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SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE METHOD III

:
SW 4010 (3 credit hours)
Instructor:
Day:
Location:
Room:

Cassandra Barragan MSW
Wednesdays 3:15 pm -6 pm
University Center
TBD

Email: ec0676@wayne.edu
Phone: 218.790.1378 (phone & text)
Office Hours: by appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The third course providing knowledge skills and a framework for social work practice related to
groups; knowledge and theories related to groups
COURSE COMPETENCIES AND PRACTICE BEHAVIORS FOR THIS COURSE
2.1.1 Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly

Practice Behaviors:

Advocate for the client access to the services of social work; practice personal reflection and
self-correction to assure continual professional development; attend to professional roles and
boundaries; demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance and communication;
engage in Career long learning; use supervision and consultation

2.1.2 Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice

Practice Behaviors:

Recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice
make ethical decisions by applying standards of the NASW Code of Ethics; tolerate ambiguity
in resolving conflicts; apply concepts of ethical reasoning to arrive at principled decisions

2.1.3 Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments

Practice Behaviors:

Distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including research based
knowledge, and practice wisdom; analyze models of assessment, prevention, intervention and
evaluation; demonstrate effective oral and written communication in working with individuals,
families, groups, organizations, communities, and colleagues

2.1.10 Engage, assess, intervene and evaluate with individuals, families, groups,
organizations and communities

Practice Behaviors:
(a) Engagement:

1

Substantively and affectively prepare for action with individuals, families, groups, organizations
and communities; use empathy and other interpersonal skills; Develop a mutually agreed-on
focus of work and desired outcomes
(b) Assessment
Collect, organize, and interpret client data; assess client strengths and limitation
develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives ; select appropriate intervention
strategies
( c ) Intervention
Initiate actions to achieve organizational goals; implement prevention interventions that
enhance client capacities; help clients resolve problems; negotiate, mediate, and advocate for
clients; facilitate transitions and endings
(d) Evaluation
Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate interventions
TEXT AND REQUIRED MATERIALS:
Toseland Ronald., & Rivas, Robert.(2013). An introduction to Group Work Practice. (7th
ed.).Needham Heights, MA: Allyn/Bacon.
Required Reading: Shulman, Lawrence, (2009). The Skills of Helping Individuals, Families,
Groups, and Communities (6th ed.). Itasca, ILL: Peacock Publishing. (chapters identified
in syllabus).
Hepworth, D., Rooney, R., Rooney, G., Gottfried, K., Larson, J. (2010). Direct social Work
Practice: Theory and Skills. (8th ed.) Belmont, CA: Thompson/ Brooks Cole (chapters
identified in syllabus.
INTRODUCTION:
The course is a continuation of four-course sequence. It builds upon the knowledge, skills and
values learned in prior courses within this sequence. Utilization of systems and problem-solving
approaches to plan for and apply appropriate social work intervention with emphasis on the utility
of groups in practice at all systems levels, e.g. macro
A major focus of SW4010 is on the development and utilization of communication, relationships
and group membership skills. Students will become familiar with planning group, clarifying a group
purpose, and assessing process and outcome. This course emphasizes a laboratory approach which
will provide the student an opportunity to develop skills in facilitating groups in micro and macro
practice necessary for generalist social work practice.
The concepts, theories principles, methods and skills relevant to group work with diverse
populations will be explored in this course. The application of group work methods with
populations-at-risk will also be examined in this course.
This course incorporates content on types of groups, group development, problem-solving and
decision making in groups. It also explores the interaction between groups and systems with their
external environment
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
All students are expected to participate fully in the learning experience through readings, discussions,
role play and exercises.
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Student achievement of the course objectives outlined in section II will be measured by written
assignments quizzes, and or examinations. While it is expected that each faculty member adhere to
the overall framework of the course syllabus incorporating concepts and structure, you are free to
utilize a variety of methods to accomplish the objectives such as video taping role play etc.
GRADING AND ASSIGNMENTS
Assignment
Quiz
Process Recording 1
Process Recording 2
Paper 1 Planning and beginnings phase
Paper 2 Middle and Ending phases
Icebreaker activity

Points

Total

Percent

100

5

180
180
250
250
50
1000

10
10
35
35
5
100

Competency #
2.1.2a d
2.1.3a-b 2.1.10d
2.110a-b
2.1.1 c-d 2.1.10d

BENCHMARK ASSIGNMENTS:
Paper 1: Analysis of group development and group behavior in early stages
&
Paper 2: behavior during the middle and termination phases
GRADING POLICY:
Students may pass the course with a grade of D but must maintain a C average during the junior and
senior year. (See Undergraduate Bulletin, Wayne State University
http://www.bulletins.wayne.edu/ubk-output/index.html)
Grade distribution range
100-95 A
94.9-90 A79.9-77 C+
76.9-73 C

89.9-87 B+
72.9-70 C-

86.9-83 B
69.9-67 D+

82.9-80 B66.9-63 D

ORGANIZATION OF THE COURSE
The course is a continuation of four-course sequence. It builds upon the knowledge, skills and
values learned in prior courses within this sequence. Utilization of systems and problem-solving
approaches to plan for and apply appropriate social work intervention with emphasis on the utility
of groups in practice at all systems levels, e.g. macro
A major focus of SW4010 is on the development and utilization of communication, relationships
and group membership skills. Students will become familiar with planning group, clarifying a group
purpose, and assessing process and outcome. This course emphasizes a laboratory approach which
will provide the student an opportunity to develop skills in facilitating groups in micro and macro
practice necessary for generalist social work practice.
The concepts, theories principles, methods and skills relevant to group work with diverse
populations will be explored in this course. The application of group work methods with
populations-at-risk will also be examined in this course.

3

This course incorporates content on types of groups, group development, problem-solving and
decision making in groups. It also explores the interaction between groups and systems with their
external environment
Social work with groups is taught in an experiential mode to enable the student to learn group work
skills first hand. A variety of exercises and lectures are used to introduce theory and provide a basis
upon which students learn and practice skills.
ROLE OF THE STUDENT AND INSTRUCTOR
See University Statement of Obligation of Students and Faculty Members of the teaching - learning
process
http://www.bulletins.wayne.edu/fib/fib2d.html
POLICIES FOR THIS COURSE
Assignment Policy:
Late papers (those not turned in on assigned day), will be downgraded by one grade, i.e. if the
paper is deemed to be an A paper, it will be given a B due to lateness. Each rewrite of a paper
will be downgraded by five points. A zero will be factored in for missing work.
Students are expected to complete all readings, participate in class and perform satisfactorily on
assignments and examinations. The instructor shall be notified of unavoidable issues in advance
which may (will) prevent compliance with assignment due date.
No incomplete will be given in this class.
Plagiarism/academic honesty:
“Plagiarism is using another person’s words or ideas without giving credit to the other person.
When you use someone else’s words, you must put quotation marks around them and give the
writer or speaker credit by revealing the source in a citation. Even if you revise or paraphrase the
words of someone else or just use their ideas, you still must give the author credit in a note.”
Plagiarism, Cheating: See WSU References:
http://www.otl.wayne.edu/pdf/2006_july_aibrochure.
http://www.doso.wayne.edu/codeof conduct.pdf
(William Harris, “Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers,”
http://virtualsalt.com/antiplag.htm, March 7, 2002)
You must cite sources from the Internet or any other form of electronic media used in your
work. Any paper suspected of plagiarism will be reviewed at Turnitin.com to verify that it is your
work and properly cited.
Any paper that is plagiarized will result in an “F” for the class and a referral to the University for
further Disciplinary Action.
APA format:
Following a standardized format is part of being a competent social work practitioner. Because
of this important and transferable skill, all papers written in the School of Social Work require
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APA format. You may purchase the Publication Manual of the American Psychological
Association (6th edition), or you may visit the website listed below
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Simple avoidable mistakes can result in a full letter grade lower. Please be mindful and
intentional in your writing and use of APA style.
WIKIPEDIA WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AS A RELIABLE SOURCE

What is Wikipedia?
“Wikipedia is a free-content encyclopedia, written collaboratively by people from all around the
world. The site is a wiki, which means that anyone can edit entries simply by clicking on the edit
this page link.”
“Because Wikipedia is an ongoing work to which anybody can contribute, it differs from a
paper-based reference source in some important ways. In particular, mature articles tend to be
more comprehensive and balanced, while other (often fledgling) articles may still contain
significant misinformation, un-encyclopedic content or vandalism. Users need to be aware of
this in order to obtain valid information and avoid misinformation which has been recently
added and not yet removed.”
Class Participation/Attendance:
Class participation include raising questions from the readings, making relevant comments
drawn from personal experience, reacting to opinions expressed by the instructor and students,
asking for clarification, being actively engaged in class exercises, or bringing up issues of general
interest to the class.

Unless there are serious extenuating circumstances, a student will not be able to earn an
A for the course with more than two absences, a B with more than four absences, or a C
with more than five absences.
Performance Criteria:
Student achievement of the knowledge and skill objectives is assessed via quizzes, which include
multiple choice, true false and short answers. Also included is a written assessment of the
historical trends of a particular social welfare policy, including the various definitions of the
problem over time.
WSU STUDENT RESOURCES
Students with disabilities
http://studentdisability.wayne.edu/rights.php.
Academic integrity and student code of conduct
http://www.doso.wayne.edu/student-conduct/Academic_Integrity.html
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at Wayne State:
http://www.caps.wayne.edu/

COURSE SCHEDULE
5

Module
Week 1
August 27
Week 2
Sept. 3
Week 3
Sept. 10
Week 4
Sept. 17
Week 5
Sept. 24
Week 6
Oct. 1
Week 7
Oct. 8

Week 8
Oct. 15

Week 9
Oct. 22

Week 10
Oct. 29

Week 11
Nov. 5

Topic
Introduction
Review Generalist Practice
Definition of concepts
Knowledge base of group work practice
Focus of Group work practice; definition of
groups; classification of groups; group versus
individual efforts
Differences between casework and group work;
intervention targets; influential theories systems,
psychodynamic, learning field, and social
exchange
Planning focus elements of treatment group
planning, elements of task group planning,
planning model for group work
Introducing new members; defining the purpose
of the group confidentially facilitating members
motivation
Group Dynamics
The development of helpful group dynamics;
group cohesion; social integration and influence
Infuse
Leadership and Diversity
Leadership and power; Interactional model of
leadership Group leadership skills; approaches to
multicultural group work
Work phase/definition of Assessment; the
assessment process; assessing the functioning of
group members; assessing the functions of the
group as a whole; linking assessment to
intervention; foster adolescents in a child welfare
systems; setting limits: an Adolescent acting-out
boys’ group
Work phase continues (contracting (role plays)the
purpose of goals types of goals guidelines for
selecting and defining goals process of mutually
selecting and defining goals formulating contracts
sample contracts
Interviewing skills furthering responses;
paraphrasing responses, closed and open-ended
responding; seeking concreteness; eliminating
nonverbal barriers to effective communication;
eliminating verbal barriers to effective
communication; gauging the effectiveness of your
response.
Factors that influence group endings; the process
of ending; planned and unplanned termination;
ending group meetings; ending the group as a
whole

Reading Assignment

T&R Chapter.1 Introduction

T&R Chapter.2 Historical
Developments
T&R Chapter 6 Planning the
group
QUIZ CHAPS 1-3
T&R Chapter 7 The group
begins Objectives in the
beginning stage
T&R Chapter 3 Understanding
group dynamics
T&R Chapter 4 Leadership&
chapter 5 leadership and
diversity
1ST PROCESS
RECORDING DUE
T&R Chapter 8 Assessment
Course pack
Shulman Chapter 11 The
Beginning phase in group work

T&R Chapter. 8 Assessment
H&L Chapter 12 Developing
Goals and Formulating a
Contract
PAPER I DUE
H&L Chap 6 Verbal following,
exploring and focusing skills,
chapter7 Eliminating
counterproductive
communication patterns
T&R Chapter 14 Ending the
group’s work

6

Week 12
Nov. 12

Ethical Issues practice values; practice ethics;
definition of group work
Adolescent discharge group; Task force on
research utilization in probation; Program
activities for groups of children and activities

Week 13
Nov. 19

Task and treatment groups
First sessions with children and adolescents ten
year old girls in a school setting; unmarried
pregnant teens in a shelter Middle stage skills
working with the reluctant and resistant group
members
No Class

Week 14
Nov. 26

T&R Chapter 1 Introduction
P 6-12
T&R P 485-496 Appendix EG
Appendix E An example of a
treatment group proposal
Appendix F an Example of a
task group proposal
Appendix g suggested readings
on program activities
2ND PROCESS
RECORDING DUE
T&R Chapter 9 Treatment
groups: Foundation Methods
& chapter11Task groups:
foundation methods

Happy Thanksgiving!
Week 15
Dec. 3

Individual in Group the concept of role in a
dynamic system the scapegoat in the group; the
deviant member; the internal leader; the
gatekeeper; the defensive member; the quiet
member; the monopolizer

Course Pack Shulman Chapter
13 Working with the Individual
and the Group & Chapter 14
Endings and Transitions with
Groups

Week 15
Student evaluation, Course wrap-up
PAPER II DUE
Dec. 10
DEC. 7
Note: Syllabus subject to change based on the needs of the class.

7

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:
The assignments presented in this course are reflective of the group process. They include a means
by which students can apply both the knowledge and skill objectives of the course.
QUIZ (100 POINTS)
One quiz will be given during the semester covering main points in the assigned reading.
The quiz will consist of multiple choices, true /false and or matching questions. It will be given at
the beginning of class.
PROCESS RECORDINGS
The first Process Recording
180 POINTS
The second Process Recording 180 POINTS

DUE: WEEK 7 OCT. 8
DUE: WEEK 12 NOV 12

For the assignment use the process recording form provided. You may type in columns or
paragraph form. If you use paragraph form include the headings from the process Recording
Outline.
The Process recording assignments are to record what you observed in the structured role plays
carried out in class or in your field placement. Process Recording I will focus on the planning and
beginning group sessions. Process Recording II will focus on the middle and ending phases of the
structured role plays carried out in class or in your field placement.
Include the information below:
Attach a diagram of group
Use circles for women and brackets for men. Put first names in the circles and brackets.
Illustrate the positions of group members, for example in pairs, circles or rows
 Content
A brief summary of the highlights of activities, discussions observed in the session

Process
Patterns of interaction observed in the group
Communication, verbal and nonverbal, etc. indicate in diagram
Social Workers behaviors and members roles in the approach-avoidance phase of
group development
Evidence of diversity (please explain)
Use the following in your interpretations:
mutual aid
exploring and testing
problem solving
conflict
self-disclosure
maintenance
normalization
counterdependency
reality testing
flight
resources
Trust
roles
Structure
solidarity
Work
social support
Empathy
validation
Types of power (implied; explicit, overt;
8

transcendence
decision making
cohesion
negotiation
intimacy
development of bond

covert; etc.)
Types of skills used by the social worker
(attending, involving the group members;
expressive; responding; focusing; making
group process explicit; etc.)

GROUP PROCESS ANALYSIS
Paper 1 Planning and beginnings phase 250 POINTS DUE: WEEK 9 OCT. 22
Paper 2 Middle and Ending phases
250 POINTS DUE: WEEK 15 DEC 7
The focus in Paper I is the analysis of the groups’ development and the members behavior in the
early states. Consider the planning for the group, the first session and sessions two or three. You
may write about the structured role play group (s) in class (choose one), or a group from your field
placement.
The objective of the group process analysis is to help the student develop the ability to remember
what s/he observes, separate out her/his thoughts and feelings from the observed behavior and
begin to relate theory to observations. Utilize readings, class handouts and lectures regarding small
group experiences built into the class.
The following outline should be used as a guide. The group process analysis paper will be
approximately five pages in length and typewritten. Student should incorporate theories/concepts
from the reading assignments in the analysis using APA citation style.


Assessment
What is the significance of this session to the group’s development as a whole and to
the
members? How did the group change as a result of this group session? Was
the change a positive one in terms of the group’s development?
Group Dynamics evident in these sessions (be explicit – using terms learned in class)
Group goals and hidden agendas
Group norms
Level of cohesiveness
Group climate
Group culture
Impressions
What do you think and feel about what transpired in the group session?
Plan of Action
How do you plan to change your group behavior?
What needs to happen for your group to be more effective?

Paper II
The same outline as in Paper I is to be applied, however, it is to be applied for the middle
and ending phases of the group.

Assessment
What is the significance of this session to the group’s development as a whole and to
the members? How did the group change as a result of this group session? Was the
change a positive one in terms of the group’s development?
Group Dynamics evident in these sessions (be explicit using terms learned in class)
9

Group goals and hidden agendas
Group norms
Level of cohesiveness
Group climate
Group culture
Impressions
What do you think and feel about what transpired in the group session?
Plan of Action
How do you plan to change your group behavior?
What needs to happen for your group to be more effective?
Based on your observation of diversity, how do you plan to respond?
Ending Phase
a. Social workers behaviors in the middle and ending phase
b. Members role in terms of denial or acceptance.


Use the following in your interpretations:
mutual aid
exploring and testing
problem solving
conflict
self-disclosure
maintenance
normalization
counterdependency
reality testing
flight
resources
Trust
roles
Structure
solidarity
Work
social support
Empathy
validation
Types of power (implied; explicit, overt;
transcendence
covert; etc.)
decision making
Types of skills used by the social worker
cohesion
(attending, involving the group members;
negotiation
expressive; responding; focusing; making
intimacy
group process explicit; etc.)
development of bond
Examples of Structured Role Play (In-classroom Laboratory).
1
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Each class member will be assigned randomly to a (role play simulation), group, e.g., by
number and will remain in that group for the semester.
The groups will continue throughout the semester simulating each phase of group-work
Each group will have 2 co-leaders and 6 members (depending on size of class).
The various roles of the participants should last no longer than 15 minutes each.
Roles will rotate so that every class member will experience being a client, social worker, etc.
Each phase will take approximately three laboratory sessions.
The purpose of the group(s) will be selected by the class members - e.g. treatment for
substance abuse, community planning, parent education.
Member roles will be alternately - participating voluntarily, involuntarily - for example court
ordered.
Each group will meet concurrently

10

1. Attach a diagram
CONTENT
#2 WHAT DID YOU SEE?

PROCESS RECORDING
SOCIAL WORKERS GUTLEVEL
FEELINGS

SW4010
LOGICAL INTERPRETATION
OF CLIENT INTERACTION
#3

11

Name_ ____ _________________________
SW4010 PROCESS RECORDING ASSIGNMENT I – 150 POINTS

Area of Grading

Poor (92 & BELOW)

Good (93 POINTS)

Very Good (118 POINTS)

Headings present? Headings not present
(5)
0
Grammar and
Spelling (10)

9 or more mistakes
5

Excellent (150 POINTS)

Points (150
total)

Headings present
5
6-8 mistakes
7

3-5 mistakes
8

0-2 mistakes
10

Based on individual
interactions
Missing some activities
Details are vague, but
enough to understand
Details are present, but not
relevant or appropriate
Some subjectivity
20

Some activities summarized
Details are fairly accurate
Details are somewhat
appropriate and relevant
Fairly objective
25

All activities summarized
Details are accurate
Details are appropriate & relevant
Objective
30

Based on individual
interactions
Interpretation based on
content not included
Interpretations are vague,
but enough to understand
Terminology not used
correctly
Some subjectivity in
interpretations

Missed some key interactions
Some interpretation directly
linked to content
Interpretations fairly accurate
and based on concepts
Terminology related, but not
always used correctly
Description given but
terminology not used
Fairly objective

Interpretations directly linked to
content
Evidence based interpretations
Interpretations are accurate and
based on concepts
Terminology used correctly
Objective

The observed patterns of
interaction describe some of the
exchanges between the
participants.

The observed patterns of interaction
describe the exchanges between the
participants and seem to re-create the 60
experience.

CONTENT
Content Summary Activity summary
(30)
incomplete
Details are generic and
Were activities and vague
discussions
Details are irrelevant
summarized?
Subjective
10

PROCESS: INTERPRETATION OF CLIENT INTERACTION
Patterns of
Interpretation not
Interaction &
connected to content
interpretation (60): Interpretations vague and
lacking detail to
Were interpretations demonstrate understanding
based on content?
of concepts
Terminology not used
Were terms from
Subjective
lecture and the book
used to describe the The observed patterns of
content and
interaction weakly describe some
interpretations?
of the exchanges between the
participants.
30

The observed patterns of interaction
clearly detail the exchanges between the
participants and serve to vividly re-create
the experience.

12

40
Communication,
Behaviors, &
Diversity (45):
Diagram
Included and
according to
format?

Diagram missing
Diversity not addressed
SW role vague or not
addressed
SW vague or behavior not
addressed

Some verbal & nonverbal
communication exchanges are
missing. The Social Worker
behaviors and member roles in
the approach-avoidance phase
difficult to recognize. There is not
Diversity explained? any explanation of evidence of
Social worker's
diversity.
behavior and
member's roles
10
explained?
Interactions
illustrated with
verbals and nonverbals?

Diagram present but not
representative of the
group interaction
Diversity mentioned, but
without insight
SW role mentioned, but
with individual members
Verbal & nonverbal
communication exchanges are
shown in the diagram with
some symbols and descriptions
as specified in the assignment
instructions. The Social
Worker behaviors and member
roles in the approach-avoidance
phase are unclear. Evidence of
diversity is explained.
21

50
Diagram present but
demonstrates effort to represent
the group interactions
accurately
Diversity explained, but lacking
insight – but effort is
demonstrated
SW role mentioned in relation
to the group process, but not
always accurate.
Verbal & nonverbal communication
exchanges are shown in the diagram
through the application of the symbols
and descriptions as specified in the
assignment instructions. The Social
Worker behaviors and member roles
in the approach-avoidance phase are
shown. Evidence of diversity is
explained.
30

Diagram complete
Shows all members
Shows verbal interactions
Shows non-verbal interactions
Diversity explained clearly and with
insight
SW role clear
SW behavior explained in context
of concepts of group
Verbal & nonverbal communication
exchanges are clear and shown in the
diagram through the correct application of
the symbols and descriptions as specified
in the assignment instructions. The Social
Worker behaviors and member roles in
the approach-avoidance phase are
detailed. Strong evidence of diversity is
explained.
45

Totals

13

Name_ ____ _________________________
SW4010 PROCESS RECORDING ASSIGNMENT II – 150 POINTS

Area of Grading

Poor (92 & BELOW)

Good (93 POINTS)

Very Good (118 POINTS)

Headings present? Headings not present
(5)
0
Grammar and
Spelling (10)

9 or more mistakes
5

Excellent (150 POINTS)

Points (150
total)

Headings present
5
6-8 mistakes
7

3-5 mistakes
8

0-2 mistakes
10

Based on individual
interactions
Missing some activities
Details are vague, but
enough to understand
Details are present, but not
relevant or appropriate
Some subjectivity
20

Some activities summarized
Details are fairly accurate
Details are somewhat
appropriate and relevant
Fairly objective
25

All activities summarized
Details are accurate
Details are appropriate & relevant
Objective
30

Based on individual
interactions
Interpretation based on
content not included
Interpretations are vague,
but enough to understand
Terminology not used
correctly
Some subjectivity in
interpretations

Missed some key interactions
Some interpretation directly
linked to content
Interpretations fairly accurate
and based on concepts
Terminology related, but not
always used correctly
Description given but
terminology not used
Fairly objective

Interpretations directly linked to
content
Evidence based interpretations
Interpretations are accurate and
based on concepts
Terminology used correctly
Objective

The observed patterns of
interaction describe some of the
exchanges between the
participants.

The observed patterns of interaction
describe the exchanges between the
participants and seem to re-create the 60
experience.

CONTENT
Content Summary Activity summary
(30)
incomplete
Details are generic and
Were activities and vague
discussions
Details are irrelevant
summarized?
Subjective
10

PROCESS: INTERPRETATION OF CLIENT INTERACTION
Patterns of
Interpretation not
Interaction &
connected to content
interpretation (60): Interpretations vague and
lacking detail to
Were interpretations demonstrate understanding
based on content?
of concepts
Terminology not used
Were terms from
Subjective
lecture and the book
used to describe the The observed patterns of
content and
interaction weakly describe some
interpretations?
of the exchanges between the
participants.
30

The observed patterns of interaction
clearly detail the exchanges between the
participants and serve to vividly re-create
the experience.

14

40
Communication,
Behaviors, &
Diversity (45):
Diagram
Included and
according to
format?

Diagram missing
Diversity not addressed
SW role vague or not
addressed
SW vague or behavior not
addressed

Some verbal & nonverbal
communication exchanges are
missing. The Social Worker
behaviors and member roles in
the approach-avoidance phase
difficult to recognize. There is not
Diversity explained? any explanation of evidence of
Social worker's
diversity.
behavior and
member's roles
10
explained?
Interactions
illustrated with
verbals and nonverbals?

Diagram present but not
representative of the
group interaction
Diversity mentioned, but
without insight
SW role mentioned, but
with individual members
Verbal & nonverbal
communication exchanges are
shown in the diagram with
some symbols and descriptions
as specified in the assignment
instructions. The Social
Worker behaviors and member
roles in the approach-avoidance
phase are unclear. Evidence of
diversity is explained.
21

50
Diagram present but
demonstrates effort to represent
the group interactions
accurately
Diversity explained, but lacking
insight – but effort is
demonstrated
SW role mentioned in relation
to the group process, but not
always accurate.
Verbal & nonverbal communication
exchanges are shown in the diagram
through the application of the symbols
and descriptions as specified in the
assignment instructions. The Social
Worker behaviors and member roles
in the approach-avoidance phase are
shown. Evidence of diversity is
explained.
30

Diagram complete
Shows all members
Shows verbal interactions
Shows non-verbal interactions
Diversity explained clearly and with
insight
SW role clear
SW behavior explained in context
of concepts of group
Verbal & nonverbal communication
exchanges are clear and shown in the
diagram through the correct application of
the symbols and descriptions as specified
in the assignment instructions. The Social
Worker behaviors and member roles in
the approach-avoidance phase are
detailed. Strong evidence of diversity is
explained.
45

Totals

15

SW4010 Group Analysis Paper I – PLANNING AND BEGINNING PHASE
Poor (154 & BELOW)

Good (155 POINTS)

Very Good (205 POINTS)

Excellent (250 POINTS)

APA citation style, Grammar, References.

9 or more mistakes

6-8 mistakes

3-5 mistakes

0-2 mistakes

ORGANIZATION & CLARITY

Paper is poorly
organized and difficult
to read – does not flow
logically from one part
to another. Technical
terms are poorly
defined. Writing lacks
clarity and conciseness.
10

Paper is poorly organized
and difficult to read – does
not flow logically from one
part to another. Technical
terms are poorly defined.
Writing lacks clarity and
conciseness.
15

Paper is generally well
organized and most of the
argument is easy to follow.
Terms are not clearly
defined. Writing is mostly
clear but may lack
conciseness.
20

Paper is coherently
organized and the logic
is easy to follow.
Terminology is clearly
defined. Writing is clear
and concise and
persuasive.
25

ASSESSMENT – were these questions
answered? (50)
 What is the significance of this
session to the group’s development
as a whole and to the members?
 How did the group change as a
result of this group session?
 Was the change a positive one in
terms of the group’s development?

All points not covered,
and those that are
covered are vague and
lacking insight
Subjective
25

Only 2 points covered
All points covered, but too
vague to determine an
understanding of the
concepts
Some subjectivity
35

All points covered, but
missing some detail
Fairly objective
Interactions described, but
terminology not used
Terminology used
sometimes
Fairly objective
45

All points covered
clearly and thoroughly
Terminology and
concepts clear and used
properly
Objective
Evidence based
50

GROUP DYNAMICS evident in these
sessions – were these defined? (75)
 Group goals and hidden agendas
 Group norms
 Level of cohesiveness
 Group climate
 Group culture

All points not covered,
and those that are
covered are vague and
lacking insight
Subjective
35

Only 2 points covered
All points covered, but too
vague to determine an
understanding of the
concepts
Some subjectivity
50

All points covered, but
missing some detail
Fairly objective
Interactions described, but
terminology not used
Terminology used
sometimes
Fairly objective
60

All points covered
clearly and thoroughly
Terminology and
concepts clear and used
properly
Objective
Evidence based
75

IMPRESSIONS (50)
 What do you think and feel about
what transpired in the group
session?

Impressions not given

Impressions discussed, but
lack insight or thought
25

Insight discussed, lack
insight – but effort given
40

Impressions show
thought and insight
50

(25)

0

Points
(250 total)

16

PLAN OF ACTION (50)
- How do you plan to change your
group behavior?
- What needs to happen for your
group to be more effective?
- Based on your observation of
diversity, how do you plan to
respond?

All points not covered,
and those that are
covered are vague and
lacking insight
Subjective
20

Only 2 points covered
All points covered, but too
vague to determine an
understanding of the
concepts
Some subjectivity
30

All points covered, but
missing some detail
Fairly objective
Interactions described, but
terminology not used
Terminology used
sometimes
Fairly objective
40

All points covered
clearly and thoroughly
Terminology and
concepts clear and used
properly
Objective
Evidence based
50

Totals

17

SW4010 Group Analysis Paper II – MIDDLE & ENDING PHASE
Poor (154 & BELOW)

Good (155 POINTS)

Very Good (205 POINTS)

Excellent (250 POINTS)

APA citation style, Grammar, References.

9 or more mistakes

6-8 mistakes

3-5 mistakes

0-2 mistakes

ORGANIZATION & CLARITY

Paper is poorly
organized and difficult
to read – does not flow
logically from one part
to another. Technical
terms are poorly
defined. Writing lacks
clarity and conciseness.
10

Paper is poorly organized
and difficult to read – does
not flow logically from one
part to another. Technical
terms are poorly defined.
Writing lacks clarity and
conciseness.
15

Paper is generally well
organized and most of the
argument is easy to follow.
Terms are not clearly
defined. Writing is mostly
clear but may lack
conciseness.
20

Paper is coherently
organized and the logic
is easy to follow.
Terminology is clearly
defined. Writing is clear
and concise and
persuasive.
25

ASSESSMENT – were these questions
answered? (50)
 What is the significance of this
session to the group’s development
as a whole and to the members?
 How did the group change as a
result of this group session?
 Was the change a positive one in
terms of the group’s development?
 Member role in terms of denial and
acceptance

All points not covered,
and those that are
covered are vague and
lacking insight
Subjective
25

Only 2 points covered
All points covered, but too
vague to determine an
understanding of the
concepts
Some subjectivity
35

All points covered, but
missing some detail
Fairly objective
Interactions described, but
terminology not used
Terminology used
sometimes
Fairly objective
45

All points covered
clearly and thoroughly
Terminology and
concepts clear and used
properly
Objective
Evidence based
50

GROUP DYNAMICS evident in these
sessions – were these defined? (75)
 Group goals and hidden agendas
 Group norms
 Level of cohesiveness
 Group climate
 Group culture

All points not covered,
and those that are
covered are vague and
lacking insight
Subjective
35

Only 2 points covered
All points covered, but too
vague to determine an
understanding of the
concepts
Some subjectivity
50

All points covered, but
missing some detail
Fairly objective
Interactions described, but
terminology not used
Terminology used
sometimes
Fairly objective
60

All points covered
clearly and thoroughly
Terminology and
concepts clear and used
properly
Objective
Evidence based
75

IMPRESSIONS (50)
Impressions not given
 What do you think and feel about
what transpired in the group session? 0

Impressions discussed, but
lack insight or thought
25

Insight discussed, lack
insight – but effort given
40

Impressions show
thought and insight
50

(25)

Points
(250 total)

18

PLAN OF ACTION (50)
- How do you plan to change your
group behavior?
- What needs to happen for your
group to be more effective?
- Based on your observation of
diversity, how do you plan to
respond?

All points not covered,
and those that are
covered are vague and
lacking insight
Subjective
20

Only 2 points covered
All points covered, but too
vague to determine an
understanding of the
concepts
Some subjectivity
30

All points covered, but
missing some detail
Fairly objective
Interactions described, but
terminology not used
Terminology used
sometimes
Fairly objective
40

All points covered
clearly and thoroughly
Terminology and
concepts clear and used
properly
Objective
Evidence based
50

Totals

19

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22