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Fostering Collaboration

By Travis Ferrell

Outline
1. Models
2. Implementation

3. Techniques
4. Maximizing

Models
-SuperVision
-Interdisciplinary Collaboration (A)

-Interdisciplinary Collaboration (B)

SuperVision (Glickman 2014)


Prerequisites

Function

Technical Tasks/ Cultural Tasks

Unification

Outcome

Direct Assistance
Group Dev.
Knowledge

Interpersonal
Skills

Technical Skills

Professional Dev.

SuperVision as
Development

School/
Community Goals

Curriculum Dev.

Improved
Student
Learning

Action Research

Facilitating Change
Addressing Diversity
Building Community

Individual Goals

Interdisciplinary Collaboration (A)


(Schuman 2004)
Creating a Culture of Collaboration
Reflection on Process

Flexibility

Collaborative Activities

Interdependence

Collective Ownership of Goals

Interdisciplinary Collaboration (B)


(Bronstien 2003)
Components
Figure 1
Interdependence
Newly Created Professional Activities
Flexibility
Collective Ownership of Goals
Reflection Process

Interdisciplinary Collaboration (B)


(Bronstien 2003)
Influences on Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Professional Role

Figure 2

Structural
Characteristics

Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Interdependence
Newly created professional activities
flexibility
Collective Ownership of Goals
Reflection Process
Personal
Characteristics

History of Collaboration

Implementation (McClure 2008)


- 1st Step is to increase trust among staff
+Bring team together to
a. Examine Data
b. Develop Goals
c. Develop a Shared Vision
Note: Dont undermine by verbally supporting
and failing to provide time and resources
(Glickman 2014)

Implementation

(Center for Comprehensive


School Reform and Improvement 2010)

Key Questions to Ask:


1. Are conditions right for successful collaboration?
2. Is this aligned with our vision?
3. Are we focused on improving student learning?
4. Do we use data to inform our work?
5. Do we share what we learn?

Techniques
-

Ground Rules for Effective Behavior


Consensus Decision Making
PLCs
Workshops
Curriculum Development
Action Research

Ground Rules for Effective Collaboration


(Rebori 2000)
1. Focus on interests and Ideas Facilitator Statements
"These ground rules are only suggested to help
2. Listen to understand, ask
us start thinking about how we can work
together more constructively. Does anyone have
questions
any comments or items they would like to
discuss about these suggested ground rules?"
3. All ideas count, even wild
"Are there rules you would like to add?"
ones
"As the facilitator of the group, my role is not
4. Everybody participates
only to make sure everybody follows the ground
rules, but also to model these ground rules to
5. Everyone shares
demonstrate effective group behavior."
responsibilities for rules

Ground Rules for Effective Collaboration


(Rebori 2000)
Consensus Decision-Making (5 levels)
1. I can easily support the decision or action
2. I can support the decision or action, but it is not my
preference
3. I can support the decision or action with minor
changes
4. I support the will of the group but I dont necessarily
agree with the decision or action
5. I cannot support the decision or action

Professional Learning Communities - PLCs


Department Meetings

Board Meetings
Committee Meetings
Example:
Escamilla Intermediate

Workshops (Leithwood 2004)


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Department
Campus
District
State
National

need time to apply new ideas to


lesson plans and campus

Curriculum Development
Know, Understand,
Do, Performance,
Differentiation
(Erickson 2007)
- Teachers who are involved in making
decisions about school curriculum go through
changes in their own thinking about teaching.
To discuss, debate, and finally come to an
agreement with peers about what is important
for students to know is an intellectually
challenging experience (Glickman 2014).

(Erickson 2007)

Action Research (Glickman 2014)


Phases
1. Select Focus Area
2. Conduct Needs
Assessment
3. Design Action Plan
4. Carry Out Action Plan
5. Evaluate Effects and
Revise Action Plan

Maximizing Collaboration

(Center of

Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement 2010)

Road Blocks
1. Teacher Perceptions
2. Lack of Focus
3. Underestimation of
dedication required to
collaborate

Conclusion

Team Building
Tackle Real Issues
Time to Apply
Teach One Another
Trust and Respect
Tump All

References
Bronstein, L. (2003). A Model for Interdisciplinary Collaboration. Retrieved April 21, 2014.
Dewitt, P. (2013, December 13). Fostering Teacher Leadership through Collaborative Inquiry. Education Week. Retrieved April 1,
2014, from http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?DISPATCHED=true&cid=25983841&item=http%253A%252F%252
Erickson, H.L. (2007). Concept-based curriculum and instruction for the thinking classroom. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Glickman, C., Gordon, S., & Ross-Gordon, J. (2014).Supervision and instructional leadership a developmental approach.
(Ninth ed.). Boston: Pearson. Retrieved from
http://0133121917.reader.chegg.com/reader/book.php?id=b781d8b7027bbdf7d94d1cd81e420936
Leithwood, K. (2004, January 1). How Leadership Influences Student Learning. . Retrieved April 17, 2014.
Maximizing the Impact of Teacher Collaboration. (2010, July 9). Education.com. Retrieved May 1, 2014, from
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Maximizing_Impact
McClure, C. (2008, September 1). The Benefits of Teacher Collaboration. . Retrieved May 1, 2014, from
http://www.districtadministration.com/article/benefits-teacher-collaboration
Rebori, M. (2000, August 1). Two Techniques for Fostering Collaboration in a Group. . Retrieved April 25, 2014, from
http://www.joe.org/joe/2000august/tt4.php