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Bader Reading and Language Assessment Inventory

Student Name:
Examiner Name:
Date given:
After completing the Bader, please transfer the scores from inside the booklet to this
outside cover.

Scoring Summary
Word Recognition Scoring:

___ Highest independent level


___ Highest instructional level
___ Lowest frustration level

Approximate Instructional Reading Level:


(Student Read) (check one):

___ Reading Card A (preprimer)


___ Reading Card B (primer)
___ Reading Card C (1.0)
___ Reading Card D (2.0)
___ Reading Card E (3.0)
___ Reading Card F (4.0)
___ Reading Card G (5.0)
___ Reading Card H (6.0)
___ Reading Card I (7.0)

Approximate Instructional Listening Level: ___ Reading Card A (preprimer)


(Interviewer Read) (check one):
___ Reading Card B (primer)
___ Reading Card C (1.0)
___ Reading Card D (2.0)
___ Reading Card E (3.0)
___ Reading Card F (4.0)
___ Reading Card G (5.0)
___ Reading Card H (6.0)
___ Reading Card I (7.0)
___ Reading Passage J (8.0)
a.

Bader Reading and Language Assessment Inventory (Bader)

General Information
The Indy Reads Bader Reading and Language Assessment Inventory (Bader) is an
assessment tool used to measure a students entry reading level and as a point against
which to measure progress. Carefully administering the Bader is important for a number of
reasons, including:

Confirming a students progress which serves as motivation for her/him continuing in


the program and illustrates to the tutor that his/her student is advancing.
Assisting the tutor with choosing teaching techniques. If the student isnt making
progress, the tutor can re-evaluate tutoring methods.
Aiding Indy Reads in securing grants funding by illustrating the effectiveness of the
program via the students' improved reading skills.

The Bader consists of three separate sections: Section 1- Word Recognition, Section 2Reading Comprehension, and Section 3-Writing Sample. Each section builds on the
previous. Section 1 Word Recognition is the starting point. The list becomes
progressively more difficult with each lettered list. Where you begin in Section 2 - Reading
Comprehension is based on the number of mistakes the student makes in Section 1.
Additionally, choosing a passage for Section 3 Writing Sample is based upon the number
of errors a student makes in Section 2.
The Examples of Scoring page is an important portion of the Bader. This page gives
examples of various reading behaviors a student may exhibit and how to score the
assessment if they occur. It may be helpful to review this page prior to administering the
Bader.
Throughout the assessment, it is important for you to observe the students reading
behaviors and, after the Bader has been completed, to make note of those behaviors on
the Observations page. Doing so is helpful to the tutor and the program staff.
Its important to remember the assessment process is not an exact science. At times the
scoring can be subjective. The students reading level may be different from the intake
assessment. There may be a variety of reasons for this. The student may have been
nervous or uncomfortable; the student was afraid to answer in fear of being wrong; or the
surroundings may have been a distraction.
The following is a step-by-step guide to administering the Bader.

b.

Instructions for Administering the Bader


Section 1 Word Recognition
1. Turn to page 1, Section 1Word Recognition, in the Bader assessment booklet.
2. Hand the student the first reading card (Word List A Word List D) and say, Please
read these words to me. Try to say them all even if you are not sure of some of the
words. Start with Word List A.
3. Pay close attention to the students pronunciation and mark on the Section 1Word
Recognition page as appropriate. (NOTE: If necessary, ask the student to slow
down.)
a. If the word is pronounced correctly, place a 9 next to the word.
b. If the word is pronounced incorrectly, place an X next to the word and write
the word as the student pronounced it.
c. If the reader self-corrects, add a C.
d. If a word part is omitted, draw a line through the part omitted.
e. If the student fails to pronounce the word at all, draw a line through the entire
word.
4. Ask the student to read consecutively higher lists until three or more words are
missed.
5. On the front cover of the Bader in the Word Recognition Scoring section, record
which Word List is at the students independent level (no more than one mistake),
instructional level (no more than two mistakes) and lowest frustration level (three or
more mistakes).

Section 2 Reading Comprehension


1. Select the reading passage which corresponds to the students independent level
the level at which s/he made no more than one mistake on the Word Lists.
2. Hand the student the appropriate reading card.
3. Say: This is a story I would like you to read. Please read it aloud. If you come to a
word you dont know, just do your best and keep reading. Try to remember what
you read so you can tell me about it or answer questions about the story.
a. As the student reads, note errors on the Bader. As much as possible,
reference the Examples for Scoring page to score each passage. (NOTE: Do
the best you can understandably, its a lot to keep track of and difficult to
recall all the various scoring codes.)
b. If a word is mispronounced, write it immediately above the word or as near to
the error as possible.
4. After the student reads each section, ask him or her to put the reading passage
aside. Then have the student retell the story starting from the beginning.
5. Number the memories in the order the student mentions them.
6. Record that number under Unprompted Memories at the end of each passage.
7. Use the questions or phrases to prompt recall of information not given in the
students summary. Record that number under Prompted Memories.

c.

8. Both unprompted and prompted memories count toward the total number of
memories.
9. Note the two checklists on the Section 2-Reading Comprehension Observations on
page 12. Be alert for those elements as well.
ITEMS OF NOTE:
If the student is reluctant to read aloud, ask him/her to read the paragraph silently
and then proceed with the questions. (Check appropriate box)
If the first passage you give the student is too difficult, choose a lower level.
If the student cannot read the first and/or second passages, Reading Passage A
and/or B, then read it for him or her (for listening comprehension). Continue to the
next passage as long as the student has at least the indicated number of memories
at that level. Be sure to note that you read the passage.
If a student skips words indiscriminately, suggest using a marker such as an index
card to help with tracking. Be sure to make a note of it on the Section 2-Reading
Comprehension Observations on page 12.
Starting with Reading Card G, ask students the questions to determine
comprehension rather than having them retell the story.

Section 3 Writing Sample


After the student has finished the reading portion of the assessment, please select a
reading passage one or two grade levels below their approximate instructional reading
level. Read a few sentences from the reading card and ask the student to write on this
page what they hear. If they are unable to do that, ask the student to copy on this page
one or two sentences from the card. Note the top half of the page is for a dictated writing
sample and the bottom half is for a copied writing sample.

Now that Youve Finished


Once you and the student have completed the Bader:
Go over the assessment with the student. Be sure to point out something the student
did well and to offer encouragement. Feel free to let the student know at what level
(not grade) they read.
Be sure to fill out page 12, Section 2-Reading Comprehension Observation, after
the student has already left.
Check to be sure you have finished filling out the Scoring Summary on the front
page both the Word Recognition Scoring as well as the Approximate Instructional
Level. Be sure to mark the highest level at which the required errors/memories
were NOT met.
Return the Bader booklet to the Literacy Office. The office will make a copy for the
tutor.
Revised May 2004
Instructions.doc
d.

Section 1-Word Recognition


(For incorrect words, use an X. For correct words, use a )
Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Word List A
Preprimer

Word List B
Primer

Word List C
Level 1.0

___ the

___ come

___ today

___ am

___ you

___ does

___ get

___ went

___ three

___ is

___ him

___ from

___ and

___ two

___ under

___ here

___ then

___ began

___ see

___ know

___ name

___ not

___ around

___ there

___ can

___ pet

___ could

___ will

___ house

___ again

Word List D
Level 2.0

Word List E
Level 3.0

Word List F
Level 4.0

___ biggest

___ morning

___ important

___ where

___ since

___ airport

___ yourself

___ together

___ through

___ those

___ because

___ fifteen

___ before

___ which

___ information

___ things

___ near

___ ocean

___ stopped

___ should

___ preview

___ place

___ yesterday

___ laughter

___ always

___ eight

___ preparation

___ everyone

___ remember

___ building

Word List G
Level 5.0

Word List H
Level 6.0

Word Lists Scoring


Highest
Independent
(0-1 wrong)

___ because

___ aircraft

___ bridge

___ necessary

___ microscope

___ argument

___ curious

___ chemical

___ estimation

___ representative

___ reliable

___ terminal

___ government

___ apology

___ business

___ instruction

___ direction

___ evidence

___ avenue

___ consideration

Highest
Instructional
(2 wrong)
Lowest
Frustration
(3 wrong)
Remember to record
results on the front
cover, Word Lists
Scoring section.

Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Section 2-Reading Comprehension


Reading Card A: The Dog Show (preprimer level)
I went to a dog show.
I saw big dogs.
I saw little dogs.
I saw dogs with long hair.
And dogs with short hair.
There were dogs everywhere.

Who read the passage?


Student read aloud

Student read silently

Examiner read

Please retell the story: (Number the memories in the order mentioned. Use the questions
behind the memories, if necessary, to prompt the students recall of the story.)

___ dog show

(Where did the person go?)

___ big dogs

(What size were the dogs?)

___ little dogs


___ long hair

(What was their hair like?)

___ short hair


___ everywhere

(Where were the dogs?)

Memories ___ # Unprompted ___ # Prompted


Organized retelling? Yes

No

If student read: 3 or fewer errors, 4 or more memories GO ON


If examiner read: 4 or more memories GO ON

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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Card B: A Slippery Sidewalk (primer level)


It was a cold day.
A man fell on the ice.
He was not hurt.
Put salt on the ice, said Bill.
Salt can kill the grass, said Pat.
Put sand on the ice.
I will try to find some sand, said Bill. But it is better to kill some grass than have a bad fall.

Who read the passage?


Student read aloud

Student read silently

Examiner read

Please retell the story: (Number the memories in the order mentioned. Use the questions
behind the memories, if necessary, to prompt the students recall of the story.)

___ cold day

(What kind of day was it?)

___ man fell on ice, not hurt

(What happened to the man?)

___ put salt on ice Bill

(What did Bill suggest?)

___ salt kills grass Pat

(Why did Pat say not to use salt?)

___ put sand on ice Pat

(What did Pat want to use?)

___ will find some sand Bill

(What did Bill decide?)

___ better to kill grass

(What does Bill say?)

___ than have a bad fall

(Killing the grass is better than what?)

Memories ___ # Unprompted ___ # Prompted


Organized retelling? Yes

No

If student read: 6 or fewer errors, 5 or more memories GO ON


If examiner read: 5 or more memories GO ON

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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Card C: Give Me Room (1.0)


I saw an old man get on the bus. He walked very slowly. He used a cane. I looked at the
cane with surprise. The man had a bike horn on it. I told him I had never seen a cane with a
horn. Have you ever been to the city market? he asked. I said that I had. Then you know it is
crowded, he said. People did not give me room. Now I honk my horn and they move.

Who read the passage?


Student read aloud

Student read silently

Examiner read

Please retell the story: (Number the memories in the order mentioned. Use the questions
behind the memories, if necessary, to prompt the students recall of the story.)
___ saw old man on bus

(Who did the person see? What was the old man doing?)

___ walked slowly using a cane

(Describe what the old man was doing. What did he use?)

___ surprised at horn on cane

(Why was the person surprised?)

___ never saw a cane with horn

(What did the person say to the old man?)

___ been to the market, he asked? (What did the old man ask?)
___ said yes

(What did the person answer?)

___ it is crowded

(What caused the problem for the old man?)

___ people didnt give me room

(Why was the old man bothered by the crowded market?)

___ now honks and they move

(What happens when he uses the horn?)

Memories ___ # Unprompted ___ # Prompted


Organized retelling? Yes

No

If student read: 8 or fewer errors, 6 or more memories GO ON


If examiner read: 6 or more memories GO ON

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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Card D: Linda at the Diner (2.0)


Linda has a part-time job in a diner. She works in the morning from six until ten. The
diner is busy at breakfast time. Linda works hard, but she likes her job at the diner. She likes
talking with people. Many of the same people come in every day.
At night Linda goes to school. She likes night school. She has made new friends in her
classes. The teachers are very nice.
Linda wants to learn more about business. She hopes to become a manager of a diner.
Then she wants to buy her own diner someday.
Who read the passage?
Student read aloud

Student read silently

Examiner read

Please retell the story: (Number the memories in the order mentioned. Use the questions behind the
memories, if necessary, to prompt the students recall of the story.)

___ Linda has a part-time job

(What kind of job does Linda have?)

___ at diner from 6 a.m. until 10 a.m.

(When does Linda work?)

___ diner busy at breakfast

(When is the diner busy?)

___ likes talking to people

(Why does Linda like to work at the diner?)

___ goes to night school

(What does Linda do in the evening?)

___ likes night school

(Does she like school?)

___ made new friends

(Why does Linda like night school?)

___ teachers nice

(Why else does she like night school?)

___ to study business

(Why does Linda go to school?)

___ hopes to become manager

(What did she want to do someday?)

___ wants to buy own diner

(And then what did she want to do?)

Memories ___ # Unprompted ___ # Prompted

Organized retelling? Yes No

If student read: 10 or fewer errors, 6 or more memories GO ON


If examiner read: 6 or more memories GO ON

Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Card E: The Lucky Wrong Number (3.0)


Sue and Bill were eating dinner when the telephone rang. Bill said, Ill get it. A man
asked if the washer could be delivered in the morning.
Bill said, We did not order a washer.
The man said, Is this the home of P.J. Johnson?
No, Bill said, but wait; P.J. Johnson is our uncles name and we havent seen him in a
long time. What address do you have for him?
The caller said, 201 Second Street.
Bill and Sue went to the address of P.J. Johnson. He was their uncle. They were happy
to see each other. Later Sue said, Buying that washer was lucky.
Uncle P.J. laughed, I didnt buy a washer; I bought a TV. We just had a lucky wrong
number.

Who read the passage?

Student read aloud Student read silently Examiner read

Please retell the story: (Number the memories in the order mentioned. Use the questions behind the
memories, if necessary, to prompt the students recall of the story.)
___ Bill and Sue eating dinner
___ phone rang
___ asked about delivering washer
___ we did not buy washer
___ is this P.J. Johnsons house
___ no, but that is uncles name
___ havent seen him for a long time
___ asked for address and went there
___ he was uncle; glad to see one another
___ buying washer good luck
___ didnt buy washer, bought T.V.
Memories ___ # Unprompted ___ # Prompted

(What were they doing at the start of the story?


(What happened while they were eating?)
(What did the caller want?)
(Why was this a confusing situation?)
(Where was the washer supposed to go?)
(Who was P.J. Johnson?)
(Have they seen him recently?)
(What did Bill and Sue ask the caller for?)
(When they went to the address, what happened?)
(What did they tell their uncle?)
(What had P.J. Johnson bought?)
Organized retelling? Yes

No

If student read: 13 or fewer errors, 6 or more memories GO ON


If examiner read: 6 or more memories GO ON

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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Card F: The Recovery (4.0)


In three small rooms lived a mother and her daughter, who was quite ill. The mother
worked everyday. She worked hard but could afford little more than rent, food, and clothes.
Because of this, the little sick girl would stay quietly in bed at home while her mother was
away.
The mother worried about her daughter. If only she had someone to talk to or something
to keep her mind busy.
One morning as the mother was leaving for work, she saw a little hurt bird huddled on
the windowsill. Her daughter insisted that it be brought in so she could care for it.
That evening when the mother returned, the daughter was more talkative than she had
been for a while. Every evening after that, she noticed that both the girl and the bird were
improved. They seemed to draw strength from each other.
Then one day the mother returned home to find the table set. Tears came to the
mothers eyes when the little girl said they must celebrate, for the bird was better.

Who read the passage? Student read aloud Student read silently Examiner read
Please retell the story: (Number the memories in the order mentioned. Use the questions behind the
memories, if necessary, to prompt the students recall of the story.)
___ three small rooms
___ lived a mother and sick girl
___ mother worked hard every day
___ food, rent, and clothes
___ needed someone to talk to
___ a little hurt bird
___ brought it in for the girl to care for
___ came home and found table set
___ celebrated birds recovery

(Where did the mother and daughter live?)


(What was the matter with the little girl?)
(What did the mother do every day?)
(What could the mother afford?)
(What did the mother think would help the girl?)
(What was found on the window sill?)
(What was done with the bird?)
(What did the mother find when she came home?)
(What did they celebrate?)

Memories ___ # Unprompted ___ # Prompted

Organized retelling? Yes No

If student read: 8 or fewer errors, 6 or more memories GO ON


If examiner read: 6 or more memories GO ON
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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Card G: Not in the Mood to Read (5.0)


Have you ever heard someone say, I used to like to read, but now I am not interested
in reading? Gene used to say that. Then one day he found that he could not read the small
print on the medicine bottle. Gene had his eyes tested, and he was told he needed glasses.
The day Gene put them on, he stopped at a paperback bookstore and bought a sports
magazine, a paperback mystery, and a newspaper. Genes eyes had never hurt, so he hadnt
thought about needing glasses. It seemed good to be reading again. Gene had forgotten how
much he enjoyed reading.
There are many people, both children and adults, who believe they dont feel like
reading or doing close work. Their vision is poor, but they do not know they are having
problems with their sight. However, there are others who know they should wear glasses but
dont want to wear them. They think glasses may not be attractive. This is not necessarily true.
Glasses now have such nice-looking frames that some people wear them who dont need
them! In fact, lenses in their glasses are just plain window glass.
Who read the passage? Student read aloud Student read silently Examiner read
Reading Comprehension Questions: (Ask the student the following questions and mark with a check
the questions s/he answers correctly.)
___ What do some people say about reading? (they used to like to read but dont read anymore)
___ What happened to Gene one day? (he couldnt read the label on a medicine bottle)
___ After he got his glasses, what did Gene buy? (a mystery, sports magazine, and a newspaper)
___ Why did Gene think that nothing was wrong with his eyes? (his eyes didnt hurt)
___ Why do some people probably not like to read? (they have problems with their eyes)
___ Why do some people dislike glasses? (they think they are unattractive)
___ Why do some people have window glass instead of lenses? (they like the looks of glasses but dont
need to wear them)

# of Memories: ___
If student read: 10 or fewer errors, 5 or more memories GO ON
If examiner read: 5 or more memories GO ON
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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Card H: Driver's Licenses (6.0)


States vary in their requirements for a driver's license. Some will give a license to persons sixteen
years of age, while others will not. Usually the consent of a parent or guardian is needed if an applicant
is under eighteen.
Generally, people need to fulfill three important requirements to get a driver's license. Drivers have
to prove skill in driving a vehicle and knowledge of rules and safety procedures. They also have to be
physically capable of safe driving. For example, people who are nearsighted are often issued restricted
licenses. This means that they must wear glasses or contact lenses when they drive.
Responsible people drive carefully to avoid hurting others or themselves. Most of us realize that
having a driver's license suspended or revoked can be very inconvenient. This is especially true when
driving is needed for daily commuting to work.
Some states have a system of points. This means that for every violation the driver has, there are
so many points held against him or her. If a driver has too many points in a particular period, the license
to drive will be suspended. The system seems helpful since people don't want to lose their driving
privileges.
Who read the passage? Student read aloud Student read silently Examiner read
Reading Comprehension Questions: (Ask the student the following questions and mark with a check
the questions s/he answers correctly.)
___ How do states differ in their age requirements for a drivers license (some issue licenses at 16;
others will not)
___ Whose consent is needed if the applicant is under 18? (parent or guardian)
___ What are the three requirements necessary to obtain a drivers license? (skill in driving, knowledge
of rules, physically able to drive)
___ What is a restricted license? (for those who must wear glasses and so on)
___ Explain the point system used in some states. (points are assessed against your license for
violations if too many points are received within a certain time, your license is suspended)
___ Why is the system helpful? (keeps people thinking about their responsibility behind the wheel
people dont want to lose their licenses)
___ Why is it an inconvenience to have your drivers license revoked? (cant do normal things that you
would do with a license)

# of Memories: ___
If student read: 10 or fewer errors, 5 or more memories GO ON
If examiner read: 5 or more memories GO ON

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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Card I: The Job Application (7.0)


Tina wanted a job in an office. A magazine publishing company had some openings, so Tina went
to the personnel department. The receptionist gave her an application form and asked her to go into the
next room and complete it. The form was only two pages long, but it had several parts. At the top of the
first page, Tina had to write her name, address, and social security number. She was glad she had put
her social security card in her wallet. Next Tina was asked about her record of business experience.
That part was easy, too, except for the box that said, "Reason for separation." Tina was puzzled, but
then she realized they were asking why she had lost her other job. She thought she could explain why
she left, but Tina didn't know how she could write the reason in such a tiny box.
The last part of the application asked for three reference's names, occupations, and addresses.
Tina could not remember the addresses of her references. She didn't know whether to leave that part
blank or come back later. Then she had a better idea. Tina used the telephone directory to find the
correct addresses. Tina decided that before she applied for any more jobs, she would write down the
kind of information needed on applications and take it with her.

Who read the passage?

Student read aloud

Student read silently

Examiner read

Reading Comprehension Questions: (Ask the student the following questions and mark with a check
the questions s/he answers correctly.)
Where did Tina apply for a job? (at a magazine publishing company)
Where did she go when she went to the publishing company? (receptionist in personnel office)
What was she told to do? (go to next room and fill out application form)
On the first page, what information did Tina have to know? (name, address, and social security
number)
What else was she asked about? (record of business experience)
What does reason for separation mean? (reason for leaving her job)
Why was this a problem? (she couldn't explain it in such a small space)
What did the last part of the application ask for? (three references)
How did she find the addresses? (looked in the phone book)
What will she do from now on when she applies for a job? (write down information needed and
take it with her)

# of Memories: ___
If student read: 10 or fewer errors, 6 or more memories GO ON
If examiner read: 6 or more memories GO ON

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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Reading Passage J: A Shopping Trip (8.0)


(to be read aloud by examiner as a measure of listening comprehension)
Gene and Kim had been shopping for equipment for their camping trip. For several days they
had been going from store to store looking for things they needed. Shopping was taking a lot of
time and was very inconvenient. Their neighbor said that he had been shopping by sending for
things through a mail-order catalog for years. Gene said that he had heard about mail-order
shopping, but he was worried about getting their money back if something was wrong with their
purchase. When the neighbor told Gene and Kim that the store offered a refund guarantee,
they asked him if they could borrow his catalog.
Kim noticed that people could order merchandise three ways. They could place a telephone
order, or mail an order form, or go to the mail-order counter of the store. Because the nearest
mail-order store was far away from them, they planned to order by mail.
Gene felt that they had not completely wasted their time by looking through department stores
because they could compare the catalog prices with the prices of items they had seen. They
were both pleased to find that the measurements of hiking boots were given so that they would
be able to tell whether they would fit.
Reading Comprehension Questions: (Ask the student the following questions and mark with a check
the questions s/he answers correctly.)

What had Kim and Gene been shopping for? (a camping trip)
Why didnt they like to shop? (takes a lot of time; inconvenient)
How had their neighbor been doing his shopping? (through a mail-order catalog)
What is a refund guarantee? (you can get your money back)
Why was Gene skeptical of using a mail-order catalog? (he was worried about getting his
money back if they werent satisfied)
What were the three ways that one could order from a catalog? (in the store, by phone, or
by mail)
Which method did Gene and Kim decide to use? (they ordered by mail)
Why did Gene feel they had not wasted their time? (they could compare prices to those
they had found in the catalog)
What were they pleased to find in the catalog? (measurements for boots were given)
Why was this important? (they could tell if they would fit)
# of Memories: ___
Interpretive Question: Why is it important to take your time when you shop?
Continue to Section 3 Writing Sample

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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Section 2-Reading Comprehension Observations


Observation of Reading Behaviors
Instructions:
Check all that apply. A check next to one of the items below indicates that the student
exhibited this reading behavior throughout the entire assessment. If a student reads earlier
passages well, but begins one of the behaviors listed at a higher level passage, please note at
which passage s/he began, for example, to read word by word.
Reading Behaviors Noted in the Passages
___ Changed words
___ Repeated words
___ Added words
___ Mispronounced words
___ Omitted words
___ Substituted words
___ Made no attempt to pronounce
___ Made corrections

Other Reading Behaviors Observed


___ Lost place while reading
___ Attempted to phonetically pronounce
___ Skipped a line (or lines) while reading
words
___ Read word by word
___ Substitutions and mispronunciations
(the/car/came/down/the)
resulting from dialect
___ Read with good expression
___ Substituted similar sounding words for
___ Ignored punctuation
words in passage
___ Used finger/marker to track
___ Substituted words of similar meaning
___ Problems squinting
for words in passage
___ Trouble concentrating on task
___ Other complaints or problems

Other Observations:

12
Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002

Section 3Writing Sample


Examiner: After the student has finished the reading portion of the assessment, please select a reading
passage one or two grade levels below their approximate instructional reading level. Read a few
sentences from the reading card and ask the student to write on this page what they hear. If they are
unable to do that, ask the student to copy on this page one or two sentences from the card. Note the
top half of the page is for a dictated writing sample and the bottom half is for a copied writing sample.

Dictated:

Copied:

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Bader Reading and Language Inventory 2002