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Curriculum planning chart

Generative Topic (Blythe et al, 1998): Identity in Context
Concept*

Standard

("The student will
understand…")
(The big idea, the
"enduring
understanding"
[Wiggins, 1998]; a
broad way of
making sense of the
world, or a “life
lesson”)
Our identities,
while seemingly
individual, are
surrounded by a
larger historical
timeline.
Central problem /
issue / or essential
question (intended
to "get at" the
concept; the
“motivator”)
Why am I having
you study your
identity?

NCSS Thematic Standard IV
Individual Development and
Identity. In focusing on the
discipline of history, teachers
at various school levels should
build upon learners’
knowledge, experience, and
developmental capabilities.
Teachers of the early grades
can provide learners with
experiences that give them a
sense of their own roots and of
their connections with others
and with the past. Learners can
have the opportunity to begin
to develop the skills of
historical thinking that will
enable them to differentiate
past, present, and future time,
and to raise questions and seek
answers from historical stories
and records from the past.
Their historical understandings
can draw from at least five
spheres of human activity:
social, political,
scientific/technological,
economic, and cultural as they
study the history of their
families, communities, states,
region, nation, and of other
nations or topics with worldwide implications.

Subject: Social Studies

Name: Daylan Bakes

Assessment

Facts

Skills

Problems to pose

(How will you have
evidence that they
know it?)

("The students will
know…")

("The students will
be able to…")

("Guiding questions"
or "unit questions")

Morning Journal
responses (to
activity from
previous day).

…how this identity
is shaped in a larger
historical
narrative/timeline.

…tie their own
identities to periods
of historical
significance.

How does my
identity change in
different settings?

Written responses to
comparison of
Woodson and
Nelson.

…that how they are
perceived is not
necessarily how
they identify.

…compare and
contrast fiction and
nonfiction historical
text.

Written
Autobiography
work.

…an important
historical timeline
and how/if they
identify with any/all
of it.

…think about
perception v.
identification.

Production of
Historical Timeline
Steps (brainstorm,
pair draft, table
draft, agreement on
class timeline).
Participation in
Discussion.

…the differences in
the philosophies
held by Dr. Martin
Luther King and
Malcolm X.
…which
philosophy/view of
equality they
identify most with.

* It is important to note that the concept might remain the same across subjects

…respond to
prompts in written
form.
…place historical
events in order,
deciding amongst
themselves the most
important events.
…discuss the
meaning of equality
and how that
meaning has
changed over time.

Do people see me
differently than I see
myself?
Why does this
happen/what shapes
perception?
Why is history
important/what part
are we playing in this
historical timeline?
Is society equal
today?

Activities:

Compare and
Contrast Kadir
Nelson’s Heart and
Soul to Jacqueline
Woodson’s This is
the Rope, Coming
on Home, and Show
Way (fiction v.
nonfiction).
Autobiography
(after reading
Malcolm Little).
Historical Timeline
Discussion of
Equality
Character
Comparison