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Second Grade English Language Arts Long Term Plan

Spiraled Literature Standards


RL.2.4.
Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply
rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

Elements to Teach and Discuss in Relation to Poetry
o Title: A heading that gives insight into the content of the poem
o Rhyme: Words that sound alike, often linking one concept to another
o Rhythm: The beat that results from the stress pattern of syllables
o Meter: The rhythm in a line of poetry
o Line breaks: Where lines of poetry end; a way to create and enhance meaning
o Stanza: A grouping of lines in poetry
o Verse: A line or division/grouping of lines in a poem

Questions for Considering Poetry
o Poetry is a unique genre in that its visual layout contributes to its meanings and sounds. Poets
use spaces and lines breaks to speed us up, slow us down, change our intonation, create a
rhythm, keep us on a thought, or shift our focus. As you discuss poetry formats with students,
show them how you read through the selection once or twice to get an overall picture o what
it looks like and how it is organized. An initial examination helps readers get their bearings
within the poem and become familiar with its language and structure. On a second or third
reading, students can explore the following:
o What looks like writing you have seen before? What breaks this pattern?
o Why do you think the poet chose this format?
o How are spaces and line breaks used?
o Read the poem without line breaks. How is it different?
o How are verses or stanzas used?

Poetry Center
Establish a poetry center that includes childrens poetry anthologies, photocopied poems, child-written
poems, paper, pencils, and materials for illustrating. Also make available a selection of very short
poems for children who wish to experiment with performing. Arrange for students to keep a special
notebook for copies of their favorite poems. They can print poems from the Web and tape them into
their notebooks and/or copy their own. Personal poetry anthologies make excellent individualized
reading, and kids ten to return to them again and again.

Spiraled potentially with weekly or biweekly poetry readings
RL.2.7.
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate
understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.

RL.2.10.
By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the grades 23
text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Spiraled Informational Standards
RI.2.4.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.

RI.2.10.
By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science,
and technical texts, in the grades 23 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at
the high end of the range.

Spiraled Writing Standards
W.2.4.
With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization
are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in
standards 1 3 above.)
With guidance and support from adults, produce functional writing (e.g., friendly letters,
recipes experiments, notes/messages, labels, graphs/tables, directions, posters) in which

W.2.5.

W.2.6.

the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.



Basic writing process and different types of writing for different purposes
With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by
revising and editing.

With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing,
including in collaboration with peers.

UNIT 1: Building Community, Our Place in the World


5 Weeks
Literature:
During this unit, students will be introduced to the overall structure of literature and learn to identify and describe the basic
elements of a story. They will use illustrations and text to demonstrate their understanding of these plot elements in literature
related to the unit theme. Students will be exposed to poetry on a weekly basis and begin learning key elements of poetry supply
rhythm and meaning to the text.

Informational:
The focus of this unit will be the difference between fiction and informational texts. Students will be able to identify the main
purposes for writing informational texts and learn about the types of information that can be gained by reading these texts.

Book List:
Self-Love and Knowledge
The Colors of Us by Karen Katz (Hold)
I Love My Hair by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley (Hold)
D is for Drinking Gourd: An African American Alphabet by Nancy I. Sanders
Grandfathers Journey by Allen Say (Children PICT BK Say, A.)
From Miss Ida's Porch by Sandra Belton (None)
Grandmas Gift by Eric Velasquez (Children PICT BK Velasquez, E.)
The Granddaughter Necklace by Sharon Dennis Wyeth (Hold)
The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf (None)
Suki's Kimono by Chieri Uegaki (Children PICT BK Uegaki, C.)

Respect for Others
Whoever You Are by Mem Fox (Amazon?)
Meet Danitra Brown by Nikki Grimes (Hold)
The Peace Book by Todd Parr (On hold next!)
Its Okay to Be Different by Todd Parr (On hold next!)
The Family Book by Todd Parr (On hold next!)
And to Think That We Thought That We'd Never Be Friends by Mary Ann Hoberman (Hold)
Mrs. Katz and Tush by Patricia Polacco
No English by Jacqueline Jules (Amazon?)
Oliver Button is a Sissy by Tomie dePaola
Yoko Writes Her Name by Rosemary Wells (Hold)
People by Peter Spier
One Green Apple by Eve Bunting (Children PICT BK Bunting, E.)

Poems:
Bed in Summer by Robert Louis Stevenson
Who Has Seen the Wind? by Christina Rossetti
Windy Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson
Something Told the Wild Geese by Rachel Field

Honey, I Love and Other Love Poems (Reading Rainbow Series) by Eloise Greenfield (On hold next!)

History and Science:
Frog and Toad All Year by Arnold Lobel (Seasons)
Africa Is Not A Country by Margy Burns Knight (Put on hold next!)

RL.2.5.
Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story
and the ending concludes the action.
[Basic overall structure of a story]
SWBAT identify the beginning, middle, and end of a story.
SWBAT put events from the story in sequential order.
SWBAT identify main characters, setting, problem and solution.

Prompts to Support Teacher-Led Modeling and Discussion of Text
For Poetry:

o
o
o
Stories:
o

RL.2.7.

How are line breaks used? Lets listen to what the poem sounds like without line breaks.
Why do you think the poet chose this format?
What makes this poem fun to say? Why does it make us want to move?
Lets examine how the story was introduced. How did we meet the characters? How/when
was the problem set up? How/when was it solved?


Elements to Teach and Discuss in Relation to Stories
o Title: A heading that gives insight into the content of the story
o Plot: The series of events: a beginning that draws in the reader and provides information
about the characters and setting; a middle that develops a conflict; a high point in action when
the conflict is about to be solved; and an ending or resolution
o Theme: The often unstated idea, meaning, or message that ties together the characters,
setting, and plot. Stories often have more than one theme. (Covered in later unit)

Comprehension Strategy Considering Structure (Pg. 80)
o Ask students to turn through their books and note any special features display how
previewing before reading can help them to begin to build understanding

Collaborative Engagement
o (Pg. 81) Set of cards with typed-out beginnings and endings of stories. Match the beginning
with the ending
o Students collaborate to draw a picture of the beginning and the ending of a familiar story on
large chart paper. They write one sentence to describe each.
o Create enough storyboards for each group. A storyboard is made up of cut-apart pages of a
picture book. Students place the storyboard pictures in order. You can select key pages for the
group to work with. You may wish to laminate the pages on colored construction paper,
placing pictures from the beginning on green, middle on yellow, and end on red

Independent Application
o Plot Charts (Pg. 85)
o Charting with Props
o Important Parts
o Scripting a Story for Readers Theatre
o **Collaborative Sequencing**
o Whole-class effort involving putting together the pieces of a story or drama to
replicate the original structure. After viewing a dramatic presentation or listening to a
story read aloud, each student draws one part of the story, writes one rich and
detailed sentence about that part, and determines where the event falls best: the
beginning, middle, or end. The class then meets in three groups to determine an
order for each piece within that group. The class then stands in a circle around the
room and reads the combined pieces in sequence. Adjustments in sequence may be
made before reading the piece again, and students may add helpful terms such as
first and next to help clarify the order of events. Lead the class to discuss whether the
plot has been captured. The pieces are bound together into a class book and kept in
the classroom library.
o Comparative Reviews
o Let students know that they will be considering two stories and deciding which ending
they like the best. Display both texts. Students choose one favorite and prepare an
evaluation by drawing the ending, describing what makes it good, and explaining why
they prefer it over the other ending. After the students have completed their reviews,
hold a whole-class session to graph the two choices and determine which ending was
the overall favorite.
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate
understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.

SWBAT use illustrations to describe changes to the setting throughout the story.

Focus on how illustrations help us with the objective above



Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

[Explain the difference between fiction and nonfiction texts]
SWBAT describe the difference between literature and informational texts and identify texts as either
fiction or nonfiction.
SWBAT identify the main purpose of a text what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

Fiction vs. Informational
o (Pg. 81) Gather a bin of books for each group. Each bin should contain five to seven books.
Students sort the books into two piles: stories and informational books. They go through the
two piles and makes a chart to show what is the same and different in the two types of books
(RL 5.5)


Conventions
Writing Composition
SWBAT identify and write the four sentence types:
Writers Workshop: Launching Writers Workshop
declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, and imperative

SWBAT identify nouns, action verbs, adjectives, adverbs,
Focus Trait: Ideas
subject pronouns, linking verbs, first-person and third-
person pronouns
SWBAT apply capitalization rules to the first word of a
sentence, I, and names, and names/titles of people,
places, books, days, or months
SWBAT create noun plurals by adding s, adding es or
ren, changing a phonograms
SWBAT create the past tense by adding ed (r. 28)


RI.2.6.


o
o

o
o


UNIT 2: Ancient Greece, Greek Myths, A New Nation, Cycles in
7 Weeks
Nature
Literature:
During this unit, students will learn and practice the idea of questioning while reading literature. Students will use interrogative
sentences and who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in the text. They will also use
questioning to develop higher-order thinking questions that will be used during Socratic discussion. Questioning will support
students identification of plot elements that were introduced in the first unit. Students will have continued exposure to poetry on a
weekly basis and the opportunity to review new and learned skills related to poetry.

Informational:
In this unit, students will learn to use questions to gather information from informational texts and to demonstrate understanding of
key details. Questioning will deepen students interaction with nonfiction texts and help them to see the type of information that
can be drawn from informational books and sources. In addition, students will begin to use timelines and sequence historical events
in order to begin describing the connection between a series of historical events. Through the study of Cycles in Nature, students
will begin to see connections between scientific ideas and concepts and describe their order/steps.



Book List:
Greek Myths (Core Knowledge)
By the Dawns Early Light: The Story of the Star-Spangled Banner by Steven Koll

Poems:
Caterpillars by Aileen Fisher
Discovery by Harry Behn

History and Science:
Taming of Bucephalus
Training of Spartan Girls
Preamble to the Constitution
Dolly Madison
Chickens Arent the Only Ones by Ruth Heller
From Caterpillar to Butterfly by Dr. Gerald Legg
From Seed to Sunflower by Dr. Gerald Legg
From Egg to Chicken by Dr. Gerald Legg
From Tadpole to Frog by David Steward
The Cloud Book by Tomie de Paola


RL.2.1.
Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate
understanding of key details in a text.


RI.2.1.
Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate
understanding of key details in a text.
RI.2.3.
Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in
technical procedures in a text.

Conventions
Writing Composition
o SWBAT identify linking verbs, helping verbs, conjunctions,
o SWBAT explain that a compound sentence is two
pronouns (distance), object nouns, object pronouns,
independent sentences related tot eh same thought and
prepositional phrases, possessive pronouns
joined with a connecting word (conjunction); compose
o SWBAT create noun plurals by adding s, changing
sentences that use and and but to connect two
phonograms, adding es, adding a syllable, y to i add es, f
independent sentences with a comma
to v add es
o SWBAT explain that a complex sentence is made up of a
o SWBAT create the past tense of action verbs by adding ed
group of words that can stand alone (independent clause)
(r. 28), changing phonograms, changing the word, or
and a group of words that cannot stand alone (dependent
staying the same
clause). Explain the use of conjunctions in complex

o
o
o
o
o

SWBAT alphabetize
sentences.
SWBAT explain the meaning of and use the following
o SWBAT explain that a comma separates clauses when the
suffixes: -ing, -y, -ish, -ar, -er
dependent clause begins the sentences
SWBAT describe nouns using multiple adjectives and
o SWBAT explain that related sentences are about one topic,
commas
and compose (in whole group) related sentences that use
SWBAT explain and determine the meaning of compound
the subject pronoun I and possessive pronouns
words
o SWBAT explain the attributes of narrative writing; in a
st
SWBAT use adjectives that show degrees of comparison (-er
whole group and individually compose a 1 -person
and est)
narrative

Writers Workshop: Personal Narrative


UNIT 3: Westward Expansion, Simple Machines, Insects
5 Weeks
Literature:
This unit will focus on characters in literature. Students will gain a deeper understanding of literature by examining characters at a
deeper level. Students will describe the actions, motivation, and feelings of characters over the course of the text and acknowledge
differences in points of view of characters. Comparing and contrasting different characters within and between texts will extend and
challenge students to think about characters at a broader level and how they represent the human condition in complex ways.

Informational:
In this unit, students will look beyond the words on the page and interact with text features in nonfiction books to become efficient
in locating key facts and information. In the study of simple machines and insects, students will be working extensively with images
and diagrams that add meaning to and clarify the text.


Book List:
Tall Tales (Core Knowledge)
Paul Bunyan
Johnny Appleseed
John Henry
Pecos Bill
Casey Jones
How the Spider Symbol Came to the People (Osage Plains Story)
Mohawk (Mohawk Story)
Johnny Appleseed: A Tall Tale by Steven Kellogg
Pecos Bill by Steven Kellogg
Paul Bunyan and Other Tall Tales by Jane Mason
American Tall Tales by Mary Pope Osborn

Charlottes Web by E.B. White (? Potentially introduced in Unit 2 or 3 with Life Cycles and Insects)
Poems:
Buffalo Dusk by Carl Sandburg
Bee! Im expecting you! by Emily Dickinson
Hurt No Living Thing by Christina Rossetti

History and Science:
The Oregon Trail
The Trail of Tears
Insects and Spiders: WorldWise by Penny Clarke
The Life and Times of the Ant by Charles Micucci
Insect Invaders: The Magic Schoolbus
Back and Forth: Rookie Read-About Science by Patricia J. Murphy
Push and Pull: Rookie Read-About Science by Patricia J. Murphy
Simple Machines: Rookie Read-About Science by Allan Fowler
What Is a Plane? Welcome Books by Lloyd G. Douglass
What is a Pulley? Welcome Books by Lloyd G. Douglass
What is a Screw? Welcome Books by Lloyd G. Douglass
What is Friction? Welcome Books by Lloyd G. Douglass

RL.2.3.
Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
Identify the characters in the story

RL.2.6.
Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice
for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

RL.2.7.
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate
understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.


RI.2.5.

RI.2.7.

Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes,
electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.

Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a
text.


o
o
o
o
o

o
o
o

Conventions
SWBAT identify and use object pronouns in a sentence.
SWBAT use adjectives that show degrees of comparison (-er
and est)
SWBAT use adjectives that show degrees of comparison
(good, better, best)
SWBAT form contractions
SWBAT explain that verbs may show changing time (tense);
read sentence patterns (written on the board) that show
tenses for and explain the time change; compose
oral/written sentences that use e.g. I (present tense) I
am (verb)ing I (past) I will (present) I have (verb)
SWBAT explain the meaning of and use the following
prefixes: -un, -re, -en
SWBAT explain the meaning of and use the following
suffixes: -ant, -er
SWBAT form adverbs using the suffix -ly

o
o

Writing Composition
SWBAT explain that a complex sentence is made up of a
group of words that can stand alone (independent clause)
and a group of words that cannot stand alone (dependent
clause). Explain the use of conjunctions in complex
sentences.
SWBAT explain that a comma separates clauses when the
dependent clause begins the sentences
SWBAT explain that related sentences are about one topic,
and compose (in whole group) related sentences that use
the subject pronoun I and possessive pronouns
SWBAT explain that find writers use precise language and
vary sentence construction to improve their paragraphs;
read sentences (written on the board) that include strong
adjectives and begin with prepositional phrases and
commas; compose oral/written setences that include strong
adjectives and begin with prepositional phrases and
commas
SWBAT explain the attributes of informative writing;
rd
identify attributes in a model 3 -person informative
paragraph written on the board; in whole group (and
rd
individually), use the writing process to compose a 3 -
person informative paragraph about a topic of interest to
the class, e.g. prewriting, composing, revising, editing,
publishing


Writers Workshop: All-About Books, Informational Chapter
Books


UNIT 4: Fighting for a Cause Civil Rights and Taking Care of
3/4 Weeks
our Body
Literature:
Literature in this unit will force students to acknowledge multiple perspectives as they examine the Civil Rights Unit through both
fictional and informational texts. Knowledge of character from the previous unit will be reinforced when reapplied to different time
period in history. Students will continue to acknowledge differences in points of view of the characters through literature that
focuses on a tumultuous time period in our countrys history. Illustrations in the text will facilitate students understanding of
different geographic areas, different time periods, and issues of race and class. All previously learned literature objectives will be
spiraled and reinforced through read alouds.

Informational:
By this point in the year, students have had ample exposure with informational texts about various topics. They have worked with
text features and have used questioning to gather information. In this unit, students will focus on identifying the main topic of a
multiparagraph text and then looking closely at the topics of individual paragraphs.


Book List:
Amelia and Eleanor Go For a Ride by Pam Munoz Ryan
Clara Barton: Rookie Biography by Wil Mara
Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez by Kathleen Krull
Martin Luther King, Jr. and the March on Washington by Francis E. Ruffin
Mary McLeod Bethune: Rookie Biographies by Susan Evento
Mary McLeod Bethune by Eloise Greenfield
Rosa Parks: From the Back of the Bus to the Front of the Movement by Camilla Wilson
A Picture Book of Rosa Parks by David A. Adler
The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles
Teammates by Peter Golenbock
Talkin About Bessie: The Story of Aviator Elizabeth Coleman by Nikki Grimes
Martins Big Words by Doreen Rappaport
Susan B. Anthony: Fighter for Freedom and Equality by Suzanne Slade
The Ballot Box Battle by Emily Arnold McCully
When Marian Sang by Pam Muoz Ryan
Freedom on the Menu: The Greensboro Sit-Ins by Carole Boston Weatherford
Freedom Summer by Deborah Wiles


http://www.readingrockets.org/calendar/blackhistory/
Poems:

History and Science:
Martin Luther King, Jr. I Have a Dream
The Digestive System: A True Book by Darlene R. Stille
You and Your Body: Its Science by Sally Hewitt

RL.2.6.
Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice
for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

RL.2.7.
Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate
understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.



RI.2.2.
Identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the
text


Conventions
Writing Composition
o SWBAT explain that verbs may show changing time (tense); o SWBAT explain that find writers use precise language and

o
o

read sentence patterns (written on the board) that show


tenses for and explain the time change; compose
oral/written sentences that use e.g. I (present tense) I
am (verb)ing I (past) I will (present) I have (verb)
SWBAT explain the meaning of and use the following
suffixes: -y, -tion
SWBAT explain the difference between common and
proper nouns

vary sentence construction to improve their paragraphs;


read sentences (written on the board) that include strong
adjectives and begin with prepositional phrases and
commas; compose oral/written setences that include strong
adjectives and begin with prepositional phrases and
commas
SWBAT explain the attributes of friendly (informal) letters
(heading, greeting, body, closing, signature, proper noun
st
capitals, and commas); identify attributes in a model 1 -
person friendly letter written on the board; in a whole group
and individually use the writing process to compose a
friendly letter about (informative-narrative), e.g.
prewriting, composing, revising, editing, publishing


Writers Workshop: African American Author Study, Writing
About Reading Letter Writing, Writing Nominations and
Favorite Books


UNIT 5: Early Asian Civilizations, Human Body
6 Weeks
Literature:
After working extensively with plot elements and characters in literature thus far in the year, students will develop a more
sophisticated understanding of literature by learning to determine the central message, lesson, or moral of a story. At this point in
the year, students will be able to recount or retell diverse forms of literature and synthesize their understanding of larger themes
authors choose to address. Through a study of literature across diverse cultures and the idea of theme, students will also explore
values central to these cultures. Finally, students will compare and contrast versions of the same story by different authors or from
different cultures to examine the way culture or perspective affects literature.

Informational:
(Same as Unit 4) By this point in the year, students have had ample exposure with informational texts about various topics. They
have worked with text features and have used questioning to gather information. In this unit, students will focus on identifying the
main topic of a multiparagraph text and then looking closely at the topics of individual paragraphs. (New) Students will look closely
specific points the author makes in relation to the main topic of the text. They will also describe how reasons support the points the
author makes.

Book List:
The Blind Men and the Elephant (Indian Fable) (Core Knowledge and Book) retold by Karen Backstein
The Magic Paintbrush (Chinese Folktale)
The Tongue-Cut Sparrow (Japanese Folktale)
How the Camel Got His Hump by Rudyard Kipling
The Tiger, the Brahman, and the Jackal (Indian Trickster Tale)
Folktales from China retold by Barbara Lawson
The Empty Pot by Demi

Talk (Ashanti, West African Tale)
El Pajaro Cu (Mexican Folktale)
How Iktomi Lost His Eyes (Assiniboine Tribe Story)

History and Science:
Rama and Sita: A Tale from the Ramayana
Buddha: The Enlightened One
Teachings of Confucius

Author Study (Faith Ringgold)
Tar Beach
Aunt Harriets Underground Railroad in the Sky


RL.2.2.
Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central
message, lesson, or moral.

RI.2.9.
Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.


RI.2.2.
Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the
text

RI.2.8.
Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.


Conventions
Writing Composition
o SWBAT write abbreviations for the months of the year and o SWBAT explain that find writers use precise language and
Mr., Mrs., etc
vary sentence construction to improve their paragraphs;
o SWBAT use hyphens when combining two adjectives to
read sentences (written on the board) that include strong
describe a noun
adjectives and begin with prepositional phrases and
o SWBAT explain the meaning of and use the following
commas; compose oral/written setences that include strong
suffixes: -ful, -tion, -al, -til, -ly, -sion, -ous
adjectives and begin with prepositional phrases and

o
o

SWBAT read and use the phonograms ti, ci, and si that say
/sh/
SWBAT explain words that are multiple parts of speech

commas
SWBAT explain the attributes of narrative writing; identify
rd
attributes in a model 3 -person narrative (written on the
board); in whole group (and individually) use the writing
rd
process to compose a 3 -person narrative about a topic of
interest
SWBAT explain that story dialogue is identified by quotation
marks, a comma before the quotation and a capital of the
first less of the first word
SWBAT explain that the rhythm of music is reflected in
poetry; listen to examples of poetry and identify rhyming
words (assonance/consonance), words that have the same
initial consonant sound (alliteration), and words that sound
like their meanings, e.g. meow (onomatopoeia); compose
simple poetry that includes any of these


Writers Workshop: Narrative Writing (Once Upon a Time
Adapting and Writing Fairy Tales) and Poetry


UNIT 6: The U.S. Civil War, Magnetism
5 Weeks
Literature:
Students will be exposed to literature that relates to the unit theme. All standards and objectives taught thus far will be reinforced
and practiced. Literature will challenge students to examine the motivations and feelings of characters at a deeper level.

Informational:
Students will compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.


Book List:
Netties Trip South by Ann Turner
A Picture Book of Harriet Tubman by David A. Adler
True Stories About Abraham Lincoln by Ruth Belov Gross
Henrys Freedom Box by Ellen Levine
Escape North: The Story of Harriet Tubman by Monica Kulling
Minty A Story of Young Harriet Tubman
Januarys Sparrow by Patricia Polacco
Pink and Say by Patricia Polacco
Mr. Lincolns Way by Patricia Polacco


Poems:
Harriet Tubman by Eloise Greenfield
Lincoln by Nancy Byrd Turner

History and Science:
Reminiscences of Levi Coffin
Abraham Lincoln: The Gettysburg Address
Experiments With Magnets: A True Book by Salvatore Tocci
Forces Around Us by Sally Hewitt
Magnets by Anne Schreiber
1001 Bugs to Spot by Emma Helbrough
You Can Use a Compass: Rookie Read-About Science by Lisa Trumbauer



RI.2.9.
Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.


Conventions
Writing Composition
o SWBAT explain the meaning of and use the following
o SWBAT explain that quotation marks may also be used to
suffixes: -ance, -ant, -able, -er, -est, -ly, -ful, -y, -tion, -ish, -
quote a sentence or paragraph from a book; read a direct
ly, -al
quote from a science or social studies book that includes
o SWBAT use more and most are used to show comparison
opening and closing quotation marks, a capital letter of the
with three-syllable words
first word, and a comma
o SWBAT categorize words by part of speech
o SWBAT identify the attributes of an informative paragraph
o SWBAT explain that verbs may show changing time (tense);
that includes a direct quote from a social studies book; in
read sentence patterns (written on the board) that show
whole group (and individually) use the writing process to
tenses for and explain the time change; compose
compose an informational paragraph about a historical
oral/written sentences that use e.g. I (present tense) I
individual and include one direct quote, quotation marks, a
am (verb)ing I (past) I will (present) I have (verb)
capital letter of the first word, and a comma
o SWBAT explain the use of the adverb too
o SWBAT explain that the rhythm of music is reflected in
o SWBAT identify indefinite pronouns
poetry; listen to examples of poetry and identify rhyming
words (assonance/consonance), words that have the same
initial consonant sound (alliteration), and words that sound
like their meanings, e.g. meow (onomatopoeia); compose
simple poetry that includes any of these
o SWBAT explain that a thesis states the most important

point of two or more paragraphs; identify a stated thesis in


a multi-paragraph informative report and information from
reference sources; in whole group and individually, use the
writing process to compose a multi-paragraph informative
report about


Writers Workshop: Historical Informational Writing, Poetry,
and Multi-Paragraph Informational Reports


UNIT 7: Immigration, Science Biographies
4 Weeks
Literature:
Students will be exposed to literature that relates to the unit theme. All standards and objectives taught thus far will be reinforced
and practiced. Literature will challenge students to examine how setting impacts characters and culture.

Informational:
All Standards Spiraled

Book List:
The Memory Coat by Elvira Woodruff
O, Say Can You See? Americas Symbols, Landmarks, and Inspiring Words by Sheila Keenan

Poems:

History and Science:
Quotes from Immigrants Who Came Through Ellis Island
The Pledge of Allegiance
The New Colossus
Anton van Leeuwenhoek
Elijah McCoy
Florence Nightingale
Daniel Hale Williams
Immigrant Kids (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) by Russell Freedman
Coming to America : The Story of Immigration by Betsy Maestro


Conventions
Writing Composition
o SWBAT explain and use interrogative and reflexive

pronouns
Writers Workshop: Persuasive Speeches, Petitions, and
o SWBAT categorize words by part of speech
Editorials
o SWBAT explain the meaning of and use the following
suffixes: -ance, -ous, -age, -ence, -or



THE READERS NOTEBOOK

Read Aloud/Mini-Lesson Entries

Table of Contents Whole-Class Read Aloud Book List

Table of Contents Independent and Partner Reading Book List

Large Charts Displaying Model Notebook Pages

For each unit, students will be learning a specific reading


strategy or skill. They will learn to create a page for that
particular strategy or skill in their Readers Notebook, and then
we will create that page for each story that we read. Students
will use these pages repeatedly and learn how to construct them
independently. Their ability to record information and create
pages will increase throughout the year, and eventually,
students will be able to create a Plot Page or Character Page
at the request of the teacher. All pages will be numbered, so
that the teacher can easily grade notebooks (each Friday with a
stapled in grading slip), and refer back to specific stories or
pages.
A page will be dedicated to books read as a class and will serve
as a Table of Contents for the Readers Notebook. We will
create this Table of Contents with each book that we read.
Students will create their own Table of Contents Book List for
books that they read on their own. Eventually, the teacher will
ask students to create pages for their independent books and
students will indicate which page number corresponds to the
page that they have created.
Create a large chart that shows a model page for the Readers
Notebook

LAUNCHING WRITERS WORKSHOP



Day
Lesson

Making the Writers Notebook

L1: Starting Writing Workshop

3PL1: Why Do Writers Write?

6 Traits Pg. 84 (IDEAS): Finding the


Right Topic: Whats So Special?
3PL2: Thinking About Topics to Write
About (Heart Maps and Writers
Notebook)

L2: Carrying on Independently as


Writers

L3: Using Supplies Independently

L4: Telling Stories in Illustrations





L5: Drawing Even Hard-to-Make Ideas

L6: Using Both Pictures and Words, Like
Famous Authors
L7: Sketching and Writing Words


L8: Stretching and Writing Words: Initial
Sounds

L9: Spelling the Best We Canand
Moving On
6 Traits Pg. 88 (IDEAS): Finding the
Right Topic: Fun with Funnels, Narrow it
Down
Craft Lessons (Pg. 20) Developing an
Idea
Craft Lessons (Pg. 25) Nudging Students
to Move Beyond List and Love
Stories
L11: Creating a Place for Writing-in-
Progress: Long-Term Projects
Craft Lessons (Pg. 34) How to Pace a
Story


L12: Introducing Booklets
Craft Lessons (Pg. 41) New Ways to
Write About an Old Topic
L13: Widening Writing Possibilities: Lists
and Letters
L14: Widening Writing Possibilities:
Real-World Purposes

4 Weeks (25 Lessons)


Description/Objective
Decorate cover, make tabs for Ideas, Writing, Notes
Model the process of choosing a topic, sketching it, and then
writing a tiny bit about it
Work on Writing I-Chart and Practice
Students will understand that authors often write about people
they love, ideas they care about, and experiences that leave a
lasting impression.
Bring in special objects to gather ideas
Students will think about their daily experiences and feelings as
inspiration for writing.
Students will create a heart map of important things. Students
will use a writing notebook for gathering and writing ideas.
Show writers how they can keep working by adding more to
their picture, by adding more to their words, or by starting a new
piece of writing (What to do when Im finished)
Where to find and how to take care of the tools they need for
the writing workshop
Writer can decide on a topic, envision it, and then record that
meaning on the page with drawings that are representational

Draw the best you can and keep going


Writing pictures and words
Separate out the many sounds they hear in words and write
down the letters that correspond to those sounds
Listen to how the words start

Accept approximate spellings in order to tell more about their
stories

After choosing a topic, developing an idea to make it substantial


and rich
Telling more and answering the readers questions ahead of time

Add more writing to the same piece, and use a system to


separate finished from unfinished work
Show writers how to slow down their stories, to reveal their
stories bit by bit over several pages, instead of blurting it out at
one time

Plan for and write a book with several pages
Planning for different ways to write about a topic (different
genres information vs. fictional, poetry, songs, mystery, etc)
Range of genres, for a range of purposes
During every section of the room and part of the day, there are
reasons to write and invite children to do that writing

L15: Fixing Up Writing



2PL9: Rereading, Adding, Changing
Craft Lessons (Pg. 38) Fleshing Out
Sketchy Writing by Cutting and Pasting
2PL11/12: Word Choice: Amazing
Adjectives and Vigorous Verbs (Precise
rd
Verbs 3 )
6 Traits Pg. 90 (IDEAS): Selecting
Interesting, Relevant Details: Can You
See It?
3PL8: Building a Descriptive Sentence
3PL9: Sensory Details: It Sounds About
Right! (Also reference Craft Lessons, Pg.
62)

3PL10: Using Color Words to Elaborate
Descriptions
3PL14: Partner Sharing for Revision

Fix up and revise writing so it says everything they mean it to say


before its sent to the world

Show writers how to manipulate texts they are working on by
cutting and pasting (tape, paper, and scissors) to allow room
more writing and change the order of the text

Students use a Word Splash to build sentences of varying


length and structure.
Writers use sensory details (sound) to make their writing come
alive for the reader.

Writers often use color words to paint a visual image for the
reader.

Authors share their writing with others to help improve their


writing.
L16: Editing and Fancying Up Writing
Reread, check, and edit writing to make sure its readable. Fancy

up work by adding details with colored pencils


2PL13: Spelling Tools
Introduce students to spelling tools to use independently.
L17: Reading into the Circle: An Authors Read a favorite part of their writing to the whole class, then all
Celebration
of their writing to a small group, then will enjoy refreshments
and a post-unit talk.