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BLOODBORNE PATHOGEN

TRAINING
MODULE 1

INSTRUCTIONS

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Read through this presentation


Complete the activity for this module
Take the module quiz
Review the module again so that you can
demonstrate that you are familiar with the
information and successfully pass the post-test

OBJECTIVES

What is a bloodborne pathogen?


What are some types of bloodborne pathogens?
The most common?
Transmission of these pathogens

PURPOSE OF THIS TRAINING


As an employee it can be reasonably anticipated,
as the result of performing your job duties, you
will face contact with blood and other potentially
infectious materials
Limits occupational exposure to blood and other
potentially infectious materials since any exposure
could result in transmission of bloodborne
pathogens, which could lead to disease or even
death
The more you know, the better you will perform in
real situations!

What Are Bloodborne Pathogens?

Microorganisms that are carried in the


blood and other body fluids (semen,
breast milk, vaginal secretions, saliva)
that can cause diseases

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

There Are Seven Types of Bloodborne Pathogens


Viruses
Bacteria
Protoza
Rickettsia
Fungi
Parasitic
Worms
Bacteria and Viruses are the most common

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

BACTERIA
CAN LIVE EVERYWHERE
DOES NOT REQUIRE OTHER
LIVING ORGANISMS TO
SURVIVE
CAN BE CONTROLLED BY
MEDICATIONS

VIRUSES
VIRUSES DEPEND ON OTHER
LIVING ORGANISMS TO
SURVIVE
DIFFICULT TO ELIMINATE
BECAUSE FEW MEDICATIONS
ARE EFFECTIVE

COMMON BLOODBORNE PATHOGEN


DISEASES
HEPATITIS B VIRSUS (HBV)
Poses greater risk because more easily transmitted.
HEPATITIS C VIRUS (HCV)
Causes serious liver disease; usually chronic
HUMAN IMMUNODIFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV)
Attacks the immune system

HEPATITIS B

is a virus that infection and inflammation of the liver


is transmitted primarily through "blood to blood"
contact
can lead to serious conditions such as cirrhosis &
liver cancer
can survive in dried blood for up to seven days
there is no "cure" or specific treatment for HBV
many people develop antibodies to fight the disease
which may prevent future infection

HEPATITIS B SYMPTOMS

Mild flu-like symptoms


Fatigue
Possible stomach pain
Loss of appetite
Nausea
Jaundice
Darkened urine

HEPATITIS B
VACCINATION
SERIES OF THREE SHOTS
Second shot is given one month
after the first
Third shot follows five months
after the second.
This series gradually builds up the
body's immunity to the Hepatitis
B virus.

HEPATITIS B
VACCINATION

Strongly endorsed by medical


communities
Offered to all potentially
exposed employees
Provided at no cost to
employees
Declination form should be
signed if refusing

HEPATITIS C
Hepatitis C is a contagious liver disease that ranges in severity from
a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness that
attacks the liver. It results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus
(HCV), which is spread primarily through contact with the blood of
an infected person. Hepatitis C can be either acute or chronic.
Acute is a short-term illness that occurs within the first 6 months
after someone is exposed to the Hepatitis C virus. For most people,
acute infection leads to chronic infection.
Chronic is a long-term illness that occurs when the Hepatitis C virus
remains in a persons body. Hepatitis C virus infection can last a
lifetime and lead to serious liver problems, including cirrhosis
(scarring of the liver) or liver cancer
The Hepatitis C virus can survive outside the body at room
temperature, on environmental surfaces, for at least 16 hours but
no longer than 4 days.

HEPATITIS C SYMPTOMS
Approximately 70%80% of people with acute Hepatitis C do
not have any symptoms. Some people, however, can have
mild to severe symptoms soon after being infected, including
Fever
Fatigue
Loss of appetite
Nausea
Vomiting
Abdominal pain
Dark urine
Clay-colored bowel movements
Joint pain
Jaundice (yellow color in the skin or eyes)


Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), is


caused by the virus, human immunodeficiency virus, or
HIV.
It may be many years before AIDS actually develops.
HIV attacks the body's immune system, weakening it so
that it cannot fight other deadly diseases.

HIV AND DIRECT CONTACT

The HIV virus is very fragile and will not survive very
long outside of the human body. It is primarily of
concern to employees providing first aid or medical
care in situations involving fresh blood or other
potentially infectious materials

HIV SYMPTOMS

Symptoms of HIV infection can vary, but often include:

Weakness
Fever
Sore throat
Nausea
Headaches
Diarrhea
White coating on the tongue
Weight loss
Swollen lymph glands

BLOODBORNE
PATHOGENS
TRANSMISSION
Contact with another persons
blood or bodily fluid that may
contain blood
Mucous membranes:
eyes, mouth, nose
Non-intact skin
Contaminated
sharps/needles and surfaces

BLOODBORNE
PATHOGENS
TRANSMISSION
Unbroken skin forms an impervious
barrier against bloodborne pathogens.
However, infected blood can enter
your system through:

Open sores
Cuts
Abrasions
Acne
Any sort of damaged or broken skin
such as sunburn or blisters

CONCLUSION

Bloodborne pathogen rules are in place for your


health and safety.
Failure to follow them is a risk that should not
need to be taken

PLEASE REMEMBER TO GO TO THE HELP PAGE TO


CONTACT US WITH ANY QUESTIONS

LOOK AHEAD

THIS MODULE HAS PROVIDED YOU WITH INFORMATION ON


WHAT ARE BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS, HOW PATHOGENS
ARE TRANSMITTED, AND COMMON DISEASES RESULTING
FROM BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS AS WELL AS THE
SYMPTOMS. THE NEXT TWO MODULES WILL FOCUS ON:
Using universal precautions as if everyone has a disease
Practicing good hand washing and disposal
And the use personal protective equipment and
housekeeping

RESOURCES
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
https://www.osha.gov