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Anti-Bias Unit Plan

Shawna Williams

Title: Its Ok to Be Different


Age: 2nd-3rd Grade
Questions/Concepts:

Big Question #1: What is special needs? What does a person with special needs look like?
o Key Concepts: Abilities, Disabilities, Stereotypes, Awareness
Big Question #2: How does living with special needs affect a person?
o Key Concepts: Biases, Physical Limitations, Adaptations, Empathy, Bullying, Stereotypes, Discrimination, Inclusion,
Exclusion

Social Action:

Our social action will have two parts to it. After discussing Big Question #2: How does living with special needs affect a
person? we would show our students the video of a disability accessible playground. We would then take our students on a
fieldtrip to a local playground. We will have a discussion about how children with disabilities could or could not play on the
playground. The students would then go around with measuring tools and make notes about the accessibility of the
playground. After returning to the classroom, we would have a discussion about the playground and come to a conclusion on
its accessibility. We would also discuss ways that we could make the playground more accessible. Students would then
individually draw their dream playgrounds that would be accessible to all types of students. After sharing our drawings we
would ask the students how it would feel if they couldnt play with their friends and if they thought it would be fair. We would
tell them that they could make a difference by writing to our local congressmen about our playground. We would teach a
lesson on letter writing and have our students write and send their own letters. We would end the lesson by talking about how
when we see injustices, we have to stand up against them.
o Key Concepts: Issues children with special needs have, Awareness, Adaptation, Inclusion/Exclusion, Bias, Discrimination

Block Plan
Week/Day Key Concepts
1/1
Ability

Materials/Resources
Millman, Isaac. Moses Goes to a

Activity
Opening

Disability

Concert. New York: Farrar, Straus

The teacher will read Moses Goes to a Concert and lead

Deafness

and Giroux, 1998.

discussion on these questions.

Glossary of Terms
http://archive.adl.org/education/curric
ulum_connections/fall_2005/fall_200
5_lesson5_sb_glossary.html

What was different about Moses and his classmates


Have you met a person who is deaf before?
How did Moses and his classmates communicate?
Why do you think the author wrote about Moses?

The teacher will explain that they will be learning about


multiple disabilities over the next few weeks and introduce Big
Question #1: What is special needs? What does a person

Poster sheets
Markers

with special needs look like? The teacher will write


students answers on the board.

Writing Journals
Then teacher will write Ability, Disability, and Deafness on the
poster sheet and the students will come up with definitions
(using glossary for help). Students will write them in their
writing journals and draw pictures.

Teacher will add and discuss terms throughout lessons as


1/2

needed.
Opening

Cerebral Palsy

Lears, Laurie. Nathan's Wish: A Story

Physical

About Cerebral Palsy. Morton Grove, The teacher will review vocabulary words from the day before

Disability

Ill: Albert Whitman &, 2005.

Awareness
Adaptations

and have students explain the vocabulary in their own words.


The teacher will then ask students to recall yesterdays story

Glossary of Terms:

about Moses and discuss that while Moses had a disability that

http://archive.adl.org/education/curric wasnt visible, some people have disabilities that you can see
ulum_connections/fall_2005/fall_200

(like the boy in todays story).

5_lesson5_sb_glossary.html

Jar with screw-on lid

The teacher will read Nathan's Wish: A Story About Cerebral

Journals

Palsy and lead discussion on these questions.

Ball

Vocabulary Poster

What disability did Nathan have? How could you tell?


What does it look like?
What was different about Fire?
Why did Nathan feel connected to Fire?
What were they able to do despite their disabilities?

Activity (*Taken from Disability Awareness Activity Packet)

The teacher will tell students that we will now do an activity


that helps us understand what living with a physical disability
feels like. She will then have students try different activities
using only one hand.
- Tying their shoes
- Going through the lunch line and eating lunch
- Opening a jar with a screw-on lid
- Playing catch
- Holding a stack of papers and handing out one at a time
Then the class will discuss the problems the students had. The
teacher will ask them the following questions;

What if they could not use either hand?


What problems would there be if they were in a wheel
chair and could not use their hands?

The teacher will add the words Cerebral Palsy, Physical

Disability, wheelchair, and rehabilitation to the vocabulary


poster, and students will add them to their journal glossaries.
1/3

Blindness

Strom, Maria Diaz. Rainbow Joe and


The teacher will start by reviewing the words in the students

Disability

Me. New York: Lee & Low, 1999.


journals and asking if anyone has any questions before moving
on.
Paper
Watercolors
Paintbrushes
Cups with water
Blindfolds

The teacher will show students a picture of a rainbow and have


them talk about what things the different colors make them
think of. The students will close their eyes as they imagine
these objects, feelings, places, etc. Then the teacher will
explain that some people, who are blind, cannot see colors, but
they can still experience art in different ways. She will ask the
students how they think people who are blind can do this
(playing music, singing, writing poetry, painting without
seeing, etc).
The teacher will read Rainbow Joe and Me to the class, and
ask the students to recall the things they think of when certain

colors are mentioned in the book. She will keep a list of words
from the book on the board that have rhyming words. Then the
teacher will lead a class discussion about blindness on these
questions:

How does Rainbow Joe make colors?


How does Eloise make colors?
Is one way better than the other?

The teacher will then pass out supplies to each student and
instruct the students to blindfold themselves. She will read the
words from the board and say an accompanying word that
either rhymes or doesnt. If the second word rhymes, the
children will paint on their paper. If the second word doesnt
rhyme the children will not paint and instead will raise their
hand into the air.
The students will then be given words from Rainbow Joe and
Me to write along the edges of their painting. Instruct the

students to work individually to come up with words that


rhyme with the words they are given and to write them next to
each other. The students will write at least three sentences on
the back of their painting about how it felt to paint without
being able to see.
Assessment:
- The art lesson will be graded by participation and teacher
observation. The teacher will make note of accurate painting
and hand raising according to word rhyming for each student.
-The independent written rhyming words will be graded by
completion of assignment and accuracy of words.
- The sentences on the back of the painting will be graded on
completion (meeting minimum number) and relatedness to the
prompt (any feelings about being blind).

To end, have students add the word blindness to their journal


glossary.

1/ 4

Autism

Russell is Extra Special: A Book

Disability

About Autism for Children (By:

Before the lesson begins, the teacher will ask the students what
they know about autism. The teacher will write answers on
Charles Anthony Amenta III)
the board. The teacher will not give answers or say whether a
Paper
Writing utensils
Whiteboard/Chalkboard
Dry Erase markers/Chalk
Poster Board
Markers

statement is right or wrong.


The teacher will then lead a discussion about what the students
know about autism. The teacher will ask students how they
know and point out any misconceptions they have voiced. If
there are any incorrect statements, the teacher can point out
that sometimes we believe things people tell us even if they are
wrong. (We will bring this back up when we discuss
stereotypes.) The teacher will instruct the students get out
journals and create a K-W-L graphic organizer The teacher
will instruct the students to write down the statement from the
board under the Know column The teacher will instruct the
students to come up with at least 5 things that they want to
learn about autism and write them down under the Want to

Learn column
Read Russell is Extra Special: A Book About Autism for
Children as a class. The teacher will instruct the students to
pay attention for the answers to their questions in the story.
Then students will write down the answers to the questions
that the book answered as well as any other information they
found interesting. They must include at least 5 facts. The
teacher will then pass out poster board and markers and
instruct the students to form groups and make an informational
poster about autism. The poster should have at least 5
statements. Then students will present their posters to the
class. Students will also add autism to their journal glossary as
teacher writes it on the vocabulary poster.
Assessment:
- The discussion will be graded by participation
- The independent K-W-L chart will be graded for completion
and accuracy of learned information

- Each column should have at least 5 statements


- The poster and presentation will be graded on neatness,
spelling, and speaking skills (clear and audible)
1/ 5

Disability

Stuve-Bodeen, Stephanie. We'll Paint

Down

the Octopus Red. Bethesda, MD:

syndrome

Woodbine House, 1998.

Before the lesson begins, the teacher will have students review
the vocabulary words they have learned so far.
Awareness

Then the teacher will ask the students to think of some of their
Whiteboard and markers

favorite things that they like to do with their siblings and or


friends. The teacher will then have a discussion with the class

Paper
Writing utensils
Scripts
Journal
Vocabulary Poster

about what Down syndrome is and how it affects the lives of


the people who have it as well as their families. The teacher
will answer any questions that the students may have.
Read Well Paint the Octopus Red as a class. The teacher will
ask students to get out their journals and have them write down
the things that they liked doing the most with their siblings and
or friends. As a class, divide into three groups and pick one

activity for each group and create a script based off of Well
Paint the Octopus Red that uses the students ideas instead of
the ones in the book. After the scripts are finished, assign each
student their part (activity) including a narrator as well. The
students will begin their independent practice of their parts.
Once everyone is approved, the students will go through the
entire script, reading their parts in order, out loud
After Readers Theater, the students will discuss how a person
with Down syndrome would be able to do all of the activities
they chose to include in the script with a little help and
patience.
Assessment:
-The choice of a specific activity will be graded on completion
-The independent reading will be graded on reading fluency
and speaking presentation. The teacher will keep track of the
number of mistakes made in reading. The student will speak

slowly and loud enough to be understood clearly


-The discussions will be graded by participation

The students will finish by adding Down syndrome to their


journal glossaries.
Then the teacher will pass out permission forms and ask for
2/1

Bias

Schniedewind, Nancy, and Ellen

parents help for the field trip.


The teacher will begin by reviewing the vocabulary poster and

Stereotype

Davidson. Open Minds to Equality: A

the students journals. The teacher will ask students if they

Bullying

Sourcebook of Learning Activities to

want to add any more words based off what they have learned

Discrimination

Affirm Diversity and Promote Equity.

so far. The teacher will then introduce Big Question #2: How

Awareness

Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools,

does living with special needs affect a person? The teacher

(Speakers

2006. 128. Print.

will write students answers on the board.

Disability)

Then the teacher will explain to students that they will be


Speaker

having a guest come in to speak to them later in the day. The


speaker will be a person from the community or parent/family

Vocabulary Poster

member of a student who is living with a disability. (Before

Journals

unit begins, teacher will find a speaker by asking the students

Bowl

family for assistance and reaching out to the community.)

White board and markers

The teacher will then have students write three questions to


ask the speaker and write them in their journal. One question
has to be about stereotypes/bias. Teacher will review what
stereotypes are and bring up bias specifically. Teacher will
offer examples of questions such as Were you ever made fun
of for your disability? Who bullied you and why? Students
will bring the questions to the teacher for approval and pick
one question to ask the speaker. The students will put their
chosen question into a bowl to use for the speaker.

In the afternoon the teacher will introduce the speaker to the


class and ask him/her to tell the students about his/her
disability and life. The teacher will then pull questions from
the bowl to ask the speaker. The students will take notes about
the interview to write a journal entry after. After thanking the

speaker and saying goodbye, the teacher will debrief the


students and discuss the interview. The teacher will ask the
students if they have any strong feelings about the way the
speaker was treated or felt. Then the teacher will ask the
students to start their journal entries. The teacher will write
the following requirements on the board.

Describe the person interviewed


Describe the type of disability the person has and how
the person feels about that
Share examples of ways the person has faced
discrimination and how they felt
Why do you think someone would discriminate
against them?

After giving the students ample time to write, the teacher will
ask for volunteers to read their entries aloud. The teacher will
then add the speakers disability to the vocabulary poster if it
is not already on the list, and students will add it to their
glossary.

Assessment

- The teacher will take a participation grade for the three


questions.
- The teacher will grade students on active listening and note
taking during the interview.
- The teacher will take up the journal entry to grade for
completion of the prompt, writing conventions, and paragraph
form.

*Adapted and changed from Open Minds to Equality


2/2

Disability
Dwarfism
Adaptations
Stereotypes
Bias

Riggs, Stephanie, and Bill Youmans.


The teacher will write Dwarfism on the board and ask students
Never Sell Yourself Short. Morton
to discuss what they know about dwarfism. The teacher will ask
Grove, IL: Albert Whitman and Co.,
questions about people with dwarfism that will be answered in
2001. Print.
the book, but that students might be biased toward.
Large clothing
Journals

Can people with dwarfism drive cars?


Can people with dwarfism shop at the mall and grocery
store?
Can people with dwarfism play sports?

The teacher will then read the book aloud, pausing to discuss the

questions she asked and the students answers. After the story, the
teacher will ask the students if some of the answers surprised
them, and if so, why? The teacher will explain that thinking all
people of a particular group are alike is called 'stereotyping. She
will then give the example that thinking all little people cannot
play basketball is a stereotype. She will ask students if they can
give other examples of stereotyping from the book.
She will then ask students to get out their journals and add
dwarfism, and stereotypes to their glossaries.
The teacher will ask the students experience life in a world that is
too big for them. The teacher will have them try on clothing that
is too big and try to reach items up on a tall shelf. The teacher
will then tell the students that this is how people with dwarfism
feel every day and ask them what they know about the specifics
of dwarfism

The teacher will bring back the book and read the sentence It
still hurts when people stare at me because I am a little person.
The teacher will instruct students to write a paragraph about how
they would feel if they were in Joshs shoes and had people stare
at them. Ask for volunteers to read their paragraphs aloud.
Assessment
- Grade paragraphs based on writing conventions and paragraph
form. Also grade on whether they addressed feelings and
stereotypes.
2/3

Disability
Stereotypes
Bias
Adaptations
Inclusion

Thomas, Pat, and Lesley Harker.

The teacher will begin by bringing all the students to the

Don't Call Me Special: A First Look

carpet. She will then ask them to discuss what they learned

at Disability. New York: Barron's,

yesterday and ask for any questions. The teacher will then add

2002. Print.

bias and discrimination to the vocabulary poster, while


students write the words in their glossary.

Website: http://www.adapt.org/.
The teacher will then read Dont Call Me Special by Pat
Thomas. The teacher will pause on page seven to ask students
Website:

http://kidshealth.org/kid/health_probl

who they would choose. The teacher will pause again on page

ems/learning_problem/learning_disab nine to ask students why some people would choose the girl
ilities.html

in the wheelchair over the boy. The teacher will then ask the
students if they have words for this, specifically when

Journals
Vocabulary poster

assuming things. (Stereotyping and Bias) Teacher will lead


students to these answers. The teacher will also pause and ask
the students the questions scattered throughout the rest of the
book.
Then the teacher will lead a discussion on bias. The teacher
will ask the following questions.

Why do you think the people did not like to be called


special?
Why do you think people put the children in a
different school?
How would you feel having to go to a different school
than your friends?

Teacher will then show students the Adapt website and


explain how some people are fighting against mistreatment
and injustice because of biases. The teacher will explain what
institutions are and ask students why they would fight against

them. The teacher will explain how now, most students with
disabilities learn in regular classrooms. This is called
inclusion. The teacher will ask student why they think this has
happened and what they think of it.
Then the teacher will add; learning disability, assumption,
inclusion, and institution to the vocabulary poster while
students add the words to their glossaries.
The students will also be able to get on the kids health
website for the remainder of the unit during free time to learn
more about learning disabilities.

Assessment
-Grade students on participation during reading and
2/4

Disability
Adaptations
Social Action

discussion
The teacher will then read the book, Rolling Along: The Story
Heelan, Jamee Riggio., and Nicola
of Taylor and his Wheelchair, by Heelan and Simmonds
Simmonds. Rolling Along: The Story
pausing to point out adaptations Taylor uses in order to play.
of Taylor and His Wheelchair.

Then the teacher will ask the following questions about the
Atlanta, GA: Peachtree, 2000. Print.
book.
Video http://www.nbcnews.com/video/night
ly-news/19603466

Why does Taylor use a wheelchair?


Why does Taylor go to therapy and what does he do?
What does Taylor have to pay special attention to in
his wheelchair? What adaptations does Taylor use and
need?

The teacher will remind students that they are going on a field
trip tomorrow to the local park to see if someone like Taylor
can play on the playground. Then the teacher will have
students watch the video about disability-accessible park in
Virginia and ask them what adaptations the park had. She will
also ask the students if they think Taylor would enjoy the
park.
The teacher will then explain to the students what they will be
2/5

Social Action
Adaptations
Accessibility

Website:

doing at the park.


The teacher, with the help of parent volunteers will get the

http://www.accessibleplayground.net/

students on the bus and bring them to the playground.

category/unique-equipment/
Local park

1. First, students are given 15 minutes to play on the


playground.
2. The students will then take notes about the park in

Parent Volunteers
Journals
Paper
Colored pencils
Rulers

their journals.
3. Students will be given rulers to measure pathways,
inclines, and steps to see if children with disabilities
can play on the playground.
4. Students will come back together to report their
findings and discuss the parks accessibility, taking
notes.
The children will eat lunch at the park and have more time to
play before going back to the school.
After returning, the teacher will ask students to talk about
how they would make a playground accessible. The teacher
will then pass out paper and instruct the students to draw their
dream accessible playgrounds and color them. The teacher
will tell students that their drawings will be displayed so they
should take their time. They will write a paragraph
explaining their picture and why the playground should be
built to accompany their drawing. Students will have the
chance to explore the Accessible Playground website to get

3/1

Social Action
Adaptations

Website:

further ideas for their dream playgrounds.


The teacher will have students sit on the carpet and recall

http://usgovinfo.about.com/od/uscon

what they did on their field trip and what they discovered.

gress/a/letterscongress.htm

The teacher will explain to students that now they have seen
what needs to be done, they must act on it. The teacher will

Envelopes
Paper
Stationary
Pencils

lead a discussion on why the students must act and the


consequences of inaction.
She will tell students that they will each write a letter to the
local congressman explaining what they did and what actions
the community should take to make the park more accessible
to all.
The teacher will then use the resource to help students
understand how to write a professional letter to their local
congressman. Using the internet, the class will find the
address of the congressman and write it on envelopes the
teacher will pass out. Then, the teacher will write an example
letter to the congressman with the help of the students on the
board. She will show students the parts of the letter and the
proper layout of a professional letter. The teacher will pass
out paper and instruct students to write their own letters
explaining the positive and negative aspects of the park. They

will also be required to make suggestions on how to make the


park more accessible to all children. The students will work
on the drafting process writing a rough draft and editing.
When students have been approved by the teacher for the
final draft, the teacher will give them stationary to write on.
Assessment
- Grade letter on proper letter conventions, writing
conventions, and punctuation.
- The letter should include one thing they liked about the
park, one thing that could be improved, and one suggestion of
how the community could make the park more accessible.
3/2

Bias
Stereotype
Exclusion
Target
Perpetrator
Bystander
Ally

Anti-Deformation League. (2000). A

*Teacher will send out invites to the Chat for parents.


Teacher will have discussion with students about the previous

World of Difference Institute: Anti-

days work over injustice and social action. The teacher will

Bias Study Guide. NY, NY.

tell the students that while we want to prevent stereotypes

Four Square Handout


Colored Pencils
Markers
Whiteboard and markers

from happening, sometimes they will still occur. Because of


this, it is important that we learn what to do when these

situations occur.
The teacher will tell students to think of a time when they had
to meet many new people. For example, maybe their family
moved and they had to go to a new school where they didnt
know anyone. Have students remember how they felt during
the experience. Ask students to recall what people did to
make them feel welcome, or what people did to make them
feel uncomfortable.
After the students have shared some of their experiences, tell
students that they are going to read a story about someone in
a similar situation. The teacher reads The New Girl.
The teacher will ask the following questions:

How did you feel listening to this story?


Do you think events like the one in this story really
happen?
Juanita says she felt invisible, what did she mean by
that? Have you ever felt that way?
Does this story include examples of stereotyping? If
so, what are they?
Is this story an example of exclusion?

The teacher will then draw the Roles diagram on the board

and explain what the roles, target, perpetrator, bystander,


ally mean.
The teacher will have students identify who in the story fits
each role. The teacher will ask the following questions:

What does the word target mean? Who is the target


in the story?
What does the word perpetrator mean? Where
there perpetrators in the story?
What does it mean to be a bystander? Was there a
bystander in the story?
What are some words that come to mind when you
hear the word ally? Was there an ally in the story?
What did they do?
Do you think that most people, at one time or another,
have been in each of these roles?
Which of the four roles do people get to choose?
Which of the four roles do people have no choice
about?

The teacher will tell students that they are to think about
experiences they have had in each of these four roles. She
will explain that students will not be asked to share all four
experiences but they will share at least one. The teacher will
distribute the Four Squares Handout to students and give

them colored pencils. The teacher will then explain that as


they remember a situation, they should draw a picture
representing what happened. The teacher will encourage
students to complete all four squares. However, if they have
no experience with one of the roles, they can leave it blank.
Then the teacher will add; target, perpetrator, bystander, ally,
and exclusion to the vocabulary poster while students add the
words to their glossaries.

Assessment:
The teacher will collect the Handout and grade it for
completion.

3/3

Bias
Stereotype
Exclusion
Target
Perpetrator
Bystander
Ally

Anti-Deformation League. (2000). A

* Adapted from ADL Study Guide


The teacher will review the Roles Diagram from the previous

World of Difference Institute: Anti-

day, asking the students if they have any questions. The

Bias Study Guide. NY, NY.

teacher will pass back the Four Square Handout and then

Four Square Handout

divide students into small groups. Each student in the group

Journal

will explain one of his/her pictures from the Four Square


Handout with their group. The teacher should remind
students to listen to the speaker without interrupting. After all
students have shared, the teacher will call the class to the
carpet and lead a discussion using the following questions:

How did you feel sharing a story with your


classmates?
How did you feel listening to other peoples
experiences?
Which square did you choose to talk about?
Which squares are easier or harder to talk about and
why?
Why do you think people standby when unfairness,
bullying, or other hurtful events happen?
Why do you think some people decide to by an ally?

The teacher will then pass out journals and assign the
following prompt for students to write about:

Why is it important to not be a bystander?


How can you be an ally to others, especially those
with special needs?

Assessment:
- The teacher will collect the Journals and grade it for

completion of prompt and writing conventions.

3/ 4

Disabilities
Bias
Stereotype
Social Action

Poster
Whiteboard and markers
Journals
Vocabulary Poster

* Adapted from ADL Study Guide


Debrief Unit
The teacher will gather students on the carpet and review
what they have learned as a class the past three weeks. The
teacher will write student statements on the board. The
teacher will then go over all the words on the Vocabulary
Poster. The class will come up with a contract on how they
will treat others and act when they see bias. The class will
create a poster displaying the contract which everyone will
sign. The teacher will explain the schedule for the Family
Chat that will occur tomorrow. The teacher will then provide
the following prompt for the students to write about in their
journals and share at the Chat:

3/5

Disabilities
Bias
Social Action

The students previous work


Various snacks for parents

What do you feel is the most important thing you


learned from this unit?

Students will help the teacher set up the room for the Chat
with Parents. The teacher and students will:

Hang up the dream playground drawing and


paragraphs
Display the letters written to the congressman
Display Rainbow Joe art
Display Autism posters
Put journals on the students desks

When parents arrive, they will be encouraged to browse the


art and work displayed. After 20 minutes, the parents will sit
down to watch the children perform their readers theater
scripts. Then the students will share what they have learned
throughout the unit to their parents and explain why social
action is important. They will also share their journal
responses from the previous day about the most important
thing they have learned.
Annotated Resources
Books/Texts
Amenta, Charles A. Russell Is Extra Special: A Book about Autism for Children. New York: Magination, 1992. Print.
Reading Level: 3rd grade
Summary: The book starts with an Introduction to Parents where the author identifies himself as the father of an autistic child as
well as a doctor. He goes on to talk about how autism is often inaccurately portrayed in the media and then goes on to explain what
exactly autism is and how it affects children. The story starts with a description of a young boy named Russell who has autism. The
description includes how he is different from other people and how his family helps him. The story goes on to talk about how Russell

doesnt like to be around a group of people, how he cant talk but can sign some, and how it is difficult for him to learn things. The
author mentions how Russell plays differently than most children and that he goes to a special school with other students who are like
him. The author talks about things Russell enjoys and is good at like swinging and swimming, but he also mentions that Russell
sometimes causes problems like breaking his brothers toys. The author also talks about how Russell doesnt like nighttime and even
hurts himself sometimes but he is learning ways to not do that anymore. The author ends the book by saying that even though Russell
is autistic, his family still loves him.
Lears, Laurie. Nathan's Wish: A Story About Cerebral Palsy. Morton Grove, Ill: Albert Whitman &, 2005. Print.
Reading Level: 2nd Grade
Summary: The book starts off with an explanation about what Cerebral palsy is and how it affects children, as well as the importance
of focusing on what people with CP can do instead of what they cant. The story starts with a young boy named Nathan talking about
his neighbor, Miss Sandy, and how she is a raptor rehabilitator. Nathan watches Miss Sandy take care of the birds everyday but is sad
that he cant help her do things because of his limited mobility due to his cerebral palsy. One day, Miss Sandy is taking care of an owl
with a broken wing named Fire. Fire really wants to be free again but is unable to fly. Nathan knows exactly how she feels and hopes
that her wing will get better so she can be set free. However, Fires wing never fully heals so she has to stay with Miss Sandy. This
makes Nathan sad so he looks for ways that Fire can still be useful. He discovers that Fire, instead of flying around, can now take care
of baby owls. This gives him the idea that he can help Miss Sandy in other ways too. Nathan begins answering the phone for Miss
Sandy and getting her mail. In this way, Nathan finds ways that he can help despite his disability.
Millman, Isaac. Moses Goes to a Concert. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998. Print.
Reading Level: 2nd Grade
Summary: The book starts with an explanation about how people who are deaf communicate, with American Sign Language. It also
explains how to understand the sign language that accompanies the story, including diagrams. The story starts with a young boy
named Moses who is deaf playing his new drum. Moses cant hear the sound but he can feel the vibrations. When he plays he doesnt
wear shoes so he can feel the vibrations in his hands and feet. One day Moses class goes on a fieldtrip to a concert. His teacher, Mr.
Samuels has a bag with surprises inside for them when they get to their destination. At the concert, Mr. Samuels signs to his students
that he is friends with the percussionist and that she is deaf like them. They notice that she doesnt wear shoes so that she can feel the
vibrations too. Mr. Samuels gives the students their surprises, balloons to put in their laps to help them better feel the vibrations as
well. After the concert, the children get to meet the percussionist and she tells them that if you work hard you can do anything. She
then lets the children play on her various percussion instruments. Later that night Moses tells his parents about the concert and how
when you set your mind to it you can do anything you chose, and Moses chooses to be a percussionist when he grows up.
Riggs, Stephanie, and Bill Youmans. Never Sell Yourself Short. Morton Grove, IL: Albert Whitman and Co., 2001. Print.

Reading Level: 3rd Grade


Summary: The story starts with a 14 year old boy named Josh who has achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism. Josh talks about how he
has to sleep with a special machine that gives him oxygen and how when he was little he had to use oxygen all of the time because his
lungs were underdeveloped. Joshs form of dwarfism makes him have very short arms and legs as well as other problems with his
organs. He goes on to describe all the ways he has to do things differently due to his short stature such as use a stool or get all of his
cloths altered. He doesnt mind asking people for help because everyone needs help with something. Josh enjoys sports, especially
basketball. Even though he couldnt play for his school team, he still participates by being the manager. Josh also cant wait to drive
when he gets older and his car will only need a few adjustments to make that possible. Josh talks about how he still gets sad when
people stare at him but he is confident in himself and has a lot of really good friends. Some of his friends are shy or have learning
disabilities but seeing Josh accomplish so much encourages them to do their best. When Josh is older he wants to be a pilot and he
knows that he can do this because he has seen the successes of other people like him at the yearly Little People of America national
conferences. The book ends with an explanation of dwarfism and how it affects people, including what the Little People of America
organization does by its president.
Heelan, Jamee Riggio., and Nicola Simmonds. Rolling Along: The Story of Taylor and His Wheelchair. Atlanta, GA: Peachtree, 2000.
Print.
Reading Level: 3rd Grade
Summary: The story starts with a young boy named Taylor talking about the things that him and his twin brother Tyler enjoy doing,
like reading about dinosaurs and eating chocolate ice cream. But then Taylor talks about how he is different from his brother because
he has cerebral palsy. Taylor talks about how he goes to therapy to get stronger and how he has made friends there with people who
like him have always needed to use special equipment and with those that were in accidents. His therapist Kathryn helps him get
around with leg braces and a walker, but this is hard work for Taylor and he gets tired very quickly. So Taylor can be more
independent, he starts practicing with a wheelchair and one day his family surprises him with one of his very own. It takes some time
for Taylors muscles to get strong enough to use the wheelchair, but in the meantime his brother Tyler helps him a lot. With his
wheelchair, Taylor is now able to be more independent but the buildings have to have special accommodations for him like ramps and
buttons to open heavy doors. His school has these things and he is able to do more things on his own like drink water from the
fountain and use the bathroom. At home he is even able to play basketball in his wheelchair with his brother. With his new freedom,
Taylor is ready to do anything.
Strom, Maria Diaz. Rainbow Joe and Me. New York: Lee & Low, 1999. Print.
Reading Level: 2nd Grade
Summary: The story starts with Eloise talking about how she makes colors. She can mix red and white to make pink, etc., and paints
all sorts of colorful animals. Every time she paints something, Eloise takes it to Rainbow Joe to see. He is blind but Eloise tells him

everything about her artwork. Rainbow Joe tells Eloise he can make colors too and that one day hell show her the special way he
does it. Eloises mother tells her not to mess with Rainbow Joe and that he cant mix colors because hes blind, but Eloise continues to
spend time with him. One day, Rainbow Joe describes all the colors he sees in his head to Eloise. This makes her sure that he can
make colors even though when she tried to do it without looking, her colors come out gray. On a Sunday, Rainbow Joe has a bag with
his color surprise for Eloise inside. Eloises mother makes her go to church first and afterwards they quickly return home. Rainbow
Joe pulls a saxophone out of the bag and begins playing beautiful, colorful noises and Eloise and her mother see him paint a rainbow
with music.
Stuve-Bodeen, Stephanie. We'll Paint the Octopus Red. Bethesda, MD: Woodbine House, 1998. Print.
Reading Level: 2nd Grade
Summary: The story starts with a young girl named Emma finding out she has a new baby brother named Isaac. When Emma first
found out she was going to have a sibling she wasnt very excited about it because it had always just been her and her parents. To help
her get more used to the idea, Emmas dad tells her all of the things she will be able to do with the new baby like read to it. Emma
even comes up with some of her own ideas like how they will be able to paint red octopuses at the art festival. But then the morning
that her dad told her about Isaac, he also gets sad and tells her that her little brother has Down syndrome. Emma goes through the list
of all the things she wanted to do with her brother because she is worried he will no longer be able to do them. Her dad reassures her
that with help and patience, Isaac will be able to do everything, even paint the red octopus. This realization cheers up her father and
makes Emma happy as they go to the hospital to visit Isaac.
Petrillo, Genevieve, and Lea Lyon. Keep Your Ear on the Ball. Gardiner, Me.: Tilbury House, 2007. Print.
Reading Level: 3rd Grade
Summary: The story starts with a pretty normal looking child named Davey entering a classroom as a new student. He is shown to
his desk and then goes around the classroom feeling everything. This is when the class realizes that Davey is blind. Davey is able to
do everything his classmates do, only differently. He reads Braille books when they read and uses a Braillewriter when they write.
However, when his classmates offer to do things for Davey, like throwing away is trash in the lunchroom, Davey says, thanks, but no
thanks, refusing them. Even with these refusals, Davey is able to get by on his own, except when it comes to playing kickball on the
playground. Davey is unable to kick the ball and runs too far, injuring classmates in the process. His friends begin to get annoyed and
dont understand why he wont let them do things for him. That is until one of his friends, realizes that Davey just wants to be able to
do things for himself, and that they can do things to make it easier for him. The next day, when it comes time for Davey to kick, they
blow a whistle to silence everyone, and then they roll the ball and tell Davey to listen for it. Davey is able to hear when the ball gets
to him and kick it on time. Someone else then stands at the base and makes noise so that Davey can hear what direction and how far
to run. By having his friends simply help, instead of doing things for him, Davey is now able to participate fully in their games.

Thomas, Pat, and Lesley Harker. Don't Call Me Special: A First Look at Disability. New York: Barron's, 2002. Print.
Reading Level: 2nd-3rd Grades
Summary: This book begins by asking the question, what child in this picture wouldnt like sports. It goes on to say, I bet you picked
the girl in the wheelchair, but she loves sports. It then points out that choosing the girl in the wheelchair is stereotyping. It brings up
questions and concerns about individual disabilities, special equipment that is available to help the disabled, and how people of all
ages can deal with disabilities and live happy and full lives. The book encourages kids to ask questions and confront social and
emotional questions that sometimes present problems. It also discusses how people with disabilities feel when they are treated poorly
or discriminated against.
Schniedewind, Nancy, and Ellen Davidson. Open Minds to Equality: A Sourcebook of Learning Activities to Affirm Diversity and
Promote Equity. Milwaukee, WI: Rethinking Schools, 2006. 128. Print.
This is a resource book of lessons for teachers designed to address issues of bias and inequality. It covers many different forms of
discrimination and how to teach students to recognize them. We used the lesson titled All Kinds of Bodies, All Kinds of Minds and
adapted the interview to apply to our speaker, teaching awareness and empathy.
Anti-Deformation League. (2000). A World of Difference Institute: Anti-Bias Study Guide. NY, NY. 230-236.Print.
This is a resource folder of lessons for teachers designed to discuss anti-bias in multiple situations. We adapted a socioeconomic
lesson titled; Defining Roles to teach students about the different roles people take on when involved in discriminatory situations.
Websites/Online Resources
http://archive.adl.org/education/curriculum_connections/fall_2005/fall_2005_lesson5_sb_glossary.html
This is a glossary of special needs definitions that include specific definitions as well as descriptions of topics such as inclusion and
ability. It is a very good way to build a base of knowledge on special needs and acts as a starting point for learning more about and
understanding those with special needs. It is a good resource for teachers to have so that they can explain any questions that students
pose and can help in creating lesson plans. Students would also benefit from having this resource in the classroom because it can
answer questions they might have on specific disabilities.
http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly-news/19603466
Video about a handicap accessible playground in Virginia. Good resource for students to see what an accessible playground would
look like and to get them thinking about whether or not their local playground is accessible.

http://usgovinfo.about.com/od/uscongress/a/letterscongress.htm
This is a great article for both students and teachers that explains how to write a good letter to congress. It includes how to address the
congressman, how to look up the address and tips for writing professionally. The class can use this when they write a letter about the
playground.
http://www.adapt.org/.
A grassroots organization of people with disabilities who fight for their rights to thrive in the world instead of being institutionalized.
Good resource for the teacher to see the issues faced by people with disabilities.
http://www.vcu.edu/partnership/C-SAL/downloadables/PDF/DisabilityAwarenessPacket.pdf
This packet is a resource for teachers that covers seven different disabilities and provides activities that help students to understand
how the disabilities affect people. It also has a section about media that shows how many people with disabilities are still successful
and even excel in certain fields. Finally, it has more resources that a teacher can use in the classroom.
www.campusactivism.org/server-new/uploads/ableism.pdf
This is a unit plan on ableism that deals with the concepts of ability and disability and how bullying can affect children living with
special needs. It has lesson plans that focus on what living with disabilities looks like and the stigmatization that accompanies those
disabilities.
http://www.accessibleplayground.net/category/unique-equipment/
This website is a great resource for finding out what an inclusive playground should look like. It has ADA guidelines for playgrounds
and sections on what equipment and playground services should be used. A teacher can show the class this website to show them
pictures and videos of various inclusion playgrounds before they take a fieldtrip to access their own communitys playground.
http://kidshealth.org/kid/health_problems/learning_problem/learning_disabilities.html
This is a kid friendly website all about learning disabilities. The website has audio to read to the children and answers common
questions about learning disabilities as well as being interactive. This is a good resource for students and teachers alike.

Community and Other Outside Resources


- Guest Speaker

- Field trip to a local park


- Local congressman contact

Parent/Family Participation
- Parents will be informed about the field trip and Family Chat.
- Parents will be asked to volunteer to help for the field trip.
- Parents will be asked for help finding guest speaker.
- Parents will be asked to help mail letters to local congressman.