You are on page 1of 6

Running Head: SPELLING INVENTORY ANALYSIS

Spelling Inventory Analysis
Jill Croy
North Carolina State University

1

SPELLING INVENTORY ANALYSIS

2

Spelling Inventory Analysis
Word Study Groups
Letter Name

Within Word

Mi’Asia
Demond
Evan

Sam
Yeshua
Rohit
Diana

Syllables and
Affixes
Emily
Gyan
Sanaa
Hayes
Jocelyn
Sarah
Alex
Mikayla

Derivational
Relations
Amy
Joel
Teagan
Betsybel
Reid

Although Rohit is between the Within Word and Syllables and Affixes stage, he is
an English Language Learner, and based on in­class observations, I believe he feels more 
comfortable and confident in the Within Word group. Betsybel, Reid, and Teagan did not
miss more than one on any feature, so they were also given the Upper Elementary 
Spelling Inventory. While they are further along in the Derivational Relations group, for 
classroom management purposes they are not in a group of their own. Instead, they 
receive differentiation within their group during word study activities.
Beginning Word Study
For each of my word study groups, I began instruction with the lowest feature on 
the spelling inventory where a student in the group missed more than 1. While this may 
cause several students to begin with a feature they have already mastered, they are less 
likely to be negatively impacted than in the opposite scenario, where a student would be 
working at a frustration level if instruction began several features past where they were 
“using, but confusing” (Bear, 2011). Instruction began with the following features:

SPELLING INVENTORY ANALYSIS

Letter Name: Short Vowels (this is where Demond scored 3/5)

Within Word: Long Vowels (this is where Sam and Diana scored 3/5) 

Syllables and Affixes: Inflected Endings (this is where Alex scored 3/5)

Derivational Relations: Bases or Roots (this is where Joel scored 3/5)

3

After beginning instruction with these features, I progressed in the order of the 
supplemental books and paid close attention to how comfortable students seemed with 
their given words each week.  
Implementing Instruction
On Monday, each group meets with me for approximately 20 minutes. During this
time, students read their words aloud. We discuss what they notice and come up with 
ways the words could be sorted. Students are encouraged to share why it makes sense to 
sort words in the ways being shared. If students do not arrive at an agreed upon pattern or
generalization, I sort the words in front of them and explain my reasoning. Students are 
then asked to sort the words again at their seats during one of their literacy rotations. 
For the remainder of the week, the word sort is used for the first few minutes of 
guided reading groups as reinforcement. Additionally, students are encouraged to notice 
any words in the text being used during guided reading that match the feature of focus. 
When students are trained to use our school’s iPads, I plan to include the games available
on the PD Toolkit in their literacy rotations as well. 
Each Friday, I call out ten words for each group. Often I will include one or two 
words that were not in the students’ sorts but that fit the pattern. This allows me to see if 
students can apply what they have learned to unfamiliar words. Students who misspell 

SPELLING INVENTORY ANALYSIS

4

more than three words spend time reviewing the following week while also working with 
the group’s new sort so as not to fall behind. If students consistently do not perform well, 
they are moved to a lower group.
Students’ weekly homework is as follows (written addressing the students’ 
parents):

Monday – Ask your child to sort his or her words into categories. They should 
read each word aloud during this activity. Ask them to explain why the words are 
sorted in a particular way – what does the sort reveal about spelling in general? 
Tuesday – Do a blind sort with your child. Lay down a word from each category 
as a header and then read the rest of the words aloud. Your child must indicate 
where the word goes without seeing it. Lay it down, and let him or her move it if 

they are incorrect. Repeat if more than one error is made.
Wednesday – Assist your child in doing a word hunt by looking for words in a 
book that have the same sound or pattern as the words in their weekly sort. Try to 

find two or three for each category. 
Thursday – Do a writing sort. As you call out the words in a random order, your 
child should write them in categories in their word study notebook. Call out any 
words they misspell a second or third time. Then, ask your child to glue the words
into their notebook in a sorted manner.
Reflection
Words Their Way has been a key addition to my language arts block this year. 

Most importantly, it has allowed me to provide my students with meaningful, 
differentiated spelling instruction. In years past, I had simply given students ten words on
Monday, to study as they pleased, in preparation for a test on Friday. The students were 

SPELLING INVENTORY ANALYSIS

5

not excited about the words, were not retaining what they learned, and were not 
transferring what they had learned to their writing. 
With the exception of a few children, my students are excited about word sorts 
and seem to enjoy the activities they are asked to complete. I think this is due in large 
part to the fact that they are working with words at their instructional level. For the most 
part, the words are not too easy or too difficult for them, since instruction begins where 
children are “using, but confusing” certain features. Additionally, students enjoy looking 
for patterns in their words and think it is fun to try to find the “oddballs.” The activities 
they are asked to complete require them to manipulate, say, and hunt for words, which 
allows them to make connections between reading and spelling/writing. 
Although word study and vocabulary are not the same, students do learn new 
vocabulary words through their sorts. Before analyzing the words each Monday, we 
discuss word meanings and clarify any confusion. Learning the meanings of new words 
helps build each child’s bank of vocabulary words, which in turn helps them with their 
reading comprehension.
Incorporating Words Their Way has allowed me to have a more holistic language 
arts block. Without an effective, meaningful word study component, my previous 
language arts block was lacking an important element. This year, I find my students 
discussing words frequently and during lessons we often stop to notice something about 
word sounds, patterns, or meanings. At the very least, students have an understanding 
that words are interesting and worth our attention. It is rewarding to see students excited 
about sharing and discussing what they notice about the words they read and write. 

SPELLING INVENTORY ANALYSIS
 

References
Bear, D.R., Invernizzi, M., A., Templeton, S.R., & Johnston, F. R. (2011). Words their 
way: Word study for phonics, spelling, and vocabulary instruction (5th edition). 
New York: Pearson. 

6