You are on page 1of 34

Sacramento

Office of Education

County
LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

Participant
Handbook
for the

California Preliminary
Administrative Services
Credential Program
“Our guiding principle is that high-quality leadership
is key to success for students, teachers, schools, and districts.”
www.scoeleadership.net

Dr. L. Steven Winlock
Executive Director, Leadership Institute
(916) 228-2612
swinlock@scoe.net

Kristen Coyle
Director, Program Support
(916) 228-2538
kcoyle@scoe.net

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE
Curriculum and Instruction Annex
10461 Old Placerville Road, Suite 130
Sacramento, CA 95827

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Table of Contents

Participant Handbook for the California Preliminary
Administrative Services Credential Program
2014-2015
Welcome Letter from Superintendent Dave Gordon

p. 2

Staff/Faculty Directory ~ SCOE Cohort 5

p. 3

Staff/Faculty Directory ~ Shasta COE Partner Cohort 3

p. 4

Staff/Faculty Directory ~ Placer COE Partner Cohort 1

p. 5

California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSELs)

p. 6

Program Overview

p. 12

Course Descriptions

p. 16

Course Schedule ~ SCOE Cohort 5

p. 17

Course Schedule ~ Shasta COE Partner Cohort 3

p. 18

Course Schedule ~ Placer COE Partner Cohort 1

p. 19

Fieldwork Strategies Worksheet

p. 20

End-of-Course Essay Submission Deadlines

p. 21

End-of-Course Paper Evaluation

p. 23

Project Proposal Worksheet

p. 24

Project Presentation Outline

p. 25

Online Instruction ~ SCOE Moodle

p. 26

Online Component Timeline

p. 27

Policies and Procedures

p. 28

Preliminary Administrative Services Credential

p. 30

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

1

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Welcome Letter
Superintendent Dave Gordon
More than ever, strong school leadership is key to school
improvement. School administrators are responsible
for providing a high-quality education for all students
in our local schools. We need strong leaders to set high
standards, promote excellent teaching and motivate
students and teachers.
Research shows that the Sacramento region faces a
critical shortage of trained and talented school leaders.
A new WestEd study found that by 2017, due to
retirements and other factors, Sacramento County will
need nearly 300 new school site administrators while
the Sacramento region will need close to 500. For that
reason, the Sacramento County Office of Education
(SCOE) is taking an innovative approach to preparing administrators by establishing
our Leadership Institute.
The purpose of the Leadership Institute is to provide cutting edge training, on all
levels, to meet the needs of our local schools and districts. This includes those who
are currently holding district office leadership positions, as well as newly appointed
and aspiring administrators. For example, our program will provide aspiring
administrators with professional development and preparation and licensing upon
successful completion of their training.
We have developed our Institute in collaboration with the thirteen school districts
that we serve, along with the other nine county offices in our Capital region. This
cooperation will support success for all leaders involved in our program.
We are proud that our Leadership Institute is coordinated by Dr. L. Steven Winlock.
Dr. Winlock has a long and distinguished track record of designing and delivering
leadership training in the State of California.
Thank you for your interest in preparing the people who will lead our schools
and dedicate themselves to improving the quality of education in our local
communities.

David W. Gordon
Sacramento County Superintendent of Schools

2

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Staff/Faculty Directory
SCOE Cohort 5
Leadership Institute Staff

Email

Phone

Dr. L. Steven Winlock
Executive Director

swinlock@scoe.net

(916) 228-2612 - work
(916) 718-8664 - cell

Kristen Coyle
Director, Program Support

kcoyle@scoe.net

(916) 228-2538 - work
(916) 878-0247 - cell

Michelle Carlson
Coordinator, Recruitment,
Master’s Program

micarlson@scoe.net

(916) 228-2629 - work

Melanie Slootweg
Manager, Production
Editor, The Link to Leadership

mslootweg@scoe.net

(916) 228-2635 - work

Cheryl Roberts
Program Analyst

croberts@scoe.net

(916) 228-3908

Paula Duncan
Coordinator,
Online Principal-Coaches

pduncan@egusd.net

(916) 933-8016 - home
(916) 798-7270 - cell

Dr. Mary Rountree
Coordinator, Master’s Program

mbrountree88@yahoo.com

(916) 548-4197 - cell

Leadership Institute Faculty

Email

Phone

Dr. General Davie, Jr.
Former Superintendent,
San Juan USD and Natomas USD

gernaldavie@comcast.net

(916) 961-3199 - home
(916) 952-3081 - cell

Linda Rooney
Superintendent, Eureka USD

lrooney@eureka-usd.k12.ca.us

(916) 774-1201 - work
(916) 677-7201 - cell

Dr. Anne Zeman
Executive Director, Elementary
Education, Twin Rivers USD

Anne.Zeman@twinriversusd.
org

(916) 566-1600,
ext. 50024 - work
(916) 804-2773 - cell

Tami Wilson
Director,
Development and Training,
K-12 English Language Arts

twilson@scoe.net

(916) 228-2350 - work
(916) 807-4811 - cell

Dr. L. Steven Winlock
Executive Director,
Leadership Institute

swinlock@scoe.net

(916) 228-2612 - work
(916) 718-8664 - cell

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

3

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

4

Staff/Faculty Directory
Shasta COE Partner Cohort 3
Academy Staff

Email

Phone

Dr. Kim McKenzie
Director, Leadership Academy
Shasta COE

kmckenzie@shastacoe.org

(530) 225-0125 - work
(530) 510-8124 - cell

Charlie Ellich
Instructional Services Program
Assistant, Leadership Academy
Shasta COE

cellich@shastacoe.org

(530) 225-0255 - work

Academy Faculty

Email

Phone

Frank Adelman
Superintendent, Oak Run
Elementary School District

fadelman@oakrunschool.
org

(530) 472-3241 - work
(530) 339-0930 - cell

Dr. Kim McKenzie
Director, Leadership Academy
Shasta COE

kmckenzie@shastacoe.org

(530) 225-0125 - work
(530) 510-8124 - cell

Doreen Fuller
Executive Director, Curriculum
and Instruction
Shasta COE

dfuller@shastacoe.org

(530) 245-7834 - work
(530) 229-4233 - cell

Cheryl Olson
Assistant Superintendent,
Instructional Services, Enterprise
Elementary School District

colson@eesd.net

(530) 224-4100 - work
(530) 356-2459 - cell

Mary Sakuma
Assistant Superintendent,
Human Resources
Butte COE

vonrotzsakuma@gmail.com

(530) 200-0616 - cell

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Superintendent,
Early Childhood Services
Shasta COE

thompson@shastacoe.org

(530) 225-0336 - work
(530) 524-1212 - cell

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Staff/Faculty Directory
Placer COE Partner Cohort 1
Institute Staff

Email

Phone

Dr. Renee Regacho-Anaclerio
Director, Leadership Institute
Deputy Superintendent,
Placer County Office of Education

ranaclerio@placercoe.k12.
ca.us

(530) 889-5940 - work

Jessica Garlock
Administrative Assistant to the
Deputy Superintendent

jgarlock@placercoe.k12.
ca.us

(530) 889-5936 - work

Institute Faculty

Email

Phone

Gary Callahan
Assistant Superintendent,
Roseville City School District

gcallahan@rcsdk8.org

(916) 771-1600 ext. 106
- work

Scott Leaman
Superintendent, Western Placer
Unified School District

sleaman@wpusd.k12.ca.us

(916) 645-6350 - work

Karen Quinlan
Principal, George Cirby
Elementary School, Roseville City
School District

karenq@rcsdk8.org

(916) 771-1730 - work

Roger Stock
Superintendent, Rocklin Unified
School District

rstock@rocklin.k12.ca.us

(916) 630-2230 - work

Sara Wegner
Director, Curriculum and
Staff Development, Dry Creek
Joint Elementary School District

swegner@drycreek.k12.
ca.us

(916) 770-8853 - work

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

5

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

CA Professional Standards
for Educational Leaders (CPSELs)

STANDARD 1: DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A SHARED VISION
Education leaders facilitate the development and implementation of a shared vision of learning and growth of all students.
Element 1A: Student-Centered Vision
Leaders shape a collective vision that uses multiple measures of data and focuses on equitable access, opportunities, and outcomes for all students.
Example Indicators:
1A-1 Advance support for the academic, linguistic, cultural, social-emotional, behavioral, and physical development of each learner.
1A-2 Cultivate multiple learning opportunities and support systems that build on student assets and address student needs.
1A-3 Address achievement and opportunity disparities between student groups, with attention to those with special needs; cultural, racial,

and linguistic differences; and disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds.
1A-4 Emphasize the expectation that all students will meet content and performance standards.
Element 1B: Developing Shared Vision
Leaders engage others in a collaborative process to develop a vision of teaching and learning that is shared and supported by all stakeholders.
Example Indicators:
1B-1 Embrace diverse perspectives and craft consensus about the vision and goals.
1B-2 Communicate the vision so the staff and school community understands it and uses it for decision-making.
1B-3 Build shared accountability to achieve the vision by distributing leadership roles and responsibilities among staff and community.
1B-4 Align the vision and goals with local, state, and federal education laws and regulations.
Element 1C: Vision Planning and Implementation
Leaders guide and monitor decisions, actions, and outcomes using the shared vision and goals.
Example Indicators:
1C-1 Include all stakeholders in a process of continuous improvement (reflection, revision, and modification) based on the systematic review

of evidence and progress.
1C-2 Use evidence (including, but not limited to student achievement, attendance, behavior and school climate data, research, and best

practices) to shape and revise plans, programs, and activities that advance the vision.
1C-3 Marshal, equitably allocate, and efficiently use human, fiscal, and technological resources aligned with the vision of learning for

all students.

6

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL), continued
STANDARD 2: INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP
Education leaders shape a collaborative culture of teaching and learning informed by professional standards and focused on student and professional growth.
Element 2A: Professional Learning Culture
Leaders promote a culture in which staff engages in individual and collective professional learning that results in their continuous improvement
and high performance.
Example Indicators:
2A-1 Establish coherent, research-based professional learning aligned with organizational vision and goals for educator and student growth.
2A-2 Promote professional learning plans that focus on real situations and specific needs related to increasing the learning and well-being of

all staff and students.
2A-3 Capitalize on the diverse experience and abilities of staff to plan, implement, and assess professional learning.
2A-4 Strengthen staff trust, shared responsibility, and leadership by instituting structures and processes that promote collaborative inquiry

and problem solving.
Element 2B: Curriculum and Instruction
Leaders guide and support the implementation of standards-based curriculum, instruction, and assessments that address student expectations
and outcomes.
Example Indicators:
2B-1 Develop a shared understanding of adopted standards-based curriculum that reflects student content and performance expectations.
2B-2 Promote and monitor the use of state frameworks and guides that offer evidence-based instructional and support strategies to increase

learning for diverse student assets and needs.
2B-3 Provide access to a variety of resources that are needed for the effective instruction and differentiated support of all students.
2B-4 Guide and monitor the alignment of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional practice.
Element 2C: Assessment and Accountability
Leaders develop and use assessment and accountability systems to monitor, improve, and extend educator practice, program outcomes and
student learning.
Example Indicators:
2C-1 Define clear purposes, goals, and working agreements for collecting and sharing information about professional practice and

student outcomes.
2C-2 Guide staff and the community in regular disaggregation and analysis of local and state student assessment results and program data.
2C-3 Use information from a variety of sources to guide program and professional learning planning, implementation and revisions.
2C-4 Use professional expectations and standards to guide, monitor, support, and supervise to improve teaching and learning
2C-5 Apply a variety of tools and technology to gather feedback, organize and analyze multiple data sources, and monitor student progress

directed toward improving teaching and learning.

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

7

California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL), continued
STANDARD 3: MANAGEMENT AND LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
Education leaders manage the organization to cultivate a safe and productive learning and working environment.
Element 3A: Operations and Facilities
Leaders provide and oversee a functional, safe, and clean learning environment.
Example Indicators:
3A-1 Systematically review the physical plant and grounds to ensure that they are safe, meet Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

requirements, and comply with conditions that support accessibility for all students.
3A-2 Collaborate with the district to monitor and maintain student services (e.g., food, transportation) that contribute to student learning,

health and welfare.
3A-3 Manage the acquisition, distribution, and maintenance of equipment, materials, and technology needed to meet the academic,

linguistic, cultural, social-emotional, and physical requirements of students.
3A-4 Work with stakeholders and experts to plan and implement emergency and risk management procedures for individuals and the site.
Element 3B: Plans and Procedures
Leaders establish structures and employ policies and processes that support students to graduate ready for college and career.
Example Indicators:
3B-1 Develop schedules and assign placements that are student-centered and maximize instructional time and staff collaboration.
3B-2 Manage legal and contractual agreements and storage of confidential records (both paper and electronic) to insure student security

and confidentiality.
3B-3 Set clear working agreements that support sharing problems, practices and results within a safe and supportive environment.
3B-4 Engage stakeholders in using problem solving and decision-making processes and distributed leadership to develop, monitor, evaluate

and revise plans and programs.
Element 3C: Climate
Leaders facilitate safe, fair, and respectful environments that meet the intellectual, linguistic, cultural, social-emotional, and physical needs of
each learner.
Example Indicators:
3C-1 Strengthen school climate through participation, engagement, connection, and a sense of belonging among all students and staff.
3C-2 Implement a positive and equitable student responsibility and behavior system with teaching, intervention and prevention strategies

and protocols that are clear, fair, incremental, restorative, culturally responsive, and celebrate student and school achievement.
3C-3 Consistently monitor, review and respond to attendance, disciplinary, and other relevant data to improve school climate and student

engagement and ensure that management practices are free from bias and equitably applied to all students.
Element 3D: Fiscal and Human Resources
Leaders align fiscal and human resources and manage policies and contractual agreements that build a productive learning environment.
Example Indicators:
3D-1 Provide clear rationale for decisions and distribute resources equitably to advance shared vision and goals focused on the needs of

all students.
3D-2 Work with the district and school community to focus on both short and long-term fiscal management.
3D-3 Actively direct staff hiring and placement to match staff capacity with student academic and support goals.
3D-4 Engage staff in professional learning and formative assessments with specific feedback for continuous growth.
3D-5 Conduct personnel evaluations to improve teaching and learning, in keeping with district and state policies.
3D-6 Establish and monitor expectations for staff behavior and performance, recognizing positive results and responding to poor

performance and/or inappropriate or illegal behavior directly and in a timely and systematic manner.

8

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL), continued
STANDARD 4: FAMILY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Education leaders collaborate with families and other stakeholders to address diverse student and community interests and mobilize
community resources.
Element 4A: Parent and Family Engagement
Leaders meaningfully involve all parents and families, including underrepresented communities, in student learning and support programs.
Example Indicators:
4A-1 Establish a welcoming environment for family participation end education by recognizing and respecting diverse family goals and

aspirations for students.
4A-2 Follow guidelines for communication and participation established in federal and state mandates, district policies, and

legal agreements.
4A-3 Solicit input from and communicate regularly with all parents and families in ways that are accessible and understandable.
4A-4 Engage families with staff to establish academic programs and supports that address individual and collective student assets and needs.
4A-5 Facilitate a reciprocal relationship with families that encourages them to assist the school and to participate in opportunities that

extend their capacity to support students.
Element 4B: Community Partnerships
Leaders establish community partnerships that promote and support students to meet performance and content expectations and graduate ready
for college and career.
Example Indicators:
4B-1 Incorporate information about family and community expectations and needs into decision-making and activities.
4B-2 Share leadership responsibility by establishing community, business, institutional and civic partnerships that invest in and support

the vision and goals.
4B-3 Treat all stakeholder groups with fairness and respect and work to bring consensus on key issues that affect student learning and
well-being.
4B-4 Participate in local activities that engage community members and staff in communicating school successes to the broader community.
Element 4C: Community Resources and Services
Leaders leverage and integrate community resources and services to meet the varied needs of all students.
Example Indicators:
4C-1 Seek out and collaborate with community programs and services that assist students who need academic, mental, linguistic, cultural,

social-emotional, physical, or other support to succeed in school.
4C-2 Build mutually beneficial relationships with external organizations to coordinate the use of school and community facilities.
4C-3 Work with community emergency and welfare agencies to develop positive relationships.
4C-4 Secure community support to sustain existing resources and add new resources that address emerging student needs.

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

9

California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL), continued
STANDARD 5: ETHICS AND INTEGRITY
Education leaders make decisions, model, and behave in ways that demonstrate professionalism, ethics, integrity, justice, and equity and hold
staff to the same standard.
Element 5A: Reflective Practice
Leaders act upon a personal code of ethics that requires continuous reflection and learning.
Example Indicators:
5A-1 Examine personal assumptions, values, and beliefs to address students’ various academic, linguistic, cultural, social-emotional,

physical, and economic assets and needs and promote equitable practices and access appropriate resources.
5A-2 Reflect on areas for improvement and take responsibility for change and growth.
5A-3 Engage in professional learning to be up-to-date with education research, literature, best practices and trends to strengthen their

ability to lead.
5A-4 Continuously improve cultural proficiency skills and competency in curriculum, instruction, and assessment for all learners.
5A-5 Sustain personal motivation, commitment, energy, and health by balancing professional and personal responsibilities.
Element 5B: Ethical Decision-Making
Leaders guide and support personal and collective actions that use relevant evidence and available research to make fair and ethical decisions.
Example Indicators:
5B-1 Consider and evaluate the potential moral and legal consequences of decisions.
5B-2 Review multiple measures of data and research on effective teaching and learning, leadership, management practices, equity and

other pertinent areas to inform decision-making.
5B-3 Identify personal and institutional biases and remove barriers that derive from economic, social-emotional, racial, linguistic, cultural,

physical, gender, or other sources of educational disadvantage or discrimination.
5B-4 Commit to making difficult decisions in service of equitable outcomes for students, staff and the school community.
Element 5C: Ethical Action
Leaders recognize and use their professional influence with staff and the community to develop a climate of trust, mutual respect, and honest
communication necessary to consistently make fair and equitable decisions on behalf of all students.
Example Indicators:
5C-1 Communicate expectations and support for professional behavior that reflects ethics, integrity, justice, and equity.
5C-2 Use a variety of strategies to lead others in safely examining personal assumptions and respectfully challenge beliefs that negatively

affect improving teaching and learning for all students.
5C-3 Encourage and inspire others to higher levels of performance, commitment, and motivation by modeling transparent and

accountable behavior.
5C-4 Protect the rights and appropriate confidentiality of students, staff, and families.
5C-5 Promote understanding and follow the legal, social, and ethical use of technology among all members of the school community.

10

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL), continued
STANDARD 6: EXTERNAL CONTEXT AND POLICY
Education leaders influence political, social, economic, legal and cultural contexts affecting education to improve education policies and practices.
Element 6A: Understanding and Communicating Policy
Leaders actively structure and participate in opportunities that develop greater public understanding of the education policy environment.
Example Indicators:
6A-1 Operate consistently within the parameters of federal, state, and local laws, policies, regulations, and statutory requirements.
6A-2 Understand and can explain the roles of school leaders, boards of education, legislators and other key stakeholders in making

education policy.
6A-3 Welcome and facilitate conversations with the local community about how to improve learning and achievement for all students,

including English Learners, and students needing additional support.
6A-4 Facilitate discussions with the public about federal, state and local laws, policies, regulations, and statutory requirements affecting

continuous improvement of educational programs and outcomes.
6A-5 Work with local leaders to assess, analyze and anticipate emerging trends and initiatives and their impact on education.
Element 6B: Professional Influence
Leaders use their understanding of social, cultural, economic, legal and political contexts to shape policies that lead to all students to graduate
ready for college and career.
Example Indicators:
6B-1 Advocate for equity and adequacy in providing for students’ and families’ educational, linguistic, cultural, social-emotional, legal,

physical, and economic needs, so every student can meet education expectations and goals.
6B-2 Support public policies and administrative procedures that provide for present and future needs of all children and families and

improve equity and excellence in education.
6B-3 Promote public policies that ensure the equitable distribution of resources and support services for all students.
Element 6C: Policy Engagement
Leaders engage with policymakers and stakeholders to collaborate on education policies focused on improving education for all students.
Example Indicators:
6C-1 Work with the governing board, district and local leaders to influence policies that benefit students and support the improvement

of teaching and learning.
6C-2 Actively develop relationships with a range of stakeholders, policymakers, and researchers to identify and address issues, trends,

and potential changes that affect the context and conduct of education.
6C-3 Collaborate with community leaders and stakeholders with specialized expertise to inform district and school planning, policies

and programs that respond to cultural, economic, social and other emerging issues.

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

11

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Program Overview

The SCOE Leadership Institute experience builds the capacity of instructional leaders to improve teaching and
learning so that each and every student meets or exceeds standards.
Leadership candidates will engage in a 12-month program that requires 154 hours of instruction (divided among
22 class days/7 hours each class), 77 hours of online learning, guided fieldwork, and end-of-year project for a total of
231 hours. Upon successful completion of the Leadership Institute program, participants will apply to the Commission
on Teacher Credentialing for a certificate of eligibility or a preliminary administrative services credential.

Admission Requirements
Submission of application materials by eligible participants includes:
• Completed application packet
• Personal Leadership Statement
• Resume
• Copy of Transcripts (Unofficial)
• Copy of California Teaching Credential and/or Service Credential
• Copy of CBEST Verification or proof of registration for CBEST examination

Upon analysis of application and interview, the participants will be invited to participate in the SCOE Leadership
Institute.

Progression Through the Program/Curriculum
• Participants are required to participate in face-to-face coursework that is grounded in the California Standards for
Educational Leaders (CPSELs). Working in small cohort groups, participants will collaboratively explore theories and
application of these standards. Each course is three to four
days in length, for a total of 20 days, and accounts for 50%
EDA 631 Development and Implementation of a
of the program.
Shared Vision
There will be an additional 3 days spent in State of Your
Leadership, Program Overview, Orientation Technology,
and the culminating activity or Symposium and Fieldwork
Presentations for a total of 23 days.

EDA 632

Instructional Leadership

EDA 633

Management and Learning Environment

EDA 634

Family and Community Engagement

EDA 635

Ethics and Integrity

EDA 636

External Context and Policy

Progression Through the Program/Curriculum, cont.
• Online learning that is interactive and will reinforce strategies and concepts learned in the classroom will account for an
additional 25% of the program.
• Fieldwork experiences and end-of-year project development will account for the remaining 25% of the program.
The experiences will be focused on teaching and learning. Online-Principal Coaches, Faculty Mentors, and District Coaches
will be assigned to help build relationships and to provide ongoing support.

12

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Program Overview
Continued

Completion of Program Requirements
Participants are expected to:
• attend Orientation/Technology Workshop and all Saturday classes.
• successfully complete all of the required SCOE Leadership Academy coursework per the Submission Timeline
(i.e., end-of-course paper).
• successfully complete online learning components and assignments.
• successfully complete the project proposal and end-of-year project, including presentation.

Coaching Support
The Leadership Institute provides coaching to the participants throughout the year program. Coaching is an
important aspect of a participant’s successful completion of the program. In addition to the ongoing coaching by the
Institute, there are three other coaching roles:
Faculty Coach - The Institute will assign each participant a faculty member to coach him/her through the different
aspects of the program. The focus of this coaching is to support the participant throughout the year. Faculty coaches
make contact and have discussions around the participant’s progress and experiences.
Online Principal-Coach - The online principal-coach will focus on providing insights and developing the participants’
knowledge in judgment, relationship, implementation, and balance with the online instruction component of the
Leadership Program.
District Coach - The Leadership Institute has established a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with each participant’s
school district. In the MOU, the district will provide a coach who will assist with the aspect of the Leadership Program
that involves district support. The district coach will support the participant in his/her work such as fieldwork strategies
for each course and the end-of-year project. The support will be in the area of providing knowledge and assistance
as it relates to the participants’ use of district concepts and direction for successful completion of the program. (Each
participant must identify the district coach and provide the Leadership Academy with contact information.)

Learner Outcomes
Coursework will involve reflective writing to guide you in making meaningful personal connections between leadership
theory and practice. Reflective writing is analytical and interpretive in nature as opposed to purely descriptive writing.
Each course has specific learner outcomes as a result of “unpacking” CPSELs on which each is based. Participants will
complete a 5- to 7-page paper using APA Guidelines at the end of each course and submit it before the beginning of
the next course. This paper will follow the established evaluation rubric on page 17 of this Handbook.
Participants receive a “meets standard” or “does not meet standard” grade for all coursework (e.g., fieldwork activities,
online final statements, and end-of-course papers). Participants in the Master’s Program will receive “meets standard”
or “does not meet standard” grades as well as letter grades of A or B to satisfy the National University requirements for
the course.
Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

13

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Program Overview
Continued

Guided Fieldwork for Leadership Project
The administrator at a school site has numerous responsibilities that lead to the improvement of the performance of
the students at the school. By gaining the necessary skills, attitudes, and behaviors as outlined in the CPSELs, students
have the best opportunity to meet the expectations of high standards for student learning while achieving the
mission and vision of the district. Inherent in these standards is a strong commitment to cultural diversity and the use
of technology.
The fieldwork component consists of a minimum of 60 hours designed to enhance the training and preparation of
participants in the Leadership Institute. In collaboration with surrounding districts and the Sacramento County Office
of Education, participants outline a personal learning plan for their Leadership Project. The Leadership Institute will
provide for each participant a coaching relationship that will provide ongoing support.
Project Development
The purpose of the project is to put into action concepts and standards from the coursework. The project should center
around a need for a school or district that would assist with continued leadership development and implementation.
Step 1 - Review each course description. Begin to formulate areas that could be project focus.
Step 2 - Provide the Institute with the name and position of district coach. The district coach will assist with project

development and coaching. (A memorandum has been established with district and Institute for support.)
Step 3 - Meet with your district-assigned coach for discussion on a project concept. Develop an idea or direction.
Step 4 - Review and complete the project proposal and submit to Leadership Institute for approval. (Proposal should

be completed by the end of second course.)
Project Design Elements
• Project Vision. This area should clearly outline the project from a variety of points, such as the rationale, the intended focus,
any explanation that would assist with understanding of the project.
• Leadership Standards and Elements. This area should focus on the Leadership standards and elements of the courses that
will be used for the project.
• Supporting Data and Reports. This area should highlight the supporting data that outlines the need of the project.
This could include reports or studies that support the project direction.
• Transformatonal Leadership. This area should focus on the strategies and concepts—such as use of the coursework,
standards, and elements—to assist with implementation.

14

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Program Overview
Continued

Project Design Elements, continued
• Stakeholders. This should include how the various stakeholders will be included in the project. From the conception to the
ongoing development and the overall presentation of the outcome.
• Communication Strategies for Implementation. This should include the variety of strategies to assist with the
understanding of the project. This will include the needed messages to share, the artifacts that assist with the
understanding, and the variety of levels of communication needed (i.e., meetings, written messages).
• Timeline. This should clearly outline the procedures that include the amount of time needed for the variety of the
components for the project. It should also outline what is to be accomplished in the year’s planning (i.e., week and/or
month for accomplishment).
• Success Indicators (Evaluation). This area should outline the expected or intended outcomes from the implementation of
the project. Data should be included to support the intended outcomes.

To plan your Leadership Project:
• Conceptualize your project by discussing its components with your program director, your site administrators, coach,
mentor, and peers.
• Develop a concrete plan of implementation and data collection for your project (Project Proposal).
• Receive approval from the Leadership Institute
• Prepare panel presentation.

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

15

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

Course Descriptions

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE
2014-2015
Sacramento
Office of Education

County LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Preliminary Administrative Services Credential Program
Development and Implementation of a Shared Vision
The course provides an opportunity to learn to facilitate the development, articulation, implementation, collaboration, and
stewardship of a vision of teaching and learning that is shared and supported by the school community.
Instructional Leadership
The course provides an opportunity to learn how to ensure the management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe,
efficient, and effective learning environment. The course includes the study and application of organizational theory that reflects
effective leadership and management concepts and strategies that contribute to student achievement and the professional
participation of all adults in the school community.
Management and Learning Environment
The course provides an opportunity to learn how to advocate, nurture, and sustain a school culture and instructional program that is
conducive to student learning and staff professional growth. Coursework and fieldwork focus on the implementation of state-adopted
academic content standards, frameworks, and instructional materials, as well as assessment and accountability systems.
Family and Community Engagement
The course provides an opportunity to learn how to work effectively with families, caregivers, and community members; recognize the
goals and aspirations of diverse families; respond to diverse community interests and needs; and mobilize community resources in the
service of student achievement. In this regard, the program offers the candidate an opportunity to examine and evaluate their attitudes
toward people of different races, cultures, socio-economic status and ethnic backgrounds, and treat them with fairness and respect.
Ethics and Integrity
The course provides an opportunity to examine, practice, and model a personal code of ethics, including protecting the rights and
confidentiality of students, staff, and families. The course provides an opportunity for the candidate to practice professional leadership
capacity involving stakeholders such as leadership teams, unions, and other organizations, and fosters their skills in shared decisionmaking, problem solving, and conflict management. The course provides an opportunity for the candidate to examine site and
district responsibilities with regard to students with special needs. The course develops each candidate’s ability to effectively act as
a spokesperson for the school to the extended school community. The candidate has multiple opportunities to model personal and
professional ethics, integrity, justice, and fairness and receive feedback from the course instructor and peers; reflect on personal
leadership beliefs and practices and recognize their impact and influence on the performance of others; and develop mechanisms for
sustaining personal motivation, commitment, energy, and health by learning to balance professional and personal responsibilities.
External Context and Policy
The course provides an opportunity to learn about political, societal, economic, legal, and cultural influences on schools. By augmenting the candidate’s knowledge of these interconnections, the program develops the candidate’s ability to understand, respond to, and
influence the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context of schools and leadership. The course content should provide
opportunities for the candidate to practice both team leadership and team membership so that the candidate can effectively generate
and participate in communication with key decision-makers in the school community. The candidate has an opportunity to learn how
to view himself or herself as a leader of a team and as a member of a team by engaging in coursework and fieldwork that provide
opportunities to both lead and work collaboratively.

16

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Revised 7/10/14

Course Schedule

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

Sacramento
LEADERSHIP
County LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE
INSTITUTE
SCOE Cohort 5, 2014-2015
Office of Education

SCOE Cohort 5 Course Schedule, 2014-2015

AllAllSCOE
courses
will
be at
held
the Curriculum
and Intervention
from
8:30
AM to
4:30 PM.
courses
will be
held
theatCurriculum
and Intervention
AnnexAnnex
from 8:30
AM
to 4:30
PM.
Course Date

Course Title

Online Instruction1

August 23

State of Education and Your Leadership
Program Overview and Orientation/
Technology Component

N/A

September 6
September 20
October 4

Development and Implementation
of a Shared Vision
Instructor: Dr. L. Steven Winlock
Executive Director, Leadership Institute

5 hours

October 18
November 1
November 15

Instructional Leadership
Instructor: Tami Wilson, Director
Development & Training, K-12 English Language Arts
Sacramento County Office of Education

6 hours

December 6
December 13
January 10
January 24

Management and Learning Environment
Instructor: Dr. Anne Zeman
Executive Director, Elementary Education,
Twin Rivers Unified School District

6 hours

January 31
February 14
February 28
March 14
March 28
April 11
April 25
May 9
May 16

1

Instructor: Dr. L. Steven Winlock
Executive Director, Leadership Institute

Ethics and Integrity
Instructor: Dr. General Davie, Jr., Former Superintendent,
San Juan USD and Natomas USD

External Context and Policy

5 hours

5 hours

Instructor: Linda Rooney, Superintendent,
Eureka USD

5 hours

June 13

End-of-Year Project Presentation Practice

N/A

June 20

Symposium (EOY Project Presentations)/Graduation

N/A

May 30

1

Family and Community Engagement

Year-long program includes: 154 hours of in-class instruction (22 class days/7 hours each class); and 77 hours of online

learning
Year-long
program includes: 154 hours of in-class instruction (22 class days/7 hours each class); and 77 hours
and guided fieldwork for a total of 231 hours.

of online learning and guided fieldwork for a total of 231 hours.

5/13/14

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

17

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Course Schedule
Shasta COE
Partner CohortACADEMY
3, 2014-2015
LEADERSHIP
in Partnership with the Sacramento County Office of Education Leadership Institute

Course Schedule, 2014 - 2015
All
courses
will
at Shasta
of Education
8:30
All courses
will
be be
heldheld
at Shasta
CountyCounty
Office ofOffice
Education
from 8:30 AMfrom
to 4:30
PM.AM to 4:30 PM.
Course Date

Course Title

Online Instruction1

August 9

State of Education and Your Leadership
Program Overview and Orientation/
Technology Component

N/A

September 6
September 20
October 4

Development and Implementation
of a Shared Vision
Instructor: Kim McKenzie
Director, Shasta COE Leadership Academy

5 hours

October 18
November 1
November 15

Instructional Leadership
Instructor: Jennifer Baker
Director, Instructional Services, Shasta COE

6 hours

December 6
December 13
January 10

Management and Learning Environment

January 24

Instructor: Doreen Fuller
Executive Director, Curriculum and Instruction, Shasta COE

6 hours

January 31
February 14
February 28
March 14
March 28
April 11
April 25
May 16
May 30

Instructor: Kathy Thompson
Assistant Superintendent, Shasta COE

Ethics and Integrity
Instructor: Frank Adelman
Superintendent, Oak Run

External Context and Policy

5 hours

5 hours

June 13

End-of-Year Project Presentation Practice

N/A

June 20

Symposium (EOY Project Presentations)/Graduation

N/A

Year-long program
154154
hours
of in-class
instruction
(22 class
class);
andclass);
77 hours
online
Year-long
programincludes:
includes:
hours
of in-class
instruction
(22days/7
class hours
days/7each
hours
each
andof77
hours

learninglearning
and guided
for a total of
hours.of 231 hours.
of online
andfieldwork
guided fieldwork
for231
a total

18

5 hours

Instructor: Mary Sakuma
Assistant Superintendent, Human Resources, Butte COE

June 6

11

Family and Community Engagement

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

8/01/14

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

Preliminary
Administrative
Course
Schedule

Services Credential Program
LEADERSHIP
in Partnership with the Sacramento County Office of Education Leadership Institute
INSTITUTE
Placer COE Partner Cohort 1, 2014-2015
Course Schedule, 2014 - 2015
All courses will be held at the PCOE Professional Development facilities from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM.
Classes will be held from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM at the PCOE Professional Development facilities (TBD).

Course Date

Course Title

Online Instruction1

August 9

State of Education and Your Leadership
Program Overview and Orientation/
Technology Component

N/A

August 30
September 20
October 4
October 18
November 1
November 15
December 6

Development and Implementation
of a Shared Vision
Instructor: Dr. Renee Regacho-Anaclerio
Associate Superintendent, Placer County Office of Education

5 hours

Instructional Leadership
Instructor: Sara Wegner
Director of Curriculum and Professional Development
Dry Creek Joint Elementary School District

6 hours

December 13
January 10
January 24

Management and Learning Environment
Instructor: Gary Callahan
Assistant Superintendent, Roseville City School District

6 hours

January 31
February 14
February 28
March 14
March 28
April 11
April 25
May 16
May 30

Instructor: Karen Quinlan
Kirby Elementary, Roseville City School District

Ethics and Integrity
Instructor: Scott Leaman
Superintendent, Western Placer Union School District

External Context and Policy

5 hours

5 hours

Instructor: Roger Stock
Superintendent, Rocklin Unified School District

5 hours

June 13

End-of-Year Project Presentation Practice

N/A

June 20

Symposium (EOY Project Presentations)/Graduation

N/A

June 6

11

Family and Community Engagement

ofof
in-class
instruction
(22(22
class
days/7
hours
eacheach
class);
and 77
hours
of online
Year-long
Year-longprogram
programincludes:
includes:154
154hours
hours
in-class
instruction
class
days/7
hours
class);
and
77 hours

and guided
for a totalfor
of 231
hours.
oflearning
online learning
andfieldwork
guided fieldwork
a total
of 231 hours.

6/24/14

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

19

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Fieldwork Strategies
Worksheet

LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

Course:

Participant:

Instructor:

Course Dates:

STATUS
Meets
Standard
Does Not
Meet
Standard

Meets
Standard
Does Not
Meet
Standard

Meets
Standard
Does Not
Meet
Standard

FIELDWORK STRATEGIES FOR COURSEWORK
Fieldwork:

Evidence:

Fieldwork:

Evidence:

Fieldwork:

Evidence:

Instructor Signature: __________________________

20

DUE DATE

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Date:

________________

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

End-of Course Essay
Submission Deadlines

SCOE Cohort 5
Course Date

Course Title

Essay Due Date

Grade Release
Date

Essay Resubmit
Date *

September 6, 2014 October 4, 2014

Development and Implementation of a Shared Vision

October 19, 2014

November 3, 2014

November 16, 2014

October 18, 2014 December 6, 2014

Instructional Leadership

December 21, 2014

January 12, 2015

January 25, 2015

December 13, 2014 January 31, 2015

Management and Learning
Environment

February 15, 2015

March 2, 2015

March 15, 2015

February 14, 2015 March 14, 2015

Family and Community
Engagement

March 29, 2015

April 13, 2015

April 26, 2015

March 28, 2015 April 25, 2015

Ethics and Integrity

May 10, 2015

May 25, 2015

June 7, 2015

May 9, 2015 May 30, 2015

External Context and Policy

June 14, 2015

June 29, 2015

July 12, 2015

Shasta COE Partner Cohort 3
Course Date

Course Title

Essay Due Date

Grade Release
Date

Essay Resubmit
Date *

September 6, 2014 October 4, 2014

Development and Implementation of a Shared Vision

October 19, 2014

November 3, 2014

November 16, 2014

October 18, 2014 December 6, 2014

Instructional Leadership

December 21, 2014

January 12, 2015

January 25, 2015

Deember 13, 2014 January 31, 2015

Management and Learning
Environment

February 15, 2015

March 2, 2015

March 15, 2015

February 14, 2015 March 14, 2015

Family and Community
Engagement

March 29, 2015

April 13, 2015

April 26, 2015

March 28, 2015 April 25, 2015

Ethics and Integrity

May 10, 2015

May 25, 2015

June 7, 2015

May 16, 2015 June 6, 2015

External Context and Policy

June 14, 2015

June 29, 2015

July 12, 2015

* Papers that do not meet standards must be resubmitted by date listed.

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

21

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

End-of Course Essay
Submission Deadlines, continued

Placer COE Partner Cohort 1
Course Date

Course Title

Essay Due Date

Grade Release
Date

Essay Resubmit
Date *

August 30, 2014 October 4, 2014

Development and Implementation of a Shared Vision

October 19, 2014

November 3, 2014

November 16, 2014

October 18, 2014 December 6, 2014

Instructional Leadership

December 21, 2014

January 12, 2015

January 25, 2015

Deember 13, 2014 January 31, 2015

Management and Learning
Environment

February 15, 2015

March 2, 2015

March 15, 2015

February 14, 2015 March 14, 2015

Family and Community
Engagement

March 29, 2015

April 13, 2015

April 26, 2015

March 28, 2015 April 25, 2015

Ethics and Integrity

May 10, 2015

May 25, 2015

June 7, 2015

May 16, 2015 June 6, 2015

External Context and Policy

June 14, 2015

June 29, 2015

July 12, 2015

* Papers that do not meet standards must be resubmitted by date listed.

22

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

End-of Course Paper
 

Evaluation
LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

Course ______________________________

Participant ___________________

Instructor ____________________________

Date ________________________

EVALUATION OF END-OF-COURSE PAPER
Note: The paper should be 5-7 pages and follow APA format (12-point font; preferred type faces include
Times Roman, Courier, Arial; double-spaced; one-inch margins). References should support the End-ofCourse paper (e.g., course content, articles, major concept texts) and follow APA Guidelines.

Meets
Standard

Does Not
Meet
Standard

Discuss your understanding and knowledge of the course standard. Include
reference to all elements and make connections to course content and
leadership frameworks.
Evaluator Comments:

As a leader, choose one indicator of the standard and discuss your process(es)
for implementation.
Indicator:____________________________________
Evaluator Comments:

In what area(s) would you extend your learning in the course standard?
Evaluator Comments:

Include a minimum of three references from: 1) Course Content; 2) Leadership
Frameworks; 3) Major Focus Areas (course texts); and 4) Online Instruction.
Evaluator Comments:

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

23

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Project Proposal
Worksheet

PROJECT PROPOSAL

Participant

Due Date

PROJECT DESIGN ELEMENTS
Project Vision (Description)

Leadership Standards and Elements Addressed
Supporting Data and Reports (Rationale)
Transformational Leadership (Please describe)
Stakeholders
Communication Strategies for Implementation
Timeline
Success Indicators (Evaluation)

Assigned District Coach
Project Approved

Title
Revision Needed

Comments:

Executive Director Initials

24

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Project Presentation
Outline
Vision



What is your overall vision of the project (description)?
What do you intend to accomplish?
What will the end product be?
What standards/elements will be incorporated into the project design?

Rationale



What is the importance of your project?
What supported the need for this project?
- Data, student; operational occurrences
- Observations

Transformational Leadership
• What areas of the change process were considered?
• How were major concepts of transformational leadership applied?
• What are the implementation strategies and concepts?
• How are the core development concepts (i.e., judgment, relationships,
implementation, balance) used in the development?
- Learnings from coursework (i.e., standards and elements)
- Readings; quotes
• What were effective communication strategies and procedures?

Artifacts of the Project
• What are the artifacts that assisted with the implementation?
- Examples of use of artifacts

Status/Progress

What has been accomplished around the vision?

Next Steps




Where is the project headed?
What additional information will be needed (i.e., data, research)?
What further relationships need to be developed?
What will be your ongoing communication around the progress of
your project?

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

25

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Online Instruction
SCOE Moodle
Online Component
In addition to the face-to-face class time, participants also engage in online coursework.
The purpose of this online component is to assist participants in the development of their
judgment, relationship, implementation, and balance as a future leader. Included in this
work are scenarios and articles related to leadership development. Participants are
assigned to “online communities” and are required to discuss the scenarios and articles
during a specified chat time for a specified number of hours per course (refer to chart below).

Online Instruction (hours per course)

26

Development and Implementation of a
Shared Vision

5 hours

Instructional Leadership

6 hours

Management and Learning Environment

6 hours

Family and Community Engagement

5 hours

Ethics and Integrity

5 hours

External Context and Policy

5 hours

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Online Principal-Coaches are assigned to a
community to provide guidance and coaching.
Following each scenario and article, the participants complete a final statement based upon
the prompt and submit their final statements to
his/her Online Principal-Coach by the assigned
due date. The online mechanism the Leadership
Institute uses for communicating with one
another is Moodle. Please refer to the Moodle
Step-By-Step Participant User Guide for more
specific information.

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Online Component
Timeline

Task

Responsible Party

Due Date

Select articles and scenarios, formulate questions, and send
documents to program director for approval

Online Principal-Coach
Coordinator

Three weeks prior to the end of the existing course

Form online communities and submit to Leadership
Institute

Online Principal-Coach
Coordinator

Three weeks prior to the end of the existing course

Send SCOE Moodle technician online communities,
scenarios, articles, and questions to post on SCOE Moodle
Leadership course

Leadership Institute

Two weeks prior to the end of the existing course

Inform faculty and online principal-coaches of online
communities, articles, scenarios, and questions

Leadership Institute

Two weeks prior to the end of the existing course

Email Leadership participants online communities

Leadership Institute

One week prior to the end of the existing course

Post online communities for upcoming class on
Leadership board

Leadership Institute

One week prior to the start of the upcoming course

Review articles, scenarios, and questions to prepare for
online discussion

Online Principal-Coaches

Last class session of the existing course

Email online community to determine chat schedule

Online Principal-Coaches

One week prior to start of the upcoming course

Post articles, scenarios, and questions on SCOE Moodle
Leadership course for participants

SCOE Moodle Technician

Monday following the start of the new course

Read articles, scenarios, and questions to guide online
discussions

Leadership Participants

Released on the Thursday prior to the first Saturday of
the course (after 6:00 PM)

Participate in online chats for each article and scenario

Online Principal-Coaches and
Leadership Participants

Prior to the last day of the course

Submit final statements for each article or scenario posted
to Online Principal-Coach

Leadership Participants

Final statements for each article/scenario must be
posted two days prior to the next scheduled chat time.
(All statements must be submitted on or before the
last day of course.)

Review participants’ final statements, write a response for
each participant, and submit reports to Institute (reviews
are completed before starting new chat)

Online Principal-Coaches

All final statements from Online Principal-Coaches
must be submitted no later than the Friday following
the last class of the course.

Retrieve final statements (reports) from coaches, provide
copies of reports to faculty, and file copies of reports into
participant portfolios

Leadership Institute

After reviewed by the Online-Principal Coaches

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

27

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Policies and Procedures

1. Acts of Dishonesty
Participants are expected to pursue honesty and integrity in all aspects of their academic work. Academic dishonesty,
including plagiarism, falsification of records or documents, personal misrepresentations, theft, and evasion of
Leadership Institute financial obligations will not be tolerated.

2. Attendance
Regular attendance is required and expected. Your agreed upon attendance is for the benefit of your own learning as
well as the learning of others in the cohort. Instructor facilitation, presentations, classroom exercises, and discussions
are essential parts of the educational experience for each class. Therefore, participants must attend all meetings of the
class, with class beginning at 8:30 a.m. Prompt attendance will have a direct impact on learning, performance,
and grades.
Participants who miss a class session will be given make-up assignments to compensate for the missed hours of
instruction. Make-up assignments will not be given prior to the scheduled class date and are due before the next
course begins. In the case of an emergency, please contact the course instructor to determine the impact of the
absence on academic requirements.
Participants who miss an online chat session must read the transcripts from their specific chat community and write
a statement based on the community’s points of view/discussion. Participants must also complete their own final
statement based on their own thoughts and development around the article or scenario.

3. Business Office Procedures
Refunds will only be given for those courses not attended (e.g., Attending at least one class in a course would
prevent eligibility for a refund).
Participants who are not able to participate in a particular course due to personal or family illness, maternity or
paternity leave, death in the immediate family, relocation due to job transfer, or other family or personal crisis that
prevents them from successfully participating in the program, may receive credit for participation in a future class with
a different cohort. It is the responsibility of the participant to communicate with the Institute Executive Director if an
issue is preventing him/her from completing course assignments or attending classes.

4. Disability
Participants with disabilities are eligible for reasonable accommodations in their academic work in this program. In
order to receive assistance, the participant must provide Human Resources with documentation that describes the
specific disability (i.e., psychologist, physician, or educational diagnostician). Participants with disabilities should
contact the SCOE Leadership Institute faculty to discuss academic and other needs as soon as they are diagnosed with
a disability. Once documentation is on file, arrangements for reasonable accommodations can be made.

28

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Policies and Procedures
Continued

5. District Support
Districts will provide support by identifying participants for participation, supporting their participation in the
program, guiding the fieldwork experiences of participants, and arranging time for the district coaches and
participants to meet.
The Institute Executive Director works with the participants throughout the course of the program, ensuring that
there is a match between course requirements and field experience.

6. Emergency Procedures
All participants are required to complete an emergency procedure form and turn it in to the program office on the
first day of the first core course.

7. Evaluations
Surveys are administered to participants, faculty, and participating districts to collect data on program quality and
effectiveness. Participants are expected to complete evaluations. The evaluation forms and surveys are reviewed by
Leadership Institute staff; based upon participant feedback, revisions and updates will be made accordingly.

8. Grievance and Appeals Process
Should a participant question prerequisites for program participation, program requirements, participation
hours, special needs provision, discrimination policy, program extension request rationale, satisfactory progress
requirements, and/or denial of preliminary administrative services credential, a meeting should be held with the
Institute Executive Director and the concern put in writing. The Institute Executive Director will then review concerns
and discuss concerns with involved participants, including the program participant and the representative of the
participating district. Following discussion and review of the concern, a decision wil be made regarding the grievance.
The decision will be final and will be forwarded to the participant.

9. Probation
In addition to attending assigned class sessions, participants are expected to complete all fieldwork assignments,
online coursework, and End-of-Course papers for each course. If a participant has not met program requirements
at the conclusion of the second course, the Executive Director of the Institute will schedule a meeting with the
participant to review the expectations of the program and place the participant on probation. At the conclusion of
the third course, a review of the participant’s progress will be evaluated and either the participant’s probation will be
lifted or he/she will be asked to withdraw from the Leadership Institute.

10. Textbooks and Kindle
Participants will receive Kindle readers with electronic textbooks preloaded onto the device prior to the start of
the program. Textbooks that are not available in electronic format will be provided in book format. Participants are
expected to bring their Kindles (fully charged), along with any traditional textbooks, to each class.

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education

29

Sacramento
Office of Education

County

LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE

Preliminary
Administrative Services Credential

California’s Credential Structure
California has a two-tier credential structure. A five-year preliminary credential is the first credential issued after
an individual meets basic credential requirements. A professional clear credential is issued when all credential
requirements have been completed.
To obtain a preliminary credential, participants must meet and satisfy the following requirements:
1. Possess one of the following:
• A valid California teaching credential requiring a baccalaureate degree and a program of professional preparation, including
student teaching
• A valid California Designated Subjects Teaching Credential provided the applicant also possesses a baccalaureate degree
• A valid California services credential in Pupil Personnel Services, Health Services, Library Media Teacher Services, or Clinical
or Rehabilitative Services requiring a baccalaureate degree and a program of professional preparation, including field
practice or equivalent

2. Complete one of the following:
• A Commission-approved program of specialized and professional preparation in administrative services which results in the
formal recommendation of the program sponsor—SCOE Leadership Institute
• A one-year administrative services internship consisting of supervised inservice training taken through a California college
or university with an approved internship program and obtain the recommendation of a California college or university
with a Commission-approved program
• Achieve a passing score of 173 on the School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA) examination administered by
Educational Testing Services (ETS)

3. Pass the California Basic Education Skills Test (CBEST)
4. Complete a minimum of five years of successful teaching (full-time) experience in the public schools or private
schools of equivalent status.
5. Verify employment in an administrative position on form CL-777. An individual who has completed requirements
1-4 above but does not have an offer of employment as an administrator may apply for a Certificate of Eligibility.
The preliminary credential is valid five years from the date of issuance. However, the Administrative Services Credential
is limited by the expiration date of the prerequisite credential. It will expire with and may be renewed with the
prerequisite credential during the preliminary period. By the end of the five-year preliminary period, the holder must
meet the requirements for the professional clear credential.

30

Leadership Institute, 2014-2015 • Sacramento County Office of Education