You are on page 1of 4

One Lab Per Group!

 
 
 
You MAY NOT begin experimenting until Myth Lab is approved! 

 
Myth Lab Report 
 
Names of Investigators: ​
Samantha Whately and Esther Matheny 
 
Myth to be Busted: Does the Appearance of Food Affect the Taste? 
 
Explanation of Controls/Control Group~ 
When conducting an experiment it is important to be as exact as possible. To do this, 
you should make sure that you have only one independent variable and repeated/multiple 
trials to ensure that the data that you are collecting is correct. In addition, when you are 
conducting your experiment you should include a ​
control group/contol​
.  A control group is a 
comparison group of subjects or objects that are not being treated, tested, or changed by the 
independent variable. Then, the results from your test with the independent variable are 
compared to the results without the independent variable to determine its impact. 
For example, in a medical study, some of the patients are given a placebo (a sugar 
pill) rather than the actual medicine being tested. The placebo gives the doctors the ability to 
compare the results of the group taking the medicine to the group that thinks they are taking 
the medicine. If the results are the same, then the medicine is not effective. 
Another example, if you were testing whether walking on a banana peel makes a 
person slip, you would first have someone walk across the floor without the banana peel. 
Then, you would try the same test with the banana peel. If the person slipped as often without 
the banana peel then it is not the peel that is causing the person to slip. 

 

Required Elements of Your Myth Lab 
 
★ Testable Question​
 (What is your myth, what are you investigating?) 
 
Does the Appearance of Food Affect the Taste? 
 
 
★ Hypothesis​
 (Predict what you think will happen – if, then, because) 
If we give 6­12 year old kids 2 smoothies, both of the same flavor, but different 
appearance, then the kids will prefer the nicer­looking smoothies over the gross­ looking 
smoothies because when the brain sees something unappealing, it makes you think that 
it will taste bad.  ​
Good detail 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Experiment  
★ Materials​
 (Detailed list of materials with specific amounts of each item needed) 
­ milk (500 ml) 
­bananas (4 fresh) 
­strawberries (1 bag frozen) ­​
 brand? 
            ­pineapple (1 bag frozen)­ ​
brand? 
            ­mango (1 bag frozen) ­ ​
brand? 
            ­ coconut­pinapple juice (1 carton) ­ ​
brand? 
            ­plastic cups (15) 
            ­straws (15) 
            ­Samantha’s fancy smoothie cups (15) 
            ­food coloring (red, green, blue, yellow) 
 
★ Procedure​
 (Detailed, numbered list of the steps you will take to conduct this 
investigation) ​
BE AS SPECIFIC AND DETAILED AS POSSIBLE SO I CAN 
REPEAT YOUR EXPERIMENT EXACTLY! 
 
1.) Aat random, pick 5 kids from ages 6­12 who are willing and able for you to do the 
myth on. 
2.) Pick a day that works for everyone. ​
unnecessary 
3.) Before people arrive, make the 3 different smoothie recipes (seen below) 
Cut tops of all 15 plastic cups. 
4.) Pour 5 servings ​
(what is a serving)​
 of each smoothie into 5 plastic cups and add 
food coloring. 
5.) Do the same thing, but in the nice glasses ​
(clarify this step) 
6.) One by, one take each person into a separate room and serve them the 
nice­looking smoothies. 
7.) Get their 1­10 rating​
 ­ explain this, which is high, which is low? 
8.) Repeat steps 7 and 8, alternating from the nice­looking smoothie to the 
gross­looking smoothie. Do this in a random order. 
9.) Do this for each person. 
10.) Once everyone is done, reveal the big secret! ​
(That they were the same 3 
smoothies) 
11.) Have FUN!!!  ​
You should not include this in a scientific experiment 
 
You need to have each person drink each drink three times. I would use small cups and 
have them record the results. This means that you are going to have each person will 
be drinking 18 smoothies. I would do sample size (like the size you get at the mall) You 
may need to do this on multiple days if you want to do larger smoothie sizes or you may 
want to do fewer types of smoothies. 
 

Also, you do not need to do five people, you could do as few as three 
 
Smoothie Recipe #1: 
1.) Blend together 500ml milk, 21/2 fresh bananas, and 1 bag of frozen strawberries. 
(use less strawberries as needed) 
Smoothie Recipe #2: 
1.) Blend together 300ml of water, 1 bag of frozen pineapple, and 1 bag of frozen 
mango. (Use less mango and pineapple as needed) 
Smoothie Recipe #3: 
1.) Blend together 1 carton of coconut­pineapple juice, 21/2 fresh bananas, and 1 
bag of pineapple. (Again, use less as needed)  
 
★ Variables​
 (Identify all the variables in your investigation) 

Independent Variable – The type and appearance of the 
smoothies. 
 
Appearance of the smoothie 
 
 

Dependent Variable – Whether the appearance of the 
smoothies affects the taste. 
 
 

Control Variables­ The types of smoothies, the 5 people 
tasting it. ​
Amount of smoothie they are given 
 
 
 
★ Data Collection​
 (Create a method of collecting and recording your data) 

Draw your data table​
 – ​
there will be no data​
 – ​
and labels ​
but 
include title ! 
 
Does the Appearance of Food Affect the Taste (Per Person) 
 
                               Trial 1               Trial 2 
 
Smoothie #1 
 
Smoothie #2 
 
Smoothie #3 
 Need to have three trials and an average ­ look below at a possible data  
 

 

Trail1 
­Strawber
ry normal 

Trail1 
­Strawber
ry 
changed 

Trail 2 
­Strawber
ry normal 

Trail 2 
­Strawber
ry 
changed 

Trail­ 3 
Strawberr
y normal 

Trail­ 3 
Strawberr

changed 

Subject 1 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject 2 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject 3 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
★ Analyze your data​
 (is your data ​
reliable? Do your data and observations from 
the experiment support your hypothesis? If ​
No​
 ­i​
s your data inaccurate or the 
experiment flawed? If you think that it is flawed, rewrite your procedure to 
address the flaws in the original experiment. If your data is not flawed or you 
were correct then communicate your results) 
 

Communicate the Results ​
(Write a conclusion that summarizes the important 
parts of your experiment and the results. Include the testable question, whether your 
hypothesis was correct, and specific data from your investigation) 
 
 

There is no conclusion for this 
portion as YOU CANNOT DO THE 
EXPERIMENT YET!