CIE-200.

DD

Common Intellectual Experience 2
Spring 2010 MWF 11-12 Fetterolf 110 Instructor: Nathan Rein Office hours: M 1:30-3pm, Tue 10 am-12 noon, and by appt. Olin 211, x. 2571, nrein@ursinus.edu

First paper assignment: Religion and rights in Martin Luther King For this paper, reread King's "I Have a Dream" speech (from the CIE 2 reader) and answer the question: What, in your view, is the importance of the religious language, ideas, and imagery that appear throughout the speech? There is more than one way to think about this question. For example, you might ask: is the religious content central to the argument King is making, or is it simply there to make his political point more persuasive? Or you might ask: does King present his vision (his "dream") of equality and justice as a specifically Christian (or specifically religious) vision, or not? Or you might take another approach: does the audience have to accept King's religious beliefs in order to accept his ultimate purposes, and why or why not? The question is intentionally open-ended this way. Choose an approach that seems interesting and doable to you, present your reasoning, and draw on specific passages of King's text to make your points. Your paper should have a strong thesis statement that gives the reader a sense of where your argument is going; it should explain your views clearly and give justifications for them based on the text. The first draft will be due to me via email on Friday, Feb. 5 at 5 p.m. It should be a minimum of 1200 words in length; include a word count in the paper's header. Some guidelines: • Submit it via email to me (nrein at ursinus dot edu). • Save it with a filename like this:
[your last name] - King paper, draft 1 - [date you sent the email].doc.

In other words, my paper would be saved as
Rein - King paper, draft 1 - 2-5-2010.doc

• •

Sorry if this seems anal, but it really helps me keep track of things. I will return it with comments within a week, and you will then have another week to hand in a revised version for a grade. Grading criteria: strength and clarity of your thesis; effective use of the primary text (King's speech); coherence of your overall argument; quality of your writing (in other words, no grammar or spelling errors; and your writing should be clear and understandable)

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