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Lesson Plan

This is the Rope
Lesson 1
Goals / Objectives
My goal for this lesson is for my students to understand not only the rope from the story
as a symbol for family (and that family’s history/passage of time), but for the students to
see use of narrative in presenting a historical event/timeline (the great migration). In this
lesson my students will be able to discuss and infer information about the great
migration. My students will also compare this text to some of Woodson’s other texts
(through author study chart).
Standards (and Assessment Anchors, if applicable)
8.3.4.C: Explain how continuity and change in U.S. history have influenced personal
development and identity.
Belief systems and religions
Commerce and industry
Technology
Politics and government
Physical and human geography
Social organizations
Materials and preparation
Jacqueline Woodson Author study chart
This is the Rope by Jacqueline Woodson
Smart Board (clearly written timeline of activity)
Timer
Chart Paper
Markers
Classroom arrangement and management issues
We have clear routines put in place for whole class instruction. We should have no
problem working on this lesson together as a class; however, should volume/disruption
become an issue there are also clear consequences laid out (1. Name on board, 2. Check
next to name + loss of dojo points, 3. Two checks, loss of more dojo points, 4. Three
checks, phone call home). These ‘consequences’ are a last resort and I make my best
effort to preemptively award points (for class rewards + on class dojo).
Plan
Lesson 1 (40/45 Minutes)
a. 10 Minutes - Intentional Read Aloud – Jacqueline Woodson, This is the
Rope

b. 10 Minutes - Discussion on the rope as a symbol.
i. Why was the rope so important?
ii. What different ways did they use the rope?
iii. Is there something in your house that you use in different ways?
iv. Do you know of any other symbols?
v. Do you have something in your house that could act as a symbol
for something else?
vi. What else did you notice from the story?
1. Passage of time?
c. 7 Minutes - Compare to Woodson’s other stories (Author Study Chart).
1. Is this story similar to any of Jacqueline’s other stories?
How?
ii. 3 – Minutes - Is this story nonfiction or fiction?
d. 10 – Minutes - KWL – Great Migration
1. If I Told you this book we just read is a story about the
Great Migration, what could you tell me about that
historical event, even if you have no other reference point?
Anticipating students’ responses and your possible responses
1. What students are likely to be confused by or find difficult
Some of my students will readily grasp the abstract of symbols in the home/for historical
moments/passage of time; some will struggle. I’m hoping that I, along with their peers
(crossing the zone of proximal development) will help guide them to that understanding.
2. What students are likely to find especially engaging
My kids love read alouds – especially when given the purpose ahead of time (what to
listen for, etc). I expect that this and the shared reading will readily engage the students.
3. What aspects of the lesson might present particular managerial challenges
If my students do not find my instructions clear enough, I think both activities have the
potential to pose managerial challenges. Also, the movement from whole to small group
lesson may cause confusion; sometimes when moving from whole class discussion to
table group discussion, my students fall of task.
Assessment of the goals/objectives listed above
This activity/lesson lends itself to more formative assessments of participation and
engagement – leading up to a more formal assessment in a future leslson.
Accommodations
1. Accommodations for students who may find the material too challenging

I have allowed for peer work – also, when work is done on the individual
basis, I have some ability to work one on one with a student who is
struggling.
2. Accommodations for students who may need greater challenge and/or finish
early?
Because this lesson is mostly discussion/whole class based, I do not
anticipate this being an issue.
Lesson Plan

This is the Rope
Lesson 2
Goals / Objectives
My goal for this lesson is for my students to gain a deeper understanding of the great migration.
The cause and effect of that historical ‘moment.’ I would also like them to assess sources as
reliable or unreliable (fact or fiction).
Standards (and Assessment Anchors, if applicable)
8.3.4.C: Explain how continuity and change in U.S. history have influenced personal
development and identity.
Belief systems and religions
Commerce and industry
Technology
Politics and government
Physical and human geography
Social organizations
8.1.4.B: Distinguish between fact and opinion from multiple points of view, and primary
sources as related to historical events.
Materials and preparation
Heart and Soul by Kadir Nelson
Smart Board (clearly written timeline of activity)
Timer
KWL Chart
Markers
Classroom arrangement and management issues
We have clear routines put in place for whole class instruction. We should have no problem
working on this lesson together as a class; however, should volume/disruption become an issue
there are also clear consequences laid out (1. Name on board, 2. Check next to name + loss of
dojo points, 3. Two checks, loss of more dojo points, 4. Three checks, phone call home). These
‘consequences’ are a last resort and I make my best effort to preemptively award points (for class
rewards + on class dojo).

Plan
Lesson 2 (40/45 Minutes)

2. 10 Minutes - Intentional Read Aloud or shared reading – Kadir Nelson, Heart and
Soul
3. 10 Minutes - Discussion of Great Migration
a. What have we learned?
b. Is Nelson a reliable source? Why or why not?
4. 10 Minutes - Comparison of texts – What was similar between Nelson’s and
Woodson’s texts? What was different? Which one is more reliable as historical
evidence?
5. 10 Minutes - Add any new ideas to KWL chart.
Anticipating students’ responses and your possible responses
4. What students are likely to be confused by or find difficult
Some of my kids are below a fourth grade reading level, for this reason a shared reading
is better for them than independent reading, but I worry they will not necessarily be able
to follow along.
5. What students are likely to find especially engaging
My kids like discussion – it (usually) gives them the opportunity to then share out to the
whole class.
6. What aspects of the lesson might present particular managerial challenges
Volume tends to escalate during table group discussion, which can make it difficult to
reengage into whole group instruction.
Assessment of the goals/objectives listed above
This activity/lesson lends itself to more formative assessments of participation and
engagement – leading up to a more formal assessment in a future lesson.
Accommodations
3. Accommodations for students who may find the material too challenging
I have allowed for peer work – also, when work is done on the individual/student led
basis, I have some ability to work one on one with a student who is struggling.
4. Accommodations for students who may need greater challenge and/or finish
early?
Because this lesson is mostly discussion/whole class based, I do not anticipate this being
an issue.

Lesson Plan
This is the Rope
Lesson 3
Goals / Objectives
My goal for this lesson is for my students to complete their understanding of the text This
is the Rope. They will also be able to find their own nonfiction sources, present them to
their peers and discuss what they have learned about the great migration.
Standards (and Assessment Anchors, if applicable)
8.3.4.C: Explain how continuity and change in U.S. history have influenced personal
development and identity.
Belief systems and religions
Commerce and industry
Technology
Politics and government
Physical and human geography
Social organizations
8.1.4.B: Distinguish between fact and opinion from multiple points of view, and
primary sources as related to historical events.
Materials and preparation
Jacqueline Woodson Author study chart
Heart and Soul by Kadir Nelson
This is the Rope by Jacqueline Woodson
Smart Board (clearly written timeline of activity)
Timer
Computers
Chart Paper
Classroom arrangement and management issues
We have clear routines put in place for whole class instruction. We should have no
problem working on this lesson together as a class; however, should volume/disruption
become an issue there are also clear consequences laid out (1. Name on board, 2. Check
next to name + loss of dojo points, 3. Two checks, loss of more dojo points, 4. Three
checks, phone call home). These ‘consequences’ are a last resort and I make my best
effort to preemptively award points (for class rewards + on class dojo).
Plan
Lesson 3 (45 Minutes)

6. 20/25 Minutes - Find your own sources
a. On computers the children find their own reliable sources on the Great
Migration (in table groups).
7. 15/20 Minutes - Complete KWL Chart (Gallery Walk?)
Anticipating students’ responses and your possible responses
7. What students are likely to be confused by or find difficult:
Some of my students will readily grasp the abstract of symbols in the home/for historical
moments/passage of time; some will struggle. I’m hoping that I, along with their peers
(crossing the zone of proximal development) will help guide them to that understanding.
My student sometimes struggle with navigating the internet/finding reliable sources. This
might be a challenge for some.
8. What students are likely to find especially engaging:
My students love when they are given the opportunity to present to the class, especially
after group work, when they feel secure in the knowledge they have gained.
9. What aspects of the lesson might present particular managerial challenges:
If my students do not find my instructions clear enough, I think both activities have the
potential to pose managerial challenges. Also, the small group work may cause
confusion/conflict over computer access; sometimes when working independently, my
students fall of task. .
Assessment of the goals/objectives listed above
What is produced here (on chart paper) will work in terms of assessment. I will be able to
see what my students have learned in terms of both source assessment and the great
migration.
Accommodations
5. Accommodations for students who may find the material too challenging
I have allowed for peer work – also, when work is done on the individual
basis, I have some ability to work one on one with groups who are
struggling.
6. Accommodations for students who may need greater challenge and/or finish
early?
If there are groups who finish early I will have them exchange
sources/peer edit their work.