ONE GOOD THING

every day may not be good, but there is one good thing in every day

Teaching is taxing. Sometimes it can be tough to notice,
let alone remember, the small but important victories those tiny teacher and student interactions that
powerfully shape our classroom.
There was a teacher who, at the end of every day, wrote
down a single memorable moment on a slip of paper and
put it into a jar on her desk.
This community blog is our jar - to share and celebrate
those stories of success.

“Sometimes my “one good thing” is so easy to find. Sometimes I have to
think about my day for quite awhile. And then–sometimes–it hits me
like a ton of bricks and I’m reminded how good it is to focus on the
positive and let the negative roll off you…” - Rebecka Peterson

check out the site! if you’d
like to become a
contributor, take a card
and let us know!

onegoodthingteach.wordpress.com

Visual  Patterns  
 
 
 

 

 

What  will  the  next  step  look  like?  

How  is  the  pattern  growing?  

Check  out  VisualPatterns.org  to  find  a  
variety  of  patterns  (linear,  exponential  and  
more!)  to  help  your  students  practice  
predicting  and  generalizing.

 

What  is  the  equation?  
 

 

 

MATH  TALKS  
 

WHICH IS GREATER,
86 x 38 or 88 x 36?

WHAT IS 3.75 X 32?

I did a simpler problem. I made up numbers
that would add up to 8, then I also multiply




them. (I do this because I notice that if the
two original problems were addition
problems, then their answers would be the
same.)
4 x 4 = 16; and 4 + 4 = 8
3 x 5 = 15, and 3 + 5 = 8
2 x 6 = 12, and 2 + 6 = 8
So I notice that the further apart the two
numbers are, the smaller their product. 86 x
38 are closer together, therefore their
product is greater.


3 x 32 = 96
To multiply 0.75 and 32, I kept doubling
0.75 until it’s easy. So, 0.75 doubled is 1.5,
and add another pair of 0.75 would give me
3.
Since it took 4 sets of 0.75 to make 3, then
there are 8 of these sets in 32.
3 x 8 = 24
Add this 24 to 96, I get 120.

 
 
Check  out  MathTalks.net  to  find  a  variety  
of  prompts  to  have  your  students  build  
their  number  sense  and  reasoning  skills.

A Day in the Life
DITLife.tumblr.com
Would you like to tell the world that teachers’ jobs
don't end at 2:00 when the bell rings?
We want the world to know exactly what it is like to walk a mile in our shoes.
Some of our shoes drive a long commute while others walk across campus to get to class. Certain teachers’ shoes are
tied tight to race from one class to the next as they try to beat their students. Others have a change of shoes as they get
out on the track or court or field to coach. All of us have a different story to tell, but we all have tired feet by the end of
the day!
Share the story of your entire day – from
lesson planning in the shower before sunrise
to grading at the kitchen table at night.

Read about what a day is like for all types of
educators in all types of schools around the world.
Elementary, Middle, High schools
Rural, Suburban, Urban districts
Boarding, Christian, Independent schools
Teachers, Coaches, Club Advisors

Dan Allen
7:00 PM: There are about 30
parents in attendance. We
give them a presentation
about our board’s numeracy
goal and show them a video of
students in our board learning through problem
solving and open questions. After the video, we
actually hand out chart paper and markers and ask
the parents, “How much do you spend at Tim
Horton’s in a year?”... Our presentation was only
supposed to be 20-30 minutes but the parent
group was so engaged, they ended up going until
almost 8:00.

Sahar Khatri
Bowman Dickson
Just a normal Tuesday in my
life as a math teacher at a
boarding school in Amman,
Jordan.
This morning, a student asks me to tie their bow
tie for them, which is actually a fairly common
occurrence. I have to say, bringing the bow tie to
our school has been one of my proudest
accomplishments.

I was observed by my math
coach during my second and
third period class. My
principal popped in for about
10-15 minutes for each class
and was helping some students during my second
period class. The math team later got a shout out
at the end of the day for incorporating literacy
techniques the students are used to using in their
English classes (more on that later….I hope).

 

Math  Munch  
Too  many  kids  say,  “I  hate  math.”  
 

We  write  Math  Munch  to  help  more  kids  find  something  
mathematical  that  they  love.  
 

The  internet  is  full  of  amazing  mathematical  things:  
art,  games,  people,  stories,  videos  and  more.  
 But  you  have  to  know  where  to  look.  
 

Each  week  we  gather  three  great  math  finds  
and  share  them  in  a  blog  post  on  Math  Munch.  
 

We  hope  that  you  and  your  students  will  enjoy  
exploring  the  site  and  finding  some  new  math  to  love.  
 

Bon  appetit!  

Anna  

Paul  

Justin  

mathmunch.org  
explore  Ÿ  make  Ÿ  read  
watch  Ÿ  play    

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DAILYDESMOS
GRAPHINGCHALLENGES
DAILYDESMOS.COM
@
DAILYDESMOS
Daily Desmos is full of graphing challenges. Your goal is to find the equation
that created each graph.
Challenges are ranked as Basic (appropriate for 7th+ grade) or Advanced
(appropriate for 10th+ grade). Head to the site and stretch your brain!
Do you enjoy creating graphing challenges? Sign up with Dan Anderson
(@dandersod) to become a Daily Desmos contributor.

Which one doesn't belong?
a shapes book from
Talking Math with Your Kids
talkingmathwithkids.com

Twitter Chats
Twitter Chats are one-hour weekly chats held on Twitter. There are
many different types of Twitter Chats, from general education chats to
book chats. And there are math subject chats for everything from
Middle School Math to Calculus and Statistics!
To follow a chat, just type the hashtag (ex: #MTBoS) into a Twitter
search (on Twitter.com or using a program like Tweetdeck). The
moderator of the chat will ask questions and people will respond. As
long as everyone uses the hashtag, anyone can follow the
conversation!
Sunday
Algebra 1:
Sunday 9 pm ET

Middle
School:
#msmathchat
Monday 9 pm ET

Non-Routine
Problems:

Algebra 2:

#probchat

#alg2chat

Sunday 9 pm ET

Monday 9 pm ET

Tuesday

Global Math Dept.

#alg1chat

Monday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Geometry:

Elementary:

Calculus:

#geomchat

#ElemMathChat

#calcchat

Wed 9 pm ET

Thursday 9 pm ET

Friday 11 am IST

Book/Article
Discussion:

Statistics:

#EduRead
Wed 9 pm ET

#statschat
Thursday 9 pm ET

Special Ed:
#spedmath
2nd and 4th
Thursday 9 pm ET

PreCalculus:
#precalcchat
Thursday 9:30 pm ET

Weekly themes posted on Sundays. One question per day, posted 7 am and 7 pm ET. #slowmathchat

Saturday

TMC:  Twitter  Math  Camp  
A  conference  run  by  teachers,  for  teachers.  
For  most  of  the  year,  the  #MTBoS  is  scattered  across    
the  globe.  We’re  an  online  community  after  all.  But    
for  a  few  days  in  July  we  have  a  chance  to  get  together  
for  face  to  face  interactions.  There  is  a  wealth  of  
information  that  people  bring  to  the  conference,  and  
even  more  ideas  are  sparked  that  continue  in  
conversations  and  projects  beyond  the  weekend.  
 

 
 
 
 
 

July  23-­‐26,  2015  at  Harvey  Mudd  College  in  Claremont,  CA  

                   

 
On  a  number  line.    
Ready  to  line  dance!  

 
 

 
 
Justin  Aion:  
Middle  school  teacher,  story  teller.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Live  Tweeting  the  experience  :)