

See Summary Page

Comments and Notes:

Supply lines-hoses water, all supply lines for household devices are available in a variety of materials.
While the black rubber washer hoses and lightweight plastic tubing for icemakers are common these are
not the best materials to ensure trouble free operations. These materials are not made for the long haul
and have a significantly higher failure rate than braded stainless steel hoses-lines. It is highly
recommended that all installed water supply lines-hoses used are braded stainless steel (dishwasher
lines, sink lines, washer hoses, icemaker hoses etc.). They do cost a little more but their failure rate is
almost nonexistent!
Dryer vents should be cleaned annually (or more frequently if needed) to prevent fire hazard and high
energy consumption from restrictions caused by lint build-up.

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Sealants ALL Caulking needs regular and routine maintenance.


Builders generally utilize basic caulking materials for many items. They use them to temporarily seal
joints and as putty for molding and trim. Caulks are not the best products to cover and protect most
joints and gaps because they shrink; they stain and discolor; harden over a very short time; in short they
are not very elastic or durable. Better products are available for a small increase in cost. Sealants are
much superior and do not harden fully, remain elastic and come in many forms. They come paintable
and unpaintable and some contain mold inhibitors. Never use any sealants without mold inhibitors,
they should always be used. Non paintable sealants should be used where no paint is needed or
planned and are generally clear. Sealants can come in colors but can be painted over for more protection
and do not easily discolor. It is always better to overspend on this relatively inexpensive protection
then to use cheap quality materials and make expensive repairs and increased regular maintenance later.
Sealants should be used to join almost all dissimilar materials (examples: tile to drywall, metal to
drywall, metal to wood & wood to masonry materials); as well as to prevent both planned expansion
cracks and general cracks in materials from allowing moisture to penetrate the joints; in non-resilient
materials at joints and corners (examples: granite counter top to granite countertop joints and tiles walls
corner and floor joints).

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General home maintenance


In order to maintain your home value and prevent damage from moisture intrusion it is important that
you pay attention to various areas of your home which will require maintenance on a regular schedule.
Although as the homeowner, you are responsible for determining necessary maintenance and seeing that
it is performed, some basic suggestions might include but are not limited to:
Concrete/asphalt surfaces:
- Seal or patch gaps and cracks to avoid damage from freezing moisture. Freezing moisture will enlarge
cracks in concrete and asphalt.
Exterior walls
- Trim back vegetation
- Seal gaps or cracks in walls and around doors and windows where moisture may penetrate with an
appropriate sealant or paint
- Replace any missing exterior wall covering material.
Roof
- The roof should be free of debris, which will hold moisture next to the roof covering material and
hasten deterioration.
- Keep the gutter system in good repair, sealing leaks and cleaning the gutters and downspouts
- Replace missing or damaged shingles and seal areas where flashing may not protect the roof structure
- Be sure that downspouts route roof drainage away from the foundation.
- In cold climates, downspouts which are connected to underground drains are subject to freeze
problems in the fall and spring.
Decks and porches
- Keep the finish in good condition. Clear finishes may require maintenance as often as every year or
two.
Plumbing
-Monitor pipe fittings, boilers and water heaters for corrosion or leakage. Maintain major appliances as
recommended by local professionals.
Heating
- Have the system, including the cabinet, burners, and blower and filter cleaned and adjusted on an
appropriate schedule. You can determine what constitutes an appropriate schedule by consulting with a
qualified heating contractor.
Moisture damage
- Moisture intrusion can cause damage to the home by affecting the ability of the soil to support the
weight of the foundation and by creating conditions favorable to the growth of biological organisms
such as mold fungus. Mold fungus will cause wood with which it comes into contact to decay and may
create unhealthy conditions by increasing concentrations of mold spores in the indoor air of the home.
Always watch for any signs of moisture intrusion and take steps to correct it immediately.

Date: 11/22/2014