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Year: 6

Duration of the unit:


6 weeks

Unit Name: Dynamic earth Tsunamis

ACARA Achievement standards


By the end of Year 6, students compare and classify different types of observable changes to materials.
They analyse requirements for the transfer of electricity and describe how energy can be transformed from one
form to another to generate electricity. They explain how natural events cause rapid change to the Earths
surface. They describe and predict the effect of environmental changes on individual living things. Students
explain how scientific knowledge is used in decision making and identify contributions to the development of
science by people from a range of cultures.
Students follow procedures to develop investigable questions and design investigations into simple cause-andeffect relationships. They identify variables to be changed and measured and describe potential safety risks when
planning methods. They collect, organise and interpret their data, identifying where improvements to their
methods or research could improve the data. They describe and analyse relationships in data using graphic
representations and construct multi-modal texts to communicate ideas, methods and findings.

Content Description:

Biological
science

Chemical science

Earth and space sciences

Physical Sciences

1. Science understanding
Earth and Space sciences:
Sudden geological changes or extreme weather conditions can affect Earths surface (ACSSU096)
Elaborations

o
o
o
o

investigating major geological events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis in Australia, the Asia region and throughout the world
recognising that earthquakes can cause tsunamis
describing how people measure significant geological events
exploring ways that scientific understanding can assist in natural disaster management to minimise both long- and short-term effects
considering the effect of drought on living and non-living aspects of the environment

Science as a human endeavour

Nature and development of science:

Use and influences of science:

involves testing predictions by gathering data and using evidence to develop


explanations of events and phenomena (ACSHE098)
Elaborations

Use and influence of science: Scientific knowledge is used to inform personal


and community decisions (ACSHE220)
Elaborations

investigating how knowledge about the effects of using the Earths resources has
changed over time

considering how personal and community choices influence our use of


sustainable sources of energy

describing how understanding of the causes and effects of major natural events has
changed as new evidence has become available

investigating how understanding of catastrophic natural events helps in


planning for their early detection and minimising their impact

investigating the use of electricity, including predicting the effects of changes to electrico recognising that science can inform choices about where people live and how
circuits
they manage natural disasters

considering how gathering evidence helps scientists to predict the effect of major
geological or climatic events

o
o

considering how guidelines help to ensure the safe use of electrical devices
discussing the use of electricity and the conservation of sources of energy

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

2. Science inquiry skills


Questioning and predicting

Planning and conducting

Processing and analysing data


and information

With guidance, plan appropriate


investigation methods to answer
questions or solve problems ACSIS103
Elaborations:

Following a procedure to design an


experimental or field investigation.

Discussing methods chosen with other


students, and refining methods
accordingly.

Considering which investigation methods


are most suited to answer a particular
question or solve a problem.

Evaluating

Construct and use a range of


representations, including tables and
graphs, to represent and describe
observations, patterns or relationships in
data using digital technologies as
appropriate (ACSIS107)
using digital technologies to construct
representations,
including
dynamic
representations

Communicating

Communicate ideas, explanations


and processes in a variety of ways,
including multi-modal texts
(ACSIS110)
Elaborations
discussing the best way to
communicate science ideas and
what should be considered when
planning a text
using a variety of communication
modes, such as reports,
explanations, arguments, debates
and procedural accounts, to
communicate science ideas
using labelled diagrams, including
cross-sectional representations, to
communicate ideas and processes
within multi-modal texts

Design and technologies knowledge and understanding


Design and technologies processes and production skills
General capabilities
Literacy / numeracy/ ITC/ critical and creative thinking / personal and social/ ethical understanding / intercultural
Literacy
Students become literate as they develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to interpret and use language confidently for learning and communicating in and out of school and for participating effectively in society.
Literacy involves students in listening to, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating oral, print, visual and digital texts, and using and modifying language for different purposes in a range of contexts.
Students develop literacy capability as they learn how to construct an understanding of how scientific knowledge is produced; to explore, analyse and communicate scientific information, concepts and ideas; and to
plan, conduct and communicate investigations. Scientific texts that students are required to comprehend and compose include those that provide information, describe events and phenomena, recount experiments,
present and evaluate data, give explanations and present opinions or claims. Language structures are used to link information and ideas, give explanations, formulate hypotheses and construct evidence-based
arguments.
By learning the literacy of science students understand that language varies according to context and they increase their ability to use language flexibly. Scientific vocabulary is often technical and includes specific terms
for concepts and features of the world, as well as terms that encapsulate an entire process in a single word, such as photosynthesis. Students learn to understand that much scientific information is presented in the
form of diagrams, flow charts, tables and graphs.
Numeracy
Students become numerate as they develop the knowledge and skills to use mathematics confidently across all learning areas at school and in their lives more broadly. Numeracy involves students in recognising and
understanding the role of mathematics in the world and having the dispositions and capacities to use mathematical knowledge and skills purposefully.
Many elements of numeracy are evident in the Science Curriculum, particularly in Science Inquiry Skills. These include practical measurement and the collection, representation and interpretation of data from
investigations.
Students are introduced to measurement, first using informal units then formal units. Later they consider issues of uncertainty and reliability in measurement. As students progress, they collect both qualitative and
quantitative data, which is analysed and represented in graphical forms. Students learn data analysis skills, including identifying trends and patterns from numerical data and graphs. In later years, numeracy demands
include the statistical analysis of data, including issues relating to accuracy, and linear mathematical relationships to calculate and predict values.

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability


Students develop ICT capability as they learn to use ICT effectively and appropriately to access, create and communicate information and ideas, solve problems and work collaboratively in all learning areas at school,
and in their lives beyond school. ICT capability involves students in learning to make the most of the technologies available to them, adapting to new ways of doing things as technologies evolve and limiting the risks to
themselves and others in a digital environment.
Students develop ICT capability when they research science concepts and applications, investigate scientific phenomena, and communicate their scientific understandings. In particular, they employ their ICT capability
to access information; collect, analyse and represent data; model and interpret concepts and relationships; and communicate science ideas, processes and information.
Digital technology can be used to represent scientific phenomena in ways that improve students understanding of concepts, ideas and information. Digital aids such as animations and simulations provide opportunities
to view phenomena and test predictions that cannot be investigated through practical experiments in the classroom and may enhance students understanding and engagement with science.
Critical and creative thinking
Students develop capability in critical and creative thinking as they learn to generate and evaluate knowledge, clarify concepts and ideas, seek possibilities, consider alternatives and solve problems. Critical and creative
thinking are integral to activities that require students to think broadly and deeply using skills, behaviours and dispositions such as reason, logic, resourcefulness, imagination and innovation in all learning areas at school
and in their lives beyond school.
Students develop capability in critical and creative thinking as they learn to generate and evaluate knowledge, ideas and possibilities, and use them when seeking new pathways or solutions. In the Science learning area,
critical and creative thinking are embedded in the skills of posing questions, making predictions, speculating, solving problems through investigation, making evidence-based decisions, and analysing and evaluating
evidence. Students develop understandings of concepts through active inquiry that involves planning and selecting appropriate information, and evaluating sources of information to formulate conclusions.
Creative thinking enables the development of ideas that are new to the individual, and this is intrinsic to the development of scientific understanding. Scientific inquiry promotes critical and creative thinking by
encouraging flexibility and open-mindedness as students speculate about their observations of the world. Students conceptual understanding becomes more sophisticated as they actively acquire an increasingly
scientific view of their world.
Personal and social capability
Students develop personal and social capability as they learn to understand themselves and others, and manage their relationships, lives, work and learning more effectively. The personal and social capability involves
students in a range of practices including recognising and regulating emotions, developing empathy for and understanding of others, establishing positive relationships, making responsible decisions, working effectively
in teams and handling challenging situations constructively.
Students develop personal and social capability as they engage in science inquiry, learn how scientific knowledge informs and is applied in their daily lives, and explore how scientific debate provides a means of
contributing to their communities. This includes developing skills in communication, initiative taking, goal setting, interacting with others and decision making, and the capacity to work independently and
collaboratively.
The Science learning area enhances personal and social capability by expanding students capacity to question, solve problems, explore and display curiosity. Students use their scientific knowledge to make informed
choices about issues that impact their lives such as health and nutrition and environmental change, and consider the application of science to meet a range of personal and social needs.
Ethical understanding
Students develop ethical understanding as they identify and investigate the nature of ethical concepts, values, character traits and principles, and understand how reasoning can assist ethical judgment. Ethical
understanding involves students in building a strong personal and socially oriented ethical outlook that helps them to manage context, conflict and uncertainty, and to develop an awareness of the influence that their
values and behaviour have on others.
Students develop the capacity to form and make ethical judgments in relation to experimental science, codes of practice, and the use of scientific information and science applications. They explore what integrity means
in science, and explore and apply ethical guidelines in their investigations. They consider the implications of their investigations on others, the environment and living organisms.
They use scientific information to evaluate claims and to inform ethical decisions about a range of social, environmental and personal issues, for example, land use or the treatment of animals.
Intercultural understanding
Students develop intercultural understanding as they learn to value their own cultures, languages and beliefs, and those of others. They come to understand how personal, group and national identities are shaped, and
the variable and changing nature of culture. The capability involves students in learning about and engaging with diverse cultures in ways that recognise commonalities and differences, create connections with others
and cultivate mutual respect.
There are opportunities in the Science learning area to develop intercultural understanding. Students learn to appreciate the contribution that diverse cultural perspectives have made to the development, breadth and
diversity of science knowledge and applications. Students become aware that the raising of some debates within culturally diverse groups requires cultural sensitivity. They recognise that increasingly scientists work in
culturally diverse teams and engage with culturally diverse communities to address issues of international importance.

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Cross curriculum priorities


Sustainability
Across the Australian Curriculum, sustainability will allow all young
Australians to develop the knowledge, skills, values and world views
necessary for them to act in ways that contribute to more sustainable
patterns of living. It will enable individuals and communities to reflect
on ways of interpreting and engaging with the world. The Sustainability
priority is futures-oriented, focusing on protecting environments and
creating a more ecologically and socially just world through informed
action. Actions that support more sustainable patterns of living require
consideration of environmental, social, cultural and economic systems
and their interdependence.
In the Australian Curriculum: Science the priority of sustainability
provides authentic contexts for exploring, investigating and
understanding chemical, biological, physical and Earth and space
systems.
The Australian Curriculum: Science explores a wide range of systems
that operate at different time and spatial scales. By investigating the
relationships between systems and system components and how
systems respond to change, students develop an appreciation for the
interconnectedness of Earths biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere and
atmosphere. Relationships including cycles and cause and effect are
explored, and students develop observation and analysis skills to
examine these relationships in the world around them.
In this learning area, students appreciate that science provides the basis
for decision making in many areas of society and that these decisions
can impact on the Earth system. They understand the importance of
using science to predict possible effects of human and other activity and
to develop management plans or alternative technologies that minimise
these effects.

Aboriginal and TSI histories and culture


Across the Australian Curriculum, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander histories and cultures priority provides opportunities for
all learners to deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging
with the worlds oldest continuous living cultures. Students will
understand that contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Communities are strong, resilient, rich and diverse. The
knowledge and understanding gained through this priority will
enhance the ability of all young people to participate positively in
the ongoing development of Australia.
The Australian Curriculum: Science values Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander histories and cultures. It acknowledges that
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have longstanding
scientific knowledge traditions.
Students will have opportunities to learn that Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander Peoples have developed knowledge about
the world through observation, using all the senses; through
prediction and hypothesis; through testing (trial and error); and
through making generalisations within specific contexts. These
scientific methods have been practised and transmitted from one
generation to the next. Students will develop an understanding
that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have particular
ways of knowing the world and continue to be innovative in
providing significant contributions to development in science.
They will investigate examples of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander science and the ways traditional knowledge and western
scientific knowledge can be complementary.

Asia and Australians engagement with Asia


Across the Australian curriculum, this priority will ensure that students
learn about and recognise the diversity within and between the
countries of the Asia region. They will develop knowledge and
understanding of Asian societies, cultures, beliefs and environments,
and the connections between the peoples of Asia, Australia, and the rest
of the world. Asia literacy provides students with the skills to
communicate and engage with the peoples of Asia so they can
effectively live, work and learn in the region.
In the Australian Curriculum: Science, the priority of Asia and Australias
engagement with Asia provides rich and engaging contexts for
developing students science knowledge, understanding and skills.
The Australian Curriculum: Science provides opportunities for students
to recognise that people from the Asia region have made and continue
to make significant contributions to the development of science
understandings and their applications. It enables students to recognise
that the Asia region includes diverse environments and to appreciate
that interaction between human activity and these environments
continues to influence the region, including Australia, and has
significance for the rest of the world.
In this learning area, students appreciate that the Asia region plays an
important role in scientific research and development. These can include
research and development in areas such as medicine, natural resource
management, nanotechnologies, communication technologies and
natural disaster prediction and management.

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

SEQUENTIAL LESSON MAP

5 Es

Lesson

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Learning experience

Lesson # 1 - Deashni
Tsunami Engagement.

This lesson has been


designed to introduce
students to the main causes
Inquiry question:
of Tsunamis and how they
What is a Tsunami, are formed. Students will be
how is it formed and introduced to new
vocabulary and invited to ask
are there any
open questions. Students
natural warning
will be able to share and
signs?
compare ideas through the
class discussion. This lesson
also incorporates drawing
and writing to enable teacher
to essentially challenge
students understanding and
ideas.

Evaluation

Formative assessment
Observations will be
made throughout
the lesson by means
of direct
questioning.
A KWL chart will be
used to track
progress throughout
the lesson and
completed by the
end of the lesson to
assess progress.
Students will draw a
basic diagram and
teacher can observe
for understanding.

Curriculum

Science
understanding
Earth and space
sciences
(ACSSU096).
Science as a
human endeavour
Nature and
development of
science
(ACSHE098).

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

General
Capabilities:
Literacy
ICT
Cross-Curriculum
Priorities:
Aboriginal and
Torres Strait
islander histories
and culture
Intercultural
understanding

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Recourses and
ITC

KWL Chart
http://www.pint
erest.com/emm
ataylor87/asses
sment-kwlcharts/
Video
Introducing
Tsunamis
http://oceantod
ay.noaa.gov/tra
ckingtsunamis/
welcome.html
Indigenous
traditions on
weather
http://www.bo
m.gov.au/iwk/

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Lesson

Learning experience

Evaluation

Lesson # 2 - Amy
The history of
tsunamis.
Engaging with historical
tsunamis.

This lesson has been


designed to engage students
in the history of tsunamis.
Throughout the lesson the
students will be exposed to a
variety of different tsunamis
caused by different events
and in various locations. They
will use the internet to
research two major tsunamis
in history and compare their
data using a Venn diagram.
Students will share this with
the class to form grand
discussions and expand their
knowledge base. Additionally
to extent students learning
they will be introduced to the
concept of tectonic plates
and how they move to create
different waves. Overall this
lesson is intended for
students to discover that
there are many causes of
tsunamis, they can begin in a
variety of different locations
and the destruction can vary
significantly.

Formative assessment
Observations will be
made throughout
the lesson to ensure
that students are
staying on task
during this time.
A graphic organiser
will be used to
display students
findings in a
research
investigation. This
will be collected and
observed for
comprehension by
the end of the
lesson.
Students will have
the opportunity to
verbalise their
findings and
understandings
throughout the
lesson.

Inquiry question:
What are some of
the largest recorded
tsunamis and what
triggered them to
form?

Curriculum

Science
understanding
Earth and space
sciences
(ACSSU096).
Science as a
human endeavour
Nature and
development of
science
(ACSHE098).
Use and influence
of science
(ACSHE220).

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

General
Capabilities:
Literacy
ICT
Cross-Curriculum
Priorities:
Asia and
Australians
engagement with
Asia
Sustainability

Science inquiry
skills
Communicating
(ACSIS110).

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Recourses and
ITC

Before and after


tsunami photos
http://www.abc
.net.au/news/2
014-1224/boxing-daytsunami-thennowphotos/5875900
Venn diagram
worksheet
http://www.stu
denthandouts.c
om/Assortment01/GraphicOrganizers/Blan
k-VennDiagramsInstructions.htm
l
What huge
forces cause
tsunamis video
http://splash.ab
c.net.au/home#
!/media/31077/

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Lesson

Learning experience

Lesson # 3 - Amy
Tsunami experiment.

Lesson plan three has been


Formative assessment
designed to explore the
A series of higher
impacts that tsunamis have
order thinking
when they hit the shore.
questions will be
Students will conduct a series
asked throughout
of three experiments with
this lesson; this will
different shore mediums
ensure that
consisting of firstly sand,
students are
secondly sand and rocks and
challenged in their
thirdly sand, rocks and
thinking processes.
foliage. Students will predict
The two graphic
how far the water will travel
organisers (digital
up the shore and then will.
photo story and
To extend their knowledge
cause and effect
base students will be
chart) will be
introduced to the cause and
collected at the end
effects of tsunamis; they will
of the lesson to
then be required to complete
ensure that
a cause and effects chart that
students are
will display their
connecting with the
understanding of the event.
learning outcomes
This hand on experience will
for the lesson.
ensure that students are
Observations will be
connecting with the learning
also made to ensure
outcomes and will provide
that students are
students with the tools for
engaging with the
lifelong learning in the field
lesson and keeping
of science.
on task.

Exploring the impacts


of tsunamis.
Inquiry question:
o How far can
tsunami waves
travel and what
are their
impacts?
o

Evaluation

Curriculum

Science
understanding
Earth and space
sciences
(ACSSU096).
Science as a
human endeavour
Nature and
development of
science
(ACSHE098).
Use and influence
of science
(ACSHE220).

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

General
Capabilities:
Literacy
Numeracy
ICT
Cross-Curriculum
Priorities:
Asia and
Australians
engagement with
Asia
Sustainability

Science inquiry
skills
Planning and
conducting
(ACSIS103)
Communicating
(ACSIS110).

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Recourses and
ITC

The Sumatra
tsunami clip
http://weather.
about.com/od/e
ducationalmater
ials/qt/tsumani_
lesson_plans_cu
rriculum.htm
Cause and effect
tsunami video
http://study.co
m/academy/less
on/the-causeseffects-of-atsunami.html
Cause and effect
chart
http://teachersoup.com/attac
hments/077_Ca
use_and_Effects
_Chart.pdf

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Lesson

Learning experience

Evaluation

Lesson #4 Bianca
Exploring tsunami
stages.

This lesson has been


designed to allow children to
explore the stages of a
tsunami using ICT. They are
to illustrate and discuss their
exploration findings in small
mixed ability groups and as a
whole class. Students will be
interacting with each other
majority of the time and the
teacher will be used only as a
guide. Students are
encouraged to learn from
each other whilst they
explore the ICT and the
stages od a tsunami.

Formative Assessment:
During the class
discussion in station
4 assess students
knowledge and
inferring skills.
Collect students
work books and
read over their
exploration findings
and how they have
set out their work.

Exploring stages of a
tsunami using ICT
Inquiry question:
What are the different
stages of a tsunami?

Curriculum

Science
understanding:
Earth and space
sciences
(ACSSU096).

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

Recourses and
ITC

General
Capabilities:

Stage 1
https://www.yo
utube.com/watc
h?v=Wx9vPvT51I&t=193
https://www.yo
utube.com/watc
h?v=N1aWz8Co
eU4
Stage 2
http://www.tsu
nami.noaa.gov/t
sunami_story.ht
ml
http://www.eho
w.com/info_862
6549_stagestsunami.html
http://kidsahea
d.com/external/
article/291
Stage 4
https://www.yo
utube.com/watc
h?v=Gbq412haY
1c

ICT
Literacy

Science as a
Cross Curriculum
human endeavour: Priorities:
Use and influence Sustainability
of science
(ACSHE220)
Science inquiry
skills
Communicating
(ACSIS107).

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

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Evaluation

Lesson # 5 BiancaExplaining tsunami


stages

This lesson has been


designed to allow the
students to explain the
scientific stages of a tsunami
individually. This lesson will
serve as a formative
assessment for the teacher
to understand the students
knowledge individually and
as a class. The students may
be asked questions during
their verbal explanation to
the class to further explain
certain phenomena. These
questions will be open to the
individual student explaining
and the whole class.

Formative Assessment:
Science
understanding:
Students flow chart
Earth and space
of how a tsunami
sciences
occurs will be
(ACSSU096).
collected to view in
better detail the
Science as a
information the
human
endeavour:
students have
Nature and
included. Students
development of
will be assessed on
science
the stages, their
(ACSHE098)
correct order and
the level of
Science inquiry
information
skills
included.
Communicating
(ACSIS110).
Observation of
Planning and
students verbal
conducting
explanations will be
(ACSIS103)
noted to determine
the student needs
more work on this
topic or
understands at a
sound level.

Explaining the stages of


a tsunami through
formative assessment
Inquiry question:
Explain the stages of a
tsunami?

Curriculum

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

General
Capabilities:

ICT
Literacy

Cross Curriculum
Priorities:
Sustainability

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Recourses and
ITC

Intro video
https://www.yo
utube.com/watc
h?v=Wx9vPvT51I&t=193
Flow chart: a4
paper, pencils
coloured and
standard, ruler,
eraser
Quiz
http://news.nati
onalgeographic.
com.au/news/2
010/02/100227/
tsunami-quiz/

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Learning experience

Evaluation

Lesson # 6 - Deashni
Explaining Tectonic
plates.

This lesson has been


designed to engage and
introduce students to the
theory of plate tectonics and
explore how the theory was
developed and supported by
evidence. Through class
discussion, videos, and
activities, students seek
connections between
tectonic activity and geologic
features and investigate how
the theory of plate tectonics
evolved. Students investigate
the tectonic plates (where
they are) and the history of
their movements.

Formative assessment
Observations will be
made throughout
the lesson to ensure
that students are
grasping the new
concepts.
Through discussion
and question,
students will be able
to voice their ideas
and understanding.

Inquiry question:
What are tectonic
plates, where are
they found and how
do they affect the
earths surface?

Curriculum

Science
understanding
Earth and space
sciences
(ACSSU096).
Science as a
human endeavour
Nature and
development of
science
(ACSHE098).
Use and influence
of science
(ACSHE220).

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

General
Capabilities:
Literacy
Numeracy
ICT
Cross-Curriculum
Priorities:
Asia and
Australians
engagement with

Science inquiry
skills
Planning and
conducting
(ACSIS103)
Communicating
(ACSIS110).

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Recourses and
ITC
Tectonic plates
around the
world
http://www.pbsl
earningmedia.or
g/resource/ess0
5.sci.ess.earthsys
.tectonic/tectoni
c-platesearthquakesand-volcanoes/

3 Types of
boundary plates
Plate Tectonics:
An
Introduction Qui
ckTime Video.
Cutting tectonic
activity
World Map With
Shorelines and
Continental Shelf
Boundaries PDF
Different types
of boundaries
Mountain
Maker, Earth
Shaker

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Learning experience

Lesson # 7 Trish
Week 4 Monday 20th
of April 2015

During this lesson students


are required to discover the
answer to the inquiry
question by:
Elaborating on Seismic o Exploring the role of tsunami
Activity
warning centres;
o Experimenting with seismic
Inquiry question: Why waves and tsunami
do tsunami warning
generation;
centres rely on seismic o Discovering why gathering
data?
seismic wave evidence
contributes to tsunamis
predictions.

Evaluation

Curriculum

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

Formative Assessment:
Students document
findings of two hands
on experiments, which
will be assessed to
determine if concepts
are accurate and if
additional clarification
is required.

Science
General
understanding:
Capabilities:
Earth and space o Literacy
sciences
o Critical & creative
(ACSSU096).
thinking
o Information &
Science as a
Communication
human endeavour Technology (ICT)
Nature and
capability
development of
science
Cross-Curriculum
(ACSHE098).
Priorities:
o Asia and
Science inquiry
Australians
skills
engagement with
Processing and
Asia
analysing data and
information o
(ACSIS110).

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Recourses and
ITC

Task Sheet # 1
Task Sheet # 2
Flyer: How does
the system
work?
http://www.bo
m.gov.au/tsuna
mi/about/atws.s
html

5 Es

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L
A
B
O
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A
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Lesson

Learning experience

Evaluation

Curriculum

Lesson # 8 Trish
Week 4 Wednesday
22nd of April 2015

Students plan their own


investigations to answer
student identified inquiry
questions. The knowledge
they will acquire throughout
this lesson will provide an
opportunity for students to o
clarify, extend and
consolidate new conceptual
understanding and skills.
Reading and group writing
will be used to record and
share additional concepts. A
communication product will o
be produced in Popplet to
represent ideas and
consolidating and extending
science understanding and
literacy practices.

Formative Assessment:
In groups student
collaboratively create a
concept map
demonstrating their
ability to:
Investigate how
understanding of
tsunamis helps in
planning for their early
detection and
minimising their impact
(SHE); and
Consider which
investigation methods
are most suited to
answer a particular
question (SI).

Science
General
understanding
Capabilities:
Earth and space o Information &
sciences
Communication
(ACSSU096).
Technology (ICT)
capability
Science as a o Critical & creative
human endeavour thinking
Nature and
development of
science
Cross-Curriculum
(ACSHE098).
Priorities:
o Sustainability
Science inquiry o Asia & Australias
skills
engagement with
Planning and
Asia
conducting
(ACSIS103)

Elaborating on What
we want to know
Inquiry question: What
do we still want to
know about tsunamis?

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Recourses and
ITC

KWL Chart
Genius Hour
task sheet
Popplet Online
concept map
generator

5 Es
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Lesson

Learning experience

Evaluation

Curriculum

Lesson # 9 & 10 All


Week 5 Monday 27th of
April 2015

Student reports must


incorporate ICT and can be
presented using PowerPoint or
Weebly. The reports are
required to follow the
appropriate text structure and
provide the following
information:

Summative assessment:
The summative
assessment will
demonstrate student
knowledge as follows:
A written information
report answering the
inquiry question; and
A miniature model to
accompany the
information report.

Science
General
understanding:
Capabilities:
Earth and space o Information &
sciences
Communication
(ACSSU096).
Technology (ICT)
capability
Science as a o Critical & creative
human endeavour thinking
Use and influence
of science
Cross-Curriculum
(ACSHE220).
Priorities:
Sustainability
Science inquiry
skills
Processing and
analysing data and
information
(ACSIS110).

Lessons 9 & 10 have been


allocated to students
working on their
summative assessment
items: Information Report
and miniature model.
General statement
To reduce the impact tsunamis
Students will be required have on our homes and
to demonstrate the
surrounding environment.
knowledge they have
gained throughout the
Series of descriptions
tsunami unit by writing a
Considerations include
report answering the
Precautions to be taken
following inquiry
including desirable locations
question: What
of homes, surrounding
considerations and
environment (landscape),
precautions will help save
building materials etc.
lives and reduce damage
What to do in the event of a
to homes in the event of a
tsunami warning? E.g.
tsunami?
personal safety measures,
warning systems etc.
Concluding statements
Considerations and precautions
that will help save lives and
reduce damage to homes in the
event of a tsunami include

The summative
assessment can also be
differentiated to allow
students to demonstrate
their knowledge as
follows:
A written information
report answering the
inquiry question;
OR
A miniature model
answering the inquiry
question accompanied
by a verbally presented
information report.

Cross curriculum
literacy/ numeracy

Dynamic Earth Tsunamis Unit Plan created by Amy Gampe, Bianca Polino, Deashni Pillay, Trish Gee.

Recourses and
ITC
Computers /
laptops
Sumative
Assessment
Dynamic Earth
Tsunamis Criteria
Sheet
The following
items will be
provided by the
teachers:
Landscape:
Air drying clay
Sand
Dirt
Buildings:
Lego bricks
Paddle pop
and
matchsticks
Wood glue
Blu-tac
Paints
Surrounding flora
Twigs (to
represent
trees)