Davies 1 

Ted Davies 
Mr. Douville 
English P. 3 
November 21, 2014 
 

The Rise of the Berlin Wall: The Beginning of the Fall of Communism 
 
BACKGROUND

It was a grateful day. On September 2nd, 1945,  World War II was ended. After 
seven long, war­torn years, the war had ended. But then a new problem emerged: 
Soviet domination over Eastern Europe posed a problem. The Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics  also had an iron fist rule over half of Germany, or East Germany. In the late 
1940s, Germany was divided into four zones. Each zone was controlled by an Allied 
country. The capital city of Berlin was also divided into four zones, even though Berlin 
was deep inside the Communist zone of Germany. (Background of US conflict with 
Soviet Union) 
In 1948, West Berlin was blockaded by the Soviets. They shut down the railroad 
lines, motorways, rivers, and subway lines connecting East from West. They even shut 
down the electricity. They hoped that the Western Allies would give up on West Berlin 
(so it would subsequently fall to Communism). Unexpectedly, the Allies started making 
supply flights to West Berlin. They delivered 13 tons of supplies a ​
day​
, making around 
the clock flights supplying the Germans with food and other necessities. When the 
blockade ended, 15 months after it was erected, over 200,000 supply flights had been 
made. (The Berlin Crisis) 
On May 23, 1949, the Western Allies (France, the USA and Britain) combined 
their zones into one, free, West Germany, with Communist East Germany dominated by 

 Davies 2 

the USSR. The Soviets despised of the merging of the ‘free’ zones, as they wanted a 
powerless Germany that could never attack again. This was because the Soviet Union 
had been invaded by Germany four times. The Western Allies had a different plan: They 
wanted a free, unified Germany. This notion angered the Soviets. The legacy of the 
Berlin wall symbolized the Cold War, caused social and economic chaos, and caused 
political power struggles. (The Berlin Crisis) 
COLD WAR SYMBOL

The legacy of the Berlin wall symbolized the Cold War. The wall was more than 
just a wall ­ way more than just barbed and chain link fence. The wall was about 98 
miles long, with 26 of it cutting through the city of Berlin. The wall was harder to cross 
on the Eastern side than the Western side. In fact, the majority of the wall was no wall at 
all­just a strip of land surrounded by low barbed wire fences. That strip of land was 
called the ‘death strip’. It was illuminated by lights 24/7. There were many guard towers 
along the death strip. People were up in the towers 24/7 with machine guns, so that 
people crossing the death strip could be killed easily. 186 people died attempting to 
cross the wall. (The construction of the Berlin wall) 
The Berlin Wall was also a large point of tension in the Cold War. The Soviets 
had a smart idea ­ erecting the Berlin Wall was like a Soviet form of the US’s 
Containment Policy (our foreign policy to Communism at that time). They hated the 
presence of a ‘free Germany’ in their well maintained Communist empire. It was their 
angered response to the Western Allies combining their zones. Not only that, but it ​
also 
showed the world the Soviet Union’s absolute ​
power​
 over the region [eastern Europe]. 

 Davies 3 

The whole world had their eyes on Berlin. The only ‘gap’ in the Iron Curtain had been 
shut off, and would not be re­opened for almost 30 years ­ and the fall would end 
Russian Communism. (Reasons for the Berlin Wall) 
There were lots of little competitions that both countries had. The Soviets always 
seemed to have something exactly alike the US’s idea. For example, the US had the 
Marshall plan, which was the plan to rebuild Europe after World War Two. Then the 
Soviets came up with their own plan, the Molotov Plan. But did they really put that plan 
into action? No. It was just another cliche that the USSR had. There were more, like 
NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) vs the Warsaw Pact. They both were military 
alliances, both for each its respected ‘side’ of the Cold War. (Croan) 
Speaking of the Marshall Plan, it was another tension hot­spot in the Cold War. It 
was the US’ plan to see Europe rebuilt from the fray of World War II. Now that posed an 
unfortunately problem: the plan said to rebuild all of Europe. But the Soviet union 
controlled ½ of mainland Europe. And they wanted those countries to have no Western 
influence whatsoever (the plan would only be for part of Europe). The Soviets made a 
plan of their own for their satellite nations: The Molotov Plan. But it was more of a 
scheme that the Soviets had to make themselves look good. (History of the Marshall 
Plan) 
SOCIAL/ECON. CHAOS

 The legacy of the Berlin wall caused social chaos. Some immediate social chaos 
that occurred was the fact that people that worked in the opposite zone could not go to 
work, which subsequently meant they could not earn money. But before the wall was 

 Davies 4 

built, thousands ‘defected’ to West Berlin/Germany. People were killed trying to cross 
the wall. Even women and children were shot. This posed a huge human rights issue. It 
angered East and West Berliners, as well as NATO and UN members around the globe. 
(Effects of the Wall) 
The Stasi also posed a huge problem to East Berlin. The Stasi was East 
Germany’s  Secret Police, like the KGB. They had a record on every single citizen of 
East Germany, and monitored their lives very closely. They limited free speech to a 
minimum. The Stasi also controlled people’s lives indefinitely. (STASI) 
“Economics is a subject that not greatly respect one’s wishes” (N. Khrushchev). 
The legacy of the Berlin wall caused Economic chaos. Now. before the wall was built, 
thousands of East Germans defected (or immigrated) to Hungary and West Berlin and 
West Germany (that was one reason for the Wall to be built). With these immigrants, 
came thousands of skilled laborers and workers. It was like someone had pulled a plug 
on East Germany’s reserves of workers, causing East Germany’s GDP to fall. But in the 
West [Berlin and Germany], the economy rose quite a bit from the swarm of workers. 
Most people in West Berlin had a good job and money, unlike in the East, where people 
had some very poor jobs. But with the influx in workers [in West Berlin], there became 
less and less jobs. (1961 Berlin Wall goes up) 
POLITICAL

The legacy of the Berlin Wall caused Political power struggles and movements. 
In 1953, Joseph Stalin died. Subsequently, there was a blank space for a Soviet 
supreme leader. Nikita Khrushchev was the man to take that spot. Being more 

 Davies 5 

moderate than Stalin, he denounced Stalin and Lenin in a speech. People were mad at 
him for denouncing their previous leaders, and so started a small movement of 
anti­Khrushchevism. It took six months for Khrushchev to rise to power, and he was 
almost​
 removed from power twice by members of the Executive Committee of the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics. (New York Times) 
John F. Kennedy was frustrated by the fact that he ​
could not​
 defend West Berlin 
and West Germany with nuclear weapons if invaded by the USSR. He did not want to 
start an all­out nuclear war with the Soviets. Kennedy traveled to Vienna to peace talks 
with the USSR and its satellite nations. Unfortunately, the conference was a flop. 
Khrushchev stormed out of the conference before it began. Subsequently, he increased 
military spending, to be ready to respond if anything happened in Berlin. He also put a 
military alert on Berlin, because he thought it was a point where nuclear war could break 
out. (The Cold War in Berlin) 
Ronald Reagan, the 40th president, went to West Berlin in 1987 to give an 
inspirational speech. Strategically, he delivered his speech less than 100 feet from the 
wall. Reagan attacked East German leader Mikhail Gorbachev to “please tear down this 
wall” (Reagan, 1987). He attacked Gorbachev, and called for the immediate unification 
of East and West Germany. People noted the speech, but it wasn’t until 1989 that 
people actually got Reagan’s ideas in their head. And it was a big notion the people 
had. (Remembering Reagan’s Tear Down this Wall speech) 

IMPORTANCE

 Davies 6 

The Berlin Wall also had a huge spot in history. It was very important to both the 
Soviet Union and the United States. It is still a respected thing in Communist history, as 
well as world history (and Cold War history). 
The Berlin Wall had a significant impact on the former USSR. The Wall kept 
Communism from getting polluted by democracy. It also symbolized the power the 
USSR had over eastern Europe; the Berlin wall gave the USSR more control over 
Eastern Europe.  There were also some negative impacts (but there is some debate 
over if these were positive for the USSR or not). For example, the Berlin Wall drove a 
deeper wedge between them and the USA. Another negative impact to the Soviets was 
that there was more tension. Also, the plan gave them a disadvantage, because the US 
had a legitimate reason to criticise the Soviets. (Wallace)  
The Berlin Wall also had a significant impact on the United States as well. It was 
a tell­tale sign that the USSR had power over their Satellite nations. The Wall also 
stirred up anger in the US public and Government. They wanted the wall down as soon 
as possible. But the wall also started the 30 year end to the Cold War, and ultimately 
the USSR. On the down side of the impacts, it brought the US and Soviet Union very 
close to and all­out nuclear war. It also highlighted the ‘desperate escape’ from the Cold 
War the Soviets tried to do. (Berlin Wall) 
CONCLUSION/FALL OF THE WALL

In the late 1980s, the corrupt communist government was falling apart. Countries 
were starting to want independence, and Reagan dealt a big blow to Communism in 
1987, with his speech. The satellite nations were also falling apart, by stretching away 

 Davies 7 

from the USSR. The communist leaders were getting weary of dealing with the satellite 
nations. (Wallace) 
Then, on the night of November 9th, 1989, the Wall fell. Along with it, the Soviet 
Union was no more. People hit the wall with sledgehammers, and the first gap in the 
wall was opened. The event was on TV all over the world. People were drinking and 
crying and laughing and hugging; people were re­united after 28 years of separation. 
Thousands of East Germans plowed into West Berlin. The end of the die­had 
communist gave way to the birth of some new nations, some old. New nations, like 
Slovakia and Montenegro were born. Old ones, like Estonia and Kazakhstan were also 
re­born. The former­Soviet countries were now free ­ and Germany was one country 
again. (The Fall of the Berlin Wall)