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SW4997 Integrative Seminar (3 cr. hrs.

)
University Center rm: 1-204
Wednesdays 12:00 – 2:45 p.m.

Instructor: Prof Terri Duganne
Office phone: 586.630-0963
Phone hours: 10 am–6 pm

M-F
Consultation hours: before and
after class as arranged
Email: ad9202@wayne.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course provides the integration of classroom learning and field experience to promote
student’s understanding of social work knowledge, skills and values. Assessment of knowledge
and the experiential bases for generalist social work practice occurs in this class. This course
satisfies General Education Writing Intensive requirement
COURSE COMPETENCIES AND PRACTICE BEHAVIORS
2.1.1 Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly
Practice Behaviors:
Advocate for the client access to the services of social work; practice Personal reflection and
self-correction to assure continual professional development; attend to professional roles and
boundaries; demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance and communication;
engage in Career long learning; use supervision and consultation
2.1.2 Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice
Practice Behaviors:
Recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide
practice
make ethical decisions by applying standards of the NASW Code of Ethics; tolerate
ambiguity in resolving conflicts; apply concepts of ethical reasoning to arrive at principled
decisions
2.1.3 Apply Critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments
Practice Behaviors:

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Distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including research based
knowledge, and practice wisdom; analyze models of assessment, prevention, intervention and
evaluation; demonstrate effective oral and written communication in working with
individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and colleagues

2.1.4 Engage diversity and difference in practice
Practice Behaviors:
Gain sufficient self-awareness to eliminate the influence of personal bias and values in working
with diverse groups; recognize and communicate the importance of difference in shaping life
experiences
2.1.5 Advance human rights and social and economic justice
Practice Behaviors:
Advocate for human rights and social justice; Engage in practice that advance social and
economic justice
2.1.6 Engage in research- informed practice and practice informed research
Practice Behaviors:
use research evidence to inform practice; Use practice to inform scientific inquiry
2.1.7 Apply Knowledge of human Behavior and the social environment
Practice Behaviors:
Utilize conceptual frameworks to guide the process of assessment, intervention and evaluation;
Critique and apply knowledge to understand person and environment
2.1.8 Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver
effective social work services.
Practice Behaviors:
Analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being; Collaborate with
colleagues and clients for effective policy action
2.1.9 Respond to contexts that shape practice
Practice Behaviors:
Continuously discover, appraise, and attend to changing locales, populations, scientific and
technological developments, and emerging societal trends to provide relevant services; Provide
leadership in promoting sustainable changes in service delivery and practice to improve the
quality of social service
2.1.10 Engage, assess, intervene and evaluate with individuals, families, groups,
organizations and communities
Practice Behaviors:
(a)
Engagement:
Substantively and affectively prepare for action with individuals, families, groups,
organizations and communities; use empathy and other interpersonal skills; Develop a
mutually agreed-on focus of work and desired outcomes

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(b) Assessment
Collect, organize, and interpret client data; assess client strengths and limitation
develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives ; select appropriate
intervention strategies
(c) Intervention
Initiate actions to achieve organizational goals; implement prevention interventions that
enhance client capacities; help clients resolve problems; negotiate, mediate, and advocate
for clients; facilitate transitions and endings
(d) Evaluation
Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate interventions
11 Analyze the impact of the urban context on a range of client systems, including practice
implications
Practice Behaviors:
Examine the distinct characteristics of the urban context and apply the analysis to social work
practice
TEXT
Cournoyer, B. & Stanley M. (2002). The social work portfolio: planning, assessing and documenting
lifelong learning in a dynamic profession. Pacific Grove CA: Brooks/Cole
Course pack of assigned readings provided on Blackboard
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
GRADING AND ASSIGNMENTS
Assignment
Points
Final Paper
35
Portfolio
30
Presentation
25
Reflections
10
Total
100

percent
35
30
25
10
100

Competency
2.2.1-2.2.10
2.2.3
2.1.1
2.2.1

BENCHMARK ASSIGNMENTS
Final Paper
Portfolio
GRADING POLICY
Students may pass the course with a grade of D but must maintain a C average during the junior
and senior year. (See Undergraduate Bulletin, Wayne State University)
http://www.bulletins.wayne.edu/ubk-output/index.htm

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Grade distribution:
100-95 A
94.9-90 A79.9-77 C+
76.9-73 C

89.9-87 B+
72.9-70 C-

86.9-83 B
69.9-67 D+

82.9-80 B66.9-63 D

79.9-77 C+
62.9-60 D-

ORGANIZATION OF THE COURSE
SW 4997, Integrative Seminar in Social Work, is the capstone course for the BSW Program. This is a
fifteen week, required course scheduled in the last semester of the BSW curriculum. SW4998, Field
Practice in Social Work II, is a co-requisite. Students will use a case from their field placement for
assessing their knowledge skill and ability related to entry-level generalist practice.
This course has been designated the “writing intensive” required course by the University. Students will
prepare a 25-30 page paper demonstrating their ability to incorporate the three levels of practice and the
components of the curricular areas (HBSE, Policy, Research, & Practice) of the entry level general
practitioner.
The generalist intervention model (GIM) is the overarching framework for this course. Students will,
demonstrate through written assignments their knowledge and skills related to engagement, assessment,
planning, implementation, evaluation, termination and follow-up with their client population.
The capstone seminar is intended to provide students with a culminating and integrative experience at the
end of the BSW Program. The seminar provides students with opportunities to conduct independent
research as well as refine their analytical, verbal and writing skills. The primary purpose of this capstone
seminar is to use and build upon the knowledge, skills, and insights students have gained in this
professional school. Throughout the semester students will be called upon to analyze (verbally and in
writing) required readings and various aspects of the BSW curriculum. At the end of the semester these
various components will be integrated into a final paper.
ROLE OF THE STUDENT AND INSTRUCTOR
See University Statement of obligation of Students and Faculty Members of the teaching-learning
process
http://www.bulletins.wayne.edu/fib/fib2d.html
POLICIES FOR THE COURSE
This course covers a content domain that is quite extensive. Students are expected to attend each class
session, arrive on time and remain for the entire class period. Regardless of performance on the
various assignments or reasons to explain an absence(s), a student will not be able to earn an A for
the course with more than one absence or a B with more than two absences.
1. It is expected that students complete all required readings, participate in class, and perform
satisfactorily and in a timely manner on all assignments.
2. Written assignments, unless requiring completion in class, are to be word-processed, doublespaced utilizing Times New Roman 12 font.
3. Written assignments are graded on both content and writing skills. Problems with sentence
structure, spelling, grammar, punctuation and other writing mechanics will result in a lower grade
for the assignment. The APA format is to be used as appropriate.

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4. Class participation includes raising questions from the readings, making relevant comments
drawn from personal experience, reacting to opinions expressed by the instructor or other
students, asking for clarification, being actively engaged in class exercises or bringing up issues
of interest to the class.
5. Cell phones are to be placed on vibrate or turned off. Computers may only be used in the
classroom to retrieve information for relevant classroom discussion.

PLAGIARISM/ACADEMIC HONESTY:
“Plagiarism is using another person’s words or ideas without giving credit to the other person.
When you use someone else’s words, you must put quotation marks around them and give the
writer or speaker credit by revealing the source in a citation. Even if you revise or paraphrase
the words of someone else or just use their ideas, you still must give the author credit in a note.”
http://www.otl.wayne.edu/pdf/2006_july_aibrochure.
(William Harris, “Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers,”
http://virtualsalt.com/antiplag.htm, March 7, 2002)

You must cite sources from the Internet or any other form of electronic media used in
your work. Any paper suspected of plagiarism will be reviewed at Turnitin.com to verify
that it is your work and properly cited.
Any paper that is plagiarized will result in an “F” for the class and a referral to the
University for further Disciplinary Action.

APA FORMAT
All papers written in the School of Social Work require APA format. You may purchase the
Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition), or you may visit the
website listed below
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
WIKIPEDIA WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AS A RELIABLE SOURCE
What is Wikipedia?
“Wikipedia is a free-content encyclopedia, written collaboratively by people from all around
the world. The site is a wiki, which means that anyone can edit entries simply by clicking on
the edit this page link. Because Wikipedia is an ongoing work to which anybody can
contribute, it differs from a paper-based reference source in some important ways. In
particular, mature articles tend to be more comprehensive and balanced, while other (often
fledgling) articles may still contain significant misinformation, un-encyclopedic content or
vandalism. Users need to be aware of this in order to obtain valid information and avoid
misinformation which has been recently added and not yet removed.”

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WSU STUDENT RESOURCES
Students with disabilities
http://studentdisability.wayne.edu/rights.php
Academic integrity and student code of conduct
http://www.doso.wayne.edu/student-conduct/Academic_Integrity.html
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at Wayne State:
http://www.caps.wayne.edu/
COURSE LEARNING UNITS

Units

Session

1
1/14/2015

Introduction to Seminar; Overview of
syllabus and assignments

2
1/21/2015

Guest Speaker regarding licensure and
other NASW activity. Guest Speaker
Dr. Faye Martin Developing a Weebly
site
Discussion will focus on various
intelligences, including emotional
intelligence, psychological type, and
preferred learning styles and
preferences.
The overall goal of this session is to
help students become active, selfdirected and collaborative learners.

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1/28/2015

4
2/4/2015

Prior Learning Recognition,
Assessment, and Integration
In this unit we focus on the generalist
framework, ecological perspective,
strength-oriented, empowerment
based practice and values and ethics.
The students will be documenting
their knowledge base, content areas,
learning needs and information
technology and the utilization of the
personal computer.
What is your knowledge base?
What is your competence level?
What are your social work learning
needs?

Assignment

For Session 3: Exploring your Learning
Style. Read : Cournoyer, B. & Stanley M.
(2002). Exploring your learning self,
(pp. 14-26).
Assignment:
Complete and bring to class all exercises
except Collaborative Group Learning and
Portfolio Exercise. These will be done in
class.
Assignment DUE:
Reflection #1: Complete Appendix 3 (in
text), regarding your learning style.
For Session 4:
Readings:
Cournoyer, B. & Stanley M. (2002).
Determining your Social Work Learning
Needs, (pp. 27-37)

Assignment DUE:
Reflection #2 Complete Appendix 4 (in
text). Please come to class prepared to
discuss your findings.

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How will you utilize technology in
your practice?

5
2/11/2015

Faculty Lecture

For Session 5
Readings:
Case Study 8-6 “Empowering Adolescent
Girls in Foster Care: A Short-Term Group
“The Case of Trent”, pp 3-5 and “Personal
Growth and Self-Esteem through Cultural
Spiritualism: A Native American
Experience”, pp. 73-79
Web site: NASW Page on Diversity and
Equity at
http://www.socialworkers.org/diversity.asp
Case Study 1-2 “Using the ecological
model in Generalist Practice: Life
transitions in late adulthood”, pp.10-14.

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2/18/2015

Group I presentation

7
2/25/2015

Group 2 Presentation Values and
multicultural competence

DRAFT 1 OF MAJOR PAPER DUE
Assignment DUE:
Reflection #3 Complete a reflection on
the above reading, (from 2/11/15)

Each article is to be read & reviewed
for reflection paper.
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3/4/2015

17 Faculty Lecture (HBSE)

Debate 15 “Can HBSE classes discuss
socially sensitive topics without being
labeled ‘politically incorrect’?” pp 214227
Debate 17 “Should HBSE favor social
environment theories over theories of
individual behavior”, pp 242-254
Debate 20 “should HBSE Teach Student to
Do anything?” pp.286-297
DRAFT 2 OF MAJOR PAPER
DUE

9
3/11/2015

Group 3 Human Behavior in the
Social environment

Assignment DUE:
Reflection #4 Complete a reflection on
the above reading, (3/4/15)

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Spring Break March 16 -March 21
10
3/25/2015

Faculty Lecture (Policy)

The practitioner’s role in Influencing
social welfare policy and social work
practice Chapter 8
Case 29 “From Case to Cause: My name is
Jess Overton”, pp 204-210.
DRAFT 3 OF MAJOR PAPER DUE

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4/1/2015

12
4/8/2015

13
4/15/2015

Group IV Presentation
Social Welfare Policy and Services
In this unit the focus is on how you
conceptualize your role in carrying
out policy, related functions,
including promoting social and
economic justice, as you pursue a
career in social work.
Faculty Lecture
Social Work Practice and
Research: Consolidating Gains
from the field experience
It is time to assess, sort out, pull
together clarify/formulate your own
practice framework as you
apply/applied it in your field
experience. It is also time to assess
how you utilize research knowledge
in your practice. You will need to
reflect on your field experiences,
readings, and case studies involving
micro, mezzo and macro practice as
well as research.
Group V Presents on social work
research Wrap-up: student discuss
seminar experience and readiness
for generalist practice

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4/22/2015

Overflow/continuation of any
presentations or other final relevant
course instruction
Student Evaluation of Teaching
Any other survey

15
4/29/2015

Ending Phase
All students must attend this class.
Non-attendance will result in a 5
point deduction from overall
grade.

PORTFOLIO DUE TODAY

Reading:
Evaluating practice: guidelines for the
accountable professional. “Prologue”
Case 11 “In the Best Interest of the child”
Case 15 “Sally’s Saga”
Case 18 “No mad dog looks: Group work
and mediating differences”
Case 2 “The Case of Trent Revisited: A
single subject research design.”
Assignment:
Reflection #5 essay on the above readings
due

FINAL PAPER DUE TODAY

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Note: Syllabus subject to change based on needs of the class and at the instructors discretion. All
eleven (11) competencies will be briefly reviewed throughout the semester.
COURSE ASSIGNMENTS
This capstone social work methods course has four principal assignments:
ASSIGNMENT 1
Integrative paper assignment: 35% of grade
Due Session 13 (4/15/2015)
Students write a 25-30 page paper based upon their own work with client systems.
This assignment meets the University writing intensive requirement. It is intended to provide the student
with an opportunity to demonstrate his or her knowledge and ability related to generalist practice utilizing
the eight components of social work education, as well as the competencies required of the General
Practitioner.
This paper is the culmination of the BSW academic experience.. It is intended to provide the student with
an opportunity to demonstrate his or her knowledge and ability related to generalist practice utilizing the
eight components of social work education, as well as the competencies required of the General
Practitioner.
 Diversity
 Populations at risk
 Social and Economic Justice
 Values and Ethics
 Social work policy,
 Social work practice,
 Human behavior and the social environment,
 Research methods
Students may prepare a draft for each section of the assignment to be submitted to instructor for feedback.(This is an optional assignment with no points attached!)
Please note: LATE drafts will NOT be accepted.
Draft 1

Due Session 6

Populations at Risk

The student selects a case (individual, family, group community) from his or her field placement. The
case must come from an at-risk population with whom social workers are involved (women, ethnic
minorities of color, physically and/or mentally challenged, gay men and lesbian women, aged, etc.). This
section of the paper must:
 provide documented information from a refereed journal or text identifying this client as a
member of an at- risk- population
 provide analysis of effects of membership in the oppressed population group.
discuss any ethical dilemmas presented during the interaction with the client system including
solutions to the (those)dilemmas
Draft 2
Due Session 8
Evaluation of client situation
This section of the paper must include a bio-psycho-social
Including how the client views his or her problem areas and what if anything they wish to do to abate the
problem.
In this section you must also discuss

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 Description of interventions
 Report on empirical basis of interventions
 Value and ethical dilemmas related to service delivery
 You must refer to and document journal articles related to evidence based practice related
to the intervention being used
Draft 3




Due Session 10

Evaluation of practice:

Techniques, methodologies to evaluate practice effectiveness (Social Worker and Agency)
Case outcome
 Does the Agency have a feedback loop?
Program evaluation- formal or informal
Methodology appropriate to case
Values and ethics regarding evaluation

ASSIGNMENT 2
Portfolio


30% of grade

Due Session 11

4/1/2015

The portfolio is a well-organized and carefully prepared collection of documents related to one’s
readiness for professional social work practice. It reflects evidence of an active, self-directed
approach to learning and ongoing growth as a social work student or practitioner (Cournoyer and
Stanley, 2000).
This assignment is designed to have the student summarize their academic and professional
career by compiling
goals for future development.

The format for the social work portfolio:
Your picture must be on the front cover of your portfolio
(1) Cover page;
(2) Submission letter
(3) Table of contents
(4) Introduction
(5) Resume
(6) Personal statement - Your Personal Statement should indicate the competencies you
attained during your BSW education
(7) Learning products: One assignment from each course taken in the BSW Program. For
each learning product,
 provide a written reflection indicate the competency the assignment fulfilled.
 Discuss in your reflection whether the practice behaviors and knowledge have been
achieved.
(8) Summary and appropriate appendixes
evaluations,

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three letters of reference
personal learning, goals
licenses, certificates
transcripts, (wsu has transfer transcripts)
ASSIGNMENT 3
Presentation:







25% of grade

Due as assigned in syllabus

students are assigned randomly to work together to present material to the class on one of the
foundation areas (policy, practice, human behavior, research).
Each group will be assigned an area of study found within the BSW Curriculum.
In this assignment you are to survey the bodies of literature relevant to your assigned topic.
An annotated bibliography lists sources in correct bibliographic form (APA) and includes a short
well written summary for each entry.
Each member of the group must have at least 5 bibliographic entries
Each of the entries should be combined into one Reference submission (provided to each member
of the class and the Professor with the total entries.
Prior to each group presentation I will deliver a lecture on the subject to be presented the
following week.

Group I: will present Session V (Practice) Assessment tools assessing Resource capabilities
Assessment requires social workers and clients to think about what they are doing in theoretical
and practical ways to organize their information into a usable format for planning. Clients
contribute to this process by offering their theories, interpretations, and feelings to the
assessment. Social workers contribute by integrating theoretical understanding, professional
supports and research information. Social Workers can enhance the assessment by keeping
records.





This presentation is to assess resources available to clients in their environment.
Explains social work assessment from a strengths perspective;
scrutinizes assessment information using questions from an ecosystems perspective;
articulate the use of social work tools relevant to each level of social work practice;
describe techniques for social workers to enhance assessment information through
observation;
define procedures for workers to record information in an effective and ethical manner.

Assessment processes infuse professional theory and expertise into the work of social workers
and clients. Such processes are empowering to the extent that they contextualize the issues clients
face and locate resources to achieve goals. In contrast assessment processes that elevate the social
worker’s expertise or reduce client situations to stigmatizing labels undermine a client’s progress.
The organized description of client needs and resources that comes from assessment begins to
frame the options that the partners have for development and change. Framing solutions takes
planning further. To Frame solutions, the partners articulate goals, focus on change, consider
multiple levels of intervention, and concentrate their energies toward the outcomes they seek

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Group 2 Values and Multicultural competence
Social work programs integrate content that promotes understanding, affirmation and respect for
people from diverse backgrounds. The content emphasizes the interlocking and complex nature
of culture and personal identity. It ensures that social services meet the needs of groups served
and are culturally relevant. Social work education programs integrate content about values and
principles of ethical decision making as presented in the NASW Code of Ethics
The educational experience provides students with the opportunity to be aware of personal
values, develop, demonstrate, and promote the values of the profession; and analyze ethical
dilemmas and the ways in which these affect practice, services, and clients
This presentation is to :
 educate students to recognize diversity within and between groups that may influence
assessment, intervention, and research.
 define, design, and implement strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse
backgrounds

integrate content on populations at risk, examining factors that contribute to and
constitute being at risk.
 educate students to identify how group membership influences access to resources, and
present content on the dynamics of such risk factors and responsive and productive
strategies to redress them.

integrate social and economic justice content grounded in and understanding of
distributive justice, human and civil rights, and the global interconnectedness of
oppression.
 Address content related to implementing strategies to combat discrimination, oppression,
and economic deprivation and to promote social and economic
 prepare students to advocate for non- discriminatory social and economic systems

Group 3: will present Session 8 Human Behavior and the Social Environment
Because of the multisystem and interdisciplinary nature of social work, practitioners draw from
many diverse theoretical perspectives. These perspectives help practitioners understand the
dynamics of human behavior and the impact of the sociopolitical, economic, and physical
environments. Evidence-based practice models direct processes toward expected client outcomes.
This presentation is to:
 To address the perceptions of clients’ situation, elements use by workers to determine and
apply theories, perspectives and models and orientations.
 provide content on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social
environments.

include empirically base theories and knowledge that focus on the interactions between
and among individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems.

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Include theories and knowledge of biological , sociological, cultural psychological, and
spiritual development across the life span;
Address the range of social systems in which people live individual, family, group,
organizational, and community and the ways social systems promote or deter people in
maintaining or achieving health and well-being.

Group 4: will present Session 10 on Social Work Policy and Services
Programs provide content about the history of social work, the history and current structures of
social welfare services, and the role of policy in service delivery, social work practice, and
attainment of individuals and social well-being. Course content provides students with
knowledge and skills to understand major polices that form the foundation of social welfare;
analyze organizational, local , state, national, and international issues in social welfare policy and
social service delivery; analyze and apply the results of policy research relevant to social service
delivery; and understand and demonstrate policy practice skills in regard to economic, politically,
and organizational systems, and use them to influence, formulate, and advocate for policy
consistent with social work values; and identify financial organizational administrative, and
planning processes required to deliver social services

Group 5: will present Session 12 on Research & Evidence Based Practice
Qualitative and quantitative research content provides understanding of a scientific analytic and
ethical approach to building knowledge for practice. The content prepares student to develop,
use, and effectively communicate empirically based knowledge including evidence-based
interventions. Research knowledge is used by students to provide high-quality services; to
initiate change; to improve practice, policy and social service delivery; and to evaluate their own
practice.

ASSIGNMENT 4
Reflection papers (Three (3) reflections and two (2) Appendices from Cournoyer, B. & Stanley M.
(2002). The social work portfolio: planning, assessing and documenting lifelong learning
in a dynamic profession. Pacific Grove CA: Brooks/Cole
A Reflective Paper is a piece of writing, in standard essay format, that involves your knowledge about a
particular subject. The goal is to not only discuss what you learned from a reading but to convey the
personal experiences you have had related to what you know and what you need to know or what is
missing from the information you have read. The significance of writing a reflective paper is that you
have a chance to reveal and talk about your personal insight on a topic. A reflective essay is used as a
self-assessment measure of sorts; it allows you to address what you have gained from your academic
experience as a BSW student.

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A reflective essay concentrates on your ideas and reflections about a topic; however, you want to show
why the points you are making are valid. To do so, any information that led to your conclusions should
be included in the paper as a reference.
A good reflective essay includes an insightful interpretation of the matter at hand. The feelings and
experiences that you write about in the essay should be based on your own perception and demonstrate
why your thinking might be significant on a larger scale. The essay should communicate both the
importance of the topic as well as your consideration of it.
There is no definite structural design or certain format and/or guidelines to which you should adhere. In
general, the opening paragraph should be engaging and leave the reader eager to study the rest. The body
should reveal your ideas about and experiences with the subject. In the conclusion, discuss the impact on
you as well as the probable impact that it may have on others. The conclusion sums up what you gained
from the experience. You might consider including what your conclusions are in relation to your
expectations of the subject matter before you read or viewed something about the subject.
As in any other paper or essay, strive for cohesiveness; for example, refer to the specific passage or quote
the material that drew this feeling, reflection or analysis from you and why. Do not simply summarize
what you have read or viewed; a reflection is not a summary. It is also recommended to not use a
reflection paper as a free flow of ideas and thoughts. Again, the idea of a reflective paper is to write a
description of your reaction and analysis. Comment on the relevance of what you have read or viewed
and its application to practice. It is more formal than a journal entry—so steer clear of informal language
and form.
 There are 5 reflection papers due in this course, (a.k.a. 3 essays, 2 appendices from text)
 Each paper will have a point value of (TBD).
 You will write a 1-2 page paper in which you discuss the major ideas of the reading and
your assessment of the information and come prepared to discuss your assessment in class.
 Your reflection must include all of the articles assigned for the designated sessions.

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COURSE RUBRICS

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RUBRIC
MAJOR PAPER
Student name: ___________________________________________
Basis for Grade
Organization of the paper
Is the paper or presentation organized and written in a logical manner?
Has the paper been proofread for spelling, punctuation and word choice?

Points
Available
6

Points
earned

Completeness and thoroughness:
Has the student presented issues in such a way that readers unfamiliar with the
issues can understand it as well as someone who is knowledgeable about the
issues? Are the important issues addressed?
Originality and Creativity:
Has the student used his or her analytical skills to present the content areas in
a manner that indicates more than just a restatement of what others have said
about the issues?
Has the student demonstrated an understanding of the content areas (answers
questions, makes connections, explains in own words)?
Are the student’s conclusions and recommendations well developed and
supported?
Use of APA style
Has APA format been applied appropriately
Psycho-social assessment
Include explanation of at-risk group membership; ethical dilemmas
Policy impact on Client
Include both positive and negative impact; discuss any ethical dilemmas that
you encounter as it relates to policy
Theoretical Framework
Discuss theories utilized in assessment
Treatment Plan/Intervention
Include empirical basis of intervention

4
5
5
5
5

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Evaluation of Practice
Include empirical research to demonstrate effectiveness; discus dilemmas
related to service delivery.

5

Total
35
NOTE: Structure of the paper, spelling, and grammar will be taken into account.
Structure – 5; spelling -1 for each misspelled word; grammar -1 for each error

/35

Presentation Rubric SW 4997 Integrative Seminar (Peer evaluation)
Name_________________________________________________

Date_______

Group
Topic
Basis for Grade
Submitted bibliography 1 week
before presentation
Audible in all parts of the classroom
(good volume)
Presents information in a logical
manner (verbal organization)

Points
Available

Comments

5
1
1

Maintains “professionalism” good
posture, no fidgeting, not reading
from notes, uses clear , organized
language, expresses ideas fluently,
visual supplements

3

Demonstrates
knowledge
and
understanding of the topic, accuracy,
thoroughness

8

Answers questions, makes
connections, explain in own words

Points
Earned

4

Encourages class participation
1
Provides handouts
1

17

Identify something new you learned
from the information presented
Total

1
25

/25

Additional comments

Evaluator Signature: ________________________________________________________________

Please note do NOT provide ½ points.

Presentation Rubric SW 4997 Integrative Seminar: Final Score Sheet (faculty)
Name_________________________________________________

Date_______

Group
Topic
Basis for Grade

Points
Points
Available earned/class
evaluation
Style

Faculty
Final
evaluation points
earned

Audible in all part of the
classroom (good volume
Presents information in a
logical manner (verbal
organization
Remains on topic
Maintains
“professionalism” – good
posture, no fidgeting, not
reading from notes
Content
Demonstrates knowledge of
topic, accuracy,
thoroughness
Engagement
Demonstrates
understanding (answers
questions, makes
connections, explain in own
18

words
Encourages class
participation
Provides handouts
Identify something new you
learned from the
information presented
total
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Portfolio Rubric
Student
Assessment
Picture on cover
Cover Page
Submission letter
Table of contents
Introduction
Resume
Personal statement
Learning products/ assessments
related to competencies
Appendixes
 Letters of references (3)
 Personal Learning over
next 5 years
 Licenses
 Transcripts
 Course syllabi
Overall structure

Points
available

Points
achieved

5
3
7
10

5

Spelling
grammar
Total

30

/30

Overall structure, grammatical and spelling errors will result in a 1 point deduction for each error .

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Bibliography
*Appleby, G.A., Colon, E. & Hamiliton, J. (2002). Diversity, oppression and social functioning: personin-environment assessment and intervention. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Ashford, J., Lecroy, C., & Lortie, K. (2001). Human behavior in the social environment: A
multidimentsional perspective. (2nd edition). Belmont CA: Brooks /Cole.
Barret, B. & Logan, C. (2002). Counseling gay men and lesbians. Pacific Groves, CA: Brooks /Cole
*Bloom, M., & Klein, W.C. eds. (1997). Controversial Issues in human behavior and the social
environment. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
*Bloom, M., Fischer, J., & Orme, J. (2003). Evaluating Practice: Guidelines for the accountable
professional. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Brueggemann, W. (2002). The Practice of Macro Social Work Belmont CA: Brooks/Cole.
Carter, B. & McGoldrick, M. eds. (1999). The expanded family life cycle: individual, family, and social
perspectives. (3rd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Cournoyer, B. R. & Stanley, M. J. (2002). The social work portfolio: planning, assessing, and
documenting lifelong learning in a dynamic profession. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

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DeBord, K., Canu, R.F., & Kerpelman, J. (2002). Understanding a work-family fit for single parents
moving from welfare to work. Social Work, 45, 313-324.
*Dolgoff, R. & Feldstein (2000). Understanding social welfare. (3rd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn
and Bacon.
Hepworth, D., Rooney R. & Larson, J. (2004) Direct Social Work Practice: Theory and Skills (6th
edition). Pacific Grove CA: Brooks/Cole.
Germain, C. & and Gitterman, A. (1996). The life model of social work practice. (2nd ed.). Columbia
University Press.
*Gilbert, N. & Terrell,P. (1998). Dimensions of social welfare policy. (4th ed.). Needham Heights, MA:
Allyn and Bacon.
Kilpatrick, A.C. & Holland, T.P. (1999). Working with families: an integrative model by level of need. (2nd
ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Kirst-Ashman, K & Hull, G. (2004). Understanding Generalist Practice (3rd edition).
Chicago IL: Nelson Hall Publishers.
Kirst-Ashman, K & Hull, G. (2004). Generalist Practice with Organizations and Communities. Chicago
IL: Nelson Hall Publishers.
*Lecroy, C.W. (1999). Case studies in social work practice. (2nd ed.). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.
Lowenberg, F.M., Dolgoff, R., & Harrington, D. (2002). Ethical decisions for social work practice. (6th
ed.). Itasca, ILL: F.E. Peacock Publishers.
Marlow, C. (2001). Research Methods for Generalist Social Work. (3rd ed.). Belmont CA: Brooks/Cole.
*McInnis-Dittrich, K, Integrating social welfare policy and social work practice: an empowering
approach. (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Miley, K.K., O’Melia, M. & DuBois, B. (2002). Generalist social work practice: an empowering
approach, (3rd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

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National Assosciation of Social Workers. (2002). Social work speaks: NASW policy statements (5 th ed.).
Washington, DC: NASW Press.
Netting, F., Kettner, P., & McMurtry S. (2004). Social Work Macro Practice (3rd edition). Boston MA:
Allyn and Bacon.
Patterson, D.A. (2002). Personal computer applications in the social services. Needham Heights, MA:
Allyn and Bacon.
Payne, Malcolm, (1997). Modern Social Work Theory: A critical introduction Chicago,IL: Lyceum
Books, Inc.
*Rivas, R.F. & Hull, G.H. (2002). Case studies in generalist practice. (2 nd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Royce, D. (1999). Research Methods in Social Work (3rd edition). United States, Wadsworth .
Sheafor, B.W., & Horejsi, C.R. (2003). Techniques and guidelines for social work practice. (6th ed.).
Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Toseland, R.W., & Rivas, R.F. (1998). An introduction to group work practice. (3rd ed.). Needham
Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Tripodi, T. (1994). A primer on Single-Subject Design for clinical social workers. Washington D.C.
NASW Press.
Unrau, Y., Krysik, J., & Grinnell, R. (2001). Social Work Research and Evaluation: Quantitative and
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Weinbach, R. & Grinnell, R. (2004). Statistics for Social Workers (6th edition) .Needham Heights, MA:
Allyn and Bacon.

Web Sites
Code of Ethics of the National Association for Social Workers (approved by the 1996 NASW Delegate
Assembly and revised by the 1999 NASW Delegate Assembly) http://www.naswdc.ort/pubs/code/asp

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Council on Social Work Education Curriculum Policy Statement for Baccalaureate Degree Programs at
http://www.cswe.org
Social Work Café at http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/4862
The New Social Worker’s online Career Center at http://www.socialworker.com
* Coursepak Readings.

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