You are on page 1of 7

Running Head: LENSES ON READING

Lenses on Reading
Jill Croy
North Carolina State University

1

Running Head: LENSES ON READING

2

Lenses on Reading
LaBerge­Samuels Automatic Information­Processing Model
The LaBerge­Samuels Automatic Information­Processing Model appeared in the 
1970s as a type of “bottom­up” cognitive processing model. The model is described as 
“bottom­up” because it follows the idea that the reading process is a series of progressive 
stages that build upon each other. LaBerge and Samuels present five major components 
in their model beginning with visual memory. Visual memory occurs when individual 
letters are recognized. Then, sounds are attached to letters in the second stage, 
phonological memory. In the third stage, episodic memory, the reader digests the context 
surrounding the target information. Meaning is created in the semantic memory, the 
fourth component, and finally, in the fifth component, careful consideration is given to 
attention. Attention, is central to the model and is deconstructed into two types: external, 
or observable attention and internal, or unobservable attention. Internal attention is 
broken down further into three components of its own: alertness, selectivity, and limited 
capacity. The components of the LaBerge­Samuels model highlight the notion that a 
beginning reader who has yet to develop automaticity with reading can struggle to 
comprehend a text if the majority of their attention is being allocated to decoding (Tracey
& Morrow, 2012, p. 157­159). 
The LaBerge­Samuels Automatic Information­Processing Model directly 
connects to classroom literacy practice because it is the way reading instruction is 
delivered in most American elementary schools. Students begin by learning their letters 
and sounds. They then combine letters and decode simple words. Next, students begin 

Running Head: LENSES ON READING

3

working on comprehension by determining the meaning of sentences when words are put 
together. 
The LaBerge­Samuels model makes me wonder how much more effective reading
instruction would be if children were tracked academically by ability rather than age. 
Tracking children this way is a complicated notion, but for the purposes of successful 
reading instruction it seems appropriate. In my third grade class this year, I have several 
students who comprehend texts written on a fifth grade level, as well as a handful of 
students working on a first grade level. While I differentiate in my classroom, I am 
curious if a more effective way of moving students through the five components of the 
LaBerge­Samuels model exists.
Social Constructivism
Lev Semionovich Vygotsky created the well­known theory of Social 
Constructivism, which is rooted in his belief that learning takes place when children 
interact socially with others. Vygotsky also presented the idea of sign systems: a culture’s
language, writing, and counting systems. According to Vygotsky, a child’s language 
development is dependent upon the sign systems they learn from the people around them 
as they grown up. As children master sign systems, they continually add to their mastery 
of language and therefore their ability to interact with their world. Vygotsky referred to 
this process as “semiotic mediation.” Vygotsky also famously introduced the idea of a 
child’s “zone of proximal development” as well the idea of “scaffolding.” The two terms 
go hand in hand. Scaffolding is support offered to children by more capable individuals, 
such as older peers or adults, and a child’s zone of proximal development is their ideal 

Running Head: LENSES ON READING

4

level of task difficulty with scaffolding. Vygotsky believed that a child must first 
experience a behavior socially before learning could take place (Tracey & Morrow, 2012,
p. 127­129).
Vygotsky’s theory of Social Constructivism is present in the newly adopted 
Common Core State Standards. The standards include several speaking and listening 
goals as well as language goals in which students interact socially as a means of learning.
Discussion is promoted in a variety of settings, as is collaboration between peers 
(National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State 
School Officers, 2010). This coincides with Vygotsky’s belief that children learn by 
interacting socially with others.
I have seen the learning that can take place when children interact with one 
another in an academic setting. During reading mini­lessons, students in my class are 
often asked to “turn and talk” with one another to share their ideas or questions. This is a 
way to ensure student engagement, because each child is responsible for speaking and 
responding about the topic at hand. I also use small­group work in all subjects to allow 
students an opportunity to learn from each other. As my students explain their thinking to
others, I often notice them either becoming more confident in their answer as they say it 
aloud, or correcting themselves due to a realization that their response is flawed. 
Inquiry Learning
John Dewey introduced the concept of Inquiry Learning, which stresses the 
importance of motivating students by approaching learning in a problem­based way. In 
Inquiry Learning, students take part in experiences, which in turn lead them to ask 

Running Head: LENSES ON READING

5

questions, predict answers, collect data, draw conclusions, and reflect through 
collaboration and cooperation. In doing so, students create their own learning as they 
continually identify problems and take steps to solve them. Dewey believed that through 
this process, children would be capable of effectively participating in and contributing to 
society (Tracey & Morrow, 2012, p. 59­61).
Problem­Based learning generates high student engagement when used in any 
subject. Because students have developed a question they are personally invested in, they 
are more motivated to seek answers and solve their problem. Rather than give students 
information, a teacher can take on the role of facilitator and guide students to resources 
that can help them gather information or data. 
This year Inquiry Learning was utilized in my classroom through
an online virtual sticky-note wall. I uploaded a famous photograph depicting a 
woman with her children in the midst of the Great Depression. As part of a unit on 
character traits, students were asked to post virtual sticky notes with questions and 
insights they had about the woman in the picture.  Students were curious and therefore 
determined to understand the circumstances surrounding the subjects of the photograph.

Running Head: LENSES ON READING

6

References
National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State 
School Officers. (2010). Common Core State Standards for English language arts
and literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Washington,
DC: Authors. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/ELA­Literacy.
Tracey, D., & Morrow, L.M. (2012). Lenses on reading. New York: Guilford Press.

Running Head: LENSES ON READING

7