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Running head: ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Annotated Bibliography
Linda S. Davis
Liberty University Online

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

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Annotated Bibliography

Ackerman, B. (2007). PRAISE - Effectively guiding student behavior. Colorado Springs, CO:
Association of Christian Schools International.
This author provides advice on basic behavior management using a Christian perspective
in a research-based approach. The book uses the acronym PRAISE as being proactive,
using reinforcements, assessing and analyzing the intent of misbehavior, being sincere,
and empowering students with the Holy Spirit in them as the keys to successful
classroom management. This book is a helpful source to encourage students to use
simulation technology in a safe and effective manner.
Cha, M., Han, S., Lee, J., & Choi, B. (2012). A virtual reality based fire training simulator
integrated with fire dynamics data. Fire Safety Journal, 50, 12-24. Retrieved from
http://www.sciencedirect.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/science/article/pii/S03797112120
00136
This article presents a study that proposes, implements, and uses a virtual reality-based
fire training simulator. The simulator provides firefighters with second-hand experiences
to aid in making quick decisions as well as safe and systematized reactions in actual fire
conditions. The safe level-based visualization mapping provided by the simulator allows
students to intuitively experience dangerous fire environments while performing training.
This article is an indispensable source for firefighter education.
Damassa, D. A., & Sitko, T. D. (2010). Simulation technologies in higher education: Uses,
trends, and implications. ECAR Bulletin, 3, 1-9. Retrieved from
https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERB1003.pdf
The authors of this article explain the uses, trends, and implications of simulation
technology in higher education. They discuss the two major factors contributing to the

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increase of simulation technology in higher education starting with the increased


availability of simulation resources, devices, and systems in the virtual reality
environment. The second factor is the proven fact that simulation technologies are
effective tools for competency-based education. This article presents as a helpful source
for an overview of simulation technology.
Grant, M. M., & Davis, K. H. (2007). Simulation-based learning in medical laboratory
education: Current perspectives and practices. Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory
Science, 70(1), 1-71. Retrieved from
https://csmls.org/csmls/media/documents/publications/reports/csmls_simulations_final_r
eport.pdf
This article scrutinizes existing literature, techniques, and expertise to construct an
evidence-base for simulation education in medical laboratory science programs. This
provides instructors with paradigms of simulation laboratory education and guidelines for
future research. This research suggests simulations foster seamless educational
experiences. This article is a helpful source for Medical Laboratory Science professional
development.
Lateef, F. (2010). Simulation-based learning: Just like the real thing. Journal of Emergencies,
Trauma and Shock, 3(4), 348352. doi:10.4103/0974-2700.70743.
This article discusses simulation as a technique for practicing and learning when applied
to diverse disciplines. This technique is used to replace and amplify real-life experiences
with guided ones to replicate substantial characteristics of the real-world in an interactive
format. They provide health science knowledge, attitudes, and skills without putting

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patient safety in jeopardy. This article will provide validity to the real-life likeness of
simulation.
MacIntyre, N. R. (2004). Respiratory system simulations and modeling. Respiratory Care 49(4),
401-409. Retrieved from http://www.rcjournal.com/contents/04.04/04.04.0401.pdf
This article discusses simulators and models used in respiratory therapy ranging from
simple mechanical devices to complex systems using sophisticated computerization.
These devices are very helpful in clinician education to improve understanding of the
cardiorespiratory system. Improved clinician performance in simulated situations
transfer to improved performance in real-life situations. This article is a helpful source
for Respiratory professional development.
McCullough, J. D. (2008). Kingdom living in your classroom. Colorado Springs, CO: Purposeful
Designs Publications.
Kingdom living-the way God envisioned must saturate every part of ones life and career.
This requires maintaining a vivacious, growing relationship with God reflecting and
modeling Christlikeness for the students and their parents as wells others in the school
community. This book provides valuable discernment and everyday tips on maximizing
ones influence for God everywhere.
McKenna, K. D., Carhart, E., Bercher, D., Spain, A., Todaro, J., & Freel, J. (2015).
Understanding simulation training in paramedic education: Follow-up data from a
NAEMSE research project. PreHospital Emergency Care. Retrieved from
http://informahealthcare.com/doi/pdfplus/10.3109/10903127.2014.995845
This article discusses research on the use of simulation in early paramedic education.

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Most paramedic programs appear to have simulation devices and resources. However,
faculty training stimulates their use or lack of it. This article is an indispensable source
for paramedic educators.
Medley, C., & Horne, C. (2005). Using simulation technology for undergraduate nursing
education. Journal of Nursing Education, 44(1), 31-40. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/203926863?pqorigsite=summon
This article is specifically used for enhancing undergraduate nursing education using
simulation technology. The article discusses the use of simulation technology from basic
to complex nursing instruction. This article is an excellent source for nursing education.
METI. (2008). HPS... unmatched realism with objective performance assessment. Medical
Education Technologies, Inc. Retrieved from
http://www.ahcsimcenter.umn.edu/prod/groups/ahc/@pub/@ahc/@simcenter/documents/
asset/ahc_asset_030078.pdf
This article discusses the METIs Human Patient Simulator (HPS) explicitly created for
respiratory, anesthesia, and critical care training. HPS comes in cardiovascular,
neurological, respiratory, and pharmacological models for objective learning experiences.
This article is a helpful source for a wide range of medical education fields.
Ren, A., Chen, C., Shi, J., & Zou, L. (2006). Application of virtual reality technology to
evacuation simulation in fire disaster. In CGVR, 15-21. Retrieved from
http://ww1.ucmss.com/books/LFS/CSREA2006/CGV4239.pdf
This article presents a virtual reality scheme for simulation of occupant evacuation.

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

The accurate and timely evacuation of occupants is important in saving lives during a
fire. The virtual reality scheme can make safe evaluations allowing for safe evacuation of
the building. This article is an excellent source for firefighter education.
Rozanek, M., Suchomel, J., Kudrna, P., & Hejnalova, H. (2014). Wholebody simulator
connected with lung simulator for educational purposes. Proceedings of the 2013
International Conference on Education and Educational Technologies. Retrieved from
http://www.europment.org/library/2013/rhodes/bypaper/EET/EET-25.pdf
This article discusses ASL 5000 a precise simulator of lung mechanics. The ECS
simulator simulates gas diffusion from the lungs to the blood and vice versa. The authors
describe a connection concerning the two simulators in regard to the correct use of the
properties of both simulators allowing the monitoring of lung mechanics and gas
diffusion at the same time. This article is an excellent source for respiratory education.