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FANUC Robotics

System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA


ArcTool eLearn
Student Manual
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

This publication contains proprietary information of


FANUC Robotics America Corporation furnished for
customer use only. No other uses are authorized without
the express written permission of FANUC Robotics
America Corporation
FANUC Robotics America Corporation
3900 W. Hamlin Road
Rochester Hills, Michigan 48309-3253

Table of Contents

FRAMES ..................................................................................................................... 1
1.1

SLIDE 2-TYPES OF FRAMES ..............................................................................................1

1.2

SLIDE 3-FRAME OVERVIEW ...............................................................................................1

1.3

SLIDE 4-TWO DIMENSIONAL CARTESIAN COORDINATE .......................................................1

1.4

SLIDE 5-ONE QUADRANT ..................................................................................................1

1.5

SLIDE 6-THREE DIMENSIONAL CARTESIAN COORDINATE ....................................................1

1.6

SLIDE 7-9-ORIENTATION IN WORLD MODE-MINOR AXES ...................................................1

1.7

SLIDE 10-CARTESIAN COORDINATE SYSTEM .....................................................................1

1.8

SLIDE 11-WORLD FRAME..................................................................................................1

1.9

SLIDE 12-RIGHT HAND RULE ............................................................................................1

1.10

SLIDE 13-TOOL FRAME .....................................................................................................1

1.11

SLIDE 14-TOOL FRAME FEATURES ....................................................................................1

1.12

SLIDE 15-ADJUSTING TOOL CENTER POINT .......................................................................1

1.13

SLIDE 16-ACTUAL TOOL CENTER POINT ............................................................................1

1.14

SLIDE 17-METHODS OF DEFINING THE TOOL FRAME ..........................................................1

1.15

SLIDE 18-TEACHING A TOOL CENTER POINT 6 POINT METHOD ..........................................1

1.16

SLIDE 19-TOOL CENTER POINT 6 POINT METHOD PROCEDURE .........................................1

1.17

SLIDE 20-VERIFY TCP......................................................................................................1

1.18

SLIDE 21-SELECTING A TOOL FRAME FROM THE JOG MENU ...............................................1

1.19

SLIDE 22-HOW THE ROBOT FRAMES ARE LINKED ...............................................................1

1.20

SLIDE 23-USER FRAME.....................................................................................................1

1.21

SLIDE 24- EXAMPLE OF USER & TOOL FRAME IN A TP PROGRAM .......................................1

1.22

SLIDE 25-SAMPLE PROGRAM UFRAME VS. WORLD FRAME ................................................1

1.23

SLIDE 26-USER FRAME PROCEDURE ................................................................................1

1.24

SLIDE 27-YOU TRY IT-USER FRAME ..................................................................................1

1.25

SLIDE 28-REMOTE TOOL CENTER POINT ...........................................................................1

1.26

SLIDE 29-FUNCTION KEY ..................................................................................................1

1.27

SLIDE 30-RTCP INSTRUCTION ..........................................................................................1

1.28

SLIDE 31-NO RTCP INSTRUCTION ....................................................................................1

1.29

SLIDE 32-JOG FRAME .......................................................................................................1

1.30

SLIDE 33-JOG FRAME PROCEDURE ...................................................................................1

1.31

SLIDE 34-FRAMES SUMMARY ............................................................................................1

1.32

SLIDE 35-QUIZ .................................................................................................................1

ii

Table of Contents
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

INPUT/OUTPUT............................................................................................................ 1
2.1

SLIDE 2-ANALOG ..............................................................................................................1

2.2

SLIDE 3-DIGITAL INPUT/OUTPUT .......................................................................................1

2.3

SLIDE 4-DIGITAL ...............................................................................................................1

2.4

SLIDE 5-ROBOT I/O ..........................................................................................................1

2.5

SLIDE 6-ROBOT I/O ..........................................................................................................1

2.6

SLIDE 7-MODEL A INPUT/OUTPUT .....................................................................................1

2.7

SLIDE 8-RACK ASSIGNMENT .............................................................................................1

2.8

SLIDE 9-MODEL A RACK ................................................................................................1

2.9

SLIDE 10-SLOT ASSIGNMENT ............................................................................................1

2.10

SLIDE 11-MODEL A SLOT ASSIGNMENT .............................................................................1

2.11

SLIDE 12-STARTING POINT/CHANNEL ASSIGNMENT ...........................................................1

2.12

SLIDE 13-MODEL A-STARTING POINT ASSIGNMENT ...........................................................1

2.13

SLIDE 14-CONFIGURING I/O..............................................................................................1

2.14

SLIDE 15-CONFIGURIG I/O STATUS ...................................................................................1

2.15

SLIDE 16-COMPLEMENTARY SIGNALS ...............................................................................1

2.16

SLIDE 17-I/O DETAIL ........................................................................................................1

2.17

SLIDE 18-19-MONITORING/CONTROLLING I/O ...................................................................1

2.18

SLIDE 20-SIMULATING I/O.................................................................................................1

2.19

SLIDE 21-CONFIGURING GROUP I/O..................................................................................1

2.20

SLIDE 22-GROUP INPUT/OUTPUT ......................................................................................1

2.21

SLIDE 23-INPUT/OUTPUT REVIEW .....................................................................................1

PROGRAM INSTRUCTION .............................................................................................. 1


3.1

SLIDE 2-MODULE CONTENT ..............................................................................................1

3.2

SLIDE 3-DATA REGISTER ..................................................................................................1

3.3

SLIDE 4-POSITION REGISTER INSTRUCTIONS .....................................................................1

3.4

SLIDE 5-POSITION REGISTER ELEMENT .............................................................................1

3.5

SLIDE 6-PROGRAM INSTRUCTIONS ....................................................................................1

3.6

SLIDE 7-BRANCHING INSTRUCTIONS..................................................................................1

3.7

SLIDE 8-LABEL DEFINITION INSTRUCTION LBL[X] ...............................................................1

3.8

SLIDE 9-UNCONDITIONAL BRANCH CALL .........................................................................1

3.9

SLIDE 10-CONDITIONAL BRANCHING INSTRUCTIONS ..........................................................1

3.10

SLIDE 11-IF REGISTER .....................................................................................................1

3.11

SLIDE 12-EXAMPLE #1 IF REGISTER ..............................................................................1

Table of Contents

iii

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

3.12

SLIDE 13-EXAMPLE #2 IF REGISTER ..............................................................................1

3.13

SLIDE 14-IF INPUT/OUTPUT ..............................................................................................1

3.14

SLIDE 15-EXAMPLE #3 IF / OR.......................................................................................1

3.15

SLIDE 16-IF PROCEDURE .................................................................................................1

3.16

SLIDE 17-YOU TRY IT IF REGISTER ................................................................................1

3.17

SLIDE 18-SELECT INSTRUCTIONS....................................................................................1

3.18

SLIDE 19-SELECT INSTRUCTION PROCEDURE..................................................................1

3.19

SLIDE 20-SELECT INSTRUCTIONS YOU TRY IT ...............................................................1

3.20

SLIDE 21-WAIT INSTRUCTION...........................................................................................1

3.21

SLIDE 22-REMARK INSTRUCTION ....................................................................................1

3.22

SLIDE 23-OVERRIDE INSTRUCTION .................................................................................1

3.23

SLIDE 24-MESSAGE INSTRUCTION ..................................................................................1

3.24

SLIDE 25-TIMER INSTRUCTION ........................................................................................1

3.25

SLIDE 26-MODULE COMPLETE ..........................................................................................1

ARCTOOL PROGRAMMING ........................................................................................... 1


4.1

SLIDE 2-MODULE CONTENT ..............................................................................................1

4.2

SLIDE 3-ARCTOOL PROGRAM GUIDELINES ........................................................................1

4.3

SLIDE 4-WELD I/O ............................................................................................................1

4.4

SLIDE 5-CONTROLLED START R-J3 THRU R-3IB ................................................................1

4.5

SLIDE 6-CONTROLLED START FOR R-30IA ........................................................................1

4.6

SLIDE 7@ CONTROLLED START WELD I/O EQUIPMENT SELECTION ....................................1

4.7

SLIDE 8-SETTING UP THE WELDING SYSTEM .....................................................................1

4.8

SLIDE 9-WELD EQUIPMENT ...............................................................................................1

4.9

SLIDE 10-SETTING LINCOLN EQUIPMENT ...........................................................................1

4.10

SLIDE 11-ARC DEFAULTS INSTRUCTION DEMO ..................................................................1

4.11

SLIDE 12-ARC PROGRAMMING ..........................................................................................1

4.12

SLIDE 13-WELD ENABLED KEY .........................................................................................1

4.13

SLIDE 14-ARC START .......................................................................................................1

4.14

SLIDE 15-ARC END...........................................................................................................1

4.15

SLIDE 19-ARC WELD SCHEDULE .......................................................................................1

4.16

SLIDE 20-DELAY TIME ......................................................................................................1

4.17

SLIDE 21-ARC START SCHEDULE DEMO ............................................................................1

4.18

SLIDE 23-WEAVE INSTRUCTIONS ......................................................................................1

4.19

SLIDE 24-ARC WEAVE SETUP ...........................................................................................1

iv

Table of Contents
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

4.20

SLIDE 25-WEAVE SCHEDULE ............................................................................................1

4.21

SLIDE 26-WEAVE INSTRUCTION PROGRAM ........................................................................1

4.22

SLIDE 28-PATH JOGGING ..................................................................................................1

4.23

SLIDE 29-TORCHMATE .....................................................................................................1

4.24

SLIDE 30-TORCHMATE VIDEO ...........................................................................................1

4.25

SLIDE 31-INSTALLING & ALIGNING THE TOUCH BLOCK .......................................................1

4.26

SLIDE 32-SETUP TORCHMATE ..........................................................................................1

4.27

SLIDE 33-EXECUTE TM_ADJST MACRO ...........................................................................1

4.28

SLIDE 34-VIEW THE TCP OFFSETS ...................................................................................1

4.29

SLIDE 35-COURSE OVERVIEW ..........................................................................................1

MODIFYING A PROGRAM .............................................................................................. 1


5.1

SLIDE 2-MODIFYING PROGRAMS .......................................................................................1

5.2

SLIDE 3-INSERT .............................................................................................................1

5.3

SLIDE 4-DELETE.............................................................................................................1

5.4

SLIDE 5-COPY ................................................................................................................1

5.5

SLIDE 6-PASTE ...............................................................................................................1

5.6

SLIDE 7-PASTE-F2 LOGIC ...............................................................................................1

5.7

SLIDE 8-9 PASTE F3 POS-ID .......................................................................................1

5.8

SLIDE 10-11 PASTE F4 POSITION ..............................................................................1

5.9

SLIDE 12-REVERSE PASTE ...........................................................................................1

5.10

SLIDE 13-PASTE - F1 R-LOGIC ......................................................................................1

5.11

SLIDE 14-PASTE F1 R-LOGIC .....................................................................................1

5.12

SLIDE 15-PASTE F2 R-POS-ID ....................................................................................1

5.13

SLIDE 16-PASTE F2 R POS-ID ....................................................................................1

5.14

SLIDE 17-PASTE F4 R-POS.........................................................................................1

5.15

SLIDE 18-PASTE F4 R-POS.........................................................................................1

5.16

SLIDE 19-PASTE F3 RM-POS-ID .................................................................................1

5.17

SLIDE 20-PASTE F3 RM-POS-ID .................................................................................1

5.18

SLIDE 21-PASTE F5 RM-POS......................................................................................1

5.19

SLIDE 22-PASTE F5 RM-POS......................................................................................1

5.20

SLIDE 23-FIND ................................................................................................................1

5.21

SLIDE 24-REPLACE ........................................................................................................1

5.22

SLIDE 25-RENUMBERING..............................................................................................1

5.23

SLIDE 26-COMMENT ......................................................................................................1

Table of Contents

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.24

SLIDE 27-UNDO ..............................................................................................................1

5.25

SLIDE 28-YOU TRY IT .......................................................................................................1

5.26

SLIDE 29-MODULE REVIEW ...............................................................................................1

MACRO COMMANDS .................................................................................................... 1


6.1

SLIDE 2-MODULE CONTENT ..............................................................................................1

6.2

SLIDE 3-OVERVIEW OF MACROS .......................................................................................1

6.3

SLIDE 4-TEACH PENDANT USER KEYS ..............................................................................1

6.4

SLIDE 5-MACRO COMMAND ASSIGNMENTS ........................................................................1

6.5

SLIDE 6-OPERATOR PANEL BUTTONS ...............................................................................1

6.6

SLIDE 7-MANUAL FUNCTIONS MACROS .............................................................................1

6.7

SLIDE 8-SETTING UP MACRO COMMANDS..........................................................................1

6.8

SLIDE 9-YOU TRY IT .........................................................................................................1

6.9

SLIDE 10-MACRO REVIEW ................................................................................................1

PRODUCTION SETUP ................................................................................................... 1


7.1

SLIDE 2-AGENDA ..............................................................................................................1

7.2

SLIDE 3-REMOTE/LOCAL MODE ........................................................................................1

7.3

SLIDE 4-PRODUCTION SETUP IN SYSTEM CONFIG MENU....................................................1

7.4

SLIDE 5-PRODUCTION SETUP ...........................................................................................1

7.5

SLIDE 6-PRODUCTION START CHECKS ..............................................................................1

7.6

SLIDE 7-PRODUCTION SETUP GENERAL CONTROLS........................................................1

7.7

SLIDE 8-STYLE SELECT USING DIN START METHOD PROCEDURE ......................................1

7.8

SLIDE 9-SUMMARY ...........................................................................................................1

FILE MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................................... 1


8.1

SLIDE 2-MODULE CONTENT ..............................................................................................1

8.2

SLIDE 3-DISPLAY PROGRAM FILES ....................................................................................1

8.3

SLIDE 4-COPY A PROGRAM...............................................................................................1

8.4

SLIDE 5-DELETE PROGRAM FILES .....................................................................................1

8.5

SLIDE 6-7-ABORTING A PROGRAM ....................................................................................1

8.6

SLIDE 8-YOU TRY IT .........................................................................................................1

8.7

SLIDE 9-TYPES OF FILES ..................................................................................................1

8.8

SLIDE 10-STORAGE DEVICES ............................................................................................1

8.9

SLIDE 11-SET THE DEFAULT DEVICE & GENERATE A DIRECTORY .......................................1

8.10

SLIDE 12-YOU TRY IT .......................................................................................................1

vi

Table of Contents
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

8.11

SLIDE 13-BACKUP UP FILES VS. CONTROLLER BACKUP .....................................................1

8.12

SLIDE 14-BACKUP FILES USING THE FILE MENU ...............................................................1

8.13

SLIDE 15-LOADING FILES USING THE FILE MENU ..............................................................1

8.14

SLIDE 16-BACKUP UP A CONTROLLER AS IMAGES ..............................................................1

8.15

SLIDE 17-RESTORING CONTROLLER IMAGES .....................................................................1

Course Overview
System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA

Course Overview

1 Frames
2 Input/Output
3 Program Instruction
4 - ArcTool Programming
4 Modify a Program
5 Macro Commands
6 Robot Setup for Production
7 File Management

Module Contents

Frames:

World Frame,

Tool Frame,

User Frame and within user frames, the Remote Tool


Center Point which is only available in some
applications,

Jog Frame

Input/Output:

After successfully completing this module, you should


know the different types of Inputs and Outputs and how
to configure them.

There are several types of I/Os, but in this module, the


different types of Inputs and Outputs are:

Robot

Digital;

Analog

Group

Inputs and Outputs are electrical signals that enable the


robot controller to communicate with End of Arm Tooling,
process equipment, other external sensors and other
devices.

Course Overview
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

Program Instructions

Data Register

Position Register Instruction

Branching Instructions

Label

Unconditional

JMP LBL

CALL

Conditional

Wait Instructions

Miscellaneous Instructions

Remark

Override

Message

Timer

ArcTool Programming

ArcTool Program Guideline

Weld I/O

Setup and Select Weld Equipment

ArcTool Instructions
ArcTool Default Instructions

Arc Weld Schedule


Delay Time

Weld Enable

Weave Patterns
Weave Instructions
Weave Schedule

Torchmate

Course Overview
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

Modifying a Program

Inserting blank lines into a Program.

Deleting lines from a Program

Copying and Pasting lines within a Program

Finding program instructions within a Program

Replacing Items

Renumbering Positional IDs

Turning ON and OFF Comments

And the UNDO function

Macro Commands

Overview of Macros

Setting Up Macro Commands

Assigning a Macro to a Teach Pendant User Key,Manual


Functions or Operator Panel Buttons

Robot Setup for Production

Learn how setup a robot for production using the teach


pendant.

Cover various production modes, system and Cell I/O


configurations.

A video to reinforce the step by step process needed to


configure the settings

File Management

Copying and Deleting Programs,

Backup all or specific types of files to a specific device.

Learn how to load program from the backup device

Then wrap-up with how to do an image backup and


Restore

Course Overview
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1
1

Frames

System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA

FRAMES
Frames

Frames

Audio:
Welcome to Frames. In this course we will investigate what type of frames there are. We will
see how to set them up and what they are used for.

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.1 Slide 2-Types of Frames


Frames

Types of Frames
World frame - default frame of the robot
Tool frame - user defined frame
User frame - user defined frame
RTCP Remote Tool Center Point
HandlingTool, DispenseTool, and
SpotTool+ only)
Jog frame - user defined frame

Audio:
This course will cover all the frames available within FANUC software. The robot uses four
kinds of frames which are
World Frame,

Tool Frame,

User Frame and within user frames, the Remote Tool Center Point which is only available in
some applications,

and finally wrap up with Jog Frame

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.2 Slide 3-Frame Overview

Audio:
1. But first, an overview of what a
frame is. A frame is an intersection
of three planes at right angles to
each other. The point where all
three planes intersect is called the
origin point. Where X,Y & Z values
are all 0. Here are more examples
of a Frame with the Origin point
in different positions.
2. Any point can be located within a
frame by providing three positive or negative numbers to represent the X,Y & Z
distances from the origin. This kind of system is called a Cartesian coordinate system.
3. The frame itself is a set of numbers used to describe the location, and orientation about
the X,Y,Z axes of the reference frame.

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.3 Slide 4-Two Dimensional Cartesian Coordinate


Frames

Two Dimensional Cartesian Coordinate

II

Quadrant

x
y
values values

>0

>0

II

<0

>0

III

<0

<0

IV

>0

<0

y-axis

x-axis

Origin = 0
IV

III

Audio:
To further explain the Cartesian Coordinate system, we will start with the two dimensional
system also known as the rectangular coordinate system two axes are used as references.
X is the horizontal axis.
Y is the Vertical axis.
The Origin is the location where both axes intersect. It's reference point is "0". All
measurements are based off of the origin point.
As you can see in this illustration there are four quadrants generated.
Quadrant "I" references point values positive for both the x and y axes.

Quadrant "II" references point values negative for x, positive for y.

Quadrant "III" references point values negative for both x and y axes.

Quadrant "IV" references point values positive for x, negative for y.

Notice the quadrants are in counterclockwise order by convention.


Now we will focus on just one quadrant.

Frames

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.4 Slide 5-One Quadrant

Audio:
To determine the robots position in millimeters we use this scale to figure this out. The result is
positive 600 in the x direction and positive 800 in the y direction

10

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.5 Slide 6-Three Dimensional Cartesian Coordinate

Audio:
In the three dimensional Cartesian Coordinate system we are adding another axis to the plane.
X axis becomes forward and backward movement.

Y axis becomes a side to side movement.

Z is the UP and DOWN movement.

The values reflect the location for positional information, the values shown in this slide reflects
Distance from the origin along the X axis which reflects in example 600
Distance from the origin along the Y axis which is 800
Distance from the origin from the Z axis which is negative 700

11

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.6 Slide 7-9-Orientation in WORLD mode-Minor Axes


Frames

Orientation in WORLD mode Minor Axes


Orientation
Yaw (W) Rotation around X
Pitch (P) Rotation around Y
Roll (R) Rotation around Z
Major Axes

Minor Axes

Frames

Orientation in WORLD mode Minor Axes


Orientation
Yaw (W) Rotation around X
Pitch (P) Rotation around Y
Roll (R) Rotation around Z
Major Axes

Minor Axes

Audio:
The orientations of a position is expressed in three dimensions also, but are measured in
degrees of rotation about the x, y, and z axes.
Use the minor axes from the teach pendant when jogging about the x, y and z axes
When rotating Yaw it is Rotating around X

12

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.7 Slide 10-Cartesian Coordinate System


Frames

Cartesian Coordinate System

+Z=800mm
Teach Pendant POSN menu
-BCKEDT-

LINE 0

AUTO ABORTED

POSITION

JOINT 100 %

World

Tool: 1

0
Configuration: N U T, 0, 0, 0
x: 1800.000

y: 1000.000

z:

800.000

w: -146.360

p:

r:

-22.691

-33.432

+Y=1000mm
+X=1800mm

[ TYPE ]

JNT

USER

WORLD

Audio:
Putting it all together this robots position in Cartesian is positive 1800 millimeters in the x
direction, positive 1000 millimeters in the y direction and positive 800 in the z direction all from
the origin.
The robots orientation is negative 146 degrees about X which is the yaw value and negative 33
degrees about Y which is the pitch value and negative 22 degrees about Z which is the roll
value.
You can view the robots positional values from the Position menu on the Teach Pendant.

13

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.8 Slide 11-World Frame


Frames

World Frame
J1

ORIGIN OF
WORLD
FRAME
J2

J2

J1

Audio:
Starting with World Frame.
1. The World Frame is the default frame of the robot. It cannot be changed by the user.
2. The origin of the world frame is located on the centerline of the J1-axis and at the height
of the centerline of the J2-axis.
3. The location of this origin never changes.
4. And the orientation of the World frame never changes.

14

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.9 Slide 12-Right Hand Rule


Frames

Right Hand Rule


+Z
+X

+Z

+Y

+X

+Y

Audio:
The directions of the World frame can be represented by the right hand rule. Also the World
coordinates can be better understood if you stand behind or by the side of the robot and then
use the right handed rule.

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.10

Slide 13-Tool Frame


Frames

Tool Frame

+X
+X

ToolDefault
CenterTool
Point
has moved
from the
Frame Origin
faceplate to the tool
+Y
+Y
A Tool frame is
defined using the
Cartesian
coordinate system

+Z
+Z

Audio:
Now we will discuss the Tool Frame.
Its origin is called the tool center point (TCP). By default, the TCP is located at the center of
the robots faceplate. When you set up a Tool frame, also called a UTool, you move the TCP
from the robots faceplate to define the point on the applicator, gun, torch, or other tool where
the painting, welding, sealing, handling, or other application work is to be done.

15

16

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.11

Slide 14-Tool Frame Features

Audio:
So why define a Tool Center Point.
An important reason to define a TCP is simply to jog the TCP to the workpiece which makes
programming easier. Some software applications are based on a correctly defined TCP. For an
Example, in a SpotTool servo gun application, the TCP is tied to the tip wear compensation.
Another important reason to define a TCP is to have consistency from robot to robot, especially
in a plant that has many cells.

Frames

17

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.12

Slide 15-Adjusting Tool Center Point

Audio:
Here is another example of the default Tool Frame located on the Face Plate. When the tool is
mounted, it does not take into account the actual position of the tooling where the work is to be
done. Therefore if you jog the robot using default tool coordinates you will be unable to control
the position of the robot relative to the center of the attached tooling.
In order for the Tool coordinates X,Y,& Z to refer to the center of the tooling, you must adjust the
Tool Frame offset as shown here.

18

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.13

Slide 16-Actual Tool Center Point


Frames

Actual Tool Center Point

Audio:
Here are some examples of different toolings Tool Frame Offsets. in PaintTool, the TCP is
approximately 12 inches from the end of the applicator, but this can vary depending on your
particular applicator; in ArcTool, the TCP is the tip of the wire; in SpotTool+, the TCP is where
the tips of the gun meet when they are closed; in HandlingTool, the TCP is where the gripper
closes to pick the part up.

Frames

19

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.14

Slide 17-Methods of Defining the Tool Frame


Frames

Methods of Defining the Tool Frame


Three Point Method
defines just the location of the tool frame when the values
cannot be measured and directly entered

Six Point Method


defines the location and orientation of the tool frame when the
values cannot be measured and directly entered.

Direct Entry Method


used when tool dimensions are known and can be entered
directly into Tool Frame settings. Direct Entry must be used with
4-axis robots

Audio:
There are three ways to define a tool Frame:
The Three Point Method, the Six Point Method, and the Direct Entry Method.
Use the three point method to define just the location of the tool frame when the values
cannot be measured and directly entered

Use the six point method to define the location and orientation of the tool frame when the
values cannot be measured and directly entered.

The direct entry method provides for direct numerical entry of known tool dimensions. Direct
Entry is used when tool dimensions are known and can be entered directly into Tool Frame
settings. Direct Entry must be used with 4-axis robots, such as the M410iB and the A520iB.

In this exercise you will set up the Tool Frame using the 6 point method.

20

Frames
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.15

Slide 18-Teaching a Tool Center Point 6 Point Method

Audio:

This video (which will repeat) is displaying the 6 point method which requires you to
teach 6 points. The first 3 approach points are used to define the location of the Tool
Center Point and are the same approach points as in the 3 Point method. The three
additional points define the direction vector for the tool. These three additional points
define orientation, measured in degrees of rotation about an axis. W stands for Yaw.
Yaw rotates about the X axis. P stands for Pitch, and rotates about the Y axis. R, for
Roll, rotates about the Z axis. All are measured in degrees.

When recording the Orient origin point or to simplify teaching points 4, 5, and 6, align
the desired X, Y, and Z directions of the tool with the X, Y, and Z of the World frame in
any order that avoids singularity. In this example it is convenient to align the tool frame
Z with the World frame Z and the Tool frame X with the World frame X. This alignment
is based on the shape of the tool and the need to avoid singularity.

When you teach the Orient Origin point it is often helpful to start with all of the Zero
position reference marks aligned. Then you can move the minor axes until the tool is
squared up with the World Frame. Just be sure the robot is not in singularity. Then you
can record the Orient Origin point.

Frames

21

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

1.16

Slide 19-Tool Center Point 6 Point Method Procedure

Audio:
The following video will show how to define a Tool Center Point using the 6 point
method. You will teach 3 different approach points, an Orient origin point and then
define your Positive X and Positive Z direction points. In the process of learning the
6 point method, you will learn the 3 Point Method as well.
1

The first thing you need to do is turn the Teach Pendant to the ON position, then press the
MENUS key. From the pop-up menu cursor down to SETUP and press the ENTER key.

Press the F1 TYPE key and cursor down to FRAMES and press the ENTER key. Upon
selecting Frames, the Tool frame setup is the default screen.

Press the F2 DETAIL key to select TOOL Frame #1.

To name this Tool Frame, press ENTER key. You will name this tool frame POINTER,
after you have typed the name PRESS the ENTER key.

Select the 6 point method from the function key F2 .

You begin by teaching 3 points on a fixed reference, with the orientation of the tool 90
degrees different on each point. This is all that is required when teaching a 3 point method.

You will now jog the tool to the approach point #1 and HOLD the SHIFT key and PRESS
F5 RECORD to record it.

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Now cursor down to approach point #2 . Remember you need 3 different planes recorded.
Now jog the tool to approach point #2, and again hold the SHIFT key and PRESS F5
RECORD.

Release the SHIFT key and cursor down to APPROACH point 3. Jog the tool to approach
point 3 position then press and HOLD the SHIFT key plus the F5 key to record this
position.

10 This completes the 3 point method. The 6 point method continues to the next step of
defining the Orient Origin point. Any orientation of the tool will work as long as the tool is
square to the World Frame and the robot is not in Singularity.
11 In the final 2 steps you define the Positive X and Positive Z directions of the Tool Frame.
First we will define the Positive X direction by jogging the tool from the Orient Origin point at
least 250 mm, then HOLD the SHIFT key and PRESS the F5 RECORD.
12 Finally you need to define the Positive Z Direction. Start by moving back to the Orient
Origin point being careful that the tool doesnt move the part.
13 Now jog the tool at least 250mm in the direction that you want to define as the Positive Z
direction and HOLD the SHIFT key and PRESS the F5 RECORD.
The Tool Frame have now been defined.

Frames

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1.17

Slide 20-Verify TCP


Frames

Verify TCP

Audio:
If the TCP was taught correctly, it will move in the direction you want when you jog in X, Y, or Z.
When you rotate the tool, it should rotate about the Tool center point. The TCP should remain
stationary.

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1.18

Slide 21-Selecting a Tool Frame from the Jog Menu


Frames

Selecting a Tool Frame from the Jog Menu


Tool #1

Tool #2

Tool ( .=10)
Jog
User
Group

2
0
3
2

Audio:
When there are multiple tools and groups defined on a robot, you can use the jog menu to
verify and change the following jogging information:
TOOL, JOG, and USER frame number of each frame.
Additionally, you can change motion group number be aware that before changing motion
group number, the frame number that is displayed is the frame number defined within that
motion group.
First press SHIFT plus the coordinate key on the Teach Pendant. Select TOOL and enter the
number of the frame you want. Then press the coordinate key without the shift key until desired
coordinate system is selected.
After you have taught the Tool Center Point and that tool is selected, you can test the tool by
jogging in the Tool Frame you have just taught.

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1.19

Slide 22-How the Robot Frames are linked


Frames

How the Robot frames are linked


Robot
Tool Frame (TCP)

Taught Position
J P[1] 100% FINE

Positional data

User Frame origin

Audio:
In Summary, the Tool Frame Offset tells the controller where the Tool frame is relative to the
center of the faceplate
Positional data tells the controller where the Tool frame is, relative to the User frame. In this
example, there is a defined User Frame that is not using the default world frame.
User frame offset data (UFRAME) tells the controller where the defined USER frame is relative
to World frame. This is the next subject.

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1.20

Slide 23-User Frame


Frames

User Frame
User Frame is
this offset in
the X,Y,Z,W,P,R

World Frame

User frame - user defined frame

+Z

PL
AN
E
X

PL
AN
E

AN
E

-X

-X

XP

Y PLANE

-Y

-Z

PL

+Y

+Z

+Y
+X

NE
LA

+X

You can define up to 9 user frames


within R-J3 controllers

PL
AN
E

-Y

-Z

User:
Now lets discuss the User Frame

User frame is a frame that you can set up in any location, with any orientation. User
frames are used so that positions in a program can be recorded relative to the origin of
the frame.

If you do not set up the location and orientation of the user frame before you create a
program, then the user frame will be set, by default, to the world frame origin point.

When jogging the robot in User coordinates and you have not defined a user frame, then the
XYZ motion will be the same as XYZ motion in world.
If you jog the robot in User Coordinates, and a user frame has been defined and that defined
user frame is selected, you must remember that the X, Y, & Z origin point is referenced from
the defined user frame, not the center of the robot, like World Coordinates does.
You can define up to nine user frames within the R-J3 controllers
There are three methods of setting the Uframe: The Three Point Method, the Four Point Method
and the Direct Entry Method.

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1.21

Slide 24- Example of User & Tool Frame in a TP Program


Frames

Example of User & Tool Frame in a TP Program


Program

Position Detail

Audio:
Each time a point is taught in a program, the recorded positional data provides the location of
the TCP, expressed as X, Y, & Z, relative to the origin of the currently selected User Frame.
The orientation of the Tool Frame, expressed as W, P, & R, for Yaw, Pitch and Roll, is also
relative to the User Frame.
Therefore, if no Tool Frame has been taught, the X, Y, & Z positional data will reference from
the center of the robot faceplate and not the center of the attached tool. However, if a Tool
frame has been taught, and, that Tool Frame is selected, the X, Y, Z, W, P, & R data will
reference the actual Tool Center Point.

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1.22

Slide 25-Sample Program UFrame vs. World Frame


Frames

Sample Program UFrame vs. World Frame


Program is
referenced
from UFrame

Program Points

Audio:
One of the benefits of defining a user frame is when multiple programs are based on a user
frame which can be referenced from the workpiece and when the workpiece moves, then editing
the user frame would adjust all programs based on that user frame.

Frames

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1.23

Slide 26-User Frame Procedure

Audio:
This video will show you how to define a User Frame using the 3 point method.
1

First turn the Teach Pendant to the ON position, then press the MENUS key. From the
pop-up menu cursor down to SETUP and press the ENTER key.

Now press the F1 TYPE key and cursor down to FRAMES and press the ENTER key.
Upon selecting Frames, the Tool frame setup is the default screen.

Select User frame from the function key F3 labeled OTHER and press ENTER

Press F2 DETAIL function key to define and name the user frame.

You can name the user frame within the Comment line; however this has already been
defined. To delete the existing name and rename it hold the Shift key plus arrow right to
delete one character at a time. We will rename it to be called BOX. The Teach Pendant
recognizes the Frame number and not the comment name you provide.

Press the softkey F2 labeled method to select the method that you will be using when
defining the User Frame

Jog the robot to the Orient origin point position and record it using the SHIFT and F5
Record key

Next, you define the Positive X direction by jogging the robot from the Orient Origin point at
least 250 mm, then HOLD the SHIFT key and PRESS the F5 RECORD key.

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Now jog the tool at least 250mm in the direction that you want to define as the Positive Y
direction and HOLD the SHIFT key and PRESS the F5 RECORD key.

10 This completes the procedure on how to define a user frame using the three point method
11 Now we will demonstrate using the newly defined the User Frame. newly
12 When you press the SHIFT plus the COORD key, you can verify the user frame number
that is selected.
This completes the demonstration on how to create a three point user frame.

Frames

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1.24

Slide 27-You Try It-User Frame

Audio:
This is your opportunity to recall the steps needed to define a User Frame using the 3 point
method.
You can name the user frame within the Comment line; however this has already been defined.
We will rename it to be called BOX.
We will Jog the robot to the Orient origin point position
We will jog the robot from the Orient Origin point 250 mm.
We will jog the tool at least 250mm in the direction that defines the Positive Y direction.

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1.25

Slide 28-Remote Tool Center Point


Frames

Remote Tool Center Point

Tool
Frame

+Z

+Y

-X

+Z
+X

User Frame
+Y (Remote Tool
Center Point)

Audio:
In this section, we will cover the Remote Tool Center Point
A remote tool is an external tool within the robots working envelope that performs work on a
part that is delivered by the robot. In situations where the robot carries the workpiece and the
tool is stationary, you can make use of the User Frame to provide special movement of the
workpiece about the tool. In these situations the User Frame is called a Remote Tool Center
Point.
You can define a user frame whose origin is at the external tool to allow moving the part relative
to the external tool.
When the user frame is employed this way, it is called a Remote Tool Center Point.
You must first define a user frame before you can use the Remote Tool Center Point feature
when jogging the robot. If you want to include remote tool center point moves in a program, you
must include Remote Tool Center Point instructions in the program.

Frames

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1.26

Slide 29-Function Key


Frames

Function Key

FCTN

Audio:
The controller must have the Remote Tool Center Point software option installed.
To jog the robot in Remote Tool Center Point, you must press the Function key on the Teach
Pendant, select Toggle Remote TCP and press enter. Once you have selected the Remote
TCP function and you are using XYZ coordinates, the selected Remote Tool Center Point, along
with the coordinate system will be displayed in the teach pendant window. In this example
Remote TCP one and Tool Coordinate is displayed in the Teach Pendant window.
When this function is enabled and the remote tool center point user frame has been defined,
you can jog the robot with the part around the remote tool.

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1.27

Slide 30-RTCP Instruction

Audio:
if you want to use the Remote Tool Center Point option in your Teach Pendant program, you
must decide where it is needed and then place it on the end of the program-line statement using
the CHOICE menu to display Motion Options to select RTCP. Notice in this animation, which
provides multiple views of the same motion, how the robot with part will jog around the remote
tool. When you are done viewing this slide, press the next slide icon.

Frames

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1.28

Slide 31-No RTCP Instruction

Audio:
Here is an example of the resulting path of a robot using a Teach Pendant program without the
Remote Tool Center Point option. This example also shows multiple views of the same motion.
Notice how the robot with part is not accurate when rotating around the tool.

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1.29

Slide 32-Jog Frame


Frames

Jog Frame
World Frame
Jog Frame

You can set up as many as 5 different jog frames for each robot

Audio:
We will wrap up with Jog Frame
The Jog Frame provides a convenient way to jog the robot relative to a particular workpiece.
In this example, A Jog frame was defined to move along a part when the part is oriented
differently from the world frame.
This displays two examples: the world frame and the jog frame.
The benefits of defining a jog frame, are that it makes jogging easier when teaching points, and
it will remove the need to "tack while jogging, if a part is skewed in relation to the world frame.
Remember that Jog frames can be taught anywhere inside the robots workspace.
You may like to think of a Jog Frame as another right hand rule defined somewhere within the
work envelope.

NOTE

that a Jog Frame has no effect on program data!

Before you can use a jog frame, you must set up its location and orientation.
You can set up as many as five different jog frames for each robot.

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You can select one jog frame to be active at a time per motion group.
Once the Jog Frame has been defined and is selected, the robot can be jogged in that frame.
There are two methods you can use to define a jog frame:
The Direct Entry method and the Three Point method
1. The direct entry method provides for direct recording and numerical entry of the frame
position.
2. This method allows you to designate the origin with the actual values for x, y, z, w, p,
and r when they are already known.
Usually however, the frame data is unknown. In that case you can use the three point method
to teach a jog frame.

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1.30

Slide 33-Jog Frame Procedure

Audio:
In this video you will learn how to define a jog frame.
1

First, turn on the Teach Pendant, then select Setup from the MENU key.

Now press the function key F1 labeled TYPE and cursor down to FRAMES and press the
ENTER key.

Select Jog frame from the function key F3 labeled OTHER and press ENTER

Press F2 DETAIL function key to define and name the jog frame.

Press ENTER to name this frame BOX, then press ENTER again

Select the function key F2 labeled METHOD and select 3 point.

Place the robot at the top left hand corner of the box and record the origin point. When the
robot is positioned at this point, press Shift plus F5 to Record this position.
For the X direction, jog the robot in the direction that you want the jog frame plus X direction
to be. Any coordinates can be utilized to get to the +X directions. Coordinates do not
have any bearing on the final outcome in defining the jog frame.

Now jog the robot so that the pointer is half way down the box to represent the +Y direction.

Frames

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Press SHIFT F5 to record the

+Y

direction

10 Now test the frame that was just created. Change the coordinates to jog frame.
11 When you bring up the jog menu with the SHIFT plus the COORD key, you will see that
jog frame number 1 is active
This completes the Jog Frame setup procedure

1.31

Slide 34-Frames Summary


Frames

Frames Summary
World frame - default frame of the robot
Tool frame - user defined frame
User frame - user defined frame
RTCP Remote Tool Center Point
HandlingTool, DispenseTool, and SpotTool+ only)

Jog frame - user defined frame

Audio:
You have completed the frames module. In this module understanding the different types of
frames has been the key topic. We learned that world frame is always the default frame of the
robot. An important reason to define a tool frame is simply jog the TCP to the work piece which
makes programming easier. User frame is a frame that you can setup in any location and any
orientation. User frames are used so that positions in a program can be recorded relative to the
origin of the frame.
A remote tool is an external tool within the robots working envelope that performs work on a
part that is delivered by the robot. And the course wrapped up with Jog frame which simply
provides a convenient way to jog the robot relative to a particular work piece.

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1.32

Slide 35-Quiz
Frames

Quiz
Now is your opportunity to test your
knowledge
You must pass with an 80% or higher
You may retake the questions as many times
as necessary, but you must close out of the
course before retaking it again.

Click here to begin the


Quiz

Audio:
If you have any questions or would like to provide feedback, please contact
trainingweb@fanucrobotics.com
And now in the next slides you will have the opportunity to test your knowledge of the
information that has been provided.

41

Input/Output

System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA

2 INPUT/OUTPUT
Input/Output

Module Objectives
After successfully completing this module you should
know the different types of I/O and how to configure
them:

Audio:
Welcome to Input, Output
After successfully completing this module, you should know the different types of Inputs and
Outputs and how to configure them.
There are several types of I/Os, but in this module, the different types of Inputs and Outputs
are: Robot; Digital; Analog and Group.
Inputs and Outputs are electrical signals that enable the robot controller to communicate with
End of Arm Tooling, process equipment, other external sensors and other devices.

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2.1 Slide 2-Analog


Input/Output

Analog
Typical Voltage Values
-10 volts to +10 volts

Substance
Pressure Transducer - Analog

Audio:
First, what are Analog signals Analog Signals are created from sensors, or transducers in the
work cell, or sent from a Robot controller via its control module to a transducer within the cell to
effect a change. This signal is normally an electrical voltage within an accepted range of values
that is transmitted to or from an I/O circuit-board or module connected to a robot controller.
Notice, in this example, that as the substance fills the tank, the pressure transducer puts out an
analog voltage that is used to determine when to open the valve and release the substance.
Analog input devices convert external analog signals into numbers for use by the controller.
Analog Output devices send analog signals out to external devices. Typical voltages of analog
inputs and Outputs are from negative 10 to positive 10 volts

Input/Output

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2.2 Slide 3-Digital Input/Output


Input/Output

Digital Input/Output

Light switch is OFF


ON

Audio:
A Digital Input and Output signal is a control signal sent to or from the controller. Digital signals
can have only one of two possible states: ON or OFF.

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2.3 Slide 4-Digital


Input/Output

Digital

Float with Switch Digital

OFF
ON

Substance

Audio:
Here is an example of a Digital signal. As a substance fills the tank, a switch, connected to the
float at the top of the tank will disconnect to break a connection. This becomes a digital OFF
signal, and is used to stop the flow of substance. Then as the substance drains out of the tank,
the floats switch will make the connection to turn the substance-flow on.

Input/Output
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

2.4 Slide 5-Robot I/O

Audio:
Robot Inputs and Outputs are digital signals
usually used to manipulate the End of Arm
Tooling. These signals are sent through the
End Effector or the EE connector located on
the robot. Although all robot have it, not all
robots use it.

45

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2.5 Slide 6-Robot I/O

Audio:
This example shows how the programming instruction would be written to manipulate the End of
Arm Tooling utilizing Robot Outputs.

Input/Output

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2.6 Slide 7-Model A Input/Output

Audio:
Heres how to configure Digital AND ANALOG Inputs and Outputs:
When all appropriate I/O hardware has been installed and connected, you must configure the
I/O. Configuring I/O establishes the correspondence between the signal number and the
physical port. Each signal, or signal-sequence must be configured to a rack, a slot in the rack,
and the channel number or starting point. You can change this configuration depending on the
kind of I/O you are using. Model A I/O is unique, in the fact that some FANUC software will be
automatically configured, similar to the PC-worlds Plug and Play.

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2.7 Slide 8-Rack Assignment


Input/Output

Rack Assignment
The rack is the first part of the address for an
I/O signal
The following ground rules apply to assigning
I/O rack numbers

Racks are numbered sequentially


Process I/O is always rack 0
Model A or Model B I/0 Starts at rack 1
PLC I/O is always rack 16
DeviceNet is always rack 81-84
ControlNet is always Rack 85/86

Audio:
The rack is the first part of the address for an I/O signal.
The following ground rules apply to assigning I/O rack numbers:
Racks are numbered sequentially

Process I/O is always rack 0

Model A or Model B I/0 Starts at rack 1

PLC I/O is always rack 16

DeviceNet is always rack 81-84

and ControlNet is always rack 85 & 86.

Input/Output

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2.8 Slide 9-Model A Rack


Input/Output

Model A - Rack
Rack

Audio:
The rack is the physical location on which the input or output process I/O board or modular I/O
is mounted. Your system can contain multiple racks.

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2.9 Slide 10-Slot Assignment


Input/Output

Slot Assignment
The slot is the second part of the address for
an I/O signal
The slot number distinguishes individual I/O
modules on a rack
The following rules apply to slot assignment

Slot numbers are assigned sequentially


Valid numbers are 1 through 9, no letters
The first process I/O board is always assigned slot 1
Slot numbers cannot be used twice in the same rack

Audio:
The slot is the second part of the address for an I/O signal. The slot number distinguishes
individual I/O modules on a rack.
The following rules apply to slot assignment:
Slot numbers are assigned sequentially

Valid numbers are 1 through 9, no letters

The first process I/O board is always assigned slot 1

And slot numbers cannot be used twice in the same rack.

Input/Output

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2.10

Slide 11-Model A Slot Assignment

Audio:
The first opening within the Rack is for the Interface card. The remaining slots are for the Input
and Output cards.
Here is an example of a model A I/O inside a controller.

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2.11

Slide 12-Starting Point/Channel Assignment


Input/Output

Starting Point/Channel Assignment


Starting points-digital signals
The physical position on the I/O module or
process I/O board that identifies the first port in a
range

Channel-Analog Signals
Physical position of the port on a process I/O
Terminal number for modular I/O

Audio:
Starting points for digital signals are the physical position on the I/O module or process I/O
board that identifies the first point in a range.
Analog Signals use channels that are the physical position of the port on a process I/O board or
a terminal number for I/O card.

Input/Output

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2.12

Slide 13-Model A-Starting Point Assignment


Input/Output

Model A - Starting Point Assignment

I/O Signal
Connections

Audio:
This is an example of a digital I/O card. It has 16 inputs or outputs. The signal terminals are
labeled A0 through A7 and B0 through B7. Digital input/output one is terminal A0. Digital input
2 is terminal A1, continuing through the first 8 input/outputs. Digital input 9 is terminal B0, and
the remaining input/outputs continue on terminals B1 through B7. The schematic diagram
indicates the proper wiring for power, ground and connection for each input/output signal.

54

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2.13

Slide 14-Configuring I/O

Input/Output
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

Audio:
We are now ready to Configure Digital I/O:
1

Press the MENU key and select I/O.

Then press the F1 [TYPE] key and select Digital you will see the following screen.

The F3 IN/OUT key will let you toggle between Inputs and Outputs.

Now press the F2 CONFIG Key to get to the configuration screen.

First set your range or the number of ports you want to configure. In this example we will
change the range from 1 thru 64 to 1 thru 16.

Then cursor over and assign the Rack, Slot and Starting Point.

It is important that once you have completed your I/O configuration that you power down the
controller and power it back up to get the changes to take effect.

55

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2.14

Slide 15-Configurig I/O Status

Audio:
The Status line describes the current status of the I/O.
ACTIVE - the assignment is valid and active.
INVALID the assignment is invalid based on the I/O hardware present when the controller was
turned ON. Invalid will appear when you choose incorrect values for that module
PENDING - the assignment is valid, but not active.
UNASSIGNED - An assignment has not been made.

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2.15

Slide 16-Complementary Signals


Input/Output

Complementary Signals
DO[1]

DO[2]

DO[3]

DO[4]

DO[5]

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

Audio:
If Output signals are configured as a complementary pair, a command to turn that signal ON will
also turn its paired output OFF.
In this example Digital Outputs 1 and 2 are setup to be complementary. By manipulating Digital
Output 1, we can also manipulate Digital output 2.
In this example the cursor is on Digit Output 1, we have turned it OFF then Digital Output 2 will
automatically turn ON. Only outputs can be set as complementary pairs. So Digital Output 1
and 2 can be a paired together, then 3 and 4 together, 5 and 6 are together and so on.

58

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2.16

Slide 17-I/O Detail


Input/Output

I/O Detail

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5
Next

Audio:
The I/O Detail key lets you name, set the polarity of and configure complementary pairs for each
Input or Output.
Complementary pairs are always defined on the odd output.
To access the detail screen, from the I/O screen press the next key then press the F4 DETAIL
key. To name the I/O, with the cursor on the Comment line, press the ENTER key. To set the
output to be complementary, cursor down to Complementary and press the F4 TRUE key. You
must power down the controller and power it back up to get the changes to take effect.

Input/Output
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

2.17

Slide 18-19-Monitoring/Controlling I/O


Input/Output

Monitoring/Controlling I/O

WARNING:
BEFORE FORCING A SIGNAL BE SURE THAT
IT IS SAFE TO DO SO.
SIGNALS SHOULD BE FORCED FOR TESTING
AND TROUBLESHOOTING PURPOSES ONLY.
AFTER COMPLETION OF TESTING OR
TROUBLESHOOTING BE SURE TO RETURN ALL
I/O SIGNALS TO THEIR NORMAL CONDITION.

Audio:
BEFORE FORCING A SIGNAL BE SURE THAT IT IS SAFE TO DO SO.
SIGNALS SHOULD BE FORCED FOR TESTING AND TROUBLESHOOTING PURPOSES
ONLY.
AFTER COMPLETION OF TESTING OR TROUBLESHOOTING BE SURE TO RETURN ALL
I/O SIGNALS TO THEIR NORMAL CONDITION.

59

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Input/Output

Monitoring/Controlling I/O
DO [1]
DO [2]
DO [3]
DO [4]
DO [5]
DO [6]
DO [7]
DO [8]
DO [9]
DO [10]
F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

DO [11]

Audio:
The Teach Pendant can be used to monitor and control Input and Output signals. Monitoring
I/O is using the teach pendant to see the I/O being manipulated in a program. Controlling I/O is
turning the signals ON or OFF manually. As seen in this example Digital Outputs can be
manually forced ON or OFF without being simulated.

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2.18

Slide 20-Simulating I/O


Input/Output

Simulating I/O

ON
OFF

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

Audio:
Simulating a Input allows us to change the bit for the signal without a signal actually going into
or out of the controller. Digital Input signals must be Simulated first and then the signal can be
manually forced ON or OFF.

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2.19

Slide 21-Configuring Group I/O


Input/Output

Configuring Group I/O

Power OFF then ON to enable changes.

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

Audio:
Group I/O is made up of a sequence of digital I/O signals that is interpreted as a binary integer.
When configuring group I/O, you first need to look at the configuration of the I/O you want to
group. In this example we will configure Digital Outputs (DO) 1-16 to Group Output #1. To view
the configuration, go into the I/O screen and press F2 CONFIG. Digital Outputs 1-16 are
assigned to Rack 1, Slot 1 and our starting point will be 1. Now press the F1 TYPE key to view
the Group Outputs. Press the F2 CONFIG key to configure the Group Output.
Insert Rack information from the Digital Outputs configuration, in example, we used Rack 1, Slot
1 and Starting Point 1 and the range of digital output we used is 16.
Once you have configured your Group Outputs you must power down the controller and power it
back up to gets the changes to take effect.

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2.20

Slide 22-Group Input/Output


Input/Output

Group Input/Output

Binary Bits

DO[1]

DO[2]

DO[3]

DO[4]

DO[5]

16

1: GO [1] = 2
10
17

Audio:
Once the Group I/O are configured you can manipulate multiple I/O with binary bits.
When Group Output #1 is set to 2 the Binary bit 2 is switched ON.
When Group Output #1 is set to 10 both Binary bits 2 and 8 are switched ON.
And when Group Output #1 is set to 17, Binary bits 1 and 16 are switched ON.
An example of using Group I/O might to turn ON multiple colors of paint or turn on several items
simultaneously by using one number.

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2.21

Slide 23-Input/Output Review


Input/Output

Input/Output Review
Robot Inputs and Outputs are signals between the
robot and the controller.
An analog signal is an input or output voltage that
has a range of values within the I/O board or module
that is being used.
Digital signals can have only one of two possible
states: ON or OFF.
Group I/O is made up of a sequence of digital I/O
signals that is interpreted as a binary integer.
Click here to begin the
Quiz

Audio:
In Review
Robot Inputs and Outputs are signals between the robot and the controller.

An analog signal is an input or output voltage that has a range of values within the I/O board
or module that is being used.

Digital signals can have only one of two possible states: ON or OFF.

Group I/O is made up of a sequence of digital I/O signals that is interpreted as a binary
integer.

This concludes the Input/Output Module. The next four slides will provide you the
opportunity to test your knowledge and comprehension.

Program Instruction

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System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA

3 PROGRAM INSTRUCTION
Program Instructions

Program Instructions

Audio:
Welcome to the Program Instructions Module

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3.1 Slide 2-Module Content


Program Instructions

Module Content
Data Register
Position Register Instruction
Branching Instructions
Label
Unconditional
JMP LBL
CALL
Conditional

Wait Instructions
Miscellaneous Instructions

Remark
Override
Message
Timer

Audio
This module will cover Data Registers, Position Register Instruction, Unconditional and
Conditional Branching,
Wait Instructions and Miscellaneous Instructions which are Remark, Override, Message and
Timer

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3.2 Slide 3-Data Register


Program Instructions

Data Register

Direct

R[3]= 2

Registers are used to store


numbers
Numbers can be used for
arithmetic operations, track part
count, cycle count,
May contain group I/O data
Default number of registers is 32
Can be changed during initial
setup or during control start

Internal Register

Direct vs Indirect
Indirect

R [R [3] ] = 5
External Register
R[R[3]=2] or R[2]

Audio:
Registers are very powerful programming tools. When used correctly, registers can be utilized
as counter, to set program flags, or to adjust program speed. A register stores one number.
The default number of registers is 32, however up to 999 registers are available.
Many instructions employ direct or indirect addressing techniques. When direct addressing is
used, the actual value is entered into the instruction. For example, if the register instruction
R[3]= 2 is used, the current contents of register 3 is replaced with the value 2.
When indirect addressing is used, the instruction contains a register within a register. This
indicates that the actual value of the internal register becomes the register number of the
external register. In the example shown Register 3 is the internal register and statement shown
(R[R[3]]) is the external register. Since in the previous instruction value of the internal register 3
is 2, the external register number addresses register 2 instead of register 3. Therefore, the
result of the second instruction is that the contents of the external register 2 is to be replaced
with the value 5.
You can increase the number of registers during a controlled start.

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3.3 Slide 4-Position Register Instructions


Program Instructions

POSITION REGISTER Instructions


PR[GRPn:x]=[value]

Audio:
Position registers can be used to store global positions, such as a home or a maintenance
position which contain x,y,z,w,p,r, configuration.
Position Registers allow positions to be predefined for shared use by many programs.
Position register instructions can manipulate the robot positions. They include assignment,
addition, and subtraction instructions.
The following is the instruction syntax
The Group number is needed if there is more than one group defined. The x is the position
register number direct or indirect. For clarification of direct or indirect, refer to the slide
Register Instructions
The value choices are LPOS which is the current Cartesian coordinates in xyzwpr and
configuration; JPOS which is Current joint angles; UTOOL number is the Tool Frame; UFRAME
number is the User frame; PR number is the Position Register and P number is the Position.
The operator choices are addition, subtraction or carriage return to terminate without adding an
operator
The maximum number of the same arithmetic operator you can have in one instruction is 5.

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3.4 Slide 5-Position Register Element


Program Instructions

POSITION REGISTER Element

PR [i, j]

Direct:
Position Register element #

Indirect:
Position register #= contents of R[x]

/PROG PREG_ELE
1: !POSITION REG VALUE
2:J P[1:ABOVE JOINT] 100% FINE
3:J P[2] 100% FINE
4: PR[1]=LPOS
5: PR[1,2]=600
6:L PR[1] 100.0inch/min FINE
7:J P[1:ABOVE JOINT] 100% FINE
/END

Indirect:
Position register element #= contents of R[x]

Direct:
Position Register element #
For Cartesian Positions: For Joint positions

1=x
2=y
3=z
4=w
5=p
6=r
7=config

1=joint 1
2=joint 2
3=joint 3
4=joint 4
5=joint 5
6=joint 6
n=joint n

x, y, z, w, p, r, config
x,600,z, w, p, r, config

Audio:
Position register element instructions manipulate a specific position register element. A position
register element is one element of a specified position register. Where the designation for i
represents the position register number and the j represents the position register element.
The program example shown, line 4 is changing Position register 1 to equal the current
Cartesian coordinates position in line 3 (x,y,z,w,p,r,config) as explained in the previous slide.
Program line number 5 is using position register element 2 which is y shown in the table, to
equal 600.
Program Line 6 will move the robot in a linear move to position register 1 with 100 inches per
minute travel speed and Fine termination.

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3.5 Slide 6-Program Instructions


Program Instructions

Program Instructions

Instruction

Instruction

Instruction

1 Registers

1 Skip

1 LOCK PREG

2 I/O

2 Payload

2 MONITOR/MON. END

3 IF/SELECT

3 Offset/Frames

4 WAIT

4 Multiple control

5 JMP/LBL

5 Program control

6 CALL

6 MACRO

7 Miscellaneous

7 Tool Offset

8 next page--

8 next page--

8 next page--

Audio:
While creating or editing a program from the select menu, all instructions can be displayed while
the cursor is on the program line number or at the END of the program. The function 1 key
labeled INSTRUCTION will provide a list as shown here.

Program Instruction
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

3.6 Slide 7-Branching Instructions


Program Instructions

Branching Instructions
1. Label Definition Instruction
2. Unconditional Branching Instructions
3. Conditional Branching Instructions

Audio:
Starting with Branching instructions
Branching Instructions cause the program to branch, or jump, from one place in a program to
another. There are three kinds of branching instructions:
1. Label definition instruction
2. Unconditional branching instructions
3. Conditional branching instructions

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3.7 Slide 8-Label Definition Instruction LBL[x]


Program Instructions

Label Definition Instruction LBL[x]


LBL[x: comment]
Direct:
Label number

As many as 16 numbers, letters,

Indirect:

blank spaces, the punctuation ;, :,

R[x] where label #= contents of R[x]

, , (, ), and the characters * , _


and @

Unconditional
Branching
Instruction

JMP LBL[x]
1: LBL [1]
2: J P[2] 100% CNT80
3: L P[3] 2000mm/s CNT80
4: L P[4] 2000mm/s CNT80
5: L P[5] 2000mm/s CNT80
6: L P[2] 2000mm/s CNT80
7: JMP LBL [1]
END

Audio:
A label marks the location in a program that is the destination of a program branch. A label is
defined using a label definition instruction.
A comment can be added to describe the label. After a label has been defined, it can be used
with conditional and unconditional branching instructions.
Use the Jump Label instruction to branch to the specified label.
Watch the program flow. When it reaches the Jump Label 1, the program then looks for the
label 1 to continue the program

Program Instruction

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3.8 Slide 9-Unconditional Branch Call


Program Instructions

Unconditional Branch - Call


CALL program
Name of Program
PROG2
PROG1
PROG1
PROG2
JOINT 100%
P[2] 100% CNT80
1: J P[1]
P[3] 2000mm/s CNT80
2: J P[2]
P[4] 2000mm/s CNT80
3: L P[3]
P[5] 2000mm/s CNT80
4: L P[4]
5: L P[6] 2000mm/s CNT80
END
6: L P[2] 2000mm/s CNT80
7: CALL PROG2
8: L P[7] 2000mm/s CNT80
END

Audio:
Another Branch instruction you could use is the CALL instruction.
The CALL program instruction causes the program to branch to another program and execute it.
When the called program finishes executing, it returns automatically to the main program at the
first instruction after the call program instruction. It is not necessary to add a call statement in
the second program to return back to the first program as it will automatically return when it
reaches the program END.

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3.9 Slide 10-Conditional Branching Instructions


Program Instructions

Conditional Branching Instructions


IF instructions - Branch to a specified label or
program if certain conditions are true. There are
register IF instructions and input/output IF
instructions.
SELECT instructions - Branch to one of
several jump or call instructions, depending on
the value of a register.

Audio:
Conditional branching instructions branch from one place to another in a program, depending on
whether certain conditions are true. There are two kinds of conditional branching instructions:
IF instructions which branch to a specified label or program if certain conditions are true. There
are register IF instructions and input/output IF instructions.
And there is the SELECT instructions which branch to one of several jump or call
instructions, depending on the value of a register.

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3.10

Slide 11-IF Register


Program Instructions

IF Register

Condition

IF R[x] [operator] [value]


Direct:

[action]

Register #

= equal

constant value

Indirect:

<> not equal

R[x] where value


= contents of
R[x]

R[x] where register #=


contents of R[x]

< less than


<= less than or
equal
> greater
than or
equal

JMP LBL[x]
CALL program

IF R [1] = 1 AND R [2] = 2 AND DI [2] = ON, JMP LBL [2]

Audio:
Register IF instructions compare the value contained in a register with another value and then
take an action if the comparison is true.
For an IF instruction, conditions can be connecting using AND or OR.
Looking at the example shown, the IF is checking to see if Register 1 is equal to 1 AND Register
2 is equal to 2 AND Digital Input 2 is ON. When all three conditions are true, then the action is
to jump to label 2.

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3.11

Slide 12-Example #1 IF Register


Program Instructions

Example #1 IF Register
R[1: Number of welds]
R[2: Number of Tip Dresses]
DI[2: Zone is Clear]
IF R[1] >= 3000 and R[2] = 5 and DI[2]=ON, JMP LBL [2]

Audio:
In this example, Register 1 is tracking the number of welds
Register 2 is tracking the number of tip dresses
Digital Input 2 is used to determine if the Zone is clear
So If the number of welds in register 1 is greater than or equal to 3000 and the caps have
already been shaved or dressed more than five times which is determined by the value in
register 2 AND the zone is clear which Digital Input [2] is equal to ON of other equipment
then jump to another part of the program to execute the Cap Change program which means
its time to change weld caps.

Program Instruction

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3.12

Slide 13-Example #2 IF Register


Program Instructions

Example #2 IF Register
R[1: Number of parts on the pallet]
R[2: Number pallets stacked]
DO[2: Request for Fork Truck]

If R[1] >= 30 and R[2] = 5,


JMP LBL [2]
.
.
.
LBL 2
DO[2]=ON

Audio:
In example 2 IF the number of parts on the pallet is greater than or equal to 30 which is
determined by register 1 number value indicates that the pallet is full AND the number of pallets
stacked in register 2 is equal to 5 then jump to another part of the program to turn on the light
beacon Digital Output [2] for the Fork Truck indicating that these are ready to go.

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3.13

Slide 14-IF Input/Output


Program Instructions

IF Input/Output

Condition

IF [I/O] [operator] [value]

JMP LBL[x]

DO[x]
DI[x]
RO[x]

[action]

= equal
<> not equal

RI[x]
SO[x]
SI[x]
UO[x]
UI[x]

IF DI [10]=ON OR R [7]=R [8], JMP LBL [2]

CALL program
R[X]
On
Off

DO[x]
DI[x]
RO[x]
RI[x]
SO[x]
SI[x]
UO[x]
UI[x]

Audio:
Input/output IF instructions compare an input or output value with another value and take an
action if the comparison is true.
You cannot mix the AND or OR operators in the same operation.
Here is an example of using an OR operator. The IF is checking to see if Digital Input #10 is
ON -OR- Register 7 has the same value as Register 8. In the event one of the two conditions is
true, then the action will jump to label 2.

Program Instruction

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3.14

Slide 15-Example #3 IF / OR
Program Instructions

Example #3 IF / OR
DO[10: Conveyor Running]
R[7: Number of parts processed]
R[8: Maximum number of parts]
LBL [1]
.
.
.
If DO[10] = OFF OR R[7] = R[8],
JMP LBL [2]
.
.
.
JMP LBL [1]
LBL [2]
END

Audio:
In example 3, If the conveyor Digital Output [10] has been shut off, or if the number of parts
processed in register 7 equals the number of parts needed in register 8, then the logic jumps to
the end of the program. Otherwise the program jumps back to the beginning to continue to run
until it processes all the parts needed.

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3.15

Slide 16-IF Procedure

Audio:
This video will demonstration the steps to create an IF Register program instructions.
1

Select the program to be edited.

Arrow down to the End to add the new Program Instruction or insert a new program line if
needed.

Turn the Teach Pendant switch to the On position.

Press the NEXT key to add the new Program Instruction

Press F1 key labeled INSTRUCTION

Arrow down to highlight the IF/SELECT instruction

Press ENTER to select the instruction

Select the appropriate operator for the IF statement. This demonstration is using the equal
operator, press ENTER to select it.

Press ENTER again to select Register statement

10 Select the Register number for the IF instruction. This demonstration will use a constant
value to compare against Register 1
11 Enter in the constant value to compare with.

Program Instruction

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This completes a condition portion of the If statement. Arrow down to select AND if you desire
another condition

3.16

Slide 17-You Try It IF Register

Audio:
Here you will need recall all the steps needed to create an IF Register program instruction.

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3.17

Slide 18-SELECT Instructions


Program Instructions

SELECT Instructions

MAIN2:
1:LBL[1]
2: SELECT R[5:PRGSLCT]=1 CALL PROG1
3:
=2 CALL PROG2
4:
=3 CALL PROG3
5:
ELSE JMP LBL[1]
L P[7] 2000mm/s CNT80
END

Audio:
A select instruction compares the value of a register with one of several values and takes an
action if the comparison is true:
If the value of the register equals one of the values, the jump or call instruction associated with
that value is executed.
If the value of the register does not equal one of the values, the jump or call instruction
associated with the word ELSE is executed.
In the program example shown, once the program has captured a valid number, it will execute
this program once and then it will move on to the next instruction.

Program Instruction

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3.18

Slide 19-SELECT Instruction Procedure

Audio:
This video will demonstration all the steps that are needed to call specific programs based on a
Registers value utilizing the SELECT branching instructions.
1

Select and edit the program to add the instructions to. Tturn on the teach pendant.

Press the Next key to display the F1 instruction choice.

Press Function 1 to select the SELECT instruction

Arrow down to line 3 labeled IF/SELECT

Press ENTER to select the instruction. All the IF and SELECT choices will appear. You
must press line 8 labeled next page to view the SELECT instruction choices. We will use
all three SELECT instructions listed here to accomplish the task.

Select the first item labeled SELECT Register equal to.

Enter register 5

Press Enter

Now select Constant

10 Within Register 5, determine if the content contains the value 1.


11 If the value is 1, then issue a CALL instruction to PROGRAM 1

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12 To add additional branching instructions, we need to insert two more select conditions.
13 Arrow down to IF/SELECT and press ENTER
14 Once again, select NEXT PAGE to view the SELECT instruction choices.
15 This time select item 2 labeled <select> equal
16 Now we will determine if Register 5, contains the value 2.
17 Select the CALL instruction
18 If the register 5 contains the value 2, select the program name PROG2
19 Now we will repeat the process to insert another CALL instruction to Program name
PROG 3
20 Now insert the ELSE JUMP LABEL instruction in the event that Register 5 does not contain
the values 1, 2 or 3
21 Enter the value 1 to jump to label 1
This completes the SELECT instruction demonstration. Press the next slide icon at the bottom
of the course window to continue the course.

Program Instruction

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3.19

Slide 20-SELECT Instructions You Try it

Audio:
This is your opportunity to recall the steps needed to call specific programs based on a register
value utilizing the select branching instructions.

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3.20

Slide 21-WAIT Instruction

Audio:
WAIT condition instructions delay program execution until specified conditions are true or until
an amount of time elapses (a timeout occurs). The timeout can be specified as one of the
following:
Forever - the program will wait until the condition is true.
Timeout, LBL[i] - the program will wait for the time specified in Timeout . If the condition is still
not true, the program will branch to the specified label.
You can specify the timeout by setting the system variable $WAITTMOUT to a time, in
milliseconds. The default timeout value is 3000 milliseconds which is 3 seconds. You can
change this system variable by going to MENU , SYSTEM then press F1 labeled TYPE and
select Variable.
The example shown will wait for Digital Input 1 to equal On and Digital Input 2 to equal ON for 3
seconds (based off the system variable WAIT default setting), if the digital inputs do not turn on,
then the program will move to label 1.

Program Instruction

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3.21

Slide 22-REMARK Instruction


Program Instructions

REMARK Instruction

Remark

/PROGRAM INTFZONE
1: !Run interference zones
Miscellaneous statements
1 RSR [ ]
2 UALM [ ]
3 TIMER [ ]
4 OVERRIDE
5 Remark
6 Message
7 Parameter Name

Audio:
Now we will discuss the Miscellaneous Instructions.
The Remark instructions allow you to annotate the program. Remark information does not affect
the execution of the program. When you add a remark instruction, you enter the message to
display within the program. The remark instruction can be from 1 to 32 alphabetic, numeric,
punctuation, and blank space characters. The first character of a remark instruction is an
exclamation point (!).

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3.22

Slide 23-OVERRIDE Instruction


Program Instructions

OVERRIDE Instruction
1: OVERRIDE = 100 %

Audio:
The OVERRIDE instruction sets the speed override to a percentage value of the programmed
speed. So if your Teach pendant is set at 50% as shown in this screen, inserting an
OVERRIDE instruction of 100% will ensure the program will run at that percentage speed.

Program Instruction

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3.23

Slide 24-MESSAGE Instruction

Audio:
The MESSAGE instruction displays the specified message on the USER screen. The message
can be from 1 to 23 alphabetic, numeric, punctuation, and blank space characters. If you want a
blank line between messages, leave the message content empty.
When the MESSAGE instruction is executed, the user screen is displayed automatically.

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3.24

Slide 25-TIMER Instruction

Audio:
Timer instructions allow you to start, stop, and reset up to ten different timers in a program.
Timers allow you to determine how long a routine takes to execute, or how long your entire
production program takes to execute. Timers can be started in one program and then stopped in
another.
The timer result can be viewed press MENU , press 0 for next, then select STATUS. Press
F1 for TYPE then select Program Timer

Program Instruction

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3.25

Slide 26-Module Complete


Program Instructions

Module Complete
Next 5 slides will present questions to text
your knowledge
80% or higher is passing
If you need to take the quiz again, close the
course and reopen it again

Start the Quiz

Audio:
This completes the Program Instructions module. The next few slide will provide the opportunity
to test your knowledge and comprehension.

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ArcTool Programming

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System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA

4 ARCTOOL PROGRAMMING
ArcTool Information

ArcTool Overview

Audio:
This module will discuss how to setup and teach an Arc Welding program.

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4.1 Slide 2-Module Content


ArcTool Information

Module Content

ArcTool Program Guideline


Weld I/O
Setup and Select Weld Equipment
ArcTool Instructions

Arc Weld Schedule

Weld Enable
Weave Patterns

ArcTool Default Instructions


Delay Time

Weave Instructions
Weave Schedule

Torchmate

Audio:
In this module we will cover ArcTool Programming guideline
A Weld input and output discussion
How to setup and select weld equipment
ArcTool program instructions
How to set the ArcTool default instructions to make it easier to program
Using the Arc Weld schedule and an understanding of the delay time
How to enable the weld
An understanding of Weave pattern choices and inserting weave instructions into a
program that uses the weave schedule
And we will wrap up with torchmate option

Modifying a Program
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

4.2 Slide 3-ArcTool Program Guidelines


ArcTool Information

ArcTool Program Guidelines


Use fine termination for weld start and weld end.
Use linear or circular motion type and CNT 100
termination type in motion instructions during arc welding
(weld points).
Position the torch in the correct position and orientation
depending on your joint type.
Minimize changes in wrist orientation.
Use the proper schedule for each position; consult
application process specification information for your
application.

Audio:
Use the following guidelines when you teach an Arc Welding program:
Use fine termination type for weld start and weld end instructions. Because the starting and
ending of the weld must be accurately located.
Use linear or circular motion type and Continuous 100 termination type in motion instructions
during arc welding (weld points), because it will maintain the proper stick-out and prevent
pausing and point locations
Position the torch in the correct position and orientation depending on your joint type.
Minimize changes in wrist orientation, because this will help avoid singularity issues along
maintaining a straight tooling position.
Use the proper weld schedule for each position as using the proper schedule will ensure weld
quality.

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4.3 Slide 4-Weld I/O


ArcTool Information

Weld I/O
ArcTool supports:
Analog and Digital I/O
DeviceNet is another method
ArcLink is the newest robotic interface
ArcLink XT (Ethernet)

Audio:
When configuring Input and Outputs, ArcTool supports several different types of connections to
the welding equipment and the choice is governed by the specific equipment chosen for your
application. The welding equipment can be connected to the robot controller with analog and
digital I/O, DeviceNet, or ArcLink.
Analog and Digital I/O hardware is the traditional way to connect a robot and a welding power
supply. Typically a Process I/O board and a standard weld cable are used. Modular I/O (Model
A) is also used, but less often. The Lincoln Electric PowerWave 450 and Invertec STT II series
use the analog and digital I/O interface. Welding equipment that uses the Process I/O board
connects to the welding input and output signals on the CRW1 connector.
DeviceNet is another method to connect to some models of Lincoln Electric weld equipment.
Instead of individual connections for each signal, analog and digital I/O signals are transmitted
over a 5 wire CAN (Controller Area Network) network using serial communication. Explicit
messaging is also used to exchange setup information. A DeviceNet DNP scanner from SS
Technologies and a PC-104 Motherboard are required.
ArcLink is the newest robotic interface to Lincoln Electric weld equipment. ArcLink is a CAN
2.0B based serial communication network similar to DeviceNet. It requires the same interface
boards that are used with DeviceNet but has different DIP switch settings and cabling. ArcLink
has a substantially richer interface than DeviceNet, allowing for tighter integration and faster
control from ArcTool.
The weld controller in the ArcLink XT system handles the signal processing for you and does
not require adjustment

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4.4 Slide 5-Controlled Start R-J3 thru R-3iB

Audio:
The next several slides, will be discussing setting up the weld equipment. This requires a
controlled start. Controlled start is where you set up hardware equipment, robot motion
parameters, execute any software setup, installing options and updates, or loading or setting
system variables to the robot.
Controlled start for R-J3 through R-J3iB is executed by holding the PREVIOUS AND NEXT keys
on the teach pendant while powering up the robot.

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4.5 Slide 6-Controlled Start for R-30iA

Audio:
For the R-30iA, you can cycle power from the function menu or turn off the disconnect while
holding down the PREVIOUS and NEXT keys.

Modifying a Program

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4.6 Slide 7-@ Controlled Start Weld I/O Equipment Selection


Audio:
The following Configuration Menu will appear. Press the numeric key number 3 labeled
CONTROLLED START and press ENTER . After selecting Controlled start The Weld
equipment manufacturer and model will appear.
Cursor down to item 6 labeled Manufacturer and select F4 CHOICE.

View your choices and select the appropriate manufacturer. This example, we selected Lincoln.
When highlighted the manufacturer, press ENTER to select it.

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Next arrow down to line 7 labeled Model. Press F4 CHOICE and highlight the power supply of
your choice and press ENTER to select.

When done, press the FCTN key and enter on START COLD

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4.7 Slide 8-Setting up the Welding System


Audio:
After installing the weld power supply that will be used, verify the weld system setup menu to
ensure to proper operation of your system.
To get to this menu, Press Menu, select Setup, then press F1 TYPE and select Weld System
For detail of each of these items, refer to the ArcTool manual that came with your robot.
Typically, the default values are set correctly.

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4.8 Slide 9-Weld Equipment


Audio:
The weld equipment is accessed when you select Menu, then Setup, select Weld Equipment
from the TYPE function key, you will find that dependent on the type of equipment that was
installed during controlled start, this menu will display different choices that is custom to that
equipment. For example, this screen is showing General Purpose. Whereas when selecting
Lincoln Electric PowerWave with ArcLink as the Weld equipment, then this screen will display
different choices that is specific to that equipment.

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4.9 Slide 10-Setting Lincoln Equipment


Audio:
This example will demonstrate using the Lincoln equipment.
If you want to search for pulse welding process, cursor down on to line 3 as shown here. Press
Function 4 labeled YES, then cursor down to line 4 for wire type, then press F4 labeled
CHOICE and the following choices will appear. We will select STEEL.

Now that we have set the criteria for SEARCH parameters for lines 2-4, press F3 labeled
SEARCH and the following screen will appear. The choices displayed show the wire diameter
and process that can be selected for use. Cursor down will provide more choices. This
example, we will selected process 19 using the Function 2 labeled SELECT.

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The final screen appears filling in line 1 with the specific process selected for use.

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4.10

Slide 11-Arc Defaults Instruction Demo

Audio:
A list of default motion instructions is provided for ease of programming. These contain the
motion type, speed and other items to create the program. These defaults may be changed as
needed.
When setting your default motion statements, be sure that the shift key is not depressed when
you press F1 .
Notice the F1 is labeled ED_DEF which means EDIT DEFAULTS. When you press F1 again,
all the default motion statements will be displayed for editing.

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This example we will change the motion type to Circular.


When finished, press F5 labeled DONE.
After you have defined the default instructions you can add them to the program. You select
one of the available default instructions to be the current default instruction by moving the cursor
to that instruction. You can define and change default instructions any time while you write or
modify a program.
If the F1 key is pressed without the shift key depressed, the default motion statement will be
displayed and will highlight the last edited line. So, when recording points, while using the
SHIFT F1 key, the highlighted motion statement will be inserted.
FCTN 2 through FCTN 4 keys provide ArcTool Default motion instructions that also can be
displayed and modified as shown here.

To teach the default motion instruction that was selected, hold the SHIFT then press F1 and
the Circular instruction will be inserted.
In this example, this is not the default motion statement desired. We will delete this instruction.
We are going to change the default motion selection
We will highlight the desired default motion statement and press enter. This will do two things, it
will insert it into the program, plus it will become the selected motion statement for further use.

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4.11

Slide 12-Arc Programming

Audio:
This demonstration is showing is how to program using the default motion statements keys we
had shown previously.
Welding will not occur unless the weld enable output is turned on. Hold the Shift while
depressing the weld enable key.
Note the LED light is turned on, displaying weld enable. CAUTION, when this light is lit and the
program runs, welding will occur when an arc start command is encountered.
The robot default speed must be set to 100% for welding to occur even with the weld enable
turned on.
As you watch this simulation program run, note that at each corner the weld speed commands
are utilizing the travel speed specified in the weld schedule. Additionally, notice how the robot
does not slow down at each corner of the box because of the continuous 100 termination type.

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4.12

Slide 13-Weld Enabled Key

Audio:
The previous demonstration showed enabling the weld using the Weld Enable key while holding
the SHIFT key and the Weld enable LED light displayed.
When you press the Weld Enable key WITHOUT the shift key, the following screen will display
allowing you to TOGGLE weld enable output from TRUE TO FALSE using the F5 key.
CAUTION once the weld enable output has been set to true, any time an arc start command is
seen in the program, welding will begin.

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4.13

Slide 14-Arc Start


ArcTool Information

Arc Start
Arc
Arc
Arc
Arc
Arc

Start
Start
Start
Start
Start

[ i
[v,
[v,
[a,
[a]

]
wfs]
a]
wfs]

Arc Start [..., ...]


[v, wfs]
v: voltage, in Volts
wfs: wire feed speed, in mm/sec,
cm/min, or IPM (inches per
minute)

MIG with wire feed speed control

[v, a]
v: voltage, in Volts
a: amperage, in Amps

MIG with Weld Power Control =


CURRENT on the SETUP Weld
Equip screen

[a, wfs]
a: amperage, in Amps
wfs: wire feed speed, in mm/sec,
cm/min, or IPM (inches per
minute)

TIG with the wire feed speed


control option

Audio:
Starting with Arc Start Instruction
Arc start instructions tell the robot to begin the arc weld.
The Arc Start [integer] instruction initiates arc welding using the specified weld schedule which
will be discussed later.
The Arc Start with bracketed values instruction initiates arc welding using the voltage, wire feed
speed, and amperage specified in the instruction. The format of the instruction depends on the
kind of welding (MIG or TIG) and the weld equipment setup selected.

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4.14

Slide 15-Arc End

Audio:
Arc End instructions tell the robot to end the arc weld. There are two types of arc end
instructions:
The Arc End with an integer will stops arc welding using the specified weld schedule number
which will be discussed later.
OR you could use Arc End and within the brackets, enter in a voltage or amperage, wire feed
speed, and delay time to stops arc welding. Again, the format of the instruction depends on the
kind of welding and the weld equipment setup.

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4.15

Slide 19-Arc Weld Schedule

Audio:
Arc welding uses weld schedules to control welding conditions. A schedule defines the
information that determines how the welding will be performed.
You can access weld schedules from the DATA menu, which is shown here. Note the two
columns of inches per minute.

The Weld Schedule DETAIL screen will provide further detail when you press F2. The
information displayed on this screen will vary depending on your arc welding system setup. The
first inches per minutes column is wire feed and the next is travel speed.

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Line item 5 labeled Delay Time is the amount of time to delay for craterfill during Arc End. The
next slide will provide an example.

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4.16

Slide 20-Delay Time

Audio:
The craterfill picture shown below displays insufficient filler material at the end of a weld. By
entering in a delay time, the forward motion of the robot stops, but the arc remains established
and the wire continues to be fed using the specified time enter here.

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4.17

Slide 21-Arc Start Schedule demo

Audio:
This demonstration is showing how to insert an Arc Start instruction and what weld schedule to
use. As you view the program, notice line 1 is using user frame 1 as the active user frame.

Note that the travel speed of the robot in line 10 is traveling at 30 millimeter per second. This
will override the schedule 1s travel speed of 20 inches per minute.

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To use the schedules travel speed, cursor over to 30mm/sec within line 10 of the program.
Press F3 labeled WELD. The newly inserted Weld Speed instructions indicates to use the
speed that is in schedule 1 for the robot travel speed as the Arc Start in line 9 is calling
schedule 1.
Now that we have added the Arc Start instruction, we need to include an Arc End instruction at
the proper point in the program.
In this example we will insert the Arc End instruction on line 15. Press F1 for instructions and
select Arc. Cursor down to Arc End and press ENTER . Select Schedule 1 and ENTER . If
the delay time required to end the weld is in schedule 2, then you can select that at the arc end
statement, meaning that you do not need to use the same schedule that started the welding to
end the welding.

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4.18

Slide 23-Weave Instructions


ArcTool Information

Weave Instructions
Weave
Sine
Figure Eight
Circle
Weave L
Weave End

Audio:
Weave instructions tell the robot to use a weave pattern to arc weld. Weaving is an oscillation of
the welding torch in a particular pattern.
There are basically 5 weave instructions, 4 of which designate the pattern of the weave and the
5th will end weaving.
The weave instructions is entered on program line of its own. In other words, it cannot be an
option to an existing program instruction.
The weave is similar to the weld process in that you need to setup the weave and specify a
weave schedule.

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4.19

Slide 24-Arc Weave Setup

Audio:
Weave Setup allows you to adjust the parameters that control weaving. For most applications,
the default settings should be fine and there is no reason to change them. The Weave is
accessed from the Setup menu then select Weave

Each line item listed will affect the weave pattern. For explanation of each item, refer to the
ArcTool manual that came with your robot.

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4.20

Slide 25-Weave Schedule

Audio:
When applying weave instruction in a program, you select a weave schedule. To view the
weave schedule and the detail information, press the DATA key, then select F1 TYPE to
select Weave Schedule

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And the following will appear. Select F2 labeled DETAIL.

Item one specifies the weave frequency in cycles per second. The valid range of frequency is
from 0.1 to 10 Hertz for conventional 6-Axis weaving, and 0.1 to 30 Hertz for Wrist Axis
Weaving. The actual frequency that will be achieved depends on several factors including

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weave amplitude and dwell time. This parameter is not an absolute value for weave frequency.
It is a reference value where higher numbers result in faster weaving.
Line item 2 labeled Amplitude is the distance from the centerline of the weave pattern to each
peak. The valid range of amplitude is from .1 to 25.0 millimeters.
Line item 3 labeled Right Dwell is the amount of time the robot delays at the right side of the
weld. The valid range of right dwell is from 0.0 to 32 seconds.
Line item 4 labeled Left Dwell is the amount of time the robot pauses at the left side of the weld.
The valid range of left dwell is from 0.0 to 32 seconds.
Lines 3 & 4 does not affect circle or figure 8 patterns as there is not delay these patterns.

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4.21

Slide 26-Weave Instruction Program

Audio:
This slide is demonstrating how insert a Weave instructions into an existing program. As
mentioned previously, the Weave must be on its own program line and must follow the Arc Start
Instructions.
Here are all the weave pattern choices. We will select Circle for this demonstration.
We will select weave schedule 1.
Once again, we will insert another line for the Weave End instruction

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4.22

Slide 28-Path Jogging

Audio:
Now that we have shown how to create an ArcTool program, you can jog the robot using the
PATH jog coordinate system that will correspond to the current path of the paused Arctool
program. The PATH coordinate can only be used while a program is paused and while
executing a linear or circular motion instruction.
When you jog the robot using the PATH coordinate system, the robot will move in the frame
created by the currently paused motion instruction.
In PATH jogging, the +x jog key moves the Tool Center Point along the path. The +y jog key
moves the TCP across the path and the +z jog key moves the Tool Center Point along the
direction of the tool frame or stick out.
You cannot use the PATH jog coordinate system any other time.

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4.23

Slide 29-TorchMate
ArcTool Information

TorchMate

Audio:
Now we will discuss Torchmate 3 option. Torchmate 3 works with controller version 6????
(JOE PLEASE LET ME KNOW) And above
The TorchMate option provides an easy-to-use solution for automatically adjust the Tool Center
Point (TCP) on single motion group systems, or for systems that incorporate the MultiARM
feature (two or more robots controlled by a single controller). TorchMate automatically
compensates for bent torch barrels and worn contact tips to reduce weld defects and increase
system productivity.
TorchMate compensates for variation of the TCP in x and y, or in x, y, and z directions. A
voltage is applied to the welding wire and an input is received when the wire contacts the
TorchMate touch block. TorchMate does not compensate for variation in orientation
Multi-equipment for single robot cases is supported by teaching another Utool on the same
robot group and assigning the equipment number in the TorchMate SETUP DATA screen.
When you use TorchMate, you start with a system that is fully functional and has a properly
defined Tool Center Point. Then you set up TorchMate and perform TorchMate mastering of the
TCP for each robot. Since TorchMate provides an executable program for each robot group (up
to four robots), it can be called either automatically (for example, every 50 production parts), or
manually, whenever desired.

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4.24

Slide 30-TorchMate Video


ArcTool Information

Torchmate Video

Audio:
As you view this video, the first pass shows the normal weld path with the correct Tool center
point.
The next pass will show the tcp has been altered possibly due to a torch collision.
The tcp for the torch needs to be re-adjusted. The torchmate adjust program will be called to
correct the TCP. This is done by sensing two sides of the torchmate block plate. The
information gathered from the sensing will be loaded into a position register which applies an
offset to correct the TCP.
Notice the next pass is showing the corrected TCP.

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4.25

Slide 31-Installing & Aligning the Touch Block


ArcTool Information

Installing & Aligning the Touch Block

Audio:
When installing and aligning the touch block, allow space within the work envelope for a 250
mm "edge search" along the robot world frame x and y directions, and within the robot workcell.
If you are using automatic TorchMate adjustment, place the block in a location which minimizes
motion from the last weld position used. Similarly, if you are using automatic torch cleaner
equipment, locate the block close to that equipment prior to using TorchMate adjustment.
Make sure the torch mate block share the same ground potential as the welder, otherwise
the search routine will not work.
Allow a minimum of 3 of clear space under the cut out to prevent false detections from
the mounting plate surface.
Mount the plate such that the notch is in the robots world frame negative X and Y
quadrant as shown here.
You need to teach a TorchMate reference position for each tool frame that you want to adjust
with TorchMate. You must move the robot to the reference position so that the torch is parallel
to the z-axis of the WORLD frame, with the torch pointing in the -z direction and the tip of the
wire touching the tip of the touch block pointer.

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4.26

Slide 32-Setup TorchMate

Audio:
Once you are in the Setup screen, there are some key items to focus on they are: Tool number,
Group number, Weld equipment number, Input signal, Output signal, Search speed, Wire
advance time, Wire retract time. Equipment numbers are correct and the input signal is defined.
Tool Number = The tool defined for the torch you are using
Group number = The group you are using in the event of a multi group configuration
Weld equipment = The weld equipment define to the group you are using
Input signal = is the missing input definition in the weld input screen as shown here with the
missing value of 3. This is your touch sensing Input value to be used in the Search settings
Output signal = is again the missing output definition in the weld output screen when you
select the Output screen as just discussed with in the input signal
Search Speed = The speed the robot will search with. Be cautious when setting this speed aggressive search speed will bend the wire and result in poor recordings.
Wire advance time = Set the time long enough to feed fresh wire a minimum the length of the
taught TCP

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Wire retract time = Set this time to retract the wire upon touch completion 2mm the length of
the taught TCP. The retract value shown here is slightly longer than the feed time.
All other values not discussed can be left at default settings.
With robot perpendicular and over the torch mate pointer teach the reference position. Press
and hold the shift and F4 key to record this position. The reference position under the setup
screen will change to RECORDED. With the reference position taught the TCP can now be
mastered. Set the Jog Overide to 100% and Press and hold the SHIFT key and press F2 ,
labeled MASTER. The robot will Move and establish a master reference positions. Upon
completion the robot will move the TCP back to the reference position. The mastering status will
change to done.
Failure to reference at 100% will result in inaccurate corrections later on.

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4.27

Slide 33-Execute TM_ADJST Macro

ArcTool Information

Execute TM_ADJST Macro


Select the TM_ADJST Macro when the
Tool Center Point needs to be adjusted
Select the program from the SELECT menu
OR
Use a call statement within your program

Audio:
Use the macro named TM_ADJST to update the TCP once mastering has been established.
You will need to execute the TM-ADJST Macro when the following situations occur:
-

Before teaching points or touching up program positions

After a crash a crash not matter how minor

Between maintenance routines to correct wearing of the contact tips

Whenever a welding torch is switched or replaced

Failure to consistently use and execute the TM-ADJST macro to maintain a good TCP will result
in poor performance

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4.28

Slide 34-View the TCP Offsets


ArcTool Information

View the TCP Offsets


DATA TorchMate
Date
DATA
F1 [TYPE]
TorchMate

Time

E1 G1
G T

1 20-APR 10:49 1 1

Mastered X Y

2 19-APR 13:59 2 1

.45

4.64 0.00

3 19-APR 13:59 1 1

.45

.09 0.00

4 19-APR 13:59 2 1

.45

4.64 0.00

5 19-APR 13:58 1 1

.09

-.61 0.00

6 19-APR 13:58 2 1

.81

4.64 0.00

7 19-APR 13:57 1 1

.45

.09 0.00

8 19-APR 13:57 2 1

.71

4.64 0.00

9 19-APR 13:57 1 1

-.61

0.00 0.00

Audio:
To view the TorchMate history press the DATA key, then press F1 for TYPE and select
TORCHMATE. Every time the TM_AJST macro runs, it captures the difference between the
mastered position and the current TCP, it is not an accumulated value between every touch.
The reordered difference is what is used to correct the running TCP. For record keeping
purposes the execution history is time and date stamped.

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4.29

Slide 35-Course Overview


ArcTool Information

Course Overview

ArcTool Program Guideline


Weld I/O
Setup and Select Weld Equipment
ArcTool Instructions

Arc Weld Schedule

Weld Enable
Weave Patterns

ArcTool Default Instructions


Delay Time

Weave Instructions
Weave Schedule

Torchmate
Begin taking quiz

Audio:
This wraps up this module.
You learned the ArcTool Program rules to follow such as Using fine termination for weld start
and weld end.
And use linear or circular motion type and CNT 100 termination type in motion instructions
during arc welding (weld points).
How to setup up the Weld Input/Outputs
We discussed setting up the Weld Equipment that will differ from equipment to equipment
You learned how to set ArcTool default instruction to make programming easier
How to use Arc weld schedule and define the delay time
How the weld is in enabled
Then we covered Weave Pattern instructions and schedule
Finally we wrapped up with setting up Torchmate.
The next several slides will provide you an opportunity to test your knowledge of the material
presented in the module.

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5 MODIFYING A PROGRAM
Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

Modifying Programs

Using the Edit Command Menu

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5.1 Slide 2-Modifying Programs


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

Modifying Programs

Inserting blank lines into a Program.


Deleting lines from a Program
Copying and Pasting lines within a Program
Finding program instructions within a
Program
Replacing Items
Renumbering Positional IDs
Turning ON and OFF Comments
And the UNDO function

Audio:
In this Module we will discuss how to Modify programs. We will cover the following topics:
Inserting blank lines into a Program.

Deleting lines from a Program

Copying and Pasting lines within a Program

Finding program instructions within a Program

Replacing Items

Renumbering Positional IDs

Turning ON and OFF Comments

And the UNDO function

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5.2 Slide 3-INSERT

Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

Modifying Programs - INSERT

Audio:
To Modify a program, bring the program up on the Full Edit Screen all the items covered in this
Module are found in the Edit Command Key function 5.
The first option is to Insert Blank lines. Select the INSERT option you will be prompted How
Many Lines to Insert? Enter the number of lines to be inserted then press the ENTER key.
The blank lines will be inserted above the current location of the cursor.

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5.3 Slide 4-DELETE

Audio:
The second option under the Edit Command Key is Delete.
Once you have selected the Delete option you can move the cursor to select multiple lines to
delete. When you have selected the lines, confirm deleting those
Lines with the F4 labeled YES. The UNDO function is detailed later

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5.4 Slide 5-COPY

Audio:
The COPY function allows you to copy a single or a group of instructions. Press F5 labeled
EDCMD which will display the Edit Command Popup menu and select COPY. Next you need
to select F1 labeled COPY. Then cursor up or down to select the lines that you want to copy
and press the F1 again to actually COPY to those into memory

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5.5 Slide 6-PASTE

Audio:
When the lines of instructions have been copied which was shown from the previous slide , the
PASTE function allows you to paste a single or a group of instructions. Select F5 labeled
PASTE, then select the method in which you would like to paste the copied lines. The lines can
be pasted in normal or reversed order in a variety of ways.

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5.6 Slide 7-PASTE-F2 Logic


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F2 LOGIC
SAMPLE PROGRAM

PASTED PROGRAM

(F2) LOGIC - adds the lines exactly as they were copied,


does not record positions, but leaves the position numbers
blank.

Audio:
Paste using LOGIC command will add the lines exactly as they were copied, at the cursor
position. This does not record positions, but leaves the position numbers blank as shown here
with the dots. In this example the cursor was below line 6, CALL HOME and created lines 7
through 12.

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5.7 Slide 8-9 PASTE F3 POS-ID


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F3 POS-ID

Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F3 POS-ID
SAMPLE PROGRAM

PASTED PROGRAM

(F3) POS-ID - adds the lines exactly as they were copied, and
retains the current position numbers.

Audio:
(F3) POS-Identification
Will add lines exactly as they were copied, at the cursor position and retain the current position
numbers. In this example the cursor was below the CALL HOME of line 6.

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5.8 Slide 10-11 PASTE F4 POSITION


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F4 POSITION

Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F4 POSITION
SAMPLE PROGRAM

PASTED PROGRAM

(F4) POSITION - adds the lines exactly as they were copied,


and renumbers the copied positions with the next available
position numbers. All positional data is transferred.

Audio:
(F4) POSITION
Will add lines exactly as they were copied and renumbers the copied positions with the next
available position number at the cursor position. All positional data is transferred. In this
example Position 1 is the same as position 5. Position 2 is the same as position 6 and so on.

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5.9 Slide 12-REVERSE PASTE


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

Modifying Programs REVERSE PASTE

Audio:
By selecting the NEXT key you can reverse paste the lines that were copied.

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5.10

Slide 13-PASTE - F1 R-LOGIC


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F1 R-LOGIC

Audio:
When using function 1 labeled R-LOGIC R for Reverse

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5.11

Slide 14-PASTE F1 R-LOGIC

Audio:
(NEXT+F1) R-LOGIC
Will add lines in reverse order, at the cursor position and will not record the positions, but leaves
the position numbers blank. In this example the cursor was below the CALL HOME of line 6.

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5.12

Slide 15-PASTE F2 R-POS-ID


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F2 R-POS-ID

Audio:
When using function 2 - Reverse-Position-Identification

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5.13

Slide 16-PASTE F2 R POS-ID

Audio:
(NEXT+F2) R-POS-ID
Will add lines in reverse order and retains their original position numbers. In this example the
cursor was below the CALL HOME of line 6. As you can see the numeric values are in reverse
sequence order.

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5.14

Slide 17-PASTE F4 R-POS


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F4 R-POS

Audio:
When using function 4 R-POS Reversed Position

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5.15

Slide 18-PASTE F4 R-POS

Audio:
(NEXT+F4) R-POS
Will add lines in reverse order at the cursor position and renumbers the copied positions with
the next available position numbers. In this example the cursor was below the CALL HOME of
line 6. The last position was P[4], so when pasting it would generate the next positions starting
with 5 through 8 in reverse order.

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5.16

Slide 19-PASTE F3 RM-POS-ID


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F3 RM-POS-ID

Audio:
When using Function 3 Reversed Motion, Position, and Identification. Note: some Teach
Pendants will display the remainder label name of ID on to F4 as shown here.

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MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.17

Slide 20-PASTE F3 RM-POS-ID

(NEXT+F3) RM-POS-ID Reverse Position


Motion ID paste all instructions except motion
instructions in reverse order. Motion instructions
are created using the current (first) and next
(second) motion instruction. Original position
numbers are retained. Speed and termination
types are pasted in the proper instructions to
maintain the original speed and termination of
each path segment
You might use Reversed Motion Position & ID to
retrace a complex path such as withdrawing the
robot from a location with tight clearances. As
you watch the path of the sample program the robot will move from Position 1 to position 2 at a
fast 500mm per second. Then from P2 to P3 it will run at 50% of maximum speed, then from P3
to P4 at 10 mm per second.
The reverse of this path must maintain the same speed and termination type. When using
Function 3 Reverse Motion Position & ID, the robot will retrace the sample program steps.
From position 4 to position 3 traveling at 10 mm per second, then from P3 to P2 it will run at
50% of maximum speed, then from P2 to P1 it will run 500 mm per second.

Modifying a Program
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.18

Slide 21-PASTE F5 RM-POS


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

PASTE F5 RM-POS

Audio:
F5 RM-POS Reversed Motion and Position

149

150

Modifying a Program
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.19

Slide 22-PASTE F5 RM-POS

Audio:
(NEXT+F5) RM-POS This is exactly like the RM-POS-ID that was just shown in the previous
slide, except that new Position numbers are assigned in the pasted lines. So example shown
here, the next position will become P[5] in reverse order. P8 is the same position as P4, and
P7 is the same as P3 etc.

Modifying a Program
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.20

Slide 23-FIND
Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

Modifying Programs - FIND

Audio:
The FIND function under the Edit Command Key allows us to search a Program for specific
Program Instructions. The FIND function will search the Program from the cursor down.

151

152

Modifying a Program
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.21

Slide 24-REPLACE

Audio:
The REPLACE option will help you to Modify Registers, Modify Motion Speed and Termination,
Inputs and Outputs, Jump Labels, Calls and Time Before and Time After.
Under the Motion Modify option you can Replace Speed and Termination, and also Insert or
Remove Options.

Modifying a Program
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.22

Slide 25-RENUMBERING

Audio:
The RENUMBER function reassigns all position numbers in the program so that they are in
sequential order.
Notice that Line 5 Position ID #7 Changes to Position ID #4 but the AT symbol indicating that
the Robot is at that
Position stays constant. This verifies that RENUMBERING only changes the POSITION ID
NOT THE POSITIONAL INFORMATION.

153

154

Modifying a Program
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.23

Slide 26-COMMENT
Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

Modifying Programs - COMMENT

Audio:
The COMMENT function is a simple Toggle ON and OFF of comments in your Program. This
function works on the following types of COMMENTS:
I/O Instructions

Register Instructions

Position Register Instructions

And Position Register Element Instructions.

Modifying a Program

155

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.24

Slide 27-UNDO

Audio:
The UNDO function will allow you to undo the LAST Edit only. In this example we will UNDO a
Touched Up position.
Note the AT Symbol that Designates the robot is currently at that position.
Once you have used the UNDO function you can go back in and REDO the last edit. Or in this
case reapply your Touched Up Point.

156

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MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

5.25

Slide 28-You Try It

Audio:
This is your opportunity to recall the steps needed to copy and paste the program lines and
position numbers shown here.

Modifying a Program

157

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5.26

Slide 29-Module Review


Modifying Programs Edit Command Menu

Module Review

Inserting blank lines into a Program.


Deleting lines from a Program
Copying and Pasting lines within a Program
F2 LOGIC will add the lines exactly as they were copied
F3 POS-ID will add lines exactly as they were copied and retains the current
position numbers
F4 POSITION - Will add lines exactly as they were copied and renumbers
the copied positions with the next available position number
F1 R-LOGIC - Will add lines in reverse order, at the cursor position and
does not record the positions, but leaves the position numbers blank
F2 R-POS-ID - Will add lines in reverse order and retains their original
position numbers
F3 RM-POS-ID - Reverse Motion ID paste all instructions except motion
instructions in reverse order.
F4 R-POS - Will add lines in reverse order at the cursor position and
renumbers the copied positions with the next available position numbers
F5 RM-POS - This is exactly like the RM-POS-ID except that new Position
numbers are assigned in the pasted lines.

Take Test

Audio:
This wraps up Modifying programs module. We learned in how to insert blank lines and how to
delete program lines. We then copied program lines and then Pasted lines using different
function keys, depending upon what you were trying to achieve.
F2 LOGIC will add the lines exactly as they were copied
F3 POS-ID will add lines exactly as they were copied and retain the current position numbers
F4 POSITION - Will add lines exactly as they were copied and renumbers the copied positions
with the next available position number
When you press the NEXT key you will find all reverse paste choices
F1 R-LOGIC - Will add lines in reverse order, at the cursor position and does not record the
positions, but leaves the position numbers blank
F2 R-POS-ID - Will add lines in reverse order and retains their original position numbers
F3 RM-POS-ID - Reverse Motion ID paste all instructions except motion instructions in reverse
order.
F4 R-POS - Will add lines in reverse order at the cursor position and renumbers the copied
positions with the next available position numbers

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MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

F5 RM-POS - This is exactly like the RM-POS-ID except that new Position numbers are
assigned in the pasted lines.

In the next few slides you will have the opportunity to test your knowledge. Click on this icon
when you are ready.

Macro Commands

159

System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA

6 MACRO COMMANDS
Macro Commands

Macro Commands

Audio:
Welcome to the Macro Commands Module

160

Macro Commands
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.1 Slide 2-Module Content


Macro Commands

Module Content
Overview of Macros
Setting Up Macro Commands
Assigning a Macro to a Teach Pendant User
Key, Manual Functions or Operator Panel
Buttons

Audio:
In this module, you will learn how to define and setup macro commands, and then assign a
macro to either a Teach Pendant User key, to the Manual functions menu or to the Operator
Panel.

Macro Commands

161

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.2 Slide 3-Overview of Macros


Macro Commands

Overview of Macros

A macro is any program that is assigned the


subtype Macro
Can contain motion and non motion instructions
To use a Macro

The macro command program must be written


Macro command must be defined

Runs under one of the following conditions:

Teach Pendant user key is pressed


Selected from MANUAL FCTNS menu
I/O signal
Standard Operator panel input (USER1, USER2)

Standard Operator Panel (SOP) R-J3iB

Audio:
A Macro allows you to execute a program by just pressing one key or selecting from a menu.
Macro commands must be set up before they can be used. Macros can contain motion and non
motion instructions. First the Macro command program must be written, then it must be defined.
You can set them to run from a Teach Pendant user key, from the MANUAL FUNCTIONS
menu, from an Input signal or from the Standard Operator panel buttons labeled USER1 or
USER2. R-30iA controller does not provide the ability to assign macros to any buttons on the
Standard Operator panel.

162

Macro Commands
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.3 Slide 4-Teach Pendant User Keys


Macro Commands

Teach Pendant User Keys


UK=User Key
SU=SHIFT+User Key1

UK[1] and

SU[1]

UK[2] and

SU[2]

UK[3] and

SU[3]

and
UK[4]
SU[4]

UK[7]
UK[6]
UK[5]
TOOL
1

TOOL
2

MOVE
MENU

SETUP

POS

I/O

STATUS

and
and
and
SU[7] SU[6] SU[5]

Audio:
As mentioned from the previous slide You can set a macro to run from a Teach Pendant user
key alone or with the SHIFT key. When you set up macro commands, you can define up to
seven macros to run when the user key is pressed alone or with the SHIFT key. If you desire
user keys 1 through 7 to be pressed without the shift key then the macro program cannot
contain any motion instructions to move the robot, and no groups are defined within the group
mask in the program header information.
For example, if you have a macro program that moves the robot to a specific position and you
desire Tool1 key to be the executing macro, then this macro must be assigned to the SHIFT
plus User key 1.

163

Macro Commands
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.4 Slide 5-Macro Command Assignments


Macro Commands

Macro Command Assignments


User Key on Teach
Pendant without
SHIFT (UK)

UK [1]
UK [2]
UK [3]
UK [4]
UK [5]
UK [6]
UK [7]

User Key on
Teach Pendant
with SHIFT (SU)

SU [1]
SU [2]
SU [3]
SU [4]
SU [5]
SU [6]
SU [7]

MANUAL
FCTNS Screen
Item (MF)

Input
Signals
(DI, RI, UI)

Digital inputs DI[0] - DI[99]


MF [1] - MF [99] Robot inputs RI[0] - RI[n]
UOP inputs UI[0] - UI[n]
n: number of signals
configured in your system

Audio:
Use this table to help you know what Key Assignments are available.
You can display up to 99 macros within the Manual Functions screen

164

Macro Commands
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.5 Slide 6-Operator Panel Buttons


Macro Commands

Operator Panel Buttons


Standard Operator Panel (SOP) R-J3iB

USER1
SP [4]

USER2
SP [5]

Audio:
When you can setup a macro command program to run when a button on the operator panel is
pressed, you must assign the button, USER 1 to SP[4] and USER2 to SP[5]

Macro Commands

165

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.6 Slide 7-Manual Functions Macros

Audio:
You can set up a macro command program from the Setup Macro Command Screen to be
executed from the MANUAL Functions menu. After you set up a macro command to run from
this screen, you can then select a manual functions menu item and press the SHIFT key and
the EXEC function key to execute the macro command.
The next slide will provide detail instructions to setup Macros.

166

Macro Commands
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.7 Slide 8-Setting up Macro Commands

Audio:
This video will demonstrate all the necessary steps to take an existing Teach Pendant Program
and change it to be a Macro, then setup the macro to run from the Manual functions menu.
1

First, determine if the program sub type is a macro within the program header information.
Press the Select key to bring up all the programs

From the Next screen press the F2 key labeled DETAIL to display the program header
information

If the program sub type has not been change to a Macro, then press F4 key label CHOICE
to change it

As mentioned earlier, if you desire user keys 1 through 7 to be pressed without the shift key
then the macro program cannot contain any motion instructions that will move the robot,
and no groups are defined within the group mask. This Macro will move the robot and it
has a 1 in the group mask, so we will assign it to the Manual Functions menu.

The next step is to assign this macro to the manual functions screen. To do this, select
MENU then setup.

Press F1 labeled TYPE to select Macro

If you would like to add a new Macro, then arrow down to the next open spot and press
ENTER.

Macro Commands

167

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

Select Words, Uppercase or lowercase to create a descriptive instruction name for the
macro.

This demonstration will use a description that is already created.

10 Arrow right to assign the macro to this descriptive instruction name


11 Press the F4 KEY labeled CHOICE, to select the macro program
12 At any time you need to Remove or Clear the Instruction name, Program or the
Assignment, simply move the cursor and press the F2 key labeled CLEAR.
13 Currently, the macro is assigned to the Manual functions menu, but if you want to assign
the macro to the Operator Panel or Teach Pendant User keys or an Input signal, press the
F4 key label CHOICE to change..
14 Be sure to assign a number for this macro. If you are assigning User Keys, then refer back
to the slide named Teach Pendant User Keys to know what number to assign for a
specific key. Now that the Macro has been setup and defined, you execute the macro from
the manual function screen. Press MENU and select MANUAL FUNCTIONS
15 Notice the Instruction name open hand 1is used as there isnt a note saying NOT
ASSIGNED. To execute, turn on the teach pendant, then press and hold the SHIFT key
and then press F3 key labeled EXECUTE.
This concludes the demonstration of setting up macro commands. Press the next slide icon at
the button of the window to continue the course.

168

Macro Commands
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.8 Slide 9-You Try It

Audio:
This is where you recall the steps needed to take an existing Teach Pendant Program and
change it to be a macro and setup the macro to run from the Manual Functions menu.

Macro Commands

169

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

6.9 Slide 10-Macro Review


Macro Commands

Macro Review
Teach Pendant User Keys:
UK[1] UK[7] cannot contain any motion instructions
in the macro
SU[1] SU[7] can contain motion instructions

Standard Operator Panel


Can only use SP[4] for USER1 and SP[5] for USER2

MANUAL FUNCTIONS menu


MF[1] MF[7]
Click here to begin the
Quiz

Audio:
In review, the teach pendant user key uses UK1 through UK7 which cannot contain any motion
instructions whereas user keys SU1 through SU7 can contain motion instructions
The standard operator panel can only use SP4 for USER1 and SP5 for USER2.
The manual functions menu uses MF1 through MF7.
This concludes the Macro Module. The next four slides will provide you the opportunity to test
your knowledge and comprehension.

170

Macro Commands
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

Production Setup

171

System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA

7 PRODUCTION SETUP
Robot Setup for Production Operation

Production Setup

Audio:
Welcome to the training on Production Setup and Operations.

172

Production Setup
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

7.1 Slide 2-Agenda


Robot Setup for Production Operation

Agenda
Production Setup & Operation
System Configuration
Setup - Program Select Choices
Cell I/O Input Settings

Video
General operation of the Prog Select menu
Cell I/O

Quiz

Audio:
In this course you will learn how setup a robot for production using the teach pendant. Cover
various production modes, system and Cell I/O configurations. A video to reinforce the step by
step process needed to configure the settings. At the end of the course, there is a quiz to
reinforcement comprehension and knowledge.

173

Production Setup
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

7.2 Slide 3-Remote/Local Mode


Robot Setup for Production Operation

Remote/Local Mode

Local Mode is designed for application


development and testing.
Remote Mode is used when running
to

Memory Card Slot

production.
SYSTEM Clock
JOINT 100 %
LINE 0
AUTO ABORTED
1Clock
Remote
Display
System/Config
JOINT 100
% 100 %
2UTILITIES
Local
Hints
JOINT
External I/O is used to assign a switch

39/41
HandlingTool
(N. A.)
MENUS
3 External
I/O
33 Signal
to set in T2 mode
DO[
0]
select either Remote or Local mode
1 SELECT
4 OP DATE
panel
key
05/12/21
34 Signal
to
set
if
E-STOP
DO[
0]
V6.4060
2 EDIT
System/Config
35 Set3 if
INPUT SIMULATED
DO[
0]
TIMEDATA
08:18:22
136Clock
Sim.
Input2005,
Wait All
Delay:
0.00 sec
EMERGENCY STOP
STOP
EMERGENCY
Copyright
RightsSYSTEM
Reserved
4 STATUS
36
Sim.
Input
Wait
Delay:
0.00 secR-J3
FANUC
237Variables
FANUC
SYSTEM R-J3iB
Set
if
Sim.
Skip
Enabled
DO[
0]
FANUC
FANUC
Robotics
POSITION
BATTERY
37
Set5LTD,
if
Sim.
Skip
EnabledAmerica,
DO[ Inc.
0]
CYCLEFAULT
FAULT
338
Master/Cal
FAULT
REMOTECYCLE
Hand
broken
: USER1
<*GROUPS*>
USER2
ALARM FAULT
REMOTE/LOCAL HOLD
USER1
USER2
Licensed
Software:
Your
use
constitutes
ON-OFF
6
SYSTEM
START
RESET
RESET
START
38OTHand
broken :
<*GROUPS*>
439
Release
Remote/Local
setup:
Remote
your
acceptance.
This product protected
7Limits
USER2
39
Remote/Local
setup:
Remote
540
Axis
External
I/O(ON:Remote):RI
[
1]
ON
by several
U.S.
patents.
8
40
External
I/O(ON:Remote):RI
[
1]
641
Config
UOP9 auto assignment: None
41
UOP
auto
assignment:
None
7Please
Motionselect function
OFF
0 ]NEXT -[ TYPE
ADJUST
[TYPE]
[CHOICE]
TYPE
HELP
[ [TYPE
] ] LICENSE PATENTS
[CHOICE]

Audio:
The controller can be setup in a local or Remote mode. Local Mode is designed for
application development and testing. The controller in this mode cannot be made to start from
an external signal i.e. PLC or Cell controller. While in local mode, the selected program within
the Teach Pendant will automatically run when you press Cycle start on the Standard Operator
Panel. If no program is selected, you will receive a WARN-error code. The Remote Mode is
used when running production. The controller listens to external signals such as a PLC or a
Remote Operator Panel to start a program.
Controller version R-J3 has an external key on the controller to determine the mode selection.
Whereas controller version R-J3iB and later are controlled through the software configuration
settings from the Teach Pendant. To access the configurations settings, go to MENU then
SYSTEM which is found in the NEXT screen, Select CONFIG from the [Type] menu and the
LOCAL/REMOTE SETUP will display the mode that the controller is in. Select CHOICE to
change.
A user can create a switch that will put the robot into either Local or Remote. This can be done
by selecting External I/O in line 40 which in line 41, you assign a Digital Input number
associated to the switch. The next slides will focus on the settings within the menu of Program
select.

174

Production Setup
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

7.3 Slide 4-Production Setup in System Config Menu


Robot Setup for Production Operation

Production Setup in System Config Menu


System/Config
1/41
SYSTEM Clock
JOINT
100 %
LINE 00
AUTO
ABORTED
LINE
AUTO
ABORTED
1 Use System/Config
HOT
FALSE
ClockSTART:
Display
JOINT
100 %
UTILITIES
Hints
JOINTALL
100 %
2 I/O power
fail
recovery:RECOVER
1/41
HandlingTool (N. A.)
MENUS
1 Useprogram
HOT START:
FALSE
3 Autoexec
[********]
1 SELECT
DATE
05/12/21
2 I/Ofor
power
failV6.4060
recovery:RECOVER ALL
Cold
start:
2 EDIT
3 Autoexec program
[********]
3 DATA
4 Autoexec
program
[********]
TIME
08:18:22
1 Clock
for
Cold
Copyright
2005,start:
Allstart:
Rights Reserved
4 for
STATUS
Hot
2 4Variables
Autoexec
program
[********]
FANUC
FANUC
Robotics America,
Inc.
5LTD,
POSITION
5 HOT 3START
done
signal:
DO[
0]
Master/Cal
for HotYour
start:
Licensed
Software:
use constitutes
6 SYSTEM
4 5OTHOT
Release
START done
signal:
DO[
0]
6 Restore
program:
TRUE
your selected
acceptance.
This
product
protected
7 USER2
5
Axis
Limits
6
Restore
selected
program:
TRUE
7 Enable
UI8 signals:
TRUE
by several
U.S. patents.
6 7Config
Enable UI signals:
TRUE
8 START
for9 CONTINUE
only:
FALSE
function
7Please
8Motion
STARTselect
for CONTINUE
only:
FALSE
0 ]NEXT
-9 CSTOPI
for
ABORT:
[ TYPE
ADJUSTFALSE
[TYPE
TYPE] ] LICENSE PATENTS
HELP
[
TRUE
FALSE
10 Abort all programs by CSTOPI: FALSE
11 PROD_START depend on PNSTROBE:FALSE
12 Detect FAULT_RESET signal:
FALL
13 Use PPABN signal:
<*GROUPS*>
14 WAIT timeout:
30.00 sec
15 RECEIVE timeout:
30.00 sec
16 Retun to top of program:
TRUE
17 Original program name(F1): [PRG
]
18 Original program name(F2): [MAIN
]
19 Original program name(F3): [SUB
]
20 Original program name(F4): [TEST
]
21 Original program name(F5): [*******]

System/Config
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

1/41
Default logical command: <*DETAIL*>
Maximum of ACC instruction:
150
Minimum of ACC instruction:
0
WJNT for default motion:
******
Auto display of alarm menu:
FALSE
Force Message:
ENABLE
Reset CHAIN FAILURE detection:FALSE
Allow Force I/O in AUTO mode: TRUE
Allow chg. ovrd. in AUTO mode:TRUE
Signal to set in AUTO mode DO[
0]
Signal to set in T1 mode
DO[
0]
Signal to set in T2 mode
DO[
0]
Signal to set if E-STOP
DO[
0]
Set if INPUT SIMULATED
DO[
0]
Sim. Input Wait Delay:
0.00 sec
Set if Sim. Skip Enabled
DO[
0]
Hand broken :
<*GROUPS*>
Remote/Local setup:
Remote
External I/O(ON:Remote):DI [
0]
UOP auto assignment: Full

Audio:
Most of the setup screens you need to access when running production is the System
Configuration and Program Select. To access the System Configuration select MENU ,
then SYSTEM which is found in the NEXT screen, Select CONFIG from the [Type] menu.
Line items in red is what we will cover.
Hot start in line item 1, is a method for turning on power to the robot and controller without
entering Boot Monitor functions. At the completion of a Hot start, the screen that was displayed
before power was turned off is re-displayed. A Cold start is the standard method for turning on
power to the robot and controller which will read the Boot Monitor functions. Hot start is useful
when you are in production and an error occurs requiring you to restart the controller. In this
case the controller will restart in the same condition it was prior to shutdown, enabling you to
more easily resume production. The decision to use Hot Start or Cold Start would depend on
the application.
Line item 1 determines the robot startup mode. When set to FALSE then the robot will start in
COLD start mode, when set to TRUE it will run in HOT START mode.
Line item 3 & 4- The autoexec program (also referred as Power Normal) runs at the
completion of the power up sequence. Autoexec can be used to do custom setup or monitoring
of production conditions that can run continuously. The autoexec can be a teach pendant or a

Production Setup

175

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

KAREL program. It is not recommended to make it a motion program due to safety issues as it
will be the first program that runs after a power up sequence.
Enable User Input signals in line item 7 is a way to determine that a start signal will respond
from a PLC or from the User Operator Panel while in Remote Mode.
Line Item 26: Automatically Display the Alarm menu page when an error occurs when set to
TRUE.
When line item 27 Force message is set to ENABLE then the user page will automatically be
forced on your current screen when a message instruction that has been created within a Teach
Pendant Program is executed. When set to DISABLED, the user will have to press the
MENU key then USER to display the message.
Use the MODE SELECT switch to select the most appropriate way to operate the robot,
depending on the conditions and situation.
Item 30 determine whether to Allow or Disallow users from changing override mode speed
when the controller is in auto mode. Set the value to TRUE to allow speed changes.
And line item 39 is the setting to control Remote/Local setting when there isnt a switch on the
Operator Panel for R-J3iB controllers as discussed earlier.

176

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7.4 Slide 5-Production Setup

Audio:
Production operation setup allows you to set up a program so that it runs automatically during
production. To access Production Setup screen, select MENU , SETUP, press F1 for Type
then select Program Select screen

First item is program select mode. This determines which program will run when the cycle start
is received. This course focuses on the Program mode STYLE. When you use Style, then you
need to define which program should run based on the style number which is provided as a
Group Input. This is done by selecting the soft key DETAIL then enter all the programs within
the Style table.
A side note; another program mode choice is called Other, it could be used to run the same
program, for an example you can assign a program named MAIN.tp every time a cycle start is
received.

Production Setup

177

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

In item 2, Production Start method, you indicate how the cycle start is sent. It could be through a
User Operator panel button, through a digital input, or setting a system variable. If you select
OTHER for the program mode, then the start method should be set on User Operator panel. If
you select program mode of STYLE, then the start method should be set to Digital Input.
This screen is displaying the Cell input menu when selecting I/O from the MENUs key then Cell
Interface Type. This is where you assign the Group Input which determines the style number
that is received from the external device. You also indicate which Digital input is to be used as a
start signal, which initiates reading the style number or the Group Input.

178

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After you set items 1 and 2, you can setup production checks in lines 3 through 10. These
conditions determine if it is ok to run the robot. The General Controls within lines 11 through 14
allow you to do some miscellaneous control settings displayed. Further detail of Production
Checks and General Controls is covered in the next few slides.

Production Setup

179

MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

7.5 Slide 6-Production Start Checks

Audio:
Production Start Checks in lines 3 through 10 are settings to check before running a production
program. Press the DETAIL softkey for each production check, which will provide the same
choices as displayed here. If the line item has a number assigned, then you have the option of
ENABLING or DISABLING.
Production Check item 3 called AT Home check. When you press DETAIL softkey, the following
numbered choices are available. When there isnt a number associated, then line item is a
default setting. In order to do the AT Home check you must teach a home position. This is
done in the reference position menu when you press F1 TYPE, within this SETUP menu. You
teach one of the reference positions as a Home position. Once this is done, ENABLE the AT
Home check within the Setup menu. The controller will check to see if the robot is at the Home
position and if it is NOT at Home position, then it will not run the production program.
Production check 4 is called Resume Position Tolerance check. This position check will
check to see if the Robot arm has been moved away from its programmed path after a program
has been paused. If Resume Position Tolerance check is enabled, the controller will display:
Robot is out of tolerance.
Production check 5, simulated I/O check means that if there is an I/O on the controller that is
simulated then the controller will display a prompt box warning you of this so that you can abort
the program if needed.

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Production check 6: General override if DISABLED, then the robot speed will default to 10%.
To ensure that the robot is at 100% speed, when running production, you would ENABLE this
item.
Production check 7: Program Override. When this item is set to ENABLED, production will be
run only if the program override is set to 100%.
Production check 8: the machine lock, if ENABLED, will check to see if the Robot Lock is ON
within the Test Cycle menu. You will receive a startup check prompt message. Even though the
robot will not move when locked, the robot still thinks its running production.
Production check 9, when Single Step is set to ENABLED, production will run if the robot is not
in step mode.
Production check 10: Process Ready item is application-specific. An example, When this item
is set to ENABLED in a spot welding application, the Welder, Water saver, Water flow, and
transformer over temperature will be checked for faults during production initiation.
Each Production check provides different ENABLED choices within the program select DETAIL.
If the specified Production check fails when the program is executed or resumed, the
following actions will be taken. If Check when run or Check when resume are disabled,
these actions are ignored. The Force condition action takes priority over the other actions. If
Force condition and Prompt if failure are both enabled, only the Force condition action
is performed.
The Prompt if failure allows you to specify that a prompt will be displayed on the teach
pendant screen if the specified check caused the program start or program resume to fail. For
example, if the Production check General override <100 is enabled, a prompt will be displayed
on the teach pendant screen when the general override is less than 100. The user can then
determine how to process: continue, force, or abort.
The Post error if failure is always enabled and displays an error message on the alarm log to
indicate what caused the specified check for the program start or resume to fail. In the previous
example, the message SYST-085 Gen override not 100 would be displayed.
The Post warning if forced is used only when the Force condition check is enabled. It
displays an error message on the alarm log.
The Force condition is not available for At home check, Resume position toler., and
Machine lock Production checks.

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7.6 Slide 7-Production Setup General Controls


Robot Setup for Production Operation

Production Setup General Controls

Heartbeat Timing

Low TEMP DRAM memory

Low on execution or run-time memory.


May need to upgrade DRAM memory.

LOW PERM SRAM (CMOS) memory

An external PLC can know if the


controller is alive or dead.

Recommended minimum free: 50 KB.


Needed for installing new options or
KAREL programs or increasing Numeric
or Position Register counts.
If you do not need the above, lower
the threshold to eliminate the
warning.

Reset when Deadman pressed

You can have the controller perform an


automatic reset when the deadman on
the pendant is pressed. This is a
preference issue.

Prog Select

JOINT 100 %

1 Program select mode:


2 Production start method:
Production checks:
3
At home check:
4
Resume position toler.:
5
Simulated I/O:
6
General override < 100:
7
Prog override < 100:
8
Machine lock:
9
Single step:
10
Process ready:
General controls :
11
Heartbeat timing:
12
Low TEMP DRAM memory:
13
Low PERM CMOS memory:
14
RESET when DEADMAN press:
[ TYPE ]

1/14
STYLE
UOP
DISABLED
ENABLED
DISABLED
DISABLED
DISABLED
DISABLED
DISABLED
DISABLED
1000 MS
100 KB
50 KB
DISABLED

ENABLED DISABLED

Audio:
The General Controls portion of the Program setup menu has 4 items:
Item 11 Heartbeat timing an external PLC can know if the controller is alive or dead by
setting up the timing information
Item 12 Low TEMP DRAM memory If the controller is low on the TEMP DRAM memory it
can be made to force a message. Once you receive this message you may need to upgrade
your DRAM memory
Item 13 Low PERM Static Random Access Memory SRAM is recommended to set it a
minimum of 50 kilobytes free. This memory is needed to install new options, KAREL programs,
or increasing the numerical position register counts in the controller. If you do not need all these,
then you can lower the threshold of 50 kylobytes. Anytime you upgrade memory you need to
reload the controller from scratch.
Item 14 RESET when Deadman press. The default behavior is when ever the Deadman is
pressed then a message get posted the pendant saying Deadman switch is released and the
RESET has not be performed. You must press the RESET button to clear this alarm error.
You can have the controller do an automatic RESET every time you press Deadman switch,
provided there are no other errors active. This is a preference issue.

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7.7 Slide 8-Style Select using DIN start Method Procedure

Audio:
This video will show you how to setup the controller to run any program of your choice during
production run using the program select method called STYLE. The production start is provided
through the Digital Input. Additionally, the video will show you how to setup some production
start checks and how the controller responds to start checks when they fail. First you must put
the controller in REMOTE mode.
1

You are in the System Configuration menu. To move to the Remote/Local setup line item
or if you know the line item number, you can press the item key and enter the number.

Press the softkey F4 for CHOICE select REMOTE.

Next, you will need to go to the Program Select menu to select the program select mode
and start method which is found in the Setup menu.

Press the F4 CHOICE key to select the Program Mode STYLE, then press F3 DETAIL to
define the programs that will start production. During production, the robot receives a group
input followed by a cycle start input from an external device, such as a PLC. The robot
checks that the program name corresponds to the group input. After the robot validates that
all safety and I/O signals have been set properly for a production run, the robot runs the
program that corresponds to the style number.

To define the Program names, select DETAIL and select all the program names within the
Style Table Setup.

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After defining all the program names, you need to set item 2 Production start method to
Digital Input. Press the previous key to return to the Program Select menu.

We will provide two example Production Checks, the At Home and General Override to
demonstrate the messages that will display when starting production, Press F3 DETAIL on
the At Home line item and ENABLE both Check win run and prompt if failure General
Overide <100 screen

To ensure that the robot is at 100% speed, when running production, you would ENABLE
this item. If the speed is less than 100%, then you will ENABLE both Check win run and
prompt if failure

Production Setup is done we now need to configure I/O to indicate which Digital Input will
be used to start production. This configuration is done within the Cell I/O menu.

10 Notice the yellow highlighted message in the Teach Pendant. In order for the controller to
recognize the changes made in the Program Select menu, you need to cycle power.
11 The controller has been restarted and has returned back to the start-up menu. We will now
return to the Cell I/O menu.
12 Notice when returning to this menu that the yellow highlighted message has been removed.
You need to configure Digital Input, that you wish to use for cycle start, press F2 for
CONFIG.
13 You are now in the Input Signal Details menu. Notice the signal name is Start DIN. We will
enter in Digital Input #3 for the example.
14 To configure the next I/O signal, simply press the softkey F3 NEXT-IO
15 Once again, notice the highlighted Signal Name Initiate Style. We will enter in #1 for this
example.
16 Once again, notice the yellow highlighted message in the Teach Pendant prompting to
restart the controller. Whenever you change the I/O configurations, the controller will need
to be restarted to initialize changes to I/O setup.
17 We have completed Cell I/O configurations and are ready to run production. When you
press Cycle Start and the robot is not at Home position, then the following message will
appear.
18 Now we will demonstrate the message you will receive when the robot speed is less than
100%. To see this message, we will reduce the robot speed.
19 The robot is at the Home position and the robot speed is less than 100%. Now we will Cycle
start again and the At Home position will not display, but the General Override prompt
appears and is asking whether you want to continue or do you want to force the condition or
stop and not run the production.
This concludes the video

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7.8 Slide 9-Summary


Robot Setup for Production Operation

Summary
When you get a new robot / controller, HandlingTool
is setup for LOCAL mode. Set the Remote/Local
setting to REMOTE for production operations.
From the Prog Select Menu, select:
Program Select mode
Production Start mode

Setup the Production Check details such as At


home check, General Override < 100%.
If you do not setup the details, default values will be used.

Audio:
When you get a new robot / controller, HandlingTool is setup for LOCAL mode. Set the
remote local setting to REMOTE for production operation.

From the Prog Select Menu, select


- Program Select mode
- Production Start mode

Setup the Production Check details such as At home check, General Override < 100%.
- If you do not setup the details, default values will be used.

File Management

System R-J3, R-J3iB & R-30iA

8 FILE MANAGEMENT
File Manipulation

File Manipulation

AUTO
JOINT 100 %
691734 bytes free
1/54
No. Program name
Comment
1 -BCKEDT[
]
2 ABORTIT
[ABORT PRODUCTION]
3 ATERRJOB
VR [
]
4 ATSOFTPA
VR [
]
5 DSP_WEBP
MR [Display web page]
6 GEMDATA
PC [GEM Vars
]
7 GETDATA
MR [Get PC Data
]
8 GETIO
MR [GET CELL IO
]
9 GET_HOME
PC [Get Home Pos
]

Select

[ TYPE ]

CREATE

185

DELETE

MONITOR

[ATTR ]>

Audio:
Welcome to the File Manipulation module

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8.1 Slide 2-Module Content


File Manipulation

Module Content
Copy Programs Files
Delete Programs Files
Backup Files
Set the Backup Device

Loading Program
Image Backup and Restore

Audio:
In this module we will cover,
Copying and Deleting Programs,

Backup all or specific types of files to a specific device.

Learn how to load program from the backup device

Then wrap-up with how to do an image backup and Restore

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8.2 Slide 3-Display Program Files


File Manipulation

Display Program Files

AUTO
JOINT 100 %
691734 bytes free
24/54
1/19
No. Program name
Comment
23
1 MHSHELL
-BCKEDTVR [
]
24
2 MOV_HOME
ABORTIT
MR [MOVE
[ABORTTO
PRODUCTION]
HOME
]
25
3 MOV_REPR
HOME_IO
MR [
[MOVE
[SET AT
TOHOME
REPAIR
I-O ]
__________________VR
4 All
NTDAQ
MENUTEST
VR [
[Example menus
]
| 26
1
|MR
5 TP
OPERMENU
ORIENT
[Entry Menu Macro]
| 27
2
Programs | MR [
]
6 KAREL
ORIENT
POS1_2
| 28
3
Progs |
[
]
7 Macro
POS1_2
POS2_2
| 29
4
|
[
]
8 Cond
POS2_2
POS3_2
| 30
5
|
[
]
9 POS3_2
POS_1
[
]
| 31
+---------Select

[ TYPE ] CREATE
CREATE

DELETE

MONITOR

SELECT Menu

[ATTR ]>

Audio:
As programs are created they are stored automatically on the controller memory. A list of all
programs stored on controller memory is displayed on the SELECT menu as shown here. If you
desire to display specific types of programs then press the F1 key labeled TYPE and from
the pop-up menu select the type of program to be displayed. In this example, we will select TP
Programs and the following display will show just Teach Pendant Programs.

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8.3 Slide 4-Copy a Program

Audio:
If you would like to modify a program without changing the existing program, then use COPY
feature within the SELECT menu. When you press the NEXT key, additional function is
available.
1

Move the cursor to the program you want to copy.

When you press the function key F1 , labeled COPY you will see the following display.

Type in the new copied program name and press ENTER.

Press the F4 key, labeled YES to confirm, otherwise, press F5 labeled NO to cancel
copying the program.

When you press F4 , The selected program will be copied. The SELECT menu will be
displayed. The copied program will be displayed in the SELECT menu.

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8.4 Slide 5-Delete Program Files

Audio:
If you no longer want to have a program loaded on controller memory you can delete it. If you
want to keep a copy of the program, save it to a storage device before you delete it from the
SELECT menu. We will cover storing programs on a storage device later.
1

Press SELECT key. You will see a similar screen.

Move the cursor to the name of the program you want to delete.

Press NEXT if necessary to display the default function keys, and then press F3 , DELETE.
See a similar screen.

To delete the program, press F4 labeled YES, otherwise, press F5 labeled NO to cancel.

NOTE:

the Teach Pendant does not need to be ON or that the Deadman switch needs to be
pressed to delete programs.

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8.5 Slide 6-7-Aborting a Program


File Manipulation

Aborting a Program

TEST

LINE
FUNCTIONS

UTILITIES Hints

1 ABORT (ALL)

AUTO ABORTED
JOINT 100 %

HandlingTool (N. A.)

2 DISABLE FWD/BWD
V6.4060

Copyright 2005, All Rights Reserved


FANUC LTD, FANUC Robotics America, Inc.
Licensed Software: Your use constitutes
your acceptance.
product protected
7 RELEASEThis
WAIT
by several U.S. patents.

0 NEXT-[ TYPE ] LICENSE PATENTS

HELP

FCTN

Audio:
You cannot delete a program if it is paused, assigned to a macro, or write-protected. If the
program is paused, you must abort it (press FCTN and select ABORT ALL). If the program is
assigned to a macro, it must be "unassigned" first on the SETUP Macro screen if using
controllers versions earlier than RJ-3. The next slide will provide the step by step procedure to
accomplish this.

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Audio:
When deleting Program files, you must turn off the Write Protection first if it is on.. Additionally,
programs that are assigned to sub-type MACRO must be "unassigned" before you can delete
when you are using R-J2 and earlier controllers . R-J3 and higher, this step is not necessary.
1

From the SELECT menu cursor down to the Program that is defined as a macro.

Press the NEXT key to display additional functions

Press F2 DETAIL function key

Cursor down to Sub Type if you are using earlier versions of R-J3.

Press F4 CHOICE function key to select NONE

Verity that the Write Protection is turned OFF.

Press F1 END function key to return to the SELECT menu

Press the Next key to display the function delete

Press the F3 function key labeled DELETE to delete the program

10 Press F4 function key to confirm the deletion. The program file has been deleted.
If the Macro Start Assignment has been made on the program that was just deleted, then you
must clear the Instruction name, Program and the Assignment from the Setup Menu.
Be sure to highlight the Instruction Name and press F2 CLEAR then arrow right to Program
and Press F2 to clear and the same for Assignment. Press the next slide icon at the bottom of
the course window.

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File Management
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

8.6 Slide 8-You Try it

Audio:
Heres an opportunity to recall the steps to needed to delete program files.

193

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8.7 Slide 9-Types of Files

To manipulate a file you must know the type of file you are manipulating. This slide lists several
types of files available. During your work on the controller, you might only use a few types of
files. You can determine the file type by looking at the file name as it is displayed on the FILE
menu. The file name consists of a file name, followed by a period, then followed by a two- or
three-letter file type.

File Management
MATELRNAT0511CE REV. A

8.8 Slide 10-Storage Devices


File Manipulation

Storage Devices
The following kinds of storage devices can be used
to store programs and files:

Memory Card (MC:)


USB Memory Stick Device (UD1:)
Flash File Storage disk (FR:)
RAM Disk (RD:) (Not for SpotTool+)
Ethernet Device (optional)
Memory Device (MD:)
Memory Device Backup (MDB:)
MF Device (MF:)
Filtered Memory Device (FMD:)

Audio:
The following kinds of storage devices can be used to store programs and files: This course
does not show or explain how to format the devices or setup up a port.

195

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8.9 Slide 11-Set the Default Device & Generate a Directory

Audio:
Now we will demonstrate how to set the Default Device, then how to generate a directory of files
on that device. You can display a directory of files on the devices you use for the purpose of
loading or backing up of the files.
1

Some devices contain hundreds of files. You can display a directory of all files, or a subset
of the files as mentioned from the previous slide. This demonstration will show all Teach
Pendant Programs.

Press the MENU key

Arrow down to FILE

If necessary press F1 TYPE to select FILE

Press F5 UTILITIES to select the device. This demonstration will select the Memory Card.

Press F2 [DIRECTORY] to generate a directory of the type of files you would like to
display.

The result is displaying all teach pendant programs from the Memory Card. Press the next slide
icon at the bottom of the course window.

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8.10

Slide 12-You Try It

Audio:
Here you can recall the steps needed to setup a default device then generate a directory of files
on that device.

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8.11

Slide 13-Backup Up Files vs. Controller Backup


File Manipulation

Backing Up Files vs. Controller Backup


File
Backup
JOINT 100 %
MC: *.TP
1 -BCKEDT2 ABORTIT
3 DSP_WEBP
4 GETDATA
5 GETIO
6 HOME_IO
7 LISTMENU
8 MENUTEST
9 MOV_HOME

FILE
1/59
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP

[ TYPE ] [ DIR ]

FANUC

Controller
Backup

74
106
246
179
215
397
177
368
401
LOAD

[BACKUP][UTIL ]>

SYSTEM R-30iA

Controller Backup and Restore


Backing up a controller as an Image
(starting on the R-J3 and higher controllers)

Audio:
When backing up a files, you save it from controller memory to the default device so that you
have a second copy of the file. You can back up program, system, application, diagnostic, and
error log files to the default device using the FILE screen. The actual application software (such
as HandlingTool, SpotTool, PaintTool etcetera) that is installed on the controller will NOT be
part of the backup when using the FILE menu.
To back up all memory on the controller, which would include the application software, use the
Controller Backup and Restore function.
There are two types of controller backup. One is called Controller Backup and Restore, and
the second is called Backing up a controller as an Image.
Backing up a Controller as an Image will make a memory image, similar to taking a picture, of
the Flash-Read Only Memory (F-ROM for short) and Static-Random Access Memory (S-RAM
for short) of the controller modules. Caution should be applied when restoring controller
images. If the hardware memory configuration does not match the controller that supplied the
image, damage may result if you try to restore that image.

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8.12

Slide 14-Backup Files Using the FILE Menu

Audio:
When the default device has been setup from the Files UTILITIES screen that was shown
earlier, you can easily BACKUP files to that device. Select MENU then select FILE, select
F4 labeled BACKUP and a pop-up menu will appear to choose what type of file you want to
backup. We will demonstrate backing up all Teach Pendant programs. Notice the bottom
display showing to backup one teach pendant file at a time. You can choose F4 labeled YES
or choose F5 labeled NO, or simply select F3 to backup ALL teach pendant programs.

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8.13

Slide 15-Loading Files Using the FILE Menu

Audio:
Loading programs allow you to load programs into the controller that have been previously
backed up. First, be sure the default device has been set. Refer to the slide labeled Set the
Default Device/Generate a Directory.
When loading files, you have two options:
1

One file at a time, or

all of the same type of file

To load one file, you must generate a Directory to display that file. To load all files types, from
the FILE menu, select that type of file, then select F3 LOAD and the following display will
appear. You will see at the bottom of the windows display the name of each file being loaded.
Press F4 labeled YES to confirm.

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8.14

Slide 16-Backup up a Controller as Images

Audio:
The Image Backup feature allows you to make an image of the F-ROM and S-RAM controller
memory modules. The image is stored in a number of files that uses the extension of i-m-g on a
selected destination device.
Image backup is available from the File menu when the system is in Cold Start. After an Image
Backup is selected from the File menu, the actual backup occurs the next time the controller is
powered up. Controlled start also provides an Image Backup.
The following procedure will demonstrate Backing up a controller as images to a memory card
from the Controlled Start Mode.
Before you begin, be sure the teach pendant ON/OFF switch is OFF and the DEADMAN switch
is released and
The REMOTE/LOCAL setup item in the System Configuration Menu is set to LOCAL.

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Be sure the memory card has enough free space.


1

To begin, Press and hold the F1 and F5 keys on the teach pendant.

Turn the power disconnect circuit breaker to ON. You will see a screen similar to the
following.

Release all of the keys.

Select Controller backup/restore and press ENTER .

Select Backup controller as Images and press ENTER .

Select memory card (MC) and press ENTER .

Insert a memory card that has enough space to hold the full controller image into the
memory card interface in the CPU module in the controller.

Type 1 and press ENTER. The files will be written to the memory card. You should see
messages similar to the following.

NOTE: If BMON crashes or hangs during Writing USB: SRAM0x.img..., this could be an
indication of problems with the SRAM memory. If this occurs, contact a FANUC Robotics
Service Representative.
9

When all the image files have been written to the memory card, you will see a message
similar to the following.

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8.15

Slide 17-Restoring Controller Images

Audio:
Restoring Controller Images feature allows you to restore the F-ROM and S-RAM controller
memory from an image backup. It can only be restored to a controller with the same memory
configuration, or larger. The restore is done during power up.
The following procedure will demonstrate Restoring the controller from a memory card.
Before you begin, be sure the teach pendant ON/OFF switch is OFF and the DEADMAN switch
is released and
The REMOTE/LOCAL setup item in the System Configuration Menu is set to LOCAL.
1

To begin, Press and hold the F1 and F5 keys on the teach pendant.

Turn the power disconnect circuit breaker to ON. You will see a screen similar to the
following.

Release all of the keys.

Select Controller backup/restore and press ENTER .

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Select Restore Controller Images and press ENTER

Select the device used to restore image and press ENTER .

If you have selected memory card, you will see a screen similar to the following. Insert the
memory card that contains the full controller image into the memory card interface. As
mentioned earlier, Caution should be applied when restoring controller images. If the
hardware memory configuration does not match the controller that supplied the image,
damage may result if you try to restore that image.

Type 1 and press ENTER . The files will be read from the device and restore them into the
controller

When the restore is complete, press ENTER to return to the first screen.

This completes the File manipulation module. The next few slides will provide the opportunity to
test your knowledge and comprehension.