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SOCIAL WORK 3410

FOUNDATIONS OF ETHICS AND
VALUES IN SOCIAL WORK
WOW! PROGRAM
(1 credit hour)
Please be aware if there is a question about a grade, it must occur no more than seven days after the assignment
due date. I will not entertain any questions regarding a grade past the seven-day deadline.
This syllabus is subject to change
Instructor:

Norma Schropshire, L.M.S.W., Adjunct Professor

Email:

ar3183@wayne.edu

Work Phone: Please e-mail first and assume a 24-48 hour turnaround.
(708) 888-1648 (Office), returned phone calls will be from private/restricted caller identification.
Office Hours: Email, Phone, Vsee, Any Meeting or by appointment
Classroom:

WOW! Online Program

Spring 2014 Dates for this Course: Class begins on May 5, 2014 and closes June 20, 2014
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Beginning course in the principles, values and ethics, which underlie the profession of social
work. This course explores the meaning concepts and process of thinking about and resolving
ethical dilemmas, the promotion of ethical questions and knowledge of their historical contexts.
The ability to critically interpret and evaluate philosophical texts, positions, and arguments is
explored in this course.
COURSE COMPETENCIES AND PRACTICE BEHAVIORS FOR THIS COURSE
2.1.1 Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly
Practice Behaviors:
Advocate for the client access to the services of social work; practice
Personal reflection and self-correction to assure continual professional
development; attend to professional roles and boundaries; demonstrate
professional demeanor in behavior, appearance and communication;
engage in Career long learning; use supervision and consultation

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2.1.2 Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional
practice
Practice Behaviors:
Recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional
values to guide practice
make ethical decisions by applying standards of the NASW Code of
Ethics; tolerate ambiguity in resolving conflicts; apply concepts of ethical
reasoning to arrive at principled decisions

2.1.3 Apply Critical thinking
professional judgments

to

inform

and

communicate

Practice Behaviors:
Distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge,
including research based knowledge, and practice wisdom; analyze
models of assessment, prevention, intervention and evaluation;
demonstrate effective oral and written communication in working with
individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and colleagues

Texts and required materials
Barksy, Allan E. (2010) Ethics and Values in Social Work: An integrated approach for a
comprehensive curriculum. NY: NY Oxford University Press.
INTRODUCTION:
Course Domain and Boundaries
This is an introductory course which will provide students with a beginning knowledge of the
Social Work Professional values and ethics which underlie the profession of Social Work. It is
designed to familiarize the student with their personal values and the possible intersection of
their values and the values of their client population. Students will become familiar with the
meaning and concepts and the process of thinking about and resolving basic issues. The primary
goals of this course are to promote students’ awareness of ethical questions and knowledge of
their historical contexts and; ability to critically interpret and evaluate philosophical texts,
positions, and arguments. In particular, we will examine a variety of ethical issues by focusing
on forms or ideals of life and models for relating to others.

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Performance Criteria
Student achievement of the learning outcomes delineated for this course is assessed via tests,
case scenarios written assignments, small group projects and class participation.
GRADING AND ASSIGNMENTS
ASSIGNMENT

POINTS

PERCENTAGE

RELATED COURSE
COMPETENCY

4 QUIZZES @ 25 POINTS EACH
Bi-weekly two-chapter quizzes
*CASE VIGNETTE PAPER

100

52%

2.1.1

25

13%

2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3

*MORAL REASONING VALUES PAPER
Based on Theories of Moral Development

50

26%

2.1.2, 2.1.3

DISCUSSION EXERCISES, UNIT REFLECTIONS OR
END OF CHAPTER QUESTIONS

16

09%

TOTAL

191

100%

EXTRA CREDIT
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY

5

-

-

BENCHMARK ASSIGNMENTS
 STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO retrieve, recognize and recall
information about personal ethics and values and must be able to
construct meaning from those values by constructing and
demonstrating an ability to describe how to use information in userfriendly language ensuring the client understands.
Grading Policy:
Students may pass the course with a grade of D but must maintain a C average during the junior
and senior year. (See Undergraduate Bulletin, Wayne State University
http://www.bulletins.wayne.edu/ubk-output/index.html)
Grade distribution:
100-95 A

94.9-90 A-

89.9-87 B+

86.9-83 B

82.9-80 B-

79.9-77 C+

79.9-77 C+

76.9-73 C

72.9-70 C-

69.9-67 D+

66.9-63 D

62.9-60 D-

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ORGANIZATION OF THE COURSE
This is an 8-week 1 credit hour course. The framework of the course will involve lectures, tests,
discussion questions and reflections. Every course in the School has some ethics content in it;
however, this course goes beyond the descriptive analysis. This course provide the opportunity to
allow the student to become mindful by allowing them to critically analyze their personal values
and ethics thus creating an understanding of the underpinnings of their belief system which
serves as the impetus for decision making particularly when it comes to making decisions when
confronted with situations which conflict with their most basic belief system.
This course focuses three areas (1) remembering; (2) understanding; and (3) applying. In
mastering these areas the student will be prepared to analyze, and evaluate ethical dilemmas as
well as develop decisions appropriate to the situation.
 The first area: Remembering suggests that you must first learn how
to retrieve, recognize and recall information about ethics and values
that you hold
 Second area: Understanding
The student must be able to construct meaning from
their values
 Third area: Applying requires the student to able to describe how to
use information in user-friendly language ensuring the client
understands.
ROLE OF THE STUDENT AND INSTRUCTOR
The instructor shall adhere to the requirements set forth in the Wayne State University state
regarding teaching responsibilities. See University Statement of Obligation of Students and
Faculty Members of the teaching - learning process.
http://www.bulletins.wayne.edu/fib/fib2d.html
POLICIES FOR THIS COURSE:
Assignment Policy:
Assignments must be submitted no later than 11:59pm on the due date. Students are expected to
complete all readings, participate in class, Web 2.0 tools and perform satisfactorily on
assignments and examinations.
All assignments and quizzes/exams are due on Blackboard by 11:59 p.m. on the assigned due
date. Please Note: assignments will NOT be available after the date and time designated.
Assignments will receive a three-point deduction for each day the assignment is delayed.
Grammar and spelling on your assignments will be counted in your overall grade and is
paramount to your success in this course (Please do not use contractions). Use complete
sentences and organize your thoughts in each paragraph.

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All assignments in this course are to be written with a deep comprehensive analysis and
demonstration of critical thinking skills. To write a deep comprehensive analysis, the student will
approach issues from variety of viewpoints (balanced presentation of sources) including welldeveloped opposing viewpoints. The student will provide evidence that supports the analysis or
argument and thesis statement. Remember that each claim should support the thesis.
The essay body contains the main points that are being used to establish the central theme
outlined by the thesis. Depending on the scope and length of the essay, the number of points
being discussed will differ. Each key point should be discussed within a separate paragraph. Each
paragraph must open with a topic sentence that makes it clear to the reader, what that paragraph
will be about. The key points will need to be supported by evidence being cited from theory as
well as practice. This is where the data gathered and organized at the pre-writing phase will come
in to use. It is always better to have a transition line at the end of each paragraph that creates
proper flow through the essay.
The conclusion is where the writer reminds the reader of how the argument is supported,
multiple conclusions/implications follow from statement and data; order of ideas builds a
relevant case and references are well integrated to support the statement or work Some
instructors also want students to make a broader connection in the conclusion. This could mean
stating how the argument affects other claims about the text, or how the claim could change the
view of someone reading the analyzed text.
Errors in Clarity, Precision, Relevancy, Breadth, Logic and Mechanics will lower your overall
score (please see rubric found at the end of the syllabus).
WIKIPEDIA WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AS A RELIABLE SOURCE
APA FORMAT
All papers written in the School of Social Work require APA format. It is recommended that the
student may purchase the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th
edition), or you may visit the website listed below:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
If assignments are not submitted in APA format (including references/citations), then the
assignment will receive a five-point deduction from the assignment.
*All written assignments must include an APA cover page with the title of the assignment,
information about the class (SW 3410), the date you are handing it in, your name and Access ID.
Please include all of the above required parts in your paper. You will lose five points if you do
not provide a cover page. ***If assigned to work in a group, a designated group member must
submit a table of contents delineating each member’s responsibility. All group member names
and Access Id’s must be included on each student’s cover sheet.

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PLAGIARISM/ACADEMIC HONESTY:
“Plagiarism is using another person’s words or ideas without giving credit to the other person.
When you use someone else’s words, you must put quotation marks around them and give the
writer or speaker credit by revealing the source in a citation. Even revising or paraphrasing the
words of someone else or just use their ideas, you still must give the author credit in a note.”
Plagiarism, Cheating: See WSU References:
http://www.otl.wayne.edu/pdf/2006_july_aibrochure.
http://www.doso.wayne.edu/codeof conduct.pdf
(William Harris, “Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers,”
http://virtualsalt.com/antiplag.htm, March 7, 2002)
The student must cite sources from the Internet or any other form of electronic media used in
their work. Any paper suspected of plagiarism will be reviewed at Turnitin.com or Safe Assign to
verify that it is their work and properly cited.
Any paper that is plagiarized will result in an “F” for the class and a referral to the University for
further Disciplinary Action.
CLASS PARTICIPATION / ATTENDANCE
Student participation is important to the success of any class. For online courses you will note
that there are Discussion Questions/Exercises listed in each module. Discussion questions will be
posted as a separate thread and responses should be posted within the thread. Responses are
evaluated based on content quality. They should reflect familiarity with lecture material and/or
the readings and be approximately 200 words. Citations and references are required.
Note: Class participation includes participating in all exercises, lectures, discussions and live
sessions. Student’s will raise questions from the readings, make relevant comments drawn from
personal experience, react to others expressed opinions, ask for clarification, actively engage in
class exercises, or bring up issues of general interest to the class. Try to engage others in
professional discussions; highly effective social workers bring out the best in others!
Students are expected to complete all readings, exercises, lectures, videos, participate in live
sessions and perform satisfactorily on assignments and quizzes. The instructor shall be notified
of unavoidable issues in advance, which may (will) prevent compliance, unless there are serious
extenuating circumstances. If a student does not attend a live or Web 2.0 sessions, then he/she
will incur a three-point deduction per incident from the final grade.
A grade of incomplete may be assigned only in cases of illness, accident or other occurrences
clearly beyond the student’s control. It is the student’s responsibility to fulfill the University’s
and/or Department’s policies and procedures for obtaining an incomplete.

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Special consideration will be considered in the extreme circumstances. Employment excuses are
not warranted for this course.
The main objective of this course is for you to practice social work skills that you learn through
readings and mandatory course experiential exercises, simulations and discussions. If you do not
practice and participate, this will affect your overall learning experience.
If your employment/volunteer schedule or your personal circumstances interfere with your
ability to devote sufficient time to academic pursuits to assure reasonable expectations of success
and to reach your academic goals for this course, then you need to discuss them with your
Academic Advisor.
A session with no participation will be counted as an absence. One absence will be allowed with
no penalty. A second absence will result in one full grade deduction. For the third and
subsequent absences, two full grades will be deducted for each absence. Participation will
include attendance at discussion boards and other Web 2.0 formats.
EXCUSED ABSENCES
If the student has an excused absence, i.e. religious holiday, medical issue or approved
University activity, the instructor must be informed by the first week of class when possible. The
student is to provide the instructor with provide the instructor with an explicit schedule of
planned absences, preferably signed (if applicable) by the doctor, or University official directing
the activity. This will allow the instructor the ability to evaluate and advise the student on the
possible impact of the planned absences.
Unavoidable circumstances such as medical illness will be evaluated on a case by case basis
when personal circumstances interfere with the student's ability to devote sufficient time to
academic pursuits to assure reasonable expectations of success, students will be advised to
register, if possible, during a semester in which they will not be participating in the activity.
An excused absence does not excuse the student from completing assigned work, including
exams.
WSU STUDENT RESOURCES
If you have a documented disability that requires accommodations, you will need to register with
Student Disability Services for coordination of your academic accommodations. The Student
Disability Services (SDS) office is located at 1600 David Adamany Undergraduate Library in the
Student Academic Success Services department. SDS telephone number is 313-577-1851 or
313-577-3365 (TDD only).
Once the student has accommodations in place, a private discussion of needs will be scheduled.
Web site: http://studentdisability.wayne.edu/disabilities.php
Students with disabilities http://studentdisability.wayne.edu/rights.php.

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Academic integrity and student code of conduct
http://www.doso.wayne.edu/student-conduct/Academic_Integrity.html
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at Wayne State:

http://www.caps.wayne.edu/

Note: Faculty reserve the right to change the syllabus based on needs of the class

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Course Learning Modules
Course Outline
Modul
Content
Assignment
e
1
Introduction to the course, review the syllabus, class For Week 2 Read pages 1-9 of
May 05 discussion regarding values and ethics
the text and Chapter 1 Values –
Mine, Theirs, and Ours
2
Discussion : Foundations of values and ethics and For Week 3 Read chapter 2
May 11 values clarification
Theory, Values, and Ethics –
Macro Perspectives
Quiz 1
3
Discussion: Chapter 2: Defining values for the For Week 4 Read Chapter 3
purposes of critique
Theory,
Moral
Decision
May 28
 Critiquing theories in relation to Social Work Making, and Ethics- Micro
Perspectives
values
 Retributive justice
 Restorative justice
Discussion: Chapter 3:
For Week 5 Read chapter 4
4
 Biological factors: Needs, capacities, ethical Research values, and Ethics
and moral decision making
May 25
Quiz 2
 Psychological factors: Moral development
 Social factors
5
Roles: Researcher vs. Direct practitioner
For Week 6 Read Chapter 5
Practice, Values, and Ethics –
Interacting with an Institutional Review Board
June
Social Work with Individuals
Informed Consent
01
Confidentiality
Case Vignette
Research risks
6
Course wrap up- Administer SET
For Week 7 Course wrap-up
SET Read chapter 6 Practice
Social Work With Individuals
June
Values, and Ethics- Social work
 Engagement
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with families
 Conflicts of Interest
Quiz 3
 Planning
 Implementation
 Termination
Social work with families
For Week 8
Read Chapter 7
1. who is the client
Practice Values, and Ethics, 7
2. Confidentiality- Laws and Contracts
Social Work with groups
3. Self determination and informed consent
June
4. Engaging clients in ethics related discussion
Moral Reasoning
15
Values Paper
8
June
22

Final Quiz

Quiz 4

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COURSE ASSIGNMENTS
Moral Reasoning Values Paper
a) The student will discuss/define/analyze/critique moral reasoning, based
upon theories in chapter three of the text.
b) The student will define the difference between morals and ethics.
c) The student will explain the difference between moral decision-making
and ethical decision-making.
d) The student will explain why social workers need to know about both
types of decision-making.
e) The student will identify and explain how biological, psychological,
social and spiritual factors might affect his/her own moral decision
making, judgment and behavior when impacting clients.
f) The student will distinguish the validity of moral choices made by
social workers, even when they do not conform to the students’
conception of what is morally or ethically correct.
g) The student will distinguish between influences that may affect their
moral decision-making and factors that should guide their ethical
decision-making.
h) The student will discuss/define/analyze/critique how a social worker
would execute a moral decision about an ethical dilemma.
The student will also answer the following additional questions, with a detailed explanation: In
each answer, the student will identify a correlating code from the NASW Code of Ethics.
a)
Are you able to support clients’ decisions, even when you believe those
decisions are morally wrong (but legal)? For example, could you support a
client’s decision to stop medications? To leave treatment against medical
advice? To terminate a pregnancy? To lie to an employer?
b)

If you find yourself with a client who is of a different religious, racial, or
ethnic background, are you willing to meet them on their own cultural
ground (for example, if you are working with a newly emigrated Islamic
family in which the role of the female in the household may be more limited
than in the United States, can you respect this interaction style? Are you
willing to take the time to read, or talk to more experienced colleagues about
work with clients with these differences)?
c) Can you delineate clear and appropriate professional boundaries with
clients?

d)

Can you appropriately maintain client confidentiality? If you have difficulty
keeping the confidences of others in your everyday life, can you be certain
that you can keep professional confidences?

e)

If you believe that the rules within your organization or the laws of your
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state contravene the values of this profession, such as social justice, or the
accord of dignity to all, are you willing to engage in social and political action
efforts to change this?
f)

Impairment of professional helpers by drugs, alcohol, or other addictions is
not uncommon. If you suspect that a colleague is so impaired, will you
intervene? How? Furthermore, can you be vigilant about your own behavior
in this regard? How? Would failure to act be a violation of the Code?

g)

Let us say that you received an offer of employment in your dream job. The
new employer is asking that you start by the end of the week. Is this a
potential ethical dilemma? If so, what must be done before you can
responsibly leave for that new position?

h)

One symptom of burnout may be the use of disparaging language to
describe clients-epithets, crude descriptions, etc. Is this behavior a violation
of the Code? If so, what will you do about it?
i) Are you willing to practice in as transparent a manner as possible? For
example, in cases where the client is involuntary, such as child welfare,
are you willing to make the terms under which the case will be closed
explicit to the family?

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Case Vignette Paper
You are a social worker in a high school. One day a female sophomore student named Kate
comes to see you. She says that her friend recommended she speak with you, but she’s not sure
she wants your help. Kate tells you that her stepfather had been coming into her room at night
and touching her breasts and her vagina. This went on for several months until she told her
mother last week. When Kate informed her mother about her stepfather’s behavior, her mother
became enraged and told him he had to leave the house. She told Kate never to speak with him
again. Kate tells you that since her stepfather left, she has been having nightmares about him
returning home and has had a great deal of trouble sleeping.
You tell Kate that because you are a school social worker you are mandated to report the
stepfather to the Child Protective Services. Kate becomes very upset and tells you that you can’t
report him, because her mother will be furious for telling you about her stepfather. She is certain
that her mother will never let him back into the house again. Kate says she is willing to continue
to get help from you, but if you call CPS, she will never speak to you again and will tell
everyone she knows that you are not to be trusted
Answer the questions below regarding this case
a) Utilizing in-depth critical thinking skills, the student will analyze the
dilemma in this case.
b) The student will describe how the school social worker should proceed
with this dilemma.
c) Should the school social worker report Kate’s stepfather to Child
Protective Serves, or should the social worker continue to work with
Kate at school without notifying Child Protective Services?
d) The student will critically construct a singular moral argument
regarding one of the theories presented in the text using the
following format:
e) Description of the context
f) Singular Moral Judgment
g) Moral Principle
h) Conclusion: Therefore…
i) Construct a counter-argument using the same format
j) Based on the two arguments, which of the two moral principles would
you use to make a decision?
k) Explain your answer.

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Discussion Exercise Rubric
Discussion Rubric
Postings: Post your assignment the discussion board by the date it
appears in the course calendar the discussion Question rubric will
be used to evaluate the assignment
Evaluati
Advanced
Proficient
Not yet
Not
on
there
there
Criteria
(100%)
(75%)
(50%)
at all
(0 %)
2
Clear evidence of
Beginnings of
Poorly
Does
critical thinking –
critical thinking:
develope not
application, analysis,
postings tend to
d ideas
enter
synthesis and
address peripheral
which do the
evaluation. Postings
issues. Generally
not add
discussi
are characterized by
accurate, but could to
on
clarity of argument,
be improved with
discussio
depth of insight into
more analysis and
n
issues, originality of
creative thought,
treatment and
tendency to recite
relevance.
facts rather than
Sometimes include
address issues
unusual insights.
Arguments are well
supported
1
Responds to at least 3 Responds to less
Does
classmate’s posting
than the required #
not
on each of the
of students
enter
discussion questions
the
discussi
on
0
Standard English
Noticeable problem
No
mechanics and
with mechanics or
respons
grammar is to be
late posting
es
used at all times.
posed
Please note a full
response requires
more than I agree!
Maximum points available for each discussion assignment (2)

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Grading Rubric for all Social Work Ethics Assignments
Written, and Web 2.0

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Scoring
Excellent
100%

Compete
nt
80%

Developi
ng
50%

Beginnin
g
25%

Unaccep
table
0%

Clarity

Precision

Relevanc
y
All
informatio
n relevant
to logic of
essay,
disregards
informatio
n that is
irrelevant
to
question
at hand

Breadth

Logic

Mechanics

Clear
statement
s,
statement
and work
addresses
the
assigned
topic;
clear,
effective
transitions
between
ideas.
Presents
new ideas.
Clear
statement
s,
Statement
s address
the
assigned
topic;
several
weak
transitions
between
ideas
Statement
s posed as
a series of
questions,
not as a
clear
statement
s;
transitions
and focus
not clearly
maintaine
d

Sufficient
data and
examples
to support
work; topic
sentences
and
conclusions
, assets
claims only
when
sufficient
evidence is
presented

Approaches
issues from
variety of
viewpoints
(balanced
presentation
of sources)
including
welldeveloped
opposing
viewpoints

Multiple
conclusions/impli
cations follow
from statement
and data; paper
makes sense,
order of ideas
builds a relevant
case; references
are well
integrated to
support the
statement or
work

Sufficient number
of references;
appropriate use of
spelling, grammar
and punctuation;
appropriate use of
APA formatting
and
communication
format (e.g.,
graphs)

No more
than 1
“opinion”;
unsupporte
d by data

No more
than 2
violations
of
relevancy

Presents
other points
of view but
biases
reader more
heavily
towards one
over the
others

Conclusions
offered based on
statements and
data; paper
overall makes
sense; 1-2 ideas
do not logically
flow; references
sufficient to
support the
thesis

No more than 2
violations of APA
format, spelling,
grammar or
punctuation; good
communication
format

No more
than 2
“opinions”
supported
by data

3
violations
of
relevancy

Approaches
issues from
one
supporting
point of view
and includes
at least non
opposing
viewpoint

No more than 3
violations of APA
format, spelling,
grammar or
punctuation;
communication
format not
consistently clear

Ideas
confusing,
disconnect
ed,
purpose is
unclear,
topic
sentences
non
existent or
random.

Minimal
supporting
data, 3 or
more
opinions
unsupporte
d by data

4
violations
of
relevancy,
does not
distinguish
between
relevant
and
irrelevant
data.

No clear
statement
s, fails to
address
assignmen
t, lacks
focus and
organizatio
n

No
supporting
data,
unsupporte
d opinions.

Irrelevant,
rambling,
use of
stories
versus
reasoned
argument,
distorts
the data,
or states it
inaccuratel
y

Only
presents one
point of view
either pro or
con on an
issue; relies
primarily on
one source,
heavily
biases
reader in
favor of own
position
Only
considers
own point of
view/opinion,
no use of
reference
material, no
reference is
made to
source
material,
reasons
w/narrow
point of
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view,
unaware of
own
prejudices.

Conclusion
offered based on
thesis and data,
paper makes
sense but logic is
hard to follow
due to jumping
around.
Additional
references
needed to
support the
argument or
work
Conclusion does
not follow from
logic or
conclusion is
incomplete;
insufficient
references to
support the work,
weak integration
in text to support
the work.
No conclusion
offered, paper
does not make
sense,
arguments are
confusing and do
not hang
together.

5 or more APA
format, grammar,
spelling or
punctuation
violations; lacks
consistent or
organized
communication
format

4 violations of APA
format, grammar,
spelling or
punctuation; weak
communication
format

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Arad-Davidzon, B., & Benbenishty, R. (2007). The role of workers; attitudes and parent and
child wishes in child protection workers; assessments and recommendation regarding
removal and reunification. Children & Youth Services Review, 30(1) 107-121
Brill, N. I. & Levine, J. (2005). Working with people: The helping process (8th ed). New York:
Longman.
Cournoyer, B. R. (2007) Social work skills workbook (with infotrac) (5th ed). Belmont,
California: Wadsworth.
Dolgoff, R., Lowenburg, F. M. & Harrington, D. (2008). Ethical decisions for social work
practice (8th ed).

Pacific Grove, California: Brooks/Cole Publishing

DuBois, B. L. & Miley, K. K., (2007). Social work: An empowering profession (6th ed).
Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Gambrill, C. (2006). Social work practice: A critical thinker’s guide (2nd ed). New York:
Oxford University Press.
Grobman, L.M. (Ed.) (2005). Days in the lives of social workers: 54 professionals tell "RealLife" stories from social work practice (5th ed). Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: White Hat
Communications.
Grobman, L.M. (Ed.) (2005). More days In the lives of social workers: 35 "Real-Life" stories of
advocacy, outreach, and other intriguing roles in social work practice. Harrisburg,
Pennsylvania: White Hat Communications.
Hepworth, D. H., Rooney, R. H., Larsen, J. A., Strom-Gottfried, K. & Rooney, D. G. (2005).
Direct social work practice: Theory and skills (7th ed). Pacific Grove California:
Brooks/Cole Publishing.

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Lowenberg, F. M., Dolgoff, R. & Harrington, D. (2005). Ethical decisions for social work
practice. (7th Ed.) Itasca, Illinois: F. E .Peacock Publishers, Inc.
Miley, K. K., O’Melia, M., Duboid, B. & Quinlin, P. (Ed.). (2006). Generalist social work
practice: An empowering approach (5th ed). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Morales, A. T., Sheafor, B. W. & Scott, M. E. (2006). Social work: A profession of many faces
(With themes of the times for introduction to social work and social welfare) (11th ed).
Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Paul, R. & Elder, L. (2005). Critical thinking...and the art of substantive writing. Journal of
Developmental Education, 29(1) 40-41.
Royse, D., Dhooper, S. S. & Rompf, E. L. (2006). Field instruction: A guide for social work
students (5th ed). New York: Longman.
Reamer, F.G. (2008b) Social workers’ management of error: Ethical and risk management issues:
Families in Society, 89(1), 61-68
Saleebey, D. (Ed.). (2008). The strengths perspective in social work practice (5th ed). Boston:
Allyn & Bacon.
Shulman, L. (2008). The skills of helping: Individuals, families, groups and communities (6th
ed). Pacific Grove, California: Brooks/Cole.
Strom-Gottfried, K (2007). Straight talk about professional ethics. Chicago: Lyceum
Strom-Gottfried, K (2008). The ethics of practice with minors: High stakes, hard choices.
Chicago: Lyceum
Timberlake, E., Farber Michaela Z., & Sabatino, C.A. (2007). Generalist social work practice: A
strengths based problem solving approach (5th ed.) Pearson
Useful Websites

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Association of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors at : http://www.rit.edu/~694/bpd
Child Welfare League of America: http://www.cwla.org
Cultural Competence:
http://www.air-dc/cecp/cultural/default.htm
Council on Social Work Education: http://www.cswe.org
Defining Social and Economic Justice: (see External Links for connecting to this site)
www.cesj.org/thirdway/economic_justice_defined.htm
Human Rights and Justice: (see External Links for connecting to this site)
reckonings.net/human_rights_social_economic_justice.htm
National Association of Social Workers: http://www.naswdc.org
National Black Child Development Institute: http://www.nbcdi.org
Project Resilience "The website that teaches a strengths based approach to education, treatment,
and prevention" http://www.projectresilience.com
Strengths Based Services International: http://www.empowerkids.org
Social Work Access Network (SWAN) (Chris Monsna): http://www.sc.edu/swan
Social Work Career Quiz: http://www.abacon.com/socwk/quiz/index.htm
Social Work Resources:
http://sophia.smith.edu/~jdrisko
Social Work Resources on the Web:
wwwlibrary.csustan.edu/lboyer/socwork/resources.htm
The Asset-Based Community Development Institute: http://www.northwestern.edu/ipr/abcd
World Wide Web Resources for Social Workers: http://www.nyu.edu/socialwork/wwwr

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