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DIXIE STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

UNIT PLAN TEMPLATE


Teacher Candidate Emily Holt
Grade Level 5th_ Content Area Social Studies
Step 1 DESIRED RESULTS
A. Contextual Factors
There are 21 students in the class. There are 9 girls and 12 boys.
ELL Students & WIDA level:
There are no ELL students in this class
Students with IEP:
Ethan Speech, Math, Reading
Kaylee Math, Reading
Students who struggle with Reading:
Trentidee, Weston, Jake,
Behavior concerns:
Christein - Blurts out, interrupts, wants to show his way of thinking.
Kyson Always moving around, cant sit still, always off task.
Manny Always playing with erasers, he is easily distracted.
High level learners:
There are no GATE students in this class
Advanced learners:
Andrea
Christein
Noah
Ian
B. Utah State Core or Common Core Curriculum Standard
Benchmark: As the United States expanded westward, major issues, some of them from the
first years of the nation, began to challenge the stability of the nation. As the nation expanded,
issues of states rights, the institution of slavery, and economic development culminated in a Civil
War. This war formally ended slavery and strengthened the power of the Federal government.
The era after the Civil War was a time of major economic development and technological
innovation.
Standard 4
Students will understand that the 19th century was a time of incredible change for the United
States, including geographic expansion, constitutional crisis, and economic growth.

Objective 1
Investigate the significant events during America's expansion and the roles people played.
a. Identify key reasons why people move and the traits necessary for survival.
b. Examine causes and consequences of important events in the United States expansion
(e.g. Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clark expedition, treaties with American Indians,
Homestead Act, Trail of Tears, California Gold Rush).
c. Compare the trails that were important during westward expansion (e.g. Oregon,
Mormon, Spanish, California).
d. Assess the impact of expansion on native inhabitants of the west.
C. Enduring Understanding/Big Idea
As the population of the U.S. expanded westward across the continent it had
profound impacts on Americas geography, economy, technology, and people.
D. Essential Questions/Guiding Questions

What is Manifest Destiny and how is it related to Westward Expansion?


Which sections of land were acquired for the US and how were they acquired?
Who were key individuals of the Westward movement?
Who were the groups of people involved in the expansion of the west and why did they
go?
What reasons did people have for settling the west?
What difficulties did the people face as they moved west?
How did transportation, technology, and economics affect westward expansion?
How did westward movement impact the Native Americans?

E. Concepts
Students will need to know
Reasons for Western Expansion and its relationship to Manifest Destiny.
The geographic land growth and acquisition.
Leaders of the westward movement.
The groups of people and their reasons for moving west.
The hardships faced during Westward Expansion.
The role transportation, technology, and economics played in settling the west.
The effects westward movement had on Native Americans.
F. Skills
Students will be able to:
Explain Manifest destiny and its relationship to Westward Expansion.
Critically evaluate and explain Manifest Destiny and Americas decision to move west.
Discuss the people and events associated with Westward Expansion.
Map and discuss the growth and acquisition of the United States.
Identify key leaders involved in Westward Expansion.
Identify the different groups who moved west.
Read and write about the hardships people faced as they moved and settled the west.

Read and discuss how transportation, technology, and economics played a role in
westward expansion.
Analyze and describe the impact Westward Expansion had on Native Americans.

Step 2 ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE


1. Pre-Assessments

Students will take a pre-assessment which covers questions about Westward


Expansion, and vocabulary that will be covered during the course of this unit. This
assessment will contain several multiple choice questions, true false questions, as well
as a written answer. This will help in analyzing what students already know about the
topics that will be covered throughout the unit.

2. Formative Assessments/Evidence
Throughout the duration of this unit, students will create a lapbook to organize student tasks that
will reinforce what students are learning in each lesson. The lapbook will serve as a formative
assessment as well as a summative assessment. Many of the following activities will be included
in the lapbook:

Complete a video guide as they watch an introductory video on Westward Movement.


Critically analyze primary sources regarding Manifest destiny and write their
conclusions.
Draw and explain the geographic land growth of the U.S.
Create and label a map identifying the major trails taken by groups as they moved
west.
Complete an Education Exploration Guide that identifies key individuals who explored
the west, and lists different groups and their purpose for settling to the west.
Read stories and journals of key individuals who played an important role during
westward expansion. Create a newspaper retelling their stories.
Look at various ads regarding Westward Expansion (Louisiana
Purchase, Manifest Destiny, Lewis and Clark, Gold Rush, Pony
Express, Homestead Act). Create an ad to draw people West (Ad will be on
newspaper).
Complete a crossword puzzle that identifies important events, vocabulary and people
of the Gold Rush.
Look at different paintings and photographs and articles, identify, and list in foldable
the types of transportation (stagecoach, railroad), technology (cotton gin, telegraph)
people from used. Describe how these change life during this time period?
Examine primary sources to conclude how expansion created conflict with the Native
Americans.
Write a letter to President Andrew Jackson expressing their support or opposition to
the Indian removal Act. They must use at least three pieces of evidence to support their
opinion.

3. Summative Assessments/Evidence
Students will read and answer the questions which are exactly like the pre-assessment.
This will let me, the teacher; know if the students learned the lesson objectives that
were taught throughout the unit.
Throughout the duration of this unit, students will create a lapbook file folder to
organize student tasks that will reinforce what students are learning in each lesson.
The portfolio/lapbook will serve as a formative assessment as well as a summative
assessment.
Step 3 Lesson Objectives with Instructional Strategies
1. I will explain Manifest Destiny and its relationship to Westward Expansion during the
19th century. (1b)
Pretest
Complete a video guide as they watch an introductory video on Westward Movement.
Critically analyze primary sources regarding Manifest destiny and write their
conclusions.
2. I will draw and explain the geographic land growth of the U.S. (1b)
Louisiana Purchase
Mexican American War
Florida from Spain
Texas
Oregon
49th Parallel
Missouri Compromise
Draw and explain the geographic land growth of the U.S.
3. I will identify key individuals who played an important role in Westward movement. (1b,a)
This lesson will likely be broken up into several days.
Louis & Clark Corps of Discovery - Sacajawea
Mountain Men
Explorers
Pioneers
Complete an Education Exploration Guide that identifies key individuals who explored
the west, and lists different groups and their purpose for settling to the west.
Read stories and journals of key individuals who played an important role during
westward expansion. Create a newspaper retelling their stories.
Look at various ads regarding Westward Expansion (Louisiana
Purchase, Manifest Destiny, Lewis and Clark, Gold Rush, Pony
Express, Homestead Act). Create an ad to draw people West (Ad will be on
newspaper).
4. I will identify and explain the different reasons people moved west and
identify the major trails. (1a,c)
Mormons
Gold Rush

Pioneers
Oregon Trail
Homestead Act
Create and label a map identifying the major trails taken by groups as they moved
west.
Complete an Education Exploration Guide that identifies key individuals who explored
the west, and lists different groups and their purpose for settling to the west.
Read stories and journals of key individuals who played an important role during
westward expansion. Create a newspaper retelling their stories.
Look at various ads regarding Westward Expansion (Louisiana
Purchase, Manifest Destiny, Lewis and Clark, Gold Rush, Pony
Express, Homestead Act). Create an ad to draw people West (Ad will be on
newspaper).
Complete a crossword puzzle that identifies important events, vocabulary and people
of the Gold Rush.

5. I will explain how technology, transportation, and economy played a role in westward
expansion. (1b)
Railroad
Steamboats
Covered Wagons
Cotton Gin
Pony Express
Telegraph
Look at different paintings and photographs and articles, identify, and list in foldable
the types of transportation (stagecoach, railroad), technology (cotton gin, telegraph)
people from used. Describe how these change life during this time period?
6. I will explain how expansion created conflict. (1d)
Indian Removal Act
Trail of Tears
Examine primary sources to conclude how expansion created conflict with the Native
Americans.
Write a letter to President Andrew Jackson expressing their support or opposition to
the Indian removal Act. They must use at least three pieces of evidence to support their
opinion.
Vocabulary: expansion, Manifest Destiny, exploration, wagon train, Indian Removal act, 49ers,
Teacher Background Knowledge
Studying Westward Expansion helps students understand how the United States exploded in
both size and population during the mid 1800s. This was a time in which our country reached to
explore its boundaries all the way to the Pacific shores. Manifest destiny was a phrase used by
leaders and politicians in the 1840s to explain that it was the United States destiny and mission
to expand its boundaries by moving westward. The original 13 colonies had grown, and the desire
for new land increased.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition, the Homestead Act, the Gold Rush, the Oregon Trail, and the
Transcontinental Railroad were turning points, which changed life for thousands. People began
moving west for land, gold, power, and wealth. Some of the dreams were fulfilled, but often
people left the West in despair.
Intertwined with the events of this historical period are the Native Americans. Sometimes
encounters between those moving West and the Native Americans were positive and at other
times they were disastrous. Unfortunately, negative encounters resulted from a
misunderstanding of the values of the others culture.
Lewis and Clark Expedition In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson bought the Louisiana Territory
for 15 million dollars from France. With this act, the United States grew about 1 million square
miles; from the Mississippi to the Rockies, and from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada. Thomas
Jefferson sent Meriwether Lewis and William Clarks Corps of Discovery to find a water route to
the Pacific and to explore the newly acquired territory.
The Homestead Act was signed in 1862 by Abraham Lincoln as a way to motivate people to move
west and cultivate new lands and took effect on January 1, 1863.. The Homestead Act gave people
up to 160 acres of land. Each homesteader claimed the land with a filing fee of 10 dollars.
Afterwards, they had to live on the land and build a home. In effect, that the land had to be
settled and cultivated for five years. Approximately 270 million acres were claimed and settled
under this act.
Oregon Trail From 18361869, The Oregon Trail was one of the most feasible way for settlers to
get across the mountains. The largest waves of people arrived in Oregon in 1843 (900 settlers)
and in 1844 (1,200 settlers) in search of farmland. One out of ten people died along this trail,
usually from cholera, poor sanitation, and, at times, horrible accidents. Travel on the Oregon
Trail largely ended in 1869 when the Transcontinental Railroad was completed. Route of the
Oregon Trail http://www.endoftheoregontrail.org/maplibrary/oregontrail.html
The California Gold Rush began in n January 1848 when gold was discovered on John Sutters
estate in California. That year, President James Polk validated the findings of gold, and the Gold
Rush began. The people who moved west for gold were dubbed the forty-niners (49ers) because
many of them left their homes in 1849. (Incidentally, there were also people who came in 1848
and were called 48ers.) As the Gold Rush progressed, California became a very populous state.
Transcontinental Railroad By 1835, thousands of miles of track had been laid in the eastern part
of the United States. Trains made it easier to ship goods quickly and cheaply. New towns and
factories began to appear along the railroad route. The Pacific Railway Act (1862) authorized two
companies to build the Transcontinental Railroad. The Central Pacific Railroad Company would
begin laying tracks in California and work their way east. The Union Pacific Railroad would start
at the Missouri River and work west. Finding workers willing to support the Central Pacific
Railroad Company was difficult, because most workers preferred to leave in search of work on the
mines. Since Chinese immigrants would work for only 35 dollars a month, much less than other
workers, the Central Pacific Railroad Company decided to employ up to 10,000 Chinese men to
work on the railroad. The Great Race refers to a time when the government approved a race
between the Central Pacific Railroad Company and the Union Pacific Railroad. The company to

reach the furthest in their particular direction would make the most money.
As the railroad was built, towns would grow along its path. These became known as Boomtowns.
Railroad workers spent their extra time and money in these towns. The towns tended to be rough
places, characterized by violence and lawlessness. The railroads came together in 1869. The two
companies agreed on a date and meeting place Promontory Point, Utah, May 10, 1869. The
Central Pacific Company arrived there first on April 30. The day the last spike was placed into the
track, the two railroads connected. The Golden Spike Ceremony was a huge celebration for
everyone in America.
Native Americans hated the railroad. Not only had the railroad forced them off their lands into
reservations, but it also negatively affected the wide open spaces they cherished. The sounds of
the trains scared the wild animals away, which, in turn, affected their hunting. The railroad also
caused more people to move west, which further pushed Native Americans off their lands,
eventually leading to official relocation acts.
Native Americans and Westward Expansion There is a misperception that the Native Americans
were the emigrants biggest problem, but in fact, most Native American tribes were helpful. They
provided Lewis and Clark with supplies and transportation. They also played an essential role as
trail blazers, hunters, and scouts. Sacagawea, a Native American woman, played a valuable part
in the expedition. She was a translator for Lewis and Clark and the Native Americans. As Lewis
and Clark encountered various Native American tribes, they performed the same ritual. They
would explain to the Native Americans that the land they were on now belonged to the United
States and that their great father was Thomas Jefferson. After explaining this they would give
the Native Americans a peace medal. On one side of the medal was Thomas Jefferson and on the
other was a picture of two hands clasping.
The Trail of Tears was a sad period in history when the Cherokee where forced off their land in
Georgia. From 1790 to 1830, the white population in Georgia grew six times its original size.
Because of this, the Georgians continued to take the Cherokee Indians land and forced them into
the frontier. In 1830, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act. The Cherokees attempted to
appeal this act and formed the Cherokee Nation. They also brought a case seeking to prevent
attempts to oust them from their land. This lawsuit made its way to the United States Supreme
Court. The Cherokee lost the case (Cherokee Nation v. Georgia 1831). In 1838, the United States
Army attacked the Cherokee Nation. Men, women, and children were taken from their lands and
forced to march thousands of miles. Four thousand Cherokee died as a result of this removal.