in collaboration with

the way we see it

Europe’s Most Wanted Distribution Center Locations

Results of a Survey

Table of Contents

Contents Introduction Management Summary Country View Industry View Food and Beverage High Tech and Electronics Consumer Products Life Sciences and Pharmaceuticals Other Industry Sectors Trends in Locations for Distribution Centers

2 3 4 6 11 13 14 15 16 17 19

© 2006 Capgemini. No part of this document may be modified, deleted or expanded by any process or means without prior written approval from Capgemini

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Introduction
In the second half of 2006 in association with ProLogis, we surveyed a wide range of global operating companies that had a significant pan-European distribution network. About a hundred supply chain leaders from various industry sectors provided us with insight into their current footprint and the main issues facing them. In all, we evaluated: 300 distribution center locations 18,000 FTEs (full-time equivalents) in the realm of employment n 2.4 million square meters of distribution center surface area.
n n

The findings in this report are based entirely on the results of the survey. We do not profess to provide a comprehensive representation of the current state of distribution centers in Europe. As with any survey, we have tried to make sure the validity of our insightful conclusions take into account the number of respondents in a specific group. The goal of this report is to give a high-level overview of the pan-European distribution footprint over different industry sectors. We also address the key challenges per industry sector as stated by the respondents.

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Management Summary
The Capgemini survey into Europe’s most wanted distribution center locations reveals some interesting facts and insights into the choices, strategies and challenges of the global operating companies that took part. The Country View revealed that: n Most of the companies’ distribution centers are concentrated in The Netherlands, France, UK and Germany, with Belgium not too far behind. n The 3 types of distribution center – European Distribution Centers (EDCs), Regional Distribution Centers (RDCs) and National Distribution Centers (NDCs) – enable companies to adapt their networks to suit their strategic needs. n The country of choice for European Distribution Centers is The Netherlands, with neighbours Belgium and Germany also in the frame. n The UK is the largest employer in the distribution network, with Belgium, The Netherlands and Poland also employing significant numbers of full-time equivalents (FTEs). n Distribution centers with few FTEs per site are by far the most common, while centers with 500+ FTES are rare n The Netherlands, UK, France and Germany hosted two-thirds of the total surface area of distribution centers. The Industry View reveals that the network of distribution centers depends on the characteristics of an industry and the specific needs of both products and consumers. The results of the survey only permit summaries of the industries of those companies that provided extensive information about their operations. One interesting insight to emerge was that, in large companies at least, the logistics department is often responsible for making strategic supply chain decisions, although the board of directors is also vital. The survey reveals the following industry profiles: n High Tech and Electronics – Companies within this industry prefer The Netherlands, Germany and France for the location of their distribution centers. In most cases, the network structure is centralized with minimal stocks. Challenges to meet include balancing costs with satisfying the increasing demands of customers. n Food and Beverage – These companies prefer The Netherlands, France and Belgium for the location of their distribution centers. In most cases, the network structure is highly decentralized, with many relatively small national distribution centers (NDCs). Challenges to meet vary and include consolidation of product flow, reducing the number of centers and coping with the complexity of smaller orders. n Consumer Products – Companies in this industry clearly prefer France, with Belgium a distant second location. Network structure differs according to product specifics and characteristics. Challenges to meet include making further cost reductions through consolidation. n Life Sciences and Pharmaceuticals – These companies seem to have no preference regarding the location of their distribution centers. Network structure is highly decentralized, with many relatively small national distribution centers (NDCs). Challenges to meet include reducing complexity and ensuring reliable distribution service to customers.

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n

Other industry sectors – Companies from other industries, such as Aerospace, Apparel, Automotive, Industrial Manufacturing and Chemicals, did not provide enough information about their warehouse locations. However, information about their current distribution network and supply chain challenges are summarized towards the end of the survey.

Respondents reported the following expected distribution network changes: n Consolidation by reducing supply chain costs, complexity and numbers of distribution centers, and by merging networks. n Increased regional distribution to take advantage of opportunities in Eastern European markets, such as Poland and Romania, and to reduce the impact of increased transport costs. n Meeting change by adopting strategies that include outsourcing of logistics, leasing property, taking shorter lease contracts and using flexible warehouse space.

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Country View
Distribution centers in Europe are concentrated in The Netherlands, France, UK and Germany According to the survey, the majority of distribution centers are currently concentrated in the ‘old European’ countries, such as The Netherlands, France, UK and Germany. This is illustrated in Figure 1, in which the size of the red circles indicates the amount of distribution centers in each country. There are three different types of distribution centers: n European distribution centers (EDC) distribute to all European customers and supply regional and/or national distribution centers. An EDC is a distribution center which has outbound flows to customers or subsidiary national distribution centers located in multiple European countries. n Regional distribution centers (RDC) typically distribute to a group of adjacent countries (e.g. Spain, Portugal and southern France). n National distribution centers cover local markets in a country.

Figure 1: Concentration of distribution centers in the European countries

Figure 2 (see next page) shows the share per country of the roughly 300 distribution centers revealed in the survey. Just over half are located in the Netherlands, France, UK and Germany. The 30% assigned to other countries includes Italy (5.5%), Sweden (4%) and Switzerland (4%), while the remaining countries have a share of 2 % or less.

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Figure 2: Share of total distribution centers in Europe per country

The Netherlands 15% Other 30%

France 13%

Poland 6% Belgium 6%

UK 13%

Spain 7%

Germany 10%

The most wanted country for the location of European distribution centers is The Netherlands If we only consider distribution centers with a European function (EDCs), The Netherlands is the most wanted country, with Belgium and Germany in second and third place (see Figure 3). The Netherlands and Belgium have a relatively large number of distribution centers compared to their population size. One reason for this is that these countries are close to the major demand markets, have good transport infrastructures and have access to two large international sea harbors (Antwerp and Rotterdam) to handle large overseas flows.
Figure 3: Top 3 countries based on number of EDCs

20 18 16 14 12 Number 10 of EDCs 8 6 4 2 0 The Netherlands Belgium Germany

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The UK, Belgium and Poland have the largest employment in distribution centers The employment in distribution centers per country is defined as the number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) working in all the distribution centers in that country. The UK has the largest employment in distribution centers with 22 % of the European total (see Figure 4), with Belgium and Poland in second and third place.
Figure 4: Share of FTEs working in distribution centers per country

Czech Republic 3%

Other 11%

UK 22%

France 7%

Germany 10% Belgium 17% The Netherlands 15%

Poland 15%

According to the survey, most distribution centers in Europe have a relative low average employment of less than 50 FTEs per site (see Figure 5). Large centers, which employ more than 500 FTEs are not common and take only 2 % of the total. The results shows that 68 % of the total number of distribution sites employ less than 50 FTEs and that 23 % employ between 50 and 200 FTEs.
Figure 5: Percentage of distribution centers per employment size

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% < 50 50-200 200-500 Number of FTEs 500-1000 > 1500

% of Europe’s distribution centers

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A more detailed view (see Figure 6) of the employment in distribution centers of the top four employment countries reveals that: n In the UK, most distribution centers employ 50 to 200 FTEs and no distribution centers employ more than 500 FTEs n Belgium has distribution centers in all employment classes, even in the highest classes that employ more than 1500 FTEs. However, most distribution centers are in the lowest employment class (<50 FTE). n The majority of Poland’ distribution centers are within the lowest employment s class (< 50 FTEs), while the remainder are in the highest two classes. We found no distribution centers in the middle range. n Most of The Netherlands’ distribution centers are in the lowest employment class. Like the UK, no centers have more than 500 FTEs.
Figure 6: Percentage of distribution centers per employment size in the UK, Belgium, Poland and The Netherlands

% of UK’s distribution centers

% of Belgium distribution centers

50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% < 50 50-200 200-500 Number of FTEs 500-1000 > 1500

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% < 50 50-200 200-500 Number of FTEs 500-1000 > 1500

% of Poland distribution centers

% of Netherlands distribution centers

90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% < 50 50-200 200-500 Number of FTEs 500-1000 > 1500

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% < 50 50-200 200-500 Number of FTEs 500-1000 > 1500

The Netherlands, UK, France and Germany have the largest total surface area of distribution centers The Netherlands, UK, France and Germany together take almost two thirds of the total surface area (footage) of distribution centers in Europe (see Figure 7, next page). This total surface area is calculated as the sum of the surface areas of all the distribution centers in each country.

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Figure 7: Total distribution center surface area per country

Other 16%

The Netherlands 19%

Spain 5% Italy 6% UK 17% Belgium 11%

Germany 12%

France 14%

The whole range of surface area sizes is represented, but most distribution centers in Europe have a relatively small surface area (see Figure 8).

Figure 8: Percentage of distribution centers per surface area size

35%

30%

25%

20% % of Europe’s distribution centers

15%

10%

5%

0% <5 5-10 10-15 15-20 20-30 30-40 > 40 Square meters (x 1000)

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Industry View
The European distribution network structure depends on specific industry characteristics, such as market dynamics, volume and value of products, expected delivery time to customers and so forth. This section gives a high-level overview of the current European distribution structure per industry sector, based on the survey results. We will also discuss the key challenges faced by each industry sector. Some companies provided more detailed information about their existing warehouse locations (see Figure 9). We will discuss the industries from which we have more extensive information. n Food and Beverage n High Tech and Electronics n Consumer Products n Life Sciences and Pharmaceutical Other industry sectors that did not provide us with enough detailed information are summarized later. These include Aerospace, Apparel, Automotive, Industrial Manufacturing and Chemicals.

Figure 9: Industry sector respondents who provided details on warehouse locations

Food and Beverage High Tech and Electronics Consumer Products Life Sciences and Pharmaceutical Retail Industrial Manufacturing Chemical Automotive Aerospace Apparel Other 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14

Number of respondents

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In larger companies the logistics department is responsible for strategic supply chain decisions Overall, the power to make decisions regarding strategic supply chain issues and, in particular, the investment of new European Distribution Centers (EDC) may involve the board of directors, the logistics or supply chain department, the procurement department or the sales department. The logistics department leads the pack with 54 percent, but in 41 percent of companies the board decides where to invest in new EDCs. The procurement and sales departments are heavily involved in 4 and 1 percent of companies respectively.
Figure 10: Who makes the decisions on strategic supply chain issues?

Procurement department 4%

Sales department 1%

Board of directors 41%

Logistics department 54%

Especially in the larger companies, with turnover of more than one billion euros, more responsibility is given to the logistics department regarding supply chain decisions. The board of directors makes strategic supply chain decisions within smaller companies. Most of the industries follow the general pattern as described above. However, in the Consumer Products and Industrial Manufacturing industries the board has more power in deciding on investments and the location of new EDCs. The Aerospace industry is the only industry in which the procurement department equally shares power with the logistics department.

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Food and Beverage
Companies in the Food and Beverage sector most want to locate their distribution centers in The Netherlands, France and Belgium The Netherlands, France and Belgium together take a share of almost 60 % of the distribution centers in the Food and Beverage sector (see Figure 11).
Figure 11: Share of Food and Beverage centers per country

Other 11% Poland 5% The Netherlands 36%

Spain 8%

UK 8%

Germany 8% Belgium 11% France 13%

Current network and main supply chain challenges In general, the Food and Beverage industry characterizes itself by high volumes, perishable products, short required lead time to the market and a relative low product value per square meter. In most cases, production is dispersed over many different countries. Transport costs and delivery speed are the main drivers for the current network footprint, which leads to highly decentralized European distribution networks with the use of many relative small national distribution centers. The main challenges are not uniform for all companies in the sector. Some companies indicate that the main challenge is to find ways to consolidate the flows more and reduce the number of distribution centers. Others indicate as main challenge how to deal with the increased costs and complexity of smaller orders and smaller drop sizes to customers.
Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n

Very decentralized networks High level use of NDCs. In most cases with a surface area between 5000 and 15000 square meters Outsourcing of warehouses varies. The company usually owns the warehouse Strategic supply chain decisions are made at the logistics department

n

Smaller drop sizes and smaller orders to more customers Optimization of distribution network Further consolidation by reducing the number of distribution centers Increase in warehouse operation outsourcing

n

n

Food and Beverage

n

n

n

High Tech and Electronics
Companies in the High Tech and Electronics sector most want to locate their distribution centers in The Netherlands, Germany and France The Netherlands, Germany and France together have a 50 % share of the distribution centers in the High Tech and Electronics industry (see Figure 12).
Figure 12: Share of High Tech and Electronics centers per country

Other 21%

The Netherlands 20%

Italy 6% Sweden 6% Germany 17%

Spain 8% UK 9% France 13%

Current network and main supply chain challenges Companies in the High Tech and Electronics industry most frequently have a centralized European distribution network, which is often combined with a large portion of production overseas in Asia. In general, the product lifecycles in this industry are short and the product value per square meter is high (e.g. a pallet of iPods). The main drivers for network structure are the substantial inventory holding costs and risk of obsolescence. Transport costs have a relatively lower impact. Therefore, the distribution structure tends, in most cases, to be a centralized structure with minimal stock. However, not all High Tech and electronic products have a high value per square meter (e.g. copier machines). For such products transport costs become relatively more important and a more decentralized structure can be appropriate. The main challenge in this industry is to find the balance between costs and satisfying the needs of customers who are increasingly more demanding in terms of service requirements (e.g. delivery speed) and in terms of variety in products that increase the supply chain complexity.

Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n

High Tech and Electronics

n

n

In most cases centralized networks with a high level use of EDCs and RDCs High level of warehouse operation outsourcing Strategic supply chain decisions are made at logistics department

n

n n

Optimizing the distribution network (cost reduction versus service requirements) Reducing the number of distribution centers Increased complexity Delivery speed

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Consumer Products
Companies in the Consumer Products sector most want to locate their distribution centers in France France has 40 % of the distribution centers in the Consumer Products industry and Belgium is second with 17 % (see Figure 13). France also has the most RDCs and Belgium the highest number of EDCs for consumer products.
Figure 13: Share of Consumer Products centers per country

Other 14% Sweden 5% Germany 5% Switzerland 5% The Netherlands 5% Spain 9% Belgium 17% France 40%

Current network and main supply chain challenges The Consumer Products industry has a varied mix of demand volumes, product values per square meter, product life cycles and customer demand patterns. Even within companies the supply chain network can be different, depending on the product group (e.g. basic products versus fashionable products). The European network structure differs according to the product group and is driven by specific product characteristics, such as value density and the demand pattern. However, the industry generally shows a relative low level of warehouse outsourcing. Furthermore, most companies in this industry indicate further cost reduction through consolidation as a main supply chain challenge.
Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n

Mixed distribution structure, with the use of EDC, RDC and NDC

Reduce transport lead times and supply chain costs

n

n

Consumer Products

n

n

Low level of warehousing outsourcing n Consolidation: reduce number of in this industry distribution centers; increase size of existing warehouses Hardly any use of 4PL providers; shippers generally use many different n Change network because of offshoring logistics service providers and dramatic shift in demand regions/patterns Belgium is a “hot” location for n Customers want better service locating European Distribution Centers n Strict EU transport regulations Strategic supply chain decisions are n Consolidation of retailers who also usually taken at Board level want to minimize stocks
n

Shorten product creation to market timeframe needs

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Life Sciences and Pharmaceutical
The Life Sciences and Pharmaceutical sector shows a mixed pattern of distribution centers The distribution centers in Life Sciences and Pharmaceutical industry are dispersed over many countries in Europe (see Figure 14). In the top 7 countries the number of distribution centers is only 57 %.
Figure 14: Share of Life Sciences and Pharmaceutical centers per country

The Netherlands 15% Spain 9%

Other 43%

Switzerland 9%

France 6% Italy 6% UK Belgium 6% 6%

Current network and main supply chain challenges The Life Sciences and Pharmaceutical industry has a wide range of products, high product value per square meter and high customer expectations concerning delivery speed and quality. The industry has highly decentralized distribution structures, with mainly national distribution centers of a relative small size. The main challenges in this industry relate to reducing complexity and ensuring a reliable distribution service to its customers.
Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n

Highly decentralized structure with a high use of NDCs High value product and transport speed is vital Life sciences industry requires very high on time in full delivery performance Warehouse outsourcing varies among companies Mainly smaller sized distribution centers Logistics department usually takes strategic supply chain decisions

Transport times to remote regions in Europe Reduce the number of distribution centers and reduce complexity Increase service in last mile delivery Risk management, secure cool chain operations, regulatory compliance

n

n

n

n

Life Sciences and Pharmaceuticals
n

n

n

n

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Other Industry Sectors
This section includes the industry sectors that did not provide enough detailed information about their warehouse locations, but gave sufficient information about their current European distribution network structure and indicated their main supply chain challenges. The following industry sectors are summarized in the tables below: Aerospace, Apparel, Automotive, Industrial Manufacturing and Chemicals.

Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n

Most spare parts EDCs located around Frankfurt, Germany Very important to locate distribution centers close to main airports because the required speed of getting spare parts to other airports (to reduce downtime of airplanes) Usually highly centralized distribution networks because of high average costs of aerospace spare parts Requirement to have “old” spare parts available for a very long period of time Spare parts services are playing a major role in positioning for new aircraft sales Strongly regulated market because of export restrictions (parts that can be used both in civilian and military aircrafts)

Decentralization of spare parts distribution centers Further outsourcing of warehousing and customs activities Further centralization of major spare parts warehouses at major global air hubs (e.g. increasing profile of Dubai as the largest Middle East air hub) Emerging markets are having a major influence on the aerospace manufacturers distribution networks Increasing demands from customers regarding timely deliveries Information technology developments are having a major impact on the aerospace spare parts industry

n

n

n

n

n

Aerospace
n

n

n

n

n

Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n

Typically one or more distribution centers in low-cost regions close to manufacturing plants (e.g. Turkey) Typically one distribution center per country since the apparel retail industry is organized per country and since fashion trends are highly country-specific Low degree of outsourcing of warehouse operations Challenges around customs paper work and requirements for non-EU countries

Changes to distribution network because of increasing offshore manufacturing Large scope changes in used transport mode (truck, air, sea, barge, rail) Changes in network because of dramatic shift in demand regions/patterns Increasing inbound volumes to European Distribution Centers vs. more frequent and smaller inbound deliveries to Regional Distribution Centers Increasing usage of containers for transportation of goods Increasing usage of recent IT developments (RFID)

n

n

n

Apparel
n

n

n

n

n

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Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n n

n

n n n

Very decentralized European distribution networks Very high degree of outsourcing of warehouse operations Small storage capacity of dealers Strict next day delivery requirements High fill rate levels required

n

n

n

Automotive
n

n

n

n n

Declining average order size Further consolidation by reducing the number of distribution centers Increasing variation in used transport modes (truck, air, sea, barge, rail) Changes in network because of dramatic shift in demand regions/ patterns Emerging markets growth are having an important impact on distribution networks Increased competition and new competitors are seriously impacting distribution networks Customer are demanding better service levels EU transport regulations are becoming more strict Shorter product lifecycles Increasing cost of fuel

Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n n

n

Industrial Manufacturing

n

n

Degree of warehouse operation outsourcing varies among companies Centralized and decentralized European distribution Mainly smaller sized distribution centers Strategic supply chain decisions are usually taken at Board level

Transport cost reduction Minimize number of distribution centers

Current European Distribution Network
n

Main Supply Chain Challenges
n

n

n

Chemicals
n

n

n

n

Very decentralized European distribution networks High level of use of factory warehouses in addition to European Distribution Centers (EDCs) and National Distribution Centers (NDCs) – usually very complex distribution networks Moderate degree of outsourcing of warehouse operations – on average use of many different logistics service providers Fast connection to rail, road and inland water transport required Route to market and cost to serve extremely important for the design of distribution networks given the high percentage of transportation cost as part of the sales price Dangerous goods legislations and restrictions are having an important impact on distribution network designs Permissions are required for setting up warehouses for classified goods

n

n

n

n

n

n

n n

n

n

Further consolidation: reduce number of distribution centers Outsourcing to pan-continental 3PL/4PL Large scope changes in used transport mode (truck, air, sea, barge, rail) Changes in network because of dramatic shift in demand regions/patterns Consolidation in Western Europe where possible, expansion in Eastern Europe Stricter EU transport, safety and security regulations Management of cost inflation is extremely important Continuous cost-to-serve optimization Distribution shifting from lane carriers to network managers Increasing inbound volumes to EDCs v. smaller more frequent inbound deliveries to RDCs Increasing importance of narrow delivery time windows

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Trends in Locations for Distribution Centers
The business environment is changing continuously, which has a great impact on the distribution networks of various companies. The companies in the survey have indicated the following expected distribution network changes. For more information, see the study1 of Capgemini together with Prologis): n Consolidation driven by globalization . Reducing supply chain costs and complexity are the drivers to reduce the number of distribution centers and to merge distribution networks. n Growing importance of regional distribution. Growing transport costs, shorter delivery lead times and emerging markets (especially in Eastern Europe) require a regional-based distribution that is more driven on transport costs rather than on inventory costs. In the survey the multinationals indicated the following important trends: Market growth in Eastern European countries The survey identifies the sales and manufacturing growth in Eastern Europe as an important macro trend with potential to become more and more significant. According to 26 % of the respondents, growth in sourcing and market demand in the East is one the main influences for adding or relocating a European or regional distribution center. The European Union expansion in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) will increase the market activity further. Poland, for example, is becoming a stronger economy and has relatively low labor and land/terrain costs compared to the western European countries. Another example is Romania, which will probably become an EU member from the January 1st 2007. During 2006, companies have been establishing a presence in Romania – for example, the largest real-estate deal in Romania was established by a Dutch logistics provider who now operates six distribution centers with 180 employees. As many companies expand their business activities to these Eastern European countries, shifts in distribution networks will be needed to facilitate their supply chains. Increasing flexibility in warehouse space Most companies (86%) indicated that they have recently taken measures to increase the flexibility in their supply chain, such as: n Outsourcing of logistics such as their warehouse operations – shippers often consider outsourcing their logistics activities as a way to achieve higher flexibility (see the recent study2 on third party logistics service providers). Outsourcing of logistics is becoming more attractive, due to an increasing consolidation of service providers that leads to more global competition with fewer players.
1. “Warehousing space in Europe: meeting tomorrow’s demand”, Capgemini together with ProLogis, 2006. www.capgemini.com/resources/thought_leadership/warehousing_space_in_europe_meeting_tomorrows_demand/ 2. 11th Annual Third-Party Logistics Study 2006 conducted by Capgemini, Georgia Institute of Technology, SAP and DHL 2006 www.3plstudy.com/

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n

n

n

Leased property instead of owned property – leasing instead of owning allows companies to sell their property assets in order to redeploy capital to more productive use. Shorter lease contracts – these allow companies to flexibly adapt to changing market developments. A lease contract from one to three years is the most desirable lease term for shippers. For more information, refer to study3 of Capgemini together with ProLogis. Using flexible warehouse space – flexible warehouse space, such as multi-user facilities, is used for the short term fluctuation of customer demand. However, there is also a growing need for mid-term adaptability of the distribution network to anticipate fluctuations in demand.

Increasing transport costs Transport costs drive network change. In the future, increased transport costs may cause companies to change to a more regionalized distribution structure using regional distribution centers (RDCs) or a “local for local” structure rather than a centralized distribution structure with an EDC. The survey revealed two main sources for increased transport costs: 1. Increasing cost of fuel, cost of road tax and EU driving limits 2. Increase of delivery frequencies to improve customer service For more information on main trends and their impact on distribution network changes, see also the recent study3 of Capgemini together with ProLogis.

3. Warehousing space in Europe: meeting tomorrow’s demand, Capgemini together with ProLogis, 2006. www.capgemini.com/resources/thought_leadership/warehousing_space_in_europe_meeting_tomorrows_demand/

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About Capgemini and the Collaborative Business Experience
Capgemini, one of the world’s foremost providers of Consulting, Technology and Outsourcing services, has a unique way of working with its clients, called the Collaborative Business Experience. Backed by over three decades of industry and service experience, the Collaborative Business Experience is designed to help our clients achieve better, faster, more sustainable results through seamless access to our network of world-leading technology partners and collaborationfocused methods and tools. Through commitment to mutual success and the achievement of tangible value, we help businesses implement growth strategies, leverage technology, and thrive through the power of collaboration. Capgemini employs approximately 61,000 people worldwide and reported 2005 global revenues of 6,954 million euros. More information about individual service lines, offices, and research is available at www.capgemini.com

About ProLogis
ProLogis employs more than 1,200 people worldwide. For additional information about the company, please visit www.prologis.com

ProLogis is the world’s largest owner, manager and developer of distribution facilities, with operations in 81 markets across North America, Europe and Asia. The company has $25.3 billion of assets owned, managed and under development, comprising 406.9 million square feet (37.8 million square meters) in 2,406 properties as of September 30, 2006. ProLogis’ customers include manufacturers, retailers, transportation companies, third-party logistics providers and other enterprises with large-scale distribution needs. Headquartered in Denver, Colorado.
Authors: Roy Lenders Ewout van Loon Menno Rustenburg Maurits Speksnijder

Contacts: Capgemini Roy Lenders Vice President +31 30 689 0328

roy.lenders@capgemini.com
Menno Rustenburg Senior Consultant +31 30 689 8301

menno.rustenburg@capgemini.com ProLogis
Bert Angel Senior Vice President Global Services Europe +31 20 655 6632

bangel@prologis.com
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Capgemini Nederland B.V. Papendorpseweg 100 P.O. Box 2575 - 3500 GN Utrecht The Netherlands Tel. +31 30 689 0000

www.capgemini.com

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